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          Guillermo del Toro’s ‘Hellboy’ Movies Were the Last of Their Kind — and They Knew It - IndieWire      Comment   Translate Page      
  1. Guillermo del Toro’s ‘Hellboy’ Movies Were the Last of Their Kind — and They Knew It  IndieWire
  2. For Some Ungodly Reason, Hellboy Is Back  The Atlantic
  3. ‘Hellboy’ Review: Violently Awful  Collider.com
  4. The Bombing of ‘Hellboy’: How the Blockbuster Mentality Can Be Its Own Worst Enemy  Variety
  5. Hellboy Movies, Ranked Worst To Best | ScreenRant  Screen Rant
  6. View full coverage on Google News

          THE rIGHT IS THE lEFT:      Comment   Translate Page      
Ilhan Omar Falls Victim to the Outrage Exhibitionists (Conor Friedersdorf, 4/13/19,  The Atlantic)

When the ideological left engages in what is variously denigrated as "political correctness," virtue-signaling, performative wokeness, or "social-justice warrior" cry-bullying, many on the right find it easy to spot the flaws in those modes of discourse. But that discernment vanishes when the populist right indulges in the same vices (even as progressives become unusually attuned to their downsides).

Last month, Representative Ilhan Omar attended a banquet hosted by the Council on American-Islamic Relations, where she delivered remarks for roughly 20 minutes.

A major theme was prejudice against Muslims. "Here's the truth," she said. "For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen. Frankly, I'm tired of it. And every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it. CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties."

Omar's meaning was clear: Many Muslims felt collectively blamed for something that was indisputably perpetrated by a tiny fraction of their coreligionists and marshaled new resources to protect their civil rights in response.

it's just a choice of PCs between the wings.

          White Liberal: "The Source Of BLACK POVERTY & VIOLENCE Isn't BLACK CULTURE. Its AMERICAN CULTURE" While Street Pirate Gang Member Nipsey Hussel's LEGACY Was Hyped Up And White Washed By The 'OFFICIAL CONTAINERIZED BLACK AMERICAN LINE"........................The MURDER OF 1 And Injury Of 3 In A SHOOTING DURING HIS FUNERAL POSSESSION Proves That VIOLENCE Is A Byproduct Of The 'CONFLICT RESOLUTION SKILLS' That Were MOLESTED OUT OF THE 'BLACK COMMUNITY RITES OF PASSAGE PROGRAM' Thanks To 60 Years O      Comment   Translate Page      

SOURCE:  THE 'COLOR-LESS' PROGRESSIVE FUNDAMENTALIST NATIONALIST JOURNAL:  THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY  - PHILIP BUMP

          My Email to the Sleazy, Backstabbing POS in the WH, Zion Don.      Comment   Translate Page      
Click your shoes together and keep repeating "Israel is our friend and ally, Israel is our ..."

Thought it was time to vent my frustrations with the WORST president in US history, the Israeli ass-kissing backstabbing greedy, worthless POS, 'Zion Don,' AKA Donald Trump.
That Tubby the Grifter was a lying, thieving con artist I knew before he ran for president. Didn't realize how much of an Israeli ass-kissing backstabbing greedy, worthless POS Donny Drump was and still is.

He's broken nearly all every campaign promise to America, violating his oath of office numerous times to Americans, but doing every thing he can for Israel;
Here's the email sent this past week to the WH:
Mr. Trump:

You'll notice that I didn't use the traditional, honorific title of Mr. President, since the word president should only be consigned to someone honorable, loyal, dedicated to America and a decent man, qualities which you DON'T have.

You ran on the slickly designed 'MAGA' platform, giving hope to desperate Americans who are watching their nation's infrastructure fall down around their ears, since not nearly enough money has been dedicated to maintaining that infrastructure. Why? Because every president, at least since JFK was assassinated by Deep State types, has been shoveling tons of money and tons of free weaponry to Israel, including a bottom-feeding POS like you.

That you were a con artist I knew before you ran, but not many did, and now they're paying a terrible price for voting for a Israeli ass-kissing clown like you.

So I have 2 questions: After a long, arduous day of kissing Israeli ass, your lips must be chapped and sore, so what kind of lip motion do you use to get your lips nice and smooth, so they'll be ready for the next day of Israeli ass-kissing? I'm sure your boss, Bibi, demands that your lips stay soft and pliable so that when you plant a big, wet smoochie on his stinking ass, it will fell like his ass is being touched by angel wings.

Question #2: You're allegedly the author of the "The Art of the Deal." So please tell me what kind of deal is an art when you act like Israel's real estate agent and give away what you have NO right to, like Jerusalem and the stolen Golan Heights? My guess is that either the Mossad has some very nasty tapes of you on Epstein's Orgy Island and you're being blackmailed, but more likely, you know if you keep kissing Israeli ass, when you leave the WH, your multi-billion dollar fortune will have at least doubled.

So I'll end this by telling you the truth: You're nothing more than a back-stabbing, Israeli ass-kissing traitor who doesn't give a rat's ass about the Americans you took an oath to protect and help.

I don't know if there is a Hell, but if there is, after you leave this plane of existence, I know where you'll reside.

Goodbye ASSHOLE

Greg Bacon

'Zion Don' is a crafty con artist, but the obvious fact that you or your shell companies went bankrupt SIX--magical Kabbalah number--times as a multi-billionaire reeks of foulness.

One doesn't operate in NYC with Wall Street (((banksters))) unless they're playing the long con and now the chits are due and you're servicing your Israeli and American Jew Masters terrifically, while you ignore that America's infrastructure is falling down around our ears, like the recent Missouri River dam that burst and wiped out farmers in Nebraska and Iowa, mainly due to lack of maintenance.

Or maybe of those Mossad CCTV recordings, made while you visited your Buddy Jeff Epstein on what would become to known as 'Orgy Island' are so disgusting and filthy that you'd do ANYTHING to keep that out of the (((MSM)))?

Or maybe your religion is Mammonism and you'd do ANYTHING to increase your wealth, and a heartless, soulless, murderous POS traitor like you, should be no problem how many Americans--who you swore to protect--get fucked big time, anything for your Israeli/American Jew buddies, right?

Any comment Zion Don, or is your mouth too busy smooching some multi-billionaire like Sheldon Adelson?

Or maybe you're just a total dumbass, who brags about the "The Art of the Deal," who gives away stolen land to Israel, land that he has not

Remember what your Mother taught you, never speak while you have a mouth full of food, in this case, Kosher approved cock, Donny Drumpf.

P.S. If I go offline suddenly, you'll now why.





          Impeachable Pardon Offer?      Comment   Translate Page      
In Defying the Odds, we discuss Trump's dishonesty and his record of disregarding the rule of lawThe update -- just published --includes a chapter on the 2018 midterms.

Maggie Haberman, Annie Karni and Eric Schmitt at NYT:
President Trump last week privately urged Kevin McAleenan, the border enforcement official he was about to name as acting secretary of homeland security, to close the southwestern border to migrants despite having just said publicly that he was delaying a decision on the step for a year, according to three people briefed about the conversation.

It was not clear what Mr. Trump meant by his request or his additional comment to Mr. McAleenan that he would pardon him if he encountered any legal problems as a result of taking the action. Federal judges have already blocked the administration’s attempts to limit asylum seekers who illegally enter the country, and it is not likely that Mr. McAleenan would have ended up in jail if he had followed the president’s directive.

One of the people briefed on the conversation said it was possible Mr. Trump had intended the comments to Mr. McAleenan as a joke. But the conversation, which took place during the president’s visit to the border town of Calexico, Calif., alarmed officials at the Department of Homeland Security who were told of it, according to the people familiar with the remarks.

It was another instance of the president trying to undo a decision and to stretch the boundaries of his power, even when told there were legal issues at stake. The same situation played out on Friday, when Mr. Trump said he was considering releasing asylum seekers into so-called sanctuary cities after administration officials told reporters the proposal was rejected because of legal issues.
Quinta Jurecic at The Atlantic:
It is entirely reasonable to ask whether this, in itself, is an impeachable offense. Jamal Greene, a professor at Columbia Law School, sparked discussion on Twitter as to whether Trump’s actions might fall afoul of the Constitution’s requirement that the president “shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of … Bribery”—the pardon being the bribe offered. The legal scholar Charles Black, in his 1974 Impeachment: A Handbook, suggests that a president’s choice to pardon “all government police who kill anybody under any circumstances” would be impeachable insofar as it is “obviously wrong, in [itself], to any person of honor.”



          Saturday Stories: Nas Daily, Amateur Genealogy Detectives, and Adjunct Professors      Comment   Translate Page      
Elhanan Miller, in Tablet, with a story I can't understand how I missed, on the delightful Arab Israeli social media star Nuseir Yassin, otherwise known as Nas.

Peter Aldhous, in Buzzfeed News, on just how easy it is to use genealogy databases to track people down.

Adam Harris, in The Atlantic, with the heartbreaking story of The Hunter and what it can mean to be an adjunct professor.
       

Related Stories

 

          04/13 Links: Trump says Netanyahu election win means a ‘better chance for peace’; The Implosion of Jeremy Corbyn; Ilhan Omar, Con Artist; Elan Carr: Boycotting Israel is Anti-Semitic; EU's Collusion with Iran      Comment   Translate Page      
From Ian:

The Implosion of Jeremy Corbyn
According to polling by The Jewish Chronicle, 85 percent of British Jews now think that Corbyn is anti-Semitic. And that was before this week’s bombshell: documents obtained by The Sunday Times showing that Labour failed to investigate hundreds of anti-Semitism complaints, and let hundreds more slide. The documents show not only that Labour’s procedures for investigating anti-Semitic incidents were—despite public assurances to the contrary—dismally subpar, but also that members of Corbyn’s office directly intervened in more than one in 10 investigations, despite having claimed that they were impartial.

A council candidate who said that Jewish members of Parliament were “Zionist infiltrators” was allowed to continue his campaign. Out of 863 alleged incidents detailed in the files, only 29 resulted in a party member being expelled; 145 resulted in a “formal warning”—which is largely meaningless—and 191 cases were resolved as requiring no action. The rest, the Times reports, are unresolved, including 249 that haven’t even been opened.

A Labour spokesperson said that the report “does not reflect the full details … and is not up to date,” a non-denial that did nothing to stem the bleeding. That evening, the Jewish Labour Movement—one of the party’s oldest affiliates, linked to Labour since 1903—passed a vote of no confidence in Corbyn.

A year earlier, in March 2018, the story broke that Corbyn had been a member of three secret Facebook groups in which virulent anti-Semitic memes were sometimes shared. Understandable, perhaps, in radical campaign circles. My enemy’s enemy is my friend, right? We’re protesting an occupation, not forming a government. There’s nothing anti-Semitic about deploring Israel Defense Forces violence in Gaza, but if Palestine is your cause, sometimes you’re going to meet people who really just hate Jews—just like if Israel is your cause, sometimes you’re going to meet people who really just hate Muslims.

In one of the groups, Corbyn wrote supportively to the artist of a mural in London. It wouldn’t have been so bad—just a throwaway comment—except the mural depicted anti-Semitic tropes so blatant you could see them from space, hook noses and all. Corbyn trying to apologize was an agonizing sight. “I sincerely regret that I did not look more closely at the image I was commenting on,” he said. “I am sincerely sorry for the pain which has been caused.” It was as if, in a lifetime of fighting for causes—framing the world as good versus evil—he never really learned how to say sorry.

Abe Greenwald: Ilhan Omar, Con Artist
You see? She’s just an all-loving, rage-filled, anti-Semitic victim of prejudice.

If you set aside the canned baby talk of her speeches and articles, her actions don’t reveal much in the way of understanding and compassion. Or was she “showing up with love” when she claimed that Americans who support Israel are guilty of “allegiance to a foreign country” and that pro-Israel American leaders are somehow being paid off to support the Jewish state, and that—lest we forget—“Israel has hypnotized the world, may Allah awaken the people and help them see the evil doings of Israel?” Are all these examples of what she sees as a “mission as humans to love one another”?

Whenever Omar gets called out for her anti-Semitism or anti-Americanism, she makes a steady retreat back to the faux-compassion and understanding, simultaneously vowing to “learn” from her actions and claiming innocent victimhood. It’s then that her liberal supporters seize on her sunny rhetoric and denounce all the criticism that’s come her way. That’s precisely what’s been happening since she was caught describing 9/11 as a null event.

The con artist will thrive as long her marks are willing to be conned. Which is to say, Ilhan Omar has a bright future in the Democratic Party.
Seeking Israel From the Left
Israel has always been a Rorschach test for the left, Susie Linfield argues in her new book about intellectuals' writings on the first decades of the Jewish home state. And she's right, if not quite in the way she may have intended the metaphor.

Yes, Israel is like a Rorschach test, in the sense that many people over the 70 years of the country's existence have seen in its abstract representation some strange specificity wrought by their own fervid imagination. But Israel is like a Rorschach test in another and more important way. Something disturbing is revealed when the symmetrical inkblots of a Rorschach test provoke descriptions of violence and hatred. And something just as disturbing is revealed when the image of Israel provokes ferocious anger and unrelenting hostility.

Which it does, for a large percentage of the left these days. In her introduction and conclusion, Linfield points out that Israel was created by people who were often socialists, and it enjoyed considerable support among leftists in the West into the 1960s. But somehow, these days, Israel faces a violent antipathy from the left. An important task for historians lies in exploring how that reversal came about.

Linfield, a journalism professor at NYU, is a self-proclaimed leftist worried about the ways in which anti-Zionism has led to a surge of anti-Semitism. And yet, despite her interest in the question of why the left has rejected Israel, she attempts something different in The Lions' Den. In essence, she attacks the premise. Examining the work of prior generations of prominent intellectuals and journalists, The Lions' Den suggests that Israel has always provoked strange notions in intellectuals.

The figures Linfield takes up are a gallery of prominent Jewish left-leaning thinkers from the 1940s on—especially in her chapters on Hannah Arendt, Arthur Koestler, Isaac Deutscher, Maxime Rodinson, I.F. Stone, and Noam Chomsky. She focuses as well on two further figures: Fred Halliday (the only gentile writer she takes up) and Albert Memmi (the Tunisian writer and only non-Westerner in the book). All of them were sometime Zionists, and all of them indulged anti-Zionism. By describing their intellectual journeys—and their intellectual peculiarities—Linfield hopes to illuminate the left's odd
relation to Israel.



Pompeo says PM’s West Bank sovereignty vow won’t hurt Trump peace plan
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Friday said he did not believe Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s talk of extending Israeli sovereignty to West Bank settlements would hurt the Trump administration’s long-gestating peace plan.

His comments would appear to indicate that the US plan does not provide for Palestinian statehood, or even for Palestinian control of substantive contiguous territory in the West Bank.

Asked during a CNN interview by anchor Jake Tapper whether he thought Netanyahu “vowing to annex the West Bank” could hurt the US proposal, Pompeo answered “I don’t.”

“I think that the vision that we’ll lay out is going to represent a significant change from the model that’s been used,” he added.

“We’ve had a lot of ideas for 40 years. They did not deliver peace between the Israelis and the Palestinians,” he said. “Our idea is to put forward a vision that has ideas that are new, that are different, that are unique, that tries to reframe and reshape what’s been an intractable problem.”

He said the Trump administration wanted “a better life” for both Israelis and Palestinians.

In interviews days before the elections, Netanyahu said he intended to gradually apply Israeli law to all settlements, and that he hoped he could do so with the agreement of the United States.
Trump says Netanyahu election win means a ‘better chance for peace’
US President Donald Trump on Wednesday congratulated Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on his win in the Israeli election, and said it would improve the chances of success for his administration’s much-anticipated peace plan.

“I think we have a better chance now that Bibi has won,” Trump told reporters on the White House South Lawn before heading to Texas, using Netanyahu’s nickname. “The fact that Bibi has won, I think we’ll see some pretty good actions in terms of peace.”

“Everybody said you can’t have peace in the Middle East with Israel and Palestinians. I think we have a chance and I think we now have a better chance,” the US president added.

The White House has said it would release its peace proposal following the elections in Israel, though a report on Israeli television earlier this week said the exact timing would be dependent on the outcome of the vote.

With over 97 percent of ballots counted, and his Likud party and fellow right-wing and religious parties poised to secure a clear majority of Knesset seats, Netanyahu emerged from Tuesday’s elections in the best position to muster a coalition.

“I’d like to congratulate Bibi Netanyahu. It looks like that race has been won by him. It may be a little early but I’m hearing he’s won it and won it in good fashion,” Trump said.
Algemeiner Editor-in-Chief: Trump Peace Plan Likely to Be Very Different From Previous Initiatives
President Donald Trump’s upcoming peace plan for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict will likely be very different from previous such attempts, said Algemeiner editor-in-chief Dovid Efune on Thursday.

Speaking to i24 News, Efune said of the Trump plan, “We’ve suspected for a long time that it’s going to be quite different from what people are expecting. When we’ve spoken about peace plans in the past, typically there’s this land-for-peace equation, there’s a two-state solution, there is a framework which we’ve come to expect over decades. I’d be very surprised if its going to be along those lines.”

“I think we’re going to see a regional initiative,” he added. “We’ve had assurances time and time again from different members of the Trump administration that they would not be looking to predetermine the outcome. They won’t be coming to the table and saying, ‘Here’s what the results should be.’”

“It’s about creating a framework,” said Efune. “It’s about empowering, creating incentives, and trying to broaden the issue to regional peace and not just the Israeli-Palestinian discussion.”


Bill Clinton: Netanyahu ‘knows how to hit people where they’re tender’
Former US President Bill Clinton hailed the political prowess of newly re-elected Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, saying the “highly intelligent” Israeli leader should never be underestimated, but adding a back-handed compliment.

“You should never underestimate him, he’s highly intelligent, he understands his electorate,” Clinton said on stage Thursday at an event in New York City, as final vote counts in Israel confirmed that Netanyahu is heading for a fifth term as prime minister.

Then Clinton added: “He’s smart and able and he knows how to hit people where they’re tender.”

Clinton was speaking at an event at the Beacon Theater alongside his wife, former US secretary of state and failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

“There’s lots of minority parties in Israel, and more of them are aligned with the settler movement or religious fundamentalism than secularism or wanting peace,” he said. “Israel is a vital democracy, and they are having these debates and they will work it out.”

“There has to be some approach to reconciling the security needs of the Israelis with the need for greater autonomy and governance by the Palestinians,” Clinton said.


Boycotting Israel is Anti-Semitic, Says Newly-Sworn In Envoy Elan Carr
The United States swore in Elan Carr as the new Special Envoy for Monitoring and Combating Anti-Semitism on Thursday after the position had been left vacant since January 20, 2017.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo administered the oath of office. The secretary remarked that Carr, a Jewish-American Army veteran and the grandson of Holocaust survivors, was chosen for the “fierceness and vigor that he’ll bring to combating anti-Semitism.”

The envoy’s position was established by the Global Anti-Semitism Review Act of 2004. On his first day in the congressionally mandated post, Carr vowed to fight the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) campaign and described the organized boycott of Israel as anti-Semitic.

“An individual has a right to buy or not buy what they please. However, if there is an organized movement to economically strangle the state of Israel, that is anti-Semitic,” Carr said. “We are going to focus relentlessly on eradicating this false distinction between anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism.”




Pete Buttigieg calls Mike Pence a ‘Pharisee.’ Here’s why that angers Jews
Pete Buttigieg has a word he likes to use to describe Vice President Mike Pence: “Pharisee.”

Jewish scholars would like him to stop doing that.

Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who is running a dark horse campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, has advanced the idea of liberal candidates using religious language to express their values.

The flip side of that, Buttigieg says, is that Republican leaders don’t practice the religious values they preach. He takes particular aim at Pence, who often speaks of his own conservative Christian values while serving under President Donald Trump. Buttigieg has criticized Trump for paying off an adult film actress with whom he allegedly had an affair.

Buttigieg believes that reeks of hypocrisy, so he uses an age-old Christian metaphor for hypocrites: the Pharisees.

“There’s an awful lot about Pharisees in there,” Buttigieg told The Washington Post this week, referring to the New Testament while discussing Pence. “And when you see someone, especially somebody who has such a dogmatic take on faith that they bring it into public life, being willing to attach themselves to this administration for the purposes of gaining power, it is alarmingly resonant with some New Testament themes, and not in a good way.”

The Pharisees were one of several Jewish sects during the first century, the time of Jesus. They also included the rabbis of the Talmud and the creators of Rabbinic Judaism, the ideological ancestor of mainstream Jewish practice today.

But in Christian discourse, the Pharisees have taken on the role of “hypocrites, fools and a brood of vipers, full of extortion, greed, and iniquity,” wrote Amy-Jill Levine, a professor at the Vanderbilt University Divinity School, in an article in Sojourners magazine. That’s because the New Testament Gospels say Pharisee leaders criticized Jesus and lambaste them for hypocrisy.
Rivlin rebukes Bolsonaro: ‘No one will order forgiveness of the Jewish people’
President Reuven Rivlin on Saturday rebuked his Brazilian counterpart Jair Bolsonaro for saying this week that the crimes of the Holocaust can be forgiven, though not forgotten.

“No one will order the forgiveness of the Jewish people, and it can never be bought in the name of interests,” he said.

“What [the Nazis] did to us is etched into our memory, the memory of an ancient people,” Rivlin wrote on Twitter.

“We will never cooperate with those who deny the truth or try to erase it from memory — not by individuals and groups, not by party leaders and not by heads of state,” he wrote, the last being in apparent reference to Bolsonaro.

“We will never forgive and never forget. No one will order the forgiveness of the Jewish people, and it can never be bought in the name of interests.”

Rivlin said the Jewish people would “always fight against anti-Semitism and xenophobia,” while calling on politicians not to wade into historically fraught matters. “Political leaders are responsible for shaping the future. Historians describe the past and research what happened. Neither should stray into the territory of the other,” he said.
Yad Vashem slams Bolsonaro after Holocaust comments
President Reuven Rivlin and Yad Vashem took Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro to task on Saturday for saying the crimes of the Holocaust can be forgiven, though not forgotten.

“We can forgive, but we cannot forget,” said Bolsonaro – a strong supporter of Israel who has reversed his country’s previously negative positions regarding Israel – at a meeting with Evangelical pastors in Rio de Janeiro on Thursday.
“Those that forget their past are sentenced not to have a future. We need to act so that the Holocaust will not repeat itself,” the Brazilian leader said.
Iranian forces said killed in reported Israel airstrike on Syria missile factory
A number of Iranian forces were reportedly killed in an airstrike on a Syrian military position near the city of Masyaf in western Hama province overnight Friday-Saturday. Syrian state media said Israeli jets carried out the raid in the middle of the night, firing missiles while flying in Lebanese airspace.

Syria’s official state news agency SANA said Israel targeted a military site in the area, but that Syrian air defenses intercepted the attack, downing some of the missiles fired. The regime mouthpiece said the interception resulted in the destruction of several buildings and the wounding of three “fighters.” The area is known to house Iranian forces and their Lebanese proxy, Hezbollah.

According to a report by the London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights in Arabic, Iranian “elements” and pro-Iranian militants were killed in the alleged attack, and 17 people were injured.

Israel does not regularly comment on alleged strikes in Syria, though it has acknowledged some operations.

The Observatory said Saturday that the strike targeted a Syrian military college in the town and two buildings used by Iranian forces in nearby villages — a development center for medium-range missiles in Zawi and a training camp in Sheikh Ghadban.
Abbas swears in new PA government led by his Fatah ally, Mohammad Shtayyeh
A new Palestinian Authority government was sworn in by PA President Mahmoud Abbas on Saturday, a month after he tapped longtime ally Mohammad Shtayyeh, a member of his Fatah party, as the next premier.

The 61-year-old Shtayyeh is replacing Rami Hamdallah, who served as prime minister of the Palestinian government since 2013. He is seen as being critical of the Gaza Strip’s Hamas rulers, as well as a proponent of continuing peace talks with Israel.

The new 21-member cabinet includes some fresh faces, but senior officials, such as Foreign Minister Riyad al-Malki and Finance Minister Shukri Bishara, are keeping their positions.

Novelist Atef Abu Seif of Gaza, who was recently badly beaten during Hamas’s crackdown on protesters in the Strip, will become culture minister.

Shtayyeh’s government replaces a technocratic administration, which had the nominal backing of Hamas and all other Palestinian factions.
Thousands protest along Gaza border, 15-year-old shot dead - report
A 15-year-old boy was shot in the stomach during clashes with IDF forces east of the Jabaliya refugee camp, according to the Hamas Health Ministry on Friday.

According to the report, two other people were injured by gunfire in clashes with IDF forces east of Gaza City, when 9,000 demonstrators protested in five locations along the Gaza border.

A Palestinian was arrested after cutting the fence into Israel, waving a Palestinian flag.

The border protests began on March 30th and has seen over half a million people violently demonstrating along the security fence with Israel demanding an end to the 12-year long blockade, congregating at points along the border range between several thousand to 45,000 each day.

The one year anniversary of the border riots last week saw some 40,000 Palestinians demonstrate along the border fence and saw three Palestinians killed by IDF fire.

The cross-border violence immediately played into Israel's election campaign, which concluded earlier this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu heading toward a record fifth term in office.

But Egyptian mediators intervened to avoid further escalation by persuading Israel to lift restrictions on the movement of goods and people in and out of Gaza and expand the breadth of Mediterranean waters where Gazans can fish.
EU's Collusion with Iran
The main purpose of the Instrument in Support of Trade Exchanges (INSTEX) is to ensure that Europe -- and potentially third countries -- can continue doing business with the mullahs in Iran without risking US penalties for contravening US sanctions.

EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini seems strongly committed to ensuring that Iran -- and Europe -- continue receiving economic benefits from the illegal, unsigned, and unratified Iran nuclear deal. Mogherini insisted that Iran is complying with the JCPOA. It is not. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, referring to documents seized by Israel, stated that the nuclear deal was "built on lies" .

No amount of human rights abuses, however atrocious -- or terrorism, even against its own citizens; or cheating to acquire deliverable nuclear capability to unleash on Israel, the US and eventually threaten the entire West -- will, it seems, deter the EU from its criminal collusion with Iran. Europe seems determined to wade into its own destruction with its eyes wide open.
The IAEA’s Blind Spots on Iran’s Nuclear Program
On April 9, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani boasted that “today and throughout the past year, we have launched 114 new technologies via the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran. This is the message to the world: You have not succeeded, and you will not succeed in preventing the progress and development of the Iranian people and their nuclear program. If yesterday you feared our IR-1 centrifuges, well, here you go!”

He has reason to boast. The 2015 Iranian nuclear deal brokered by former President Barack Obama was extremely weak, but yet, given its weaknesses, the agency that was expected to monitor Iran’s compliance has been exceedingly lax.

On April 4, The Wall Street Journal reported that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspected a warehouse in Tehran that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu last year said housed nuclear equipment and materials.

When negotiating the Iranian nuclear deal, President Obama promised “anytime, anywhere inspections.” Yet six months elapsed from Netanyahu’s speech until the inspection. The question is what took the IAEA so long?


WaPo Rushes to Defend Ilhan Omar’s 9/11 Remarks, Fails Spectacularly
The Washington Post, in full white knight mode, rushed to Omar’s defense in publishing a piece in which they claimed context was needed.

After quoting several lines from her speech (which did not change what she said), “fact checker” Glenn Kessler wrote:

We will leave it to readers to determine whether Omar should have referred to “terrorists” or if the context for “some people” is clear from the speech.

When we listened to the whole speech, we were reminded of President George W. Bush’s phrasing in two famous moments after the Sept. 11 attacks.

“I can hear you! I can hear you! The rest of the world hears you! And the people — and the people who knocked these buildings down will hear all of us soon!” – Bullhorn address to Ground Zero rescue workers, Sept. 14, 2001


The other one was an Islamic Center speech in which President Bush defended Muslims in the aftermath of 9/11.

Kessler suggests that Bush’s bullhorn comments and the ones he made defending Muslims were no different than Omar’s speech.

In reality, the context surrounding Bush’s speeches meant everything after the terrorist attacks. He was by no means downplaying what happened. In the coming weeks and months, his administration would respond forcefully to the attacks.

On the other hand, the context the Post provided for Omar’s speech didn’t do her any justice. In fact, the context provided by the full video made her “some people did something” quote even worse.

Making things worse still is Omar’s widely-known reputation for repeating anti-Semitic tropes, which is a significant context for drawing conclusions about what Omar says all on its own.
Group Planning NY Rally Urging Schumer To Get Ilhan Omar Off Foreign Affairs Committee
A group called The Coalition to Get Ilhan Omar off the Foreign Affairs Committee is holding a rally on May 19 titled “Operation: Schumer’s Doorstep.”

The group states: “The Coalition seeks to mobilize Americans of all political, ethnic and religious backgrounds who are concerned about Rep. Ilhan Omar’s continuing presence on the House Foreign Affairs Committee. The Coalition’s first goal is to enlist (through all reasonable means of persuasion granted by the Constitution) Senator Schumer in the cause. The event will be part peaceful protest, prayer vigil, and press conference.”

The rally will be held outside Schumer’s building by Prospect Park in Brooklyn.

The group counsels, “We’d like people of faith to lead a prayer calling for Schumer to gain the courage of his convictions so that from this moment on, the senator will fight with every fiber of his being to drive Omar off the committee. We pray for him to become the Shomer he has always said he is.”



Dems to Redefine Hate Crime as ‘Disagreeing with Ilhan Omar About Anything’ (satire)

Claiming that existing language did not go far enough to protect victims of racism and Islamophobia, House Democrats have passed a bill redefining the term “hate crime” to include “any criticism of, or disagreement with, Representative Ilhan Omar.”

The bill comes after Omar’s description of the September 11 attacks as “some people did something” sparked outrage and led to criticism that she showed a lack of sensitivity towards victims of the attacks. Her defenders, however, said these criticisms led to death threats against the Congresswoman.

“Clearly, there could only be one reason that someone would criticize an elected member of Congress, and that is sheer bigotry,” Representative Ro Khanna said on the House floor. “No criticism of Congresswoman Omar’s religious beliefs, her actions, or her political views will be tolerated.”

After initially resisting, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was forced to bring the bill to the floor after several progressive party members threatened to lock themselves in their rooms until she agreed to do so. For some freshman lawmakers, however, the bill does not go far enough.
University of North Carolina Condemns ‘Disturbing, Hateful Language’ After Palestinian Rapper Performs Self-Described ‘Antisemitic Song’
The interim chancellor of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill has rebuked a recent campus performance by a Palestinian rapper who sang a self-described “antisemitic song” and asked audience members to invoke Mel Gibson when participating.

Palestinian rapper Tamer Nafar of the hip hop group DAM performed at UNC on the evening of March 22, as part of a 3-day academic conference on the Gaza Strip. The conference was sponsored by the UNC Center for Middle East and Islamic Studies and Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, and co-sponsored by multiple departments.

“This is my antisemitic song,” Nafar was recorded saying in a clip shared by filmmaker Ami Horowitz.

“Let’s try it together,” the rapper said while encouraging audience members to join him. “I need your help, I cannot be antisemitic alone.”


New York Times Suggests “Terrorist” Label for Israel
These contorted paragraphs are a prime example of how the newspaper’s preoccupation with casting Israel in a negative light comes at the expense of a well-informed public. Straightforward coverage of the U.S. decision about the Revolutionary Guard would leave readers with a clear understanding of the American criteria for designating Foreign Terrorist Organizations, would forthrightly describe the U.S. justification for applying the designation to Iran, and would not mislead about the State Department’s policy direction.

CAMERA’s billboard outside the New York Times building calls out the newspaper’s biased and inflammatory coverage.

What’s the actual criteria for designating a Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO), if not use of violence by intelligence services? The Foundation for Defense of Democracies explains that
U.S. law defines “terrorism” as “premeditated, politically motivated violence perpetrated against noncombatant targets by subnational groups or clandestine agents.” To be designated as an FTO under U.S. law, a foreign organization must engage in terrorism or terrorist activities that “threatens the security of United States nationals or the national security of the United States.”

That’s easy enough. And easy enough for a Times reporter to research. The passages in quotes come directly from the US Code. Similar language appears on the State Department’s Foreign Terrorist Organizations web page, which notes that in order to be listed, an organization must engage in “terrorist activity or terrorism” and “must threaten the security of U.S. nationals or the national security … of the United States.”

That’s why use of violence by, for example, a French intelligence agency doesn’t put that agency at risk for being designated a Foreign Terrorist Organization. The U.S. didn’t view their use of force as terrorism, and doesn’t regard their ally’s actions as threatening American security. The same goes for Israeli intelligence — which works closely with American intelligence agencies.
Jewish Canadian mayor: ban on wearing religious symbols 'ethnic cleansing'
The Jewish mayor of a Canadian town compared a proposed bill that would bar religious symbols on some public workers to “ethnic cleansing.”

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau asked William Steinberg, mayor since 2005 of the affluent town of Hampstead in Montreal’s west end, to apologize for the remark.

“We shouldn’t use words like that,” Trudeau, who opposes the bill, told reporters in Ottawa last Friday. “We don’t need to go to extremes.”

Steinberg instead defended using the term, saying he meant “ethnic cleansing” only in a “non-violent” sense.

The Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, B’nai Brith and human rights groups have denounced the proposed law as discriminatory and contrary to Canadian human rights charters, but polls consistently show most Quebecers supporting it by a healthy majority.
SpaceIL chief: ‘Beresheet 2 starts tomorrow, we’ll put our flag on the moon’
Following the Israeli spacecraft Beresheet’s failure to land safely on the moon this week, SpaceIL chairman Morris Kahn on Saturday announced he was launching project Beresheet 2, effective immediately, adding: “We started something and we need to finish it. We’ll put our flag on the moon.”

The small spacecraft, the world’s first privately funded moon lander, crashed into the lunar surface Thursday night during an attempted landing, apparently due to a technical glitch that caused its main engine to stop mid-landing.

Appearing on Channel 12’s “Meet the Press,” South African-born billionaire Kahn said work on the successor to Beresheet would start Sunday.

“The response we’ve gotten has been amazing. The amount of thank yous and letters is amazing,” he said. “Over the weekend I’ve had time to think about what happened, and the truth is seeing all the encouragement and support from people all over the world is amazing.

“It gave me time to think and I thought it would be a shame to leave things like that. I’ve come to announce a new project: Beresheet 2. We started something and we need to finish it. We’ll put our flag on the moon.”

He added that “Project Beresheet 2 begins tomorrow… A mission team will be meeting tomorrow to start work.”


Space Industry Leaders Praise Israel’s SpaceIL for Beresheet Moon Mission
Astronauts and scientists at the US space agency NASA commended the Israeli non-profit organization SpaceIL for its efforts after its spacecraft “Beresheet” failed to land safely on the moon on Thursday.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said, “While NASA regrets the end of the SpaceIL mission without a successful lunar landing of the Beresheet lander, we congratulate SpaceIL, the Israel Aerospace Industries and the state of Israel on the incredible accomplishment of sending the first privately funded mission into lunar orbit.”

“Every attempt to reach new milestones holds opportunities for us to learn, adjust and progress,” he added. “I have no doubt that Israel and SpaceIL will continue to explore and I look forward to celebrating their future achievements.”

Famed Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, wrote in a Twitter message to SpaceIL, “Never lose hope – your hard work, teamwork, and innovation is inspiring to all!” European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake expressed disappointment over Beresheet’s failed moon landing but said SpaceIL has “much to be proud of.”

Beresheet lifted off from Cape Canaveral in Florida on Feb. 22 and succeeded in entering the moon’s orbit, a feat only seven countries have accomplished. It is assumed that the aircraft crashed into the surface of the moon.
The forgotten female WWII-era spy who stayed silent under gruesome Nazi torture
Despite unimaginable torture by the Nazis, imprisonment in concentration camps and uncertainty over the fate of her lover and fellow spy, Allied agent Odette Sansom never betrayed the clandestine ring she was part of in occupied France during World War II.

While operating under the code name “Lise,” the French-born, British-residing Sansom helped aid the resistance in her homeland. Her actual name — which changed after the war during her several marriages — would be honored in the annals of espionage when she received the George Cross after the war. She was the first woman who had faced enemy fire to receive the honor, the second-highest award in the UK.

A posthumous UK postage stamp honoring her for her wartime service lists her as Odette Hallowes, the surname of her third husband.

While her exploits made her a celebrity in ensuing years, Sansom has become largely forgotten. A recently published book, “Code Name Lise: The True Story of the Woman Who Became WWII’s Most Highly Decorated Spy,” by Larry Loftis, aims to set the record straight.

“It’s a story of a particular heroine whom 99 percent of people — 99 percent of WWII historians — probably don’t know who she is,” Loftis told The Times of Israel. “Her family is thrilled I wrote about her life.”
Scottish Rescuer of Jewish Children From Holocaust to Be Honored in Budapest
A church missionary from Scotland who traveled to Hungary to help Jewish schoolchildren during the Second World War will be commemorated this weekend at a special ceremony in Budapest.

Jane Haining, a native of Dumfriesshire, was captured by the Nazi authorities, who deported her to the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp in Poland where she later perished.

Haining was arrested by the Gestapo in 1944 for harboring more than 400 children, the majority Jewish orphans, at the Scottish Mission School in Budapest.

When WWII began, Haining refused to return home to Scotland, choosing to stay with the children. She wrote: “If these children need me in days of sunshine, how much more do they need me in days of darkness?”

In 2010, she was posthumously awarded a Hero of the Holocaust medal by the British government. Photographs, a video, letters, a copy of her handwritten last will and testament and her Hero of the Holocaust Medal are on display at the church in her hometown of Dunscore.

Haining is also the only Scot to be honored as “righteous among the nations” – the term used for non-Jews who risked their lives to protect Jews from extermination – by Yad Vashem, Israel’s national Holocaust memorial center in Jerusalem.



We have lots of ideas, but we need more resources to be even more effective. Please donate today to help get the message out and to help defend Israel.
          4 Steps for Achieving Gender Parity      Comment   Translate Page      
Four years ago, at BTS, we implemented a data-driven hiring strategy. We prioritized evaluating candidates using observable behaviors that both the role and culture require.

In a world where women are handily outpacing men in college attendance—women made up 56 percent of college students in 2018—how is it possible that gender parity is inaccessible for many of the world’s top companies? Today, the 3,000 largest U.S. public companies aren’t projected to achieve gender parity until 2048.

Research proves that businesses with more diversity perform better, with higher returns on equity (10 percent), better operating results (48 percent), and stronger stock price appreciation (70 percent). So why aren’t companies employing equal numbers of men and women, especially if it’s better for their business? 

Through our work at some of the world’s top organizations over the last 25 years, we’ve uncovered surprising insights as to why diversity and inclusion are so challenging in the workplace. 

It Starts with Hiring: Eliminate the “Not Like Me” Unconscious Bias

In many companies, the hiring and promotion process operates in a “gray area,” relying heavily on relationships, checklists, and first impressions. Companies tend to focus on resumes—where did the applicant go to school? What was his or her last job? These metrics have been the formula for success over the last 50 years. But it clearly isn’t working when it comes to attracting diverse candidates. 

The reality is, leaders are unconsciously missing candidates who might fit a position because of their preconceived notion of what a great hire looks like. Instead of hiring someone unusual, leaders turn to the candidate they feel comfortable with—someone with a traditionally outstanding resume, who went to their alma mater, or passed the “I would hang out with them at an airport” test. The Harvard Business Review reports that unconscious bias is one of seven major obstacles challenging equal hiring opportunities today.

Based on this understanding, four years ago, we applied these insights to our own business and implemented a data-driven hiring strategy. We prioritized evaluating candidates using observable behaviors that both the role and culture require. 

This strategy allowed us to take the guesswork out of hiring and eliminate unconscious bias. As a result, our female candidates scored as high or higher than our male candidates, whereas in the past they were rated lower throughout the hiring process. In four years, we increased female representation among our consultants from 18 percent to 50 percent.

We achieved gender parity and you can, too. Here’s how:

1. Make diversity a top priority: Your business leaders own it and report out on it.

Without top leadership’s buy-in, you can’t really make progress. Harvard Business School professor emeritus John Kotter reports that 70 percent of change initiatives fail—this is why it is essential to have the leadership team take a super-active role in enabling the culture change necessary for bringing diversity to your organization. This means shifting hiring policies to be more data driven and less subjective, making a concerted effort to form diverse project teams, reflecting on (often unspoken) organizational norms and processes that have contributed to the lack of diversity, and personal leadership shifts. 

You may face skepticism. Some leaders might ask: “Is diversity really that important?” Self-awareness and the desire to change personal biases are essential capabilities for great leaders, and sometimes the best way to get skeptical leaders to grow is to have them own and drive change efforts. In every case, sponsors are critical for success.

2. Identify the key pain point.

Identifying what holds your organization back from diversity is paramount for solving the issue. This will differ from organization to organization depending on preexisting biases in the company and the field. You may be thinking, “My organization is already diverse, so this doesn’t apply to me!” But according to Christine Comaford in Forbeseveryone struggles with unconscious bias. 

For us, the pain point was getting diverse candidates into our hiring pipeline and ensuring they saw people like them during the recruitment experience. Consulting has a reputation for being an inflexible work environment, unaccommodating for employees with young children, etc. However, our Global CEO (Scandinavian values meets entrepreneurial capitalist) is very open-minded, ensuring that our people can have great careers while being present in their life moments, creating a virtuous cycle that strikes a great work-life balance. This information was shared more loudly to our employees and candidates than in the past.

3. Spread the message.

Leaders need to support and promote the initiative. Leaders have the ability to influence the culture throughout the organization, and their obvious support is essential for lighting the fire. In our case, our U.S. CEO (at the time) flew to each of our offices to talk about the initiative. I got on the phone with candidates to tell them my story of being a young working mother at BTS.

As a mid-size organization, our leaders were able to take a hands-on approach to promoting the diversity initiative to everyone. At larger organizations, cascading the message requires a more scalable approach. Digital event platforms featuring customized business simulations are one way to effectively reach thousands of people. These experiences immerse leaders in a tailored learning environment that allows them to learn and try out the new strategy at scale.

4. Implement the change: Have a “rookie mindset” when it comes to creating the environment for the most diverse, best ideas to flourish.

Taking small steps to shake up people's thinking on how they recruit, hire, train, promote, and think about people makes a measurable difference. For us, this meant being clearer in our hiring criteria, with observable behaviors and a more robust scoring rubric, and constantly working to build diverse teams. It sounds simple enough, but experience tells us change isn’t easy. 

Using tools such as customized business simulations to train leaders on the skills they need, coupled with the right mindset, can make change easier. 

In Liz Wiseman's book, “Rookie Smarts,” she encourages leaders to be rookies again, and this mindset is exactly what’s necessary for leading your organization through change. We need leaders who crave differences, and who are committed to shifting beliefs in support of a more diverse team. This must be the overarching mindset when recruiting new hires.

It’s important to realize that it’s not scary to do something different and new—it’s exciting. And being in an uncomfortable role forces you to be humbled, become curious, and seek advice from the best. As a result, you most likely will do the best work of your life.

Achieving Gender Parity and Significant Profit Growth

We achieved 50 percent female representation in 2016, and since then, we’ve seen our company continue to grow, accelerating topline growth in recent quarters. To date, we’ve had an increase in profit growth every quarter since achieving this landmark. 

Every company’s journey is different, and getting to gender parity doesn’t mean the work is over. Shifting mindsets is ongoing, challenging work, sometimes requiring interventions, working sessions, and coaching. But the difficult work pays off in retention of talent and a richer reservoir of ideas and perspectives that will make products and services better, driving tangible business results. 

Jessica Parisi is president and CEO of BTS USA. Parisi started her career at BTS as a business analyst in 1999, was promoted to lead BTS’ U.S. Western Region and then to managing director of the BTS Leadership Practice. In 2016, she was named president and CEO. Throughout her 19-year career at BTS, Parisihas pioneered turning strategy into action for leading Fortune 500 clients and many large and start-up software companies. To comment, e-mail editors@workforce.com.

 

 


          Re: 700 Years of Falling Interest Rates, 1310-2018      Comment   Translate Page      
finite_difference wrote:
Sat Apr 13, 2019 9:42 pm

Of course, that might not include the East. Would be interesting to see world GDP weighting by regions for the past 5k years. There has been trade and merchants for some time.


Here's 2000 years. The horizontal scale is unfortunate but its the only chart I've seen around.



Image#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F2019_04_14%2F357330
          THE rIGHT IS THE lEFT:      Comment   Translate Page      
Ilhan Omar Falls Victim to the Outrage Exhibitionists (Conor Friedersdorf, 4/13/19,  The Atlantic)

When the ideological left engages in what is variously denigrated as "political correctness," virtue-signaling, performative wokeness, or "social-justice warrior" cry-bullying, many on the right find it easy to spot the flaws in those modes of discourse. But that discernment vanishes when the populist right indulges in the same vices (even as progressives become unusually attuned to their downsides).

Last month, Representative Ilhan Omar attended a banquet hosted by the Council on American-Islamic Relations, where she delivered remarks for roughly 20 minutes.

A major theme was prejudice against Muslims. "Here's the truth," she said. "For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen. Frankly, I'm tired of it. And every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it. CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties."

Omar's meaning was clear: Many Muslims felt collectively blamed for something that was indisputably perpetrated by a tiny fraction of their coreligionists and marshaled new resources to protect their civil rights in response.

it's just a choice of PCs between the wings.

          DO CONSERVATIVES LOVE IMMIGRATION THE WAY THEY USED TO LOVE 9/11?      Comment   Translate Page      
I was scrolling through a page at Rush Limbaugh's site this morning and I saw a graphic that made me do a double take:



I don't want to read too much into these things but ... really? Is this the way Limbaugh's audience feels about Trump and immigration?

I lurk at a lot of right-wing sites, and I'm used to seeing immigration graphics like this, on another Limbaugh page:



But the first one -- with the sun and the triumphant Trump -- what the hell is that?

During the George W. Bush years, I regularly said that conservatives loved 9/11 -- that it was the best day of their lives, because it gave them (or so it seemed at the time) a permanent right to claim the moral high ground. They wanted war and more war. They loved regime change. They delighted in patriotic symbols and angry or sentimental patriotic music. Only one Republican has won the popular vote in a presidential election since 1988, and 9/11 was the reason. For Republicans, 9/11 was the gift that kept on giving (until the 2006 midterms, when it stopped giving).

Right-wingers still play the 9/11 card occasionally -- they're doing it now, with their usual shamelessness, as they distort the meaning of a phrase in a speech by Congresswoman Ilhan Omar -- but for the most part it's lost its power. We now have Republican president who (falsely) claims he was always opposed to the Iraq War, for which 9/11 had been a stated justification.

So maybe immigration is the new 9/11. Conservatives wallow in it as they wallowed in 9/11 because it makes them feel unquestionably morally superior. Trump as the exultant enemy of ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION is the new George W. Bush in front of the MISSION ACCOMPLISHED banner.

Trump won't stop illegal immigration, of course, but that might be to his advantage. Remember, George H.W. Bush went to war with Iraq, drove Saddam's forces out of Kuwait, then declared victory and ended the war -- and he lost his reelection bid the following year. He was no longer a "war president." His son went to war with Afghanistan and Iraq, botched both conflicts, was mired in two quagmires -- but he claimed great triumphs, and a sufficient number of voters bought it long enough to get him reelected.

That's the sweet spot for Trump: persuading his base that he's winning while never actually having enough success to declare victory. In that way, the increase in border crossings right now might be helping him. Limbaugh's graphics crew certainly seems to think so.

          The Uber IPO exposes how Saudi cash drives Silicon Valley innovation, and even the biggest tech companies can’t stop it      Comment   Translate Page      

Saudi Arabia Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman

  • Uber's S-1 filing showed that Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund owns 5% of the company.
  • The Public Investment Fund is also a top investor in Softbank's gargantuan Vision Fund, which owns 16% of Uber — not to mention sizable stakes in companies like Slack, WeWork, and DoorDash. 
  • Saudi Arabia has been criticized for human rights abuses and repressive laws, so it's a problematic source of cash for Silicon Valley, which prides itself on changing the world.
  • But Silicon Valley is under attack like never before these days, and that's caused a cynical search for stability that seems to have made taking Saudi money a non-issue. 

Silicon Valley's relationship with an undemocratic regime that has a troubling human rights record is in the spotlight. 

President Donald Trump has spoken out about it. Lawmakers are debating ways to stop the flow of money and data between the two.

The adversary in this cross-border drama is China, which has raised alarm bells in the US as it bulks up its homegrown tech industry and arouses suspicion of spying and influence.

However, there's much less fuss about the cozy ties between another repressive foreign power and Silicon Valley. 

Saudi Arabia's presence in Silicon Valley is greater than it's ever been. 

That became especially clear on Thursday when Uber filed its IPO paperwork. We learned from the S-1 filing that the kingdom's Public Investment Fund owns 5.2% of the ride-sharing company. 

The figure might actually under-count Saudi Arabia's influence within Uber. Softbank, the Japanese tech conglomerate, owns a 16.3% stake in Uber through its Softbank Vision Fund. The biggest investor in the Vision Fund is Saudi Arabia, which contributed $45 billion of the fund's massive $100 billion bankroll

Mohammed bin Salman and Masayoshi Son SoftBank

The Vision Fund is Silicon Valley's undisputed kingmaker today, writing big checks and amassing stakes in high-flying startups such as WeWork, Slack, DoorDash and GM Cruise. That means Saudi cash is essentially funding much of Silicon Valley's innovation.

As the New York Times pointed out in October, this gusher of Saudi money is an inconvenient truth for an industry that prides itself on making the world a better place.

From space to augmented reality, Saudi cash is everywhere

Some basic facts about Saudi Arabia: It's a place where torture and arbitrary arrests are widespread, according to Amnesty International; a place where women are not allowed to travel abroad without the permission of a male "guardian." It's the leader of a coalition blamed for airstrikes in Yemen responsible for thousands of civilian deaths and injuries. 

And then there's the gruesome killing of Saudi dissident journalist Jamal Khashogghi, which, according to the CIA's initial conclusion, was ordered by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman, the Wall Street Journal reported.

In other words, Saudi Arabia is antithetical to everything tech companies' altruistic mission statements claim to stand for.  

Saudi money may be more prevalent in tech now, but it's not new. Prince Alwaleed bin Talal was an early investor in Twitter, and at one point owned a stake larger than cofounder Jack Dorsey's. (Alwaleed was himself detained — in a Ritz Cartlon hotel — for three months in 2017 by his cousin Prince Mohammed, the current leader of the country).

And the Saudi Public Investment Fund is also a shareholder in Magic Leap, Tesla and Virgin Galactic, according to research firm CB Insights. Whether you're in augmented reality or outer space, there's no escaping Saudi money.

A 2018 Quartz article cites an estimate by research firm Quid that Saudi investors directly participated in tech investment rounds totalling at least $6.2 billion during the previous five years.

dara khosrowshahi fortune uber

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi backed out of a conference organized by Prince Mohammed last year after the Khashogghi killing, as did now-former Google Cloud CEO Diane Greene. But for the most part, there's been little pushback among tech startups when it comes to accepting Saudi or Softbank money.

Uber's winds of change

So why is Silicon Valley okay with Saudi money? 

It's true that we live in a world that runs on oil — so drawing a moral line isn't easy when you're pumping gas into your car every day. 

Maybe the tech industry thinks it's bringing the winds of change.

After all, when Uber announced its Saudi investment in 2016, women weren't allowed to drive.

“Of course we think women should be allowed to drive,” Uber's Jill Hazelbaker told the New York Times at the time. “In the absence of that, we have been able to provide extraordinary mobility that didn’t exist before — and we’re incredibly proud of that.”

And two years later, change did happen when the ban on women driving was officially lifted.

Did Uber's presence in Saudi Arabia cause the change? It's impossible to say with certainty, but I'd wager not. 

Much more likely is that Prince Mohammed, looking for a way to burnish his credentials as a "reformer" when he rose to power in 2017, saw the controversial driving ban as an easy and expedient thing to jettison in exchange for goodwill.

The notion of working from the inside to bring about change has a long and not-so-great track record in tech. Think back to Google contorting itself into a pretzel to justify its introduction, and then withdrawal, of a search engine in China. When outrage recently erupted over Google's secret plans to make a new censored search app for China, the company didn't even try to justify itself with a "change from within" argument.

Tech businesses don't really want a revolution

You may ask, at this point, why more companies don't take a stand and turn down Saudi cash. 

The sad reality is that companies are more interested in preserving the status quo that their businesses are built on than in bringing about change; even the "disruptive" tech companies.

That's especially true today, as tech companies are under siege from all sides, blamed for disrupting our privacy, our elections and our children's attention spans. 

donald trump orb saudi arabia

Thinking differently is great marketing copy when it sells gadgets. But there's little upside in leading a revolution if it scares away customers. 

Look no further than Google's app store. Thanks to an app called Absher, Saudi men can direct where women travel, and receive alerts when women use a passport to leave Saudi Arabia. After Insider's Bill Bostock investigation into this wife-tracking app, US lawmakers demanded that Google remove Absher from its app store.

Google refused to pull the app. It argued that the app does not violate its terms of service.

Right now, the tech industry's terms of service are clear. Whether it's about policies, products or investors, the golden rule is stability. 

SEE ALSO: Uber can't decide whether cofounder Travis Kalanick is an asset or a liability, and it makes for an awkward but revealing IPO filing

Join the conversation about this story »

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          Right wing media organizations openly propagandize on behalf of right wing politicians. What else is new?      Comment   Translate Page      
Right wing media organizations openly propagandize on behalf of right wing politicians. What else is new?

by digby



To my mind this piece from 2017 proves that Wikileaks behaved exactly like Breitbart and Fox News, advising their preferred candidate about strategy, running derogatory stories about his rival and covering for his crimes and corruption. Recall that Trump hired Steve Bannon directly from the Breitbart editor's job to formally run his campaign.

The difference, of course, is that Breitbart and Fox don't pretend to be a "radical transparency" organization devoted to exposing government power wherever they find it. They have no problem owning the fact that they are cheap, partisan whores who are working for the advancement of an authoritarian scumbag largely in order to own the libs. That's what Julian Assange did during the 2016 election. He's just less honest about it:

Just before the stroke of midnight on September 20, 2016, at the height of last year’s presidential election, the WikiLeaks Twitter account sent a private direct message to Donald Trump Jr., the Republican nominee’s oldest son and campaign surrogate. “A PAC run anti-Trump site putintrump.org is about to launch,” WikiLeaks wrote. “The PAC is a recycled pro-Iraq war PAC. We have guessed the password. It is ‘putintrump.’ See ‘About’ for who is behind it. Any comments?” (The site, which has since become a joint project with Mother Jones, was founded by Rob Glaser, a tech entrepreneur, and was funded by Progress for USA Political Action Committee.)

The next morning, about 12 hours later, Trump Jr. responded to WikiLeaks. “Off the record I don’t know who that is, but I’ll ask around,” he wrote on September 21, 2016. “Thanks.”

The messages, obtained by The Atlantic, were also turned over by Trump Jr.’s lawyers to congressional investigators. They are part of a long—and largely one-sided—correspondence between WikiLeaks and the president’s son that continued until at least July 2017. The messages show WikiLeaks, a radical transparency organization that the American intelligence community believes was chosen by the Russian government to disseminate the information it had hacked, actively soliciting Trump Jr.’s cooperation. WikiLeaks made a series of increasingly bold requests, including asking for Trump’s tax returns, urging the Trump campaign on Election Day to reject the results of the election as rigged, and requesting that the president-elect tell Australia to appoint Julian Assange ambassador to the United States.
[...]
Though Trump Jr. mostly ignored the frequent messages from WikiLeaks, he at times appears to have acted on its requests. When WikiLeaks first reached out to Trump Jr. about putintrump.org, for instance, Trump Jr. followed up on his promise to “ask around.” According to a source familiar with the congressional investigations into Russian interference with the 2016 campaign, who requested anonymity because the investigation is ongoing, on the same day that Trump Jr. received the first message from WikiLeaks, he emailed other senior officials with the Trump campaign, including Steve Bannon, Kellyanne Conway, Brad Parscale, and Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner, telling them WikiLeaks had made contact. Kushner then forwarded the email to campaign communications staffer Hope Hicks. At no point during the 10-month correspondence does Trump Jr. rebuff WikiLeaks, which had published stolen documents and was already observed to be releasing information that benefited Russian interests.

WikiLeaks played a pivotal role in the presidential campaign. In July 2016, on the first day of the Democratic National Convention, WikiLeaks released emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee's servers that spring. The emails showed DNC officials denigrating Bernie Sanders, renewing tensions on the eve of Clinton’s acceptance of the nomination. On October 7, less than an hour after the Washington Post released the Access Hollywood tape, in which Trump bragged about sexually assaulting women, Wikileaks released emails that hackers had pilfered from the personal email account of Clinton’s campaign manager John Podesta.

On October 3, 2016, WikiLeaks wrote again. “Hiya, it’d be great if you guys could comment on/push this story,” WikiLeaks suggested, attaching a quote from then-Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton about wanting to “just drone” WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange.

“Already did that earlier today,” Trump Jr. responded an hour-and-a-half later. “It’s amazing what she can get away with.”

Two minutes later, Trump Jr. wrote again, asking, “What’s behind this Wednesday leak I keep reading about?” The day before, Roger Stone, an informal advisor to Donald Trump, had tweeted, “Wednesday@HillaryClinton is done. #WikiLeaks.”

WikiLeaks didn’t respond to that message, but on October 12, 2016, the account again messaged Trump Jr. “Hey Donald, great to see you and your dad talking about our publications,” WikiLeaks wrote. (At a rally on October 10, Donald Trump had proclaimed, “I love WikiLeaks!”)

“Strongly suggest your dad tweets this link if he mentions us,” WikiLeaks went on, pointing Trump Jr. to the link wlsearch.tk, which it said would help Trump’s followers dig through the trove of stolen documents and find stories. “There’s many great stories the press are missing and we’re sure some of your follows [sic] will find it,” WikiLeaks went on. “Btw we just released Podesta Emails Part 4.”

Trump Jr. did not respond to this message. But just 15 minutes after it was sent, as The Wall Street Journal’s Byron Tau pointed out, Donald Trump himself tweeted, “Very little pick-up by the dishonest media of incredible information provided by WikiLeaks. So dishonest! Rigged system!”

Two days later, on October 14, 2016, Trump Jr. tweeted out the link WikiLeaks had provided him. “For those who have the time to read about all the corruption and hypocrisy all the @wikileaks emails are right here: http://wlsearch.tk/,” he wrote.

After this point, Trump Jr. ceased to respond to WikiLeaks’s direct messages, but WikiLeaks escalated its requests.

“Hey Don. We have an unusual idea,” WikiLeaks wrote on October 21, 2016. “Leak us one or more of your father’s tax returns.” WikiLeaks then laid out three reasons why this would benefit both the Trumps and WikiLeaks. One, The New York Times had already published a fragment of Trump’s tax returns on October 1; two, the rest could come out any time “through the most biased source (e.g. NYT/MSNBC).”

It is the third reason, though, WikiLeaks wrote, that “is the real kicker.” “If we publish them it will dramatically improve the perception of our impartiality,” WikiLeaks explained. “That means that the vast amount of stuff that we are publishing on Clinton will have much higher impact, because it won’t be perceived as coming from a ‘pro-Trump’ ‘pro-Russia’ source.” It then provided an email address and link where the Trump campaign could send the tax returns, and adds, “The same for any other negative stuff (documents, recordings) that you think has a decent chance of coming out. Let us put it out.”

Trump Jr. did not respond to this message.

WikiLeaks didn’t write again until Election Day, November 8, 2016. “Hi Don if your father ‘loses’ we think it is much more interesting if he DOES NOT conceed [sic] and spends time CHALLENGING the media and other types of rigging that occurred—as he has implied that he might do,” WikiLeaks wrote at 6:35pm, when the idea that Clinton would win was still the prevailing conventional wisdom. (As late as 7:00pm that night, FiveThirtyEight, a trusted prognosticator of the election, gave Clinton a 71 percent chance of winning the presidency.) WikiLeaks insisted that contesting the election results would be good for Trump’s rumored plans to start a media network should he lose the presidency. “The discussion can be transformative as it exposes media corruption, primary corruption, PAC corruption, etc.,” WikiLeaks wrote.

Shortly after midnight that day, when it was clear that Trump had beaten all expectations and won the presidency, WikiLeaks sent him a simple message: “Wow.”

Trump Jr. did not respond to these messages either, but WikiLeaks was undeterred. “Hi Don. Hope you’re doing well!” WikiLeaks wrote on December 16 to Trump Jr., who was by then the son of the president-elect. “In relation to Mr. Assange: Obama/Clinton placed pressure on Sweden, UK and Australia (his home country) to illicitly go after Mr. Assange. It would be real easy and helpful for your dad to suggest that Australia appoint Assange ambassador to [Washington,] DC.”

WikiLeaks even imagined how Trump might put it: “‘That’s a real smart tough guy and the most famous australian [sic] you have!’ or something similar,” WikiLeaks wrote. “They won’t do it but it will send the right signals to Australia, UK + Sweden to start following the law and stop bending it to ingratiate themselves with the Clintons.” (On December 7, Assange, proclaiming his innocence, had released his testimony in front of London investigators looking into accusations that he had committed alleged sexual assault.)

In the winter and spring, WikiLeaks went largely silent, only occasionally sending Trump Jr. links. But on July 11, 2017, three days after The New York Times broke the story about Trump Jr.’s June 2016 meeting with Natalia Veselnitskaya, a Russian lawyer with connections to Russia’s powerful prosecutor general, WikiLeaks got in touch again.

“Hi Don. Sorry to hear about your problems,” WikiLeaks wrote. “We have an idea that may help a little. We are VERY interested in confidentially obtaining and publishing a copy of the email(s) cited in the New York Times today,” citing a reference in the paper to emails Trump Jr had exchanged with Rob Goldstone, a publicist who had helped set up the meeting. “We think this is strongly in your interest,” WikiLeaks went on. It then reprised many of the same arguments it made in trying to convince Trump Jr. to turn over his father’s tax returns, including the argument that Trump’s enemies in the press were using the emails to spin an unfavorable narrative of the meeting. “Us publishing not only deprives them of this ability but is beautifully confounding.”

The message was sent at 9:29 am on July 11. Trump Jr. did not respond, but just hours later, he posted the emails himself, on his own Twitter feed.

Some time after 2011 or so, Wikileaks morphed into plain old partisan yellow journalism worthy of no more respect as a journalistic organization than Newsmax or Glenn Beck's The Blaze. It's protected under the First Amendment but you can't blame liberals for being reluctant to energetically take up the cause after what he did. The ACLU will do it, no doubt, as will other defenders of free speech. But you can bet the right wingers like Trump and Hannity will run as fast as they can now that Assange is in custody and can no longer help them out.No one should ever expect the right wing to defend free speech unless it directly benefits them.

This is a good rundown of the civil liberties and press freedom concerns about the Assange charges. Even miscreant yellow journalists have a right to publish and protect their sources.




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          La tua fertilità è influenzata dal tuo patrimonio genetico più di quanto pensi      Comment   Translate Page      

Questo blog è apparso per la prima volta su Huffpost Us ed è stato tradotto da Milena Sanfilippo

I tassi di fertilità negli Stati Uniti sono calati vertiginosamente negli ultimi anni. I ricercatori non sono del tutto sicuri della causa. C'è chi teorizza che il calo della fertilità sia dovuto al fatto che le donne aspettano troppo per avere figli, scegliendo di concentrarsi di più su istruzione e carriera. Altri sostengono che sia una reazione all'incertezza economica del paese; mentre molti sono convinti che, in parte, la colpa sia anche delle concentrazioni spermatiche sempre più basse.

Molte di queste ipotesi sono legate a circostanze specifiche, naturalmente. Ma esiste anche un'altra causa che andrebbe considerata, vale a dire il problema soggiacente del patrimonio genetico e il ruolo che gioca quando due persone decidono di avere figli. Fino a che punto la fertilità può basarsi sui fattori che abbiamo ereditato?

Si stima che circa il 50% dei casi di infertilitàsiano di origine genetica. La storia familiare gioca un ruolo ben preciso quando si parla di determinate patologie che possono portare all'infertilità. Oltre a questo, gli scienziati sono a lavoro per scoprire quali sono gli altri fattori genetici che possono influire sui problemi di fertilità.

Ecco cosa hanno scoperto finora sul coinvolgimento dei geni:

Le anomalie cromosomiche e le malattie genetiche possono ridurre la fertilità.

Partiamo da quello che sappiamo per certo: molte persone non sono in grado di concepire o di portare avanti una gravidanza a causa di anomalie genetiche e cromosomiche. Ciò significa che alcuni individui hanno ereditato una patologia che potrebbe inibire lo sviluppo cellulare dello sperma oppure rendere pressocché impossibile l'impianto dell'embrione e la sua normale crescita nell'utero.

Esistono delle eliminazioni cromosomiche, in cui cioè manca parte di un cromosoma, nonché delle mutazioni che comportano cambiamenti nel DNA. Inoltre, si verificano anche traslocazioni in cui porzioni di cromosomi si attaccano al cromosoma sbagliato. Possono verificarsi inversioni, dove il cromosoma è capovolto, e anche un fenomeno che prende il nome di aneuploidia, in cui il numero dei cromosomi è troppo alto o troppo basso. Le malattie genetiche possono essere trasmesse da un genitore, e quindi ereditate, oppure svilupparsi spontaneamente nel feto – senza motivo.

"A volte, una persona può disporre di tutte le informazioni genetiche – non manca niente perciò non presenta alcun rischio visibile per la salute – ma se si verifica una mutazione strutturale in quei cromosomi si può incorrere in un problema di fertilità", spiega a HuffPost Marie Shuetzle, consulente genetica e responsabile del team di genetica riproduttiva presso InformedDNA.

Se un soggetto è portatore di un cromosoma anomalo, l'embrione potrebbe ricevere informazioni genetiche mancanti o in eccesso, cosa che può causare un aborto spontaneo e altri rischi legati alla riproduzione. È importante sottolineare che tali anomalie possono presentarsi in modo causale in un feto da genitori normali dal punto di vista cromosomico, ma molte vengono anche trasmesse di generazione in generazione. Ad esempio, se tua madre ha un cromosoma X anomalo, avrai il 50% delle possibilità di ereditare quell'anomalia, come afferma il National Institues of Health.

Esiste anche una serie di malattie rare, causate da un singolo gene, come la sindrome dell'X fragile, la fibrosi cistica e la malattia di Tay-Sachs, che possono comportare problemi di fertilità.

"La fibrosi cistica è associata all'infertilità maschile a causa di dotto deferente [che permette il passaggio dello sperma] anormale o assente, che causa riduzione o assenza di spermatozoi nel liquido seminale" spiega Schuetzle. "La fibrosi cistica ha un'incidenza minima sulla fertilità femminile. Tuttavia, se una donna affetta è molto malata e/o sottopeso, la sua ovulazione potrebbe risultare irregolare o assente".

La genetica potrebbe influire sulla qualità e sulla quantità dello sperma, ma le possibilità sono minime.

In genere i dottori non sono in grado d'identificare la causa specifica della maggior parte delle anomalie nella produzione spermatica (che, in gergo tecnico, viene definita infertilità da fattore maschile).

"Il rischio familiare, quando ci troviamo di fronte a un fattore maschile lieve o persino di moderata gravità, è minimo," afferma Shaun Williams, endocrinologo della riproduzione presso il centro di medicina riproduttiva del Connecticut.

Quasi tutti gli esperti concordano nel dire che la stragrande maggioranza dei problemi spermatici di minore entità sono causati da fattori ambientali e legati allo stile di vita. Negli uomini si verificano però alcune gravi anomalie genetiche che possono causare una concentrazione dello sperma molto bassa o anche una mancata produzione dello sperma. Si tratta di disturbi ereditabili. Spesso, però, queste gravi anomalie causano infertilità assoluta e, pertanto, non saranno trasmesse alle future generazioni solo attraverso il rapporto sessuale.

Endometriosi e fibromi – che determinano infertilità – hanno diverse cause, una di queste potrebbe essere genetica.

Negli Stati Uniti, circa una donna su dieci convive con l'endometriosi, una dolorosa patologia infiammatoria in cui il rivestimento uterino cresce al di fuori dell'utero. Il 30-50% delle donne colpite si ritrova a combattere contro l'infertilità.

Non esiste una risposta semplice per determinare quale sia il ruolo della genetica nell'endometriosi. Si ritiene, piuttosto, che sia una patologia multifattoriale: vale a dire che entrano in gioco fattori ambientali, ereditari e acquisiti.

"Nel caso dell'endometriosi, il ruolo della genetica è stato compreso solo in parte," spiega William. "È probabile che i geni coinvolti siano molteplici, pertanto risulta difficile identificare una specifica causa genetica. In generale, il rischio è maggiore se a esserne colpite sono familiari di primo grado.

Se, ad esempio, tua madre o tua sorella è affetta da endometriosi, il tuo rischio è circa 5-7 volte maggiore rispetto a chi non ha una parente stretta affetta dalla patologia. Ma questo non presuppone alcuna certezza: il fatto che una donna della stessa famiglia abbia l'endometriosi, non implica necessariamente una familiarità con la malattia.

Lo stesso discorso vale per i fibromi, piccoli tumori benigni che crescono all'interno della cavità uterina e impediscono all'embrione di attaccarsi. Se tua madre o tua sorella hanno dei fibromi, il tuo rischio è leggermente più alto – ma, anche in questo caso, non è una garanzia. E per le donne di alcune popolazioni, ad esempio le afroamericane, le probabilità di sviluppare fibromi uterini aumentano di 3-4 volte, spiega Williams.

L'età della menopausa è ereditaria.

L'età e la velocità con cui gli ovuli diminuiscono hanno una probabile componente genetica. Alcuni esperti credono che il periodo in cui una madre è entrata in menopausa sia uno dei maggiori indicatori per capire a che età anche la figlia andrà in menopausa.

"L'età della menopausa tende a tramandarsi tra le donne di una stessa famiglia", dice Williams. "Non sempre, ma c'è un controllo genetico soggiacente sul numero di ovuli di una persona e sulla rapidità con cui quegli ovuli si esauriranno. Se una donna della tua famiglia è entrata in menopausa molto presto, allora sarai esposta a un rischio maggiore d'incorrere nella stessa perdita precoce del potenziale riproduttivo."

In alcune donne si verifica la cosiddetta insufficienza ovarica precoce, che comporta un inizio della menopausa prima dei quarant'anni. Le ricerche hanno rilevato che nel 10-15% dei casi, una parente prossima riportava la stessa patologia.

La sindrome dell'ovaio policistico può causare problemi di fertilità e, in genere, si tratta di una condizione ereditaria.

La sindrome dell'ovaio policistico, uno squilibrio ormonale che determina cisti e cicli irregolari, è tra le cause di infertilità più comuni. Gli studi hanno dimostrato che tale sindrome è fortemente influenzata dalla genetica, anche se i fattori ambientali non sono da escludersi.

"Esiste una predisposizione genetica alla sindrome dell'ovaio policistico il cui tasso è probabilmente più elevato rispetto ad altre patologie [endometriosi o fibromi], afferma Williams. "Diversi studi hanno dimostrato che fino al 40% di coppie di sorelle presentano sbalzi ormonali simili o problemi compatibili con la sindrome."

Ma nonostante le possibilità più elevate di incorrere negli stessi disturbi ormonali, nel caso in cui una parente abbia la sindrome dell'ovaio policistico, è difficile stabilire se una donna è destinata all'infertilità a causa di queste problematiche, secondo Williams. Gli esperti non hanno ancora trovato un anello che congiunga tutto – ovvero il patrimonio genetico che causa la sindrome dell'ovaio policistico che, a sua volta, causerebbe infertilità.

In conclusione: abbiamo ancora tanto da imparare in fatto di genetica e infertilità.

Secondo diversi esperti, i ricercatori non hanno ancora scoperto la causa dell'infertilità in circa il 20/30% dei casi; vale a dire che, quando esaminati, la riserva ovarica, la funzionalità spermatica, le tube di Falloppio e l'utero risultano normalmente funzionanti. Alcuni dottori sospettano che casi del genere siano legati alle abitudini e a fattori legati allo stile di vita, quali alimentazione, peso, esercizio fisico e livelli di stress. Tuttavia, molti esperti ritengono che quasi tutte le patologie che possono causare infertilità o problemi di concepimento siano accumunate da una predisposizione genetica in grado di aumentare le possibilità di una loro insorgenza.

"Credo che l'infertilità – che sia dovuta a fattori maschili o alle funzioni ovarica e uterina – abbiano tutte una radice genetica che non abbiamo ancora compreso del tutto," ammette Williams.

Per il futuro, i ricercatori sperano di identificare e capire gli schemi e le combinazioni genetiche in tutti gli individui che convivono con l'infertilità. Allora, i dottori potranno migliorare la diagnosi e la cura di ciascuna di queste patologie.

Tuttavia, c'è ancora della strada da fare. Se in famiglia c'è chi soffre di una delle patologie qui descritte – o se ti è capitato di riscontrare sintomi anomali o cicli mancati – è importante sottoporsi a un esame e un eventuale cura il prima possibile se si desidera una gravidanza.


          Why Steinbeck’s Masterpiece is Disturbingly Relevant to Trump’s America      Comment   Translate Page      
Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast

It could not be more fitting that the 80th anniversary of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath falls on Palm Sunday this year. Steinbeck’s 1939 depiction of the fictional Joad family after they, like thousands of others, have been forced off their failing Oklahoma farm, is as much a religious tale of unearned suffering as a political account of the Great Depression.

What makes the Joads’ migrant story—and by extension the stories of other Dust Bowl families of the ’30s—especially poignant in 2019 is the perspective it casts on the trials so many immigrant families face today trying to start new lives in the United States after fleeing their home countries. Except for the brief time they spend in a government-run camp for migrants, the Joads are constantly made to feel unwelcome once they take to the road.

The Grapes of Wrath begins with Tom Joad, the eldest Joad son, returning to his family after being paroled from the Oklahoma State Penitentiary, where he was sent after being convicted of killing a man in a drunken fight. It is through Tom’s eyes that we first see how his family’s life has been turned upside down.

Read more at The Daily Beast.


          The Uber IPO exposes how Saudi cash drives Silicon Valley innovation, and even the biggest tech companies can’t stop it      Comment   Translate Page      

Saudi Arabia Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman

  • Uber's S-1 filing showed that Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund owns 5% of the company.
  • The Public Investment Fund is also a top investor in Softbank's gargantuan Vision Fund, which owns 16% of Uber — not to mention sizable stakes in companies like Slack, WeWork, and DoorDash. 
  • Saudi Arabia has been criticized for human rights abuses and repressive laws, so it's a problematic source of cash for Silicon Valley, which prides itself on changing the world.
  • But Silicon Valley is under attack like never before these days, and that's caused a cynical search for stability that seems to have made taking Saudi money a non-issue. 

Silicon Valley's relationship with an undemocratic regime that has a troubling human rights record is in the spotlight. 

President Donald Trump has spoken out about it. Lawmakers are debating ways to stop the flow of money and data between the two.

The adversary in this cross-border drama is China, which has raised alarm bells in the US as it bulks up its homegrown tech industry and arouses suspicion of spying and influence.

However, there's much less fuss about the cozy ties between another repressive foreign power and Silicon Valley. 

Saudi Arabia's presence in Silicon Valley is greater than it's ever been. 

That became especially clear on Thursday when Uber filed its IPO paperwork. We learned from the S-1 filing that the kingdom's Public Investment Fund owns 5.2% of the ride-sharing company. 

The figure might actually under-count Saudi Arabia's influence within Uber. Softbank, the Japanese tech conglomerate, owns a 16.3% stake in Uber through its Softbank Vision Fund. The biggest investor in the Vision Fund is Saudi Arabia, which contributed $45 billion of the fund's massive $100 billion bankroll

Mohammed bin Salman and Masayoshi Son SoftBank

The Vision Fund is Silicon Valley's undisputed kingmaker today, writing big checks and amassing stakes in high-flying startups such as WeWork, Slack, DoorDash and GM Cruise. That means Saudi cash is essentially funding much of Silicon Valley's innovation.

As the New York Times pointed out in October, this gusher of Saudi money is an inconvenient truth for an industry that prides itself on making the world a better place.

From space to augmented reality, Saudi cash is everywhere

Some basic facts about Saudi Arabia: It's a place where torture and arbitrary arrests are widespread, according to Amnesty International; a place where women are not allowed to travel abroad without the permission of a male "guardian." It's the leader of a coalition blamed for airstrikes in Yemen responsible for thousands of civilian deaths and injuries. 

And then there's the gruesome killing of Saudi dissident journalist Jamal Khashogghi, which, according to the CIA's initial conclusion, was ordered by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman, the Wall Street Journal reported.

In other words, Saudi Arabia is antithetical to everything tech companies' altruistic mission statements claim to stand for.  

Saudi money may be more prevalent in tech now, but it's not new. Prince Alwaleed bin Talal was an early investor in Twitter, and at one point owned a stake larger than cofounder Jack Dorsey's. (Alwaleed was himself detained — in a Ritz Cartlon hotel — for three months in 2017 by his cousin Prince Mohammed, the current leader of the country).

And the Saudi Public Investment Fund is also a shareholder in Magic Leap, Tesla and Virgin Galactic, according to research firm CB Insights. Whether you're in augmented reality or outer space, there's no escaping Saudi money.

A 2018 Quartz article cites an estimate by research firm Quid that Saudi investors directly participated in tech investment rounds totalling at least $6.2 billion during the previous five years.

dara khosrowshahi fortune uber

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi backed out of a conference organized by Prince Mohammed last year after the Khashogghi killing, as did now-former Google Cloud CEO Diane Greene. But for the most part, there's been little pushback among tech startups when it comes to accepting Saudi or Softbank money.

Uber's winds of change

So why is Silicon Valley okay with Saudi money? 

It's true that we live in a world that runs on oil — so drawing a moral line isn't easy when you're pumping gas into your car every day. 

Maybe the tech industry thinks it's bringing the winds of change.

After all, when Uber announced its Saudi investment in 2016, women weren't allowed to drive.

“Of course we think women should be allowed to drive,” Uber's Jill Hazelbaker told the New York Times at the time. “In the absence of that, we have been able to provide extraordinary mobility that didn’t exist before — and we’re incredibly proud of that.”

And two years later, change did happen when the ban on women driving was officially lifted.

Did Uber's presence in Saudi Arabia cause the change? It's impossible to say with certainty, but I'd wager not. 

Much more likely is that Prince Mohammed, looking for a way to burnish his credentials as a "reformer" when he rose to power in 2017, saw the controversial driving ban as an easy and expedient thing to jettison in exchange for goodwill.

The notion of working from the inside to bring about change has a long and not-so-great track record in tech. Think back to Google contorting itself into a pretzel to justify its introduction, and then withdrawal, of a search engine in China. When outrage recently erupted over Google's secret plans to make a new censored search app for China, the company didn't even try to justify itself with a "change from within" argument.

Tech businesses don't really want a revolution

You may ask, at this point, why more companies don't take a stand and turn down Saudi cash. 

The sad reality is that companies are more interested in preserving the status quo that their businesses are built on than in bringing about change; even the "disruptive" tech companies.

That's especially true today, as tech companies are under siege from all sides, blamed for disrupting our privacy, our elections and our children's attention spans. 

donald trump orb saudi arabia

Thinking differently is great marketing copy when it sells gadgets. But there's little upside in leading a revolution if it scares away customers. 

Look no further than Google's app store. Thanks to an app called Absher, Saudi men can direct where women travel, and receive alerts when women use a passport to leave Saudi Arabia. After Insider's Bill Bostock investigation into this wife-tracking app, US lawmakers demanded that Google remove Absher from its app store.

Google refused to pull the app. It argued that the app does not violate its terms of service.

Right now, the tech industry's terms of service are clear. Whether it's about policies, products or investors, the golden rule is stability. 

SEE ALSO: Uber can't decide whether cofounder Travis Kalanick is an asset or a liability, and it makes for an awkward but revealing IPO filing

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: We tried Louis Vuitton's wireless earbuds to find out if they're worth the $995


          What It’s Like Loving A 'Game Of Thrones' Fan When You Don't Love The Show      Comment   Translate Page      

It’s almost time, y’all. The cold winds in the North are rising, death is marching beyond The Wall. Winter is finally here and ”Game of Thrones” fans are on the edge of their seats, eager for the premiere of the final season of our favorite epic drama on April 14.

Avid “GoT” watchers like myself have spent years agonizing over who lives, who dies and who will sit upon the Iron Throne. We’ve theorized, we’ve binged, we haven’t been able to shut up about it for the last year and eight months since season seven ended. The intense fandom the show (which boasts one of the largest viewerships in television history) has created is fun to be a part of. But those in our lives who love us but don’t watch the show may feel a bit left out and a tad irritated by all of the hoopla and fanfare. 

“GoT” fans totally get it if you don’t like the show. You’re wrong, of course, but we get it. Still, these left-behind significant others can start to feel like “GoT widows” who’ve lost their loved ones to the hit HBO series and can’t get a word in edgewise or even direct eye contact on Sunday nights at 9pm.

“It’s so annoying, to be honest,” Dummea Vincent, a 29-year-old executive from Pittsburgh, told me. Her husband, Lalit, has been a “GoT” fan throughout their six years of marriage, but she is not. “I just think the show is tedious. Each episode was so long and stupid. ’Game of Thrones’ has got y’all brainwashed. It feels like a cult following.”

As we prepare for the final six episodes of the series, I spoke with three women in relationships with “GoT” fans about how they cope, how they bond and most importantly, why they don’t watch the greatest show of all time for themselves. 

Whether it’s ‘You know nothing, Jon Snow’ or ‘Hodor,' my husband will not stop saying lines from the show for the entire week before the next episode comes out. I won’t hear the end of it!Dummea Vincent

“Most people who don’t watch the show probably don’t watch it because they know it’s going to be gory,” said Nicole Howard, a 31-year-old writer from Maryland who’s longtime boyfriend Aaron regularly watches the show despite the violence. It’s true, it’s not an easy series to get into. The gratuitous nudity, murder and sexual violence has certainly been a deterrent for some viewers.

“I’m a black woman and I’m a proponent of watching shows with characters that look like me. One of the things that turned me off from ′Game of Thrones’ is that it’s a very white-centered show, that made me a bit uncomfortable,” added Maud Acheampong, a 20-year-old student who’s been in a relationship with a fan named Kosi for a year.

“’GoT’ is also not a show that gives you happy feelings; it’s very much a show of crisis,” she continues. “One of the reasons I didn’t want to watch it is because I didn’t want to be anxious and sad all the time.”

Despite the problems these ladies had with the show, their partners powered through and fell in love with the fictional series, which occasionally resulted in leaving their real loves in their lives on the outside looking in.

“(He and his friends) would have these very tense, existential conversations that were contextualized by this apparently amazing show and I felt a little bit out of place sometimes,” Acheampong said. “And it would always feel like they were walking on eggshells around me when they were talking about ′Game of Thrones.’”

In other cases, being left out of the loop would be preferred.

After every episode, I won’t hear the end of it,” Vincent said. “Whether it’s ‘You know nothing, Jon Snow’ or ‘Hodor!’ or stuff like that. What even is Hodor?! He will not stop saying lines from the show for the entire week before the next episode comes out. I won’t hear the end of it!”

Added Howard, “If he wanted to ever talk about the show, he’d have to talk to other people in the (‘GoT’) community. I don’t know enough to have that discussion. I’ll probably just listen and eventually tune him out.”

Disagreeing about 'Game of Thrones' in a very weird way has emphasized to me that my relationship is a safe space.Maud Acheampong

“Game of Thrones” itself isn’t known for its portrayal of healthy fictional relationships but it’s refreshing to see, at least with these couples, how the show isn’t getting in the way of real life partnerships and teaching unexpected lessons on compromise. One of these “widows” even had a change of heart and recently decided to start watching the show.

Regardless of their varying levels of involvement in the show, these three relationships are stronger than Valyrian steel (that’s my last obscure “GoT” reference, I promise). A “Game of Thrones” fandom (or lack thereof) is just another thing that keeps their love lives interesting.

“Being able to argue [with Kosi] about ’Game of Thrones’ has actually been a positive in our relationship,” said Acheampong. “Disagreeing about ’Game of Thrones’ stories and characters in a very weird way has emphasized to me that being with Kosi is safe place; he’s here for the long haul, which is really comforting.”

As Vincent conceded, “I guess one good thing about being a ’Game of Thrones’ widow is that on a Sunday night, I know exactly where he’ll be at and what he’s doing and why he’s not picking up my phone calls. I do hope his favorite characters end up winning at the end of the show.”


          He's Going To Get Her Killed.      Comment   Translate Page      
Trump is going to get someone killed.

With this:
Let's make no mistake. Her words (however clumsy) were taken out of context. From The Atlantic:
Last month, Representative Ilhan Omar attended a banquet hosted by the Council on American-Islamic Relations, where she delivered remarks for roughly 20 minutes.

A major theme was prejudice against Muslims. “Here’s the truth,” she said. “For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen. Frankly, I’m tired of it. And every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it. CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties.”

Omar’s meaning was clear: Many Muslims felt collectively blamed for something that was indisputably perpetrated by a tiny fraction of their co-religionists and marshaled new resources to protect their civil rights in response. (CAIR was actually founded in the 1990s, but expanded significantly after 9/11.)
And if you're wondering about the "inciting violence" part take a look at something that happened before the Trump-shit hit the Fox-fan:
On March 21, 2019,at approximately l2:20p.ffi., a telephone call was received by a staff member for United States Congresswoman Ilhan Omar, a representative from the 5th Congressional District in Minnesota, at Congresswoman Omar's offices in Washington, D.C. During the telephone call, an individual who eventually identified himself as PAT CARLINEO stated to the staff member, "Do you work for the Muslim Brotherhood? Why are you working for her, she's a fucking terrorist. I'll put a bullet in her fucking skull."
And in his interview with the FBI:
CARLINEO stated that he was a patriot, that he loves the President, and that he hates radical Muslims in our government.
Now, I wonder where he got his news? and how many more Trump-loving, Muslim-hating Pat Carlineo's are there out there?

Trump's gonna get someone killed and anyone who refuses to condemn him for this will shoulder some responsibility for it.
          URL      Comment   Translate Page      

Greetings, from the Desert of Ghost Ships: Traços indicadores do antropocénico. Secado pelo desejo soviético de transformar as estepes em campos de algodão, o mar de Aral, aquele que foi um dos maiores mares interiores do planeta, é hoje um enorme deserto. A ação humana criou esta imensa paisagem ballardiana.

Rise Of The AI Artist: Confesso que demorou menos do que esperava. A estética visual da criação artística utilizando Inteligência Artificial está a chegar aos criativs das indústrias culturais. Um pouco como a glitch aesthetics, que há alguns anos era um nicho muito reduzido mas agora integra rotineiramente a iconografia visual da cultura pop.

Manga eterno: 21 clásicos imprescindibles del cómic japonés: São mesmo vinte e uma excelentes sugestões, mas é algo deprimente para um leitor português. Aqui ao lado, a oferta de BD, comics e mangá traduzida é tanta, tão diversificada e acessível, enquanto que por cá... enfim, já foi bem pior.

The Squeal of Data: Sim, também me recordo do som do modem a ligar-se à internet através da linha telefónica. A partir daqui, o Tedium fala-nos de teletypes, redes de fax, e dispositivos de acoplamento que convertiam impulsos elétricos em sons para transmissão através dos auscultadores de telefone.


Panorama of London 20 feet wide goes on display: Apaixonei-me por estas tecnologias dead media quando estava nas leituras para a minha tese de mestrado. Estes panoramas são, para todos os efeitos, realidade virtual do século XVIII e XIX. Grandes telas que eram mostradas em forma circular, eram famosas pelo sentimento de imersividade que possibilitavam. A maior parte perdeu-se quando esta tecnologia perdeu o lustre e caiu no inevitável declínio. Agora, o London Museum vai oferecer aos seus visitantes um vislumbre do que eram estes panoramas.

Treta da semana: fissão é a solução.: Ou talvez não. O real problema, aponta este artigo, está na segurança. Os resíduos radioativos são altamente contaminantes, e têm se ser guardados em segurança durante séculos. Se a energia atómica permite, de facto, obter energia mais facilmente do que com meios renováveis, os riscos a médio e longo prazo são demasiado elevados.

Ramiro (2017): A aparente normalidade banal deste filme também me seduziu. E concordo com o Cineuphoria: o trabalho do ator António Mortágua dá a esta personagem uma força e vitalidade inesperadas.

A Three-Day Expedition To Walk Across Paris Entirely Underground: Um mergulho duplo, nos mundos fascinantes da exploração urbana e nos espaços labirínticos sob a cidade de Paris. Um grupo de exploradores passa três dias a atravessar a cidade através das catacumbas e dos esgotos, uma experiência surreal de mergulho nas profundezas onde sobrevivem, mesclados, os traços da história parisiense.

What Would a Dog Do on Mars?: Não é fácil para um cão suportar os rigores das viagens espaciais. A história de Laika e outros animais que foram utilizados para testar o acesso à órbita não é animadora. Pessoalmente, fico deprimido: se for viver para Marte, tenho de deixar a minha cadela Alice na Terra? Bolas!

BALLARD (1962), THE DROWNED WORLD: Um revisitar de um dos grandes escritores de FC do século XX, através de um dos seus romances icónicos, algo prenunciador das correntes tendências de catástrofe ambiental.

Nós, E Os Nossos Cérebros: O panorama cultural lisboeta está generoso para aqueles que se interessam pela interseção entre a arte e ciência. Até 22 de abril continua no MAAT a exposição Hello Robot, que nos leva a refletir sobre a nossa relação com a robótica através de artefatos da história da computação, design, tecnologia e experiências artísticas. Agora, aproveitando a comemoração do 150.º aniversário de Calouste Gulbenkian, a venerável Fundação Gulbenkian traz ao público a exposição Cérebro: Mais Vasto que o Céu. Nela, os visitantes são convidados a descobrir talvez aquele que seja o mais importante órgão do corpo humano.O melhor da exposição? Os robots-pintores de Leonel Moura.

The Truth About Wasabi: Quer dizer que... aquele wasabi que se come nos cada vez mais proliferantes sítios onde se come sushi (passaram de raridade a praga, especialmente aqueles que fazem sushi de tudo e mais alguma coisa, com maionese e molhos à mistura)... não é o verdadeiro wasabi? É um sucedâneo feito a partir de rábano misturado com mostarda e corante verde? Toda a história do wasabi é algo muito, muito japonês, o meticuloso cultivar de uma planta rara, com todo o cuidado e sem querer massificar, para manter a pureza do sabor original.

Fifty years of the internet: A internet fez 30 anos? Não não, aponta com razão Leonard Kleinrock. De facto, a conjugação de redes que hoje chamamos de internet tem hoje cerca de cinquenta anos. O texto em si é sóbrio, transmitindo uma sensação de surpresa e algum arrependimento, quando uma das pessoas que ajudou a criar a internet se sente desencantada com os pesadelos nascidos daquele sonho de liberdade pura. Arrependimento não no sentido de achar a criação da internet um erro, mas no sentido de se ter implementado, logo de início, sistemas de fiabilização e privacidade forte. E, claro, Kleinrock não poderia deixar de contar esta delícia, do primeiro lampejo da futura internet: "After we typed the first two letters from our computer room at UCLA, namely, “Lo” for “Login,” the network crashed. Hence, the first internet message was “Lo” as in “Lo and behold” – inadvertently, we had delivered a message that was succinct, powerful, and prophetic".

Dylan Dog: O velho que lê: Finalmente, Dylan Dog a chegar aos leitores portugueses. E se o desejável seria ler obras escritas por Tiziano Sclavi, também não estamos mal servidos se forem traduzidos livros com argumentos daqueles que sabem pegar nesta personagem. Recchioni e Barbato são os que conheço melhor, mas pelo que tenho lido, Celoni também tem excelentes propostas. Nota para conhecedores da personagem: esta edição da G.floy inclui a curta Pequena Biblioteca de Babel que, se é a história que penso que é, é uma pérola borgesiana saída da imaginação fortemente referencial de Sclavi.

Computational Landscape Architecture: Porque é que gosto de ler Geoff Manaugh? Porque nos leva a pensar de forma diferente, aborda temáticas na intereseção entre tecnologia e arquitetura de formas inesperadas. Este é um excelente exemplo: se algumas espécies vegetais interferem com o sinal wifi, é possível conceber um tipo de urbanismo que otimize o fluir da radiação que não vemos, mas dela dependemos para comunicar, através da gestão das plantas e árvores plantadas.

The Chernobyl Syndrome: Recordar a história de horror que foi o acidente nuclear de Chernobyl, que nos legou a zona radiotiva de exclusão. O que surpreende, ainda hoje, é o desconhecimento intencional e a forma rudimentar como à época se lidou com o acidente e suas consequências. A forma como foi gerida a exposição à radiação é arrepiante. E ainda hoje continua. Uma vez que as regras de comércio internacional são pouco apertadas, é possível consumir-se produtos agrícolas e silvícolas contaminados, diluídos em carregamentos. Ainda hoje. Sobre isto, neste artigo, há um relato verdadeiramente grotesco vindo da União Europeia: "Chernobyl fallout had contaminated much of Europe. When Italy rejected 300,000 tons of radioactive Greek wheat, Greece refused to take it back; the European Economic Community eventually agreed to buy the wheat, which was blended with clean grain and sent to Africa and East Germany in aid shipments". É preciso ajuda alimentar? Então aproveita-se e livramo-nos de alimentos radioativos.

Boeing sold essential safety features as extras on 737 Max: O capitalismo terminal no seu melhor. Foram precisos dois acidentes aéreos fatais (e, se calhar, muitos outros relatados mas que não chegaram a ser graves) para a Boeing achar que não foi boa ideia modificar os sistemas de controle de voo dos 737 Max, mas deixar sistemas auxiliares para alertar pilotos em caso de erro de sistema ou comportamento inesperado da aeronave como extras, pagos à parte, Isto é pura negligência criminosa, e será resolvido da mesma forma que o Dieselgate o foi, com a completa impunidade dos responsáveis.
          Sunday Session: April 14, 2019      Comment   Translate Page      
Amina Claudine Myers
Here's a roundup of various music-related items of interest that have shown up in one of StLJN's various inboxes or feeds over the past week:

* Nenette Evans: My Life With Bill (AllAboutJazz.com)
* The Eclectic Mr. Klein (Jazz Times)
* Harold Danko: His Own Sound, His Own Time (AllAboutJazz.com)
* ECM @ 50 (AllAboutJazz.com)* “The most in depth concert in over 35 years”: Rod Stewart and Jeff Beck to reunite on stage (NME.com)
* Ed Palermo Enjoys a ‘Lousy Day’ with New Album (DownBeat)
* Alan Lomax’s Massive Music Archive Is Online: Features 17,000 Historic Blues & Folk Recordings (OpenCulture.com)
* Interview: Pianist Amina Claudine Myers (JazzRightNow.com)
* Knocking on doors in search of Philadelphia’s jazz history (WHYY)
* Jazz Heavyweights Herbie Hancock And Kamasi Washington Announce Joint Tour (NPR)
* Keystone Korner Club Revived in Baltimore (Jazz Times)
* Emmet Cohen Wins American Pianists Association Competition (DownBeat)
* Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks Dig Deep (DownBeat)
* George Benson talks back (Offbeat)
* Inside the Barry Harris Method (Jazz Times)
* Ambient in Outer Space: Seven Artists Exploring the Final Frontier (Bandcamp.com)
* Works of Wadada Leo Smith Celebrated at Third CREATE Festival (DownBeat)
* Four-year legal battle over estate of legendary blues musician Muddy Waters continues in DuPage courtroom (Chicago Tribune)
* AIM’s Gee Davy on the future of generative Artificial Intelligence in music (MusicBusinessWorldwide.com)
* Angel of Harlem: How a patron saint to a forgotten generation of musicians came to face her greatest challenge yet (ABC News)
* Space for the Wrong: An Interview with Frederic Rzewski (Atavist.com)
* Jazzman Dave Douglas finds inspiration in Dizzy Gillespie (Houston Chronicle)
* Hi-Fi Cocktail Bars Aren’t Just for Tokyo Anymore (Bloomberg.com)
* Holographic Frank Zappa Plays Guitar Solo in New Tour Promo (Rolling Stone)
* Berklee's Institute Of Jazz And Gender Justice Aims To Combat Sexism In Jazz (WBUR)
* The Songsmiths of Sesame Street (The Atlantic)
* Spotify, the Decline of Playlists and the Rise of Podcasts (Music Industry Blog)


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