Next Page: 10000

          Fresh Air Weekend: Henry Winkler; Rob Delaney      Comment   Translate Page      
Winkler discusses his decades-long acting career, from "The Fonz" to Barry. Ken Tucker reviews Billie Eilish's debut album. Delaney talks about wrapping up Catastrophe and working through grief.
          Nephew Of Robert E. Lee Grapples With Legacy Of American Race Relations In New Book      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          The Influence Of American Jewish Attitudes On Israeli Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Viral Stars, The 'Syncopated Ladies,' Shake Up Tap Dancing      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with tap dancer Chloe Arnold, of the Syncopated Ladies, about their viral dance videos and annual tap festival.
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.
          The Influence Of American Jewish Attitudes On Israeli Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
Following the re-election of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Nadine Epstein, editor-in-chief of Moment Magazine, about the American Jewish community's impact on Israeli politics.
          Nephew Of Robert E. Lee Grapples With Legacy Of American Race Relations In New Book      Comment   Translate Page      
Robert W. Lee tells NPR's Michel Martin what it's like to grapple with the legacy of his ancestor, Confederate General Robert E. Lee. He wrote about this in a memoir, "A Sin by Any Other Name."
          Barbershop: The Curious Case Of Julian Assange      Comment   Translate Page      
In the Barbershop, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with journalist Margaret Sullivan and former CIA deputy director John McLaughlin about whether Julian Assange's actions are heroic or treacherous.
          Cellist Yo-Yo Ma Plays Bach In Shadow Of Border Crossing      Comment   Translate Page      
The world-renowned cellist brought his Bach Project to the sister cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on Saturday.
          After Coachella Premiere, Childish Gambino's Film 'Guava Island' Is Streaming      Comment   Translate Page      
Following a major year for the "This Is America" rapper, Guava Island is a modestly stunning — and at times unnerving — extended music video about music's power to unite amid tyranny and greed.
          Ohio Republicans just made it legal for men to rape their drunk wives & force them to give birth. Seriously.      Comment   Translate Page      

The tagline for ACASignups.net is "healthcare policy data, analysis & snark", so naturally many of my blog posts have tongue-in-cheek, sarcastic headlines.

This is not one of those times. The headline above is absolutely, sickeningly true.

On a couple of days ago, both houses of the Ohio state legislature--the House and Senate alike--voted to ban abortion outright six weeks after conception. There's no exception for rape. There's no exception for incest. There is an exception for the life of the mother (not her health, mind you...just her actual ability to keep breathing)...but that's it. Yesterday this bill was signed into law by GOP Governor Mike DeWine.

The six-week abortion ban known as the "heartbeat bill" is now law in Ohio. That makes Ohio the sixth state in the nation to attempt to outlaw abortions at the point a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

Gov. Mike DeWine signed the bill Thursday afternoon, just one day after it passed the Republican-led General Assembly. The law is slated to take effect in 90 days, unless blocked by a federal judge.

Now known as the "Human Rights Protection Act," SB 23 outlaws abortions as early as five or six weeks into a pregnancy, before many women know they're pregnant. It is one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country.

The bill does include an exception to save the life of the woman, but no exceptions for cases of rape or incest.

...DeWine's signature will set off a lengthy legal fight. The ACLU of Ohio announced it will sue to stop the law, which the group says "virtually bans all abortion care."

"This legislation is blatantly unconstitutional and we will fight to the bitter end to ensure that this bill is permanently blocked," said ACLU of Ohio legal director Freda Levenson in a statement.

As horrific as this is already, it gets worse...far worse. You see,

During House session yesterday, @RepGalonski had an amendment to make it illegal to rape your wife. (It's legal in Ohio if she's drunk or incapacitated. Seriously.)

These are the 58 Republicans who rejected making spousal rape illegal: pic.twitter.com/GWM0h9Rdkq

— Gabriel Mann (@OhioGabe) April 12, 2019

I decided to look it up, and sure enough, if you take a look at pages 314 - 341 of the Ohio House Session Journal for Wednesday, April 10th, 2019, you'll see this section (actually starting on page 321), which deals with amendments to the "fetal heartbeat" bill:

Sec. 2907.02. (A)(1) No person shall engage in sexual conduct with another who is not the spouse of the offender or who is the spouse of the offender but is living separate and apart from the offender, when any of the following applies:

(a) For the purpose of preventing resistance, the offender substantially impairs the other person's judgment or control by administering any drug, intoxicant, or controlled substance to the other person surreptitiously or by force, threat of force, or deception.

(b) The other person is less than thirteen years of age, whether or not the offender knows the age of the other person.

(c) The other person's ability to resist or consent is substantially impaired because of a mental or physical condition or because of advanced age, and the offender knows or has reasonable cause to believe that the other person's ability to resist or consent is substantially impaired because of a mental or physical condition or because of advanced age.

Sec. 2907.03. (A) No person shall engage in sexual conduct with another, not the spouse of the offender, when any of the following apply:

(1) The offender knowingly coerces the other person to submit by any means that would prevent resistance by a person of ordinary resolution.

(2) The offender knows that the other person's ability to appraise the nature of or control the other person's own conduct is substantially impaired.

(3) The offender knows that the other person submits because the other person is unaware that the act is being committed.

(4) The offender knows that the other person submits because the other person mistakenly identifies the offender as the other person's spouse.

Sec. 2907.05. (A) No person shall have sexual contact with another, not the spouse of the offender; cause another, not the spouse of the offender, to have sexual contact with the offender; or cause two or more other persons to have sexual contact when any of the following applies:

(1) The offender purposely compels the other person, or one of the other persons, to submit by force or threat of force.

(2) For the purpose of preventing resistance, the offender substantially impairs the judgment or control of the other person or of one of the other persons by administering any drug, intoxicant, or controlled substance to the other person surreptitiously or by force, threat of force, or deception.

(3) The offender knows that the judgment or control of the other person or of one of the other persons is substantially impaired as a result of the influence of any drug or intoxicant administered to the other person with the other person's consent for the purpose of any kind of medical or dental examination, treatment, or surgery.

(4) The other person, or one of the other persons, is less than thirteen years of age, whether or not the offender knows the age of that person.

(5) The ability of the other person to resist or consent or the ability of one of the other persons to resist or consent is substantially impaired because of a mental or physical condition or because of advanced age, and the offender knows or has reasonable cause to believe that the ability to resist or consent of the other person or of one of the other persons is substantially impaired because of a mental or physical condition or because of advanced age.

...and so on and so forth. In all the "not the spouse of the offender" exception to rape is mentioned 25 times.

It's important to stress that it was ALREADY legal for men to rape their unconscious, drugged, drunk or mentally impaired wives in Ohio, because the world is a sick and repulsive place.

On Wednesday, the Ohio state legislature had an opportunity to at the very least correct this sickening and misogynistic legal exception at the same time they were imposing an equally misogynistic one...and yet, as noted by Gabriel Mann, here was the vote on tabling the amendment...which is to say, shooting the amendment down:

The question being, “Shall the motion to amend be agreed to?”

Representative Seitz moved that the motion be laid on the table.

The question being, "Shall the motion to amend be laid on the table?"

The yeas and nays were taken and resulted – yeas 58, nays 38, as follows:

Those who voted in the affirmative were: Representatives

Antani Arndt Baldridge Becker Blessing Brinkman Butler Callender Carfagna Carruthers Cross Cupp Dean DeVitis Edwards Ghanbari Ginter Green Greenspan Hambley Hillyer Holmes, A. Hood Hoops Jones Jordan Keller Kick Koehler Lanese Lang Lipps Manchester Manning, D. McClain Merrin Oelslager Perales Plummer Powell Reineke Richardson Riedel Roemer Romanchuk Ryan Schaffer Scherer Seitz Smith, R. Smith, T. Stein Stoltzfus Vitale Wiggam Wilkin Zeltwanger Householder-58

Those who voted in the negative were: Representatives

Boggs Boyd Brent Brown Cera Clites Crawley Crossman Denson Galonski Hicks-Hudson Holmes, G. Howse Ingram Kelly Kent LaTourette Leland Lepore-Hagan Lightbody Liston Manning, G. Miller, A. Miller, J. Miranda O'Brien Patterson Rogers Russo Sheehy Skindell Smith, K. Sobecki Strahorn Sweeney Sykes Upchurch West-38

The motion to amend was laid on the table.

Let me reiterate:

  • It was already legal in Ohio for men to rape their wife if she's drunk, drugged, unconscious or mentally incapacitated.
  • It's no illegal in Ohio for a woman to have an abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected...which is often before she even knows she's pregnant.
  • This means that as of today, in Ohio, a married man can legally drug his wife, rape her and impregnate her...and if she doesn't happen to discover she's pregnant and have an abortion within the next six weeks, she's legally required to carry her rapist's fetus to term and give birth.

Most mind-boggling of all? Six of the Republicans who voted to keep allowing men to rape their wives are women.

Here's the full list of the 58 "Yes" votes, with their districts (two Republican women voted No, and it looks like one Republican man didn't vote at all):

I have nothing snarky to add to this.


          Sudan's Military Says It Has Taken Control And Arrested President Omar Al-Bashir      Comment   Translate Page      
After nearly 30 years in power, Bashir is removed from power and detained by his own military. 


Sudan's Military Says It Has Taken Control And Arrested President Omar Al-Bashir

By James Doubek, Laurel Wamsley | NPR

A military council has taken control of Sudan and arrested its longtime president, Omar al-Bashir, the country's military said Thursday. The move comes after opposition protesters recently gained new momentum in demanding al-Bashir leave office.

Sudan's defense minister, Awad Mohamed Ahmed Ibn Auf, said the "regime" had been removed and its head arrested, as he announced the coup in a televised statement.

The minister said a transitional military council will rule the country for two years before any democratic elections will take place.

Sudan awoke early to word from the state news agency that the military would be making an announcement — news that sent thousands of people flooding to the site where protesters have been calling for al-Bashir's ouster for months.

There has been so much anticipation for this moment, NPR's Halima Gikandi reports, that "some people were cheering but not really knowing what they were cheering for, and what was going to happen." In one sign of change, activists said many of their colleagues had been released from state prisons.

or protesters, the moment is bittersweet. Their primary demand has been for al-Bashir to step down. But their second demand was for a transitional government to move the country toward a democracy — and on Thursday, there were no indications of that happening.

The woman who has become an icon of the protests, Alaa Salah, tweeted that the military's announcement was unacceptable: "The people do not want a transitional military council. Change will not happen with Bashir's entire regime hoodwinking Sudanese civilians through a military coup. We want a civilian council to head the transition."

It's unclear what will happen next, but many Sudanese fear a military takeover. And with a number of military forces and government agencies now free to assert themselves, the political picture seems more complicated than ever.

"On one hand, you have the army, which in the past few days has been seeming to protect protesters," Gikandi explains. "And on the other hand, you have the national intelligence agency, which has been known to have done human rights violations. So what does it mean now for demonstrators to be seeing that the military is taking over, and installing a two-year transitional government, consisting of all of those various intelligence agencies?"

The opposition protests began in December over the price of bread, after the government ended subsidies. But the demonstrations soon spread to political concerns, and protesters demanded al-Bashir's ouster. Since Saturday, tens of thousands have maintained a protest vigil near the military headquarters in Sudan's capital, Khartoum.

The country's armed forces have been deployed around the capital's main roads and bridges, the BBC reports, and the city's main airport is closed.

The Sudanese Professionals Association, the civil society group that has led protests since December, had called on residents to mobilize on Thursday for a sit-in. The group tweeted that the military leadership must "hand over power to the people."

Sudan's current crisis "cannot be addressed through another military coup," the group said. The SPA called for protests to continue until power is handed over to a civil transitional government.

"We will not accept Bashir's aides as part of the new situation," protester Mohamed Adam told Reuters. "Those people have killed protesters."

Media reports say the current swell of protesters is largely peaceful. The SPA said it advocated a peaceful "approach to revolution and change."

Sudanese security forces killed at least 14 people on Tuesday, NPR previously reported. But according to the BBC, the army stepped in to protect protesters from at least two attacks by forces loyal to al-Bashir.

His ouster comes just a week after Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika resigned, following weeks of mass protests against his 20-year rule. Since 2011, a number of the Arab world's longest-serving leaders have lost power: Tunisia's Ben Ali, Libya's Moammar Gadhafi, Yemen's Ali Abdullah Saleh, Egypt's Hosni Mubarak, and now Bouteflika and al-Bashir.

Now all eyes are on the Sudanese military, which has a long history of coups in the country.

Sudan gained independence from the U.K. and Egypt in 1956. Just two years later, chief of staff Lt. Gen. Ibrahim Abboud took power in a bloodless coup.

Riots and strikes in 1964 led to the military giving up control.

But Col. Gaafar Muhammad Nimeiri led a second military coup in 1969, according to the U.S. State Department's history. Nimeiri became prime minister, and the military banned political parties and dissolved parliament. He survived multiple coup attempts before succumbing to another military coup in 1985.

Gen. Abdel Rahman Swar al-Dahab led the military overthrow of Nimeiri in that coup. This time the military handed over power to a civilian government of Prime Minister Sadiq al-Mahdi after elections in 1986.

Al-Mahdi only lasted three years in power afterward. Al-Bashir, with the support of military officers and an Islamist political party, took power as leader of a junta in his own coup on June 30, 1989.

Al-Bashir had been in power almost 30 years. The International Criminal Court in the Hague issued warrants for al-Bashir's arrest in 2009 and 2010 for genocide and crimes against humanity in Sudan's Darfur region.

But those arrest warrants have not been carried out, with al-Bashir traveling to South Africa in 2015 and Chad in 2010 and returning home.

          The Influence Of American Jewish Attitudes On Israeli Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
Following the re-election of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Nadine Epstein, editor-in-chief of Moment Magazine, about the American Jewish community's impact on Israeli politics.
          Cellist Yo-Yo Ma Plays Bach In Shadow Of Border Crossing      Comment   Translate Page      
The world-renowned cellist brought his Bach Project to the sister cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on Saturday.
          Opinion: A Showcase Of 'Uncaged Art' By Children Once Detained      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Scott Simon explores an art exhibit in El Paso, Texas, by unaccompanied minors detained at the now-closed Tornillo Children's Detention center.
          How Shrinking Newsrooms Impact Local Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
A study in Urban Affairs Review found shrinking newsrooms can potentially impact the number of candidates who run for mayor. NPR's Scott Simon talks to professor Meghan Rubado, co-author of the study.
          More Possible Graves Found At Florida School      Comment   Translate Page      
Workers doing cleanup at a now-closed reform school in Florida have found 27 sites that may be unmarked graves. Researchers previously found more than 50 graves of boys who died at the school.
          Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf On Trump And 'Sanctuary Cities'      Comment   Translate Page      
President Trump said he is considering sending detained immigrants in the country illegally to "sanctuary cities." Scott Simon gets reaction from Mayor Libby Schaaf of Oakland, a "sanctuary city."
          Army Reservist On Transgender Military Ban      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Scott Simon talks to Elliot Sommer, a graduate student in the Army Reserves, about the Trump administration's policy barring transgender personnel from serving in the military.
          How One Mother's Battle Is Changing Police Training On Disabilities      Comment   Translate Page      
Patti Saylor's son, Ethan, died after an encounter with law enforcement when he was 26. She believes the incident could have been prevented with better training.
          Under Employers' Gaze, Gen Z Is Biting Its Tongue On Social Media      Comment   Translate Page      
The post-millennial generation, known as Generation Z, is entering the workforce at a time when 70 percent of employers check social media during the hiring process.
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.
          Nephew Of Robert E. Lee Grapples With Legacy Of American Race Relations In New Book      Comment   Translate Page      
Robert W. Lee tells NPR's Michel Martin what it's like to grapple with the legacy of his ancestor, Confederate General Robert E. Lee. He wrote about this in a memoir, "A Sin by Any Other Name."
          Not My Job: We Quiz Journalist Dan Rather On What He Actually Said      Comment   Translate Page      
Rather is known for folksy sayings combining colorful metaphors with colorful wisdom. We're curious to see if he can pick out what he actually said from sayings that we just made up.
          Analysis: Does Netanyahu's Win Maintain Status Quo Or Push Israel Further Right?      Comment   Translate Page      
The Israeli prime minister's fourth consecutive term — fifth total — comes as he flirts with lightning-rod issues and hard-right and religious factions.
          State Department Tried To Dissuade WikiLeaks From Posting U.S. Documents      Comment   Translate Page      
In 2010, WikiLeaks posted 250,000 leaked U.S. diplomatic cables. David Greene talks to Harold Koh, the then-legal adviser to the State Department who urged the organization not to publish them.
          Americans Are Divided Over Whether Transgender People Should Be In The Military      Comment   Translate Page      
The Pentagon is set to enforce a policy Friday banning transgender people from serving in the military. David Greene talks to Delton Daigle of the Schar School of Policy and Government about his poll.
          Assange Faces U.S. Extradition After Years Holed Up In Ecuador's Embassy      Comment   Translate Page      
Rachel Martin talks to ex-prosecutor Renato Mariotti about the U.S. charging WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange with conspiring to commit computer intrusion. An extradition hearing is set for May 2.
          Democratic Candidates Are Releasing Tax Returns, Answering Big Questions For Voters      Comment   Translate Page      
President Trump has refused to release his tax returns. Many Democrats are using that against him, as they reveal their own personal wealth and financial interests.
          Nephew Of Robert E. Lee Grapples With Legacy Of American Race Relations In New Book      Comment   Translate Page      
Robert W. Lee tells NPR's Michel Martin what it's like to grapple with the legacy of his ancestor, Confederate General Robert E. Lee. He wrote about this in a memoir, "A Sin by Any Other Name."
          North Korea Threatens To Suspend Nuclear Talks With U.S.       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #15      Comment   Translate Page      
A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Apr 7 through Sat, Apr 13, 2019

Editor's Pick

The world could transition entirely to cheap, safe renewable energy before 2050: Finnish study

Solar Panels

A study from the Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and the Energy Watch Group (EWG) from Germany says a global transition to the exclusive use of renewable energy is possible before 2050. (iStock) 

A global transition to the exclusive use of renewable energy sources is not only possible but also cheaper and safer than reliance on fossil fuels and nuclear energy, according to a new study from the Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and the Energy Watch Group (EWG) from Germany.

The study claims that the rapid development of renewable energy sources and energy storage technology will likely make it possible for the entire planet to reduce its CO2 emissions to zero even earlier than the current 2050 deadline.

The report is the first of its kind to suggest a cost-effective, all-inclusive, global roadmap to keep average global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius. It is also the first planet-wide climate change resistance plan that suggests not using carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) techniques to mechanically remove CO2 from the atmosphere.

According to the model, in 2050 some 69 percent of the world’s energy would come from solar panels, 18 percent from wind power, 3 percent from hydropower systems and 6 percent from bioenergy.

Fossil fuels and nuclear power would not be needed at all. Cars, planes and ships would run on carbon-neutral synthetic fuels produced from hydrogen and carbon dioxide.

The world could transition entirely to cheap, safe renewable energy before 2050: Finnish study, Yle News (Finland), Apr 12, 2019 


Links posted on Facebook

Sun Apr 7, 2019

Mon Apr 8, 2019

Tue Apr 9, 2019

Wed Apr 10, 2019

Thu Apr 11, 2019

Fri Apr 12, 2019

Sat Apr 13, 2019


          Cellist Yo-Yo Ma Plays Bach In Shadow Of Border Crossing      Comment   Translate Page      
The world-renowned cellist brought his Bach Project to the sister cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on Saturday.
          After Coachella Premiere, Childish Gambino's Film 'Guava Island' Is Streaming      Comment   Translate Page      
Following a major year for the "This Is America" rapper, Guava Island is a modestly stunning — and at times unnerving — extended music video about music's power to unite amid tyranny and greed.
          Dervish Finds New Ways To Celebrate Tradition With 'The Great Irish Songbook'      Comment   Translate Page      
As the Irish band Dervish approaches its 30th anniversary, they musicians have released The Great Irish Songbook with guests including Steve Earle, Rhiannon Giddens, Vince Gill and more.
          Viral Stars, The 'Syncopated Ladies,' Shake Up Tap Dancing       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          The Influence Of American Jewish Attitudes On Israeli Politics       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Nephew Of Robert E. Lee Grapples With Legacy Of American Race Relations In New Book       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Barbershop: The Curious Case Of Julian Assange       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Cellist Yo-Yo Ma Plays Bach In Shadow Of Border Crossing       Comment   Translate Page      

World-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma brought his Bach Project to the sister cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on Saturday. Laredo's "Day of Action" featured performances in both cities to celebrate the relationship between the two communities.

Ma played the opening notes of Johann Sebastian Bach's "Suite No. 1 for Unaccompanied Cello" in a park next to the Juarez-Lincoln International Bridge, one of the crossings that connect the U.S. and Mexican cities.

The Laredo performance took place on an elevated stage before an audience of officials and onlookers. Concerns over possible rain disappeared as Ma began to play in the morning sunshine.

It was part of his Bach Project, which uses the composer's 300-year-old music to explore connections between cultures. The project has taken him all over the world. On Friday it brought him to Laurie Auditorium at Trinity University in San Antonio, and on Saturday it brought him to Laredo, within a few feet of the Rio Grande.

"As you all know, as you did and do and will do, in culture, we build bridges, not walls," he said. After his performance, he gestured to the bridge to his right. "I've lived my life at the borders. Between cultures. Between disciplines. Between musics. Between generations."

Mateo Bailey, 16, lives in San Antonio. He grew up in El Paso, plays the cello, and is the son of Grammy Award-winning cellist Zuill Bailey.

He felt Ma's performance had special significance "because this event is on the border. And I'm half-Mexican as well as half-American ... and for him to connect cello with what's happening in the world is like, it's a cultural bridge that was just built, and it's amazing."

Betty DeLeon praised the cellist for visiting. "It speaks of him. What a wonderful human being to take his time and come to our tiny little town to share the importance of culture. On the border. It's amazing. It's a privilege to be a part of this."

Pete Saenz, mayor of Laredo, said despite the river and despite the bridge spanning overhead, the border is one community.

"And although people may perceive us as being so different, we're not," he said. "Here the border is extremely unique in that it's one organism. I've always said we're interdependent, interconnected. We survived because the border side survives, especially here on the border area."

This "Day of Action" also included a performance in Plaza Juarez in Nuevo Laredo, a few blocks from the international crossing. Its overall theme was an appreciation for the connections between the two cities, which see themselves as one community.

Ma was originally scheduled to play on the actual bridge, which would be briefly closed. The planned closure would've been a collaborative effort between officials and residents on both sides of the border. But the traffic and pedestrian delays the performance would have caused convinced officials to move the locale to the Tres Laredos Park right next to the bridge.

The famous cellist has studied and performed the German composer's music for six decades.

In 2018, Ma set out on a two-year journey to perform Bach's six suites for cello in 36 locations around the world. He felt the music had an ability to connect cultures and humanity from all walks of life. He said that is what motivated him to launch the project.

Copyright 2019 Texas Public Radio. To see more, visit Texas Public Radio.

          Report: BDS Co-Founder Barred From Entering U.S.      Comment   Translate Page      

The U.S. is said to have denied entry to Omar Barghouti, a co-founder of movement to impose boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) on Israel, National Public Radio reported. Among other planned stops on his U.S. trip, Barghouti had planned to speak at Harvard and New York Universities.

The Arab American Institute, which had organized Barghouti’s travel, said in a statement that Barghouti was blocked from boarding a plane despite holding valid travel documents and that he was told that U.S. immigration officials had ordered the U.S. consul in Tel Aviv to bar him from traveling to the U.S. According to the institute, Barghouti was not given a reason other than it being an "immigration matter."

A State Department official declined to comment, citing the confidentiality of visa records under U.S. law.

Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

          'Uncharted Waters': Union Tells Hollywood Writers To Fire Their Agents       Comment   Translate Page      
The abrupt directive on Friday followed a breakdown in talks over proposed changes to the agreement that has guided the basic business relationship between writers and agents for the past 43 years.
          Examining Sanders' Medicare-For-All Proposal      Comment   Translate Page      
Julie Rovner, chief Washington correspondent for Kaiser Health News, describes the latest Medicare-for-all bill by Sen. Bernie Sanders and the options for single-payer coverage proposed by lawmakers.
          Republican State Lawmakers Split Over Anti-Abortion Strategy      Comment   Translate Page      
Ohio is the latest Republican-led state to pass a ban on abortion once a fetal heartbeat can be detected. But Tennessee this week backed off on a similar bill, fearing costly legal battles. What now?
          Predictions      Comment   Translate Page      
Our panelists predict what we'll find when we zoom in on that photo of the black hole.
          Lightning Fill In The Blank      Comment   Translate Page      
All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.
          Limericks      Comment   Translate Page      
Bill Kurtis reads three news-related limericks: The Truth about Cats and Dogs, Furniture Cast and Lavatory Loudness.
          Panel Questions      Comment   Translate Page      
The 2020 Dump; Eye Trouble.
          Bluff The Listener      Comment   Translate Page      
Our panelists read three stories about new prom trends, only one of which is true.
          Panel Questions      Comment   Translate Page      
Danger Zone.
          Who's Bill This Time      Comment   Translate Page      
Bill Kurtis reads three quotes from the week's news: "Cabinet Cleaning," "Who Doesn't Want To Be A Millionaire?" and "Star Power."
          Not My Job: We Quiz Journalist Dan Rather On What He Actually Said      Comment   Translate Page      
Rather is known for folksy sayings combining colorful metaphors with colorful wisdom. We're curious to see if he can pick out what he actually said from sayings that we just made up.
          Viral Stars, The 'Syncopated Ladies,' Shake Up Tap Dancing      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with tap dancer Chloe Arnold, of the Syncopated Ladies, about their viral dance videos and annual tap festival.
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.
          The Influence Of American Jewish Attitudes On Israeli Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
Following the re-election of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Nadine Epstein, editor-in-chief of Moment Magazine, about the American Jewish community's impact on Israeli politics.
          Nephew Of Robert E. Lee Grapples With Legacy Of American Race Relations In New Book      Comment   Translate Page      
Robert W. Lee tells NPR's Michel Martin what it's like to grapple with the legacy of his ancestor, Confederate General Robert E. Lee. He wrote about this in a memoir, "A Sin by Any Other Name."
          Barbershop: The Curious Case Of Julian Assange      Comment   Translate Page      
In the Barbershop, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with journalist Margaret Sullivan and former CIA deputy director John McLaughlin about whether Julian Assange's actions are heroic or treacherous.
          Cellist Yo-Yo Ma Plays Bach In Shadow Of Border Crossing      Comment   Translate Page      
The world-renowned cellist brought his Bach Project to the sister cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on Saturday.
          After Coachella Premiere, Childish Gambino's Film 'Guava Island' Is Streaming      Comment   Translate Page      
Following a major year for the "This Is America" rapper, Guava Island is a modestly stunning — and at times unnerving — extended music video about music's power to unite amid tyranny and greed.
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.
          The Influence Of American Jewish Attitudes On Israeli Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
Following the re-election of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Nadine Epstein, editor-in-chief of Moment Magazine, about the American Jewish community's impact on Israeli politics.
          Viral Stars, The 'Syncopated Ladies,' Shake Up Tap Dancing      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with tap dancer Chloe Arnold, of the Syncopated Ladies, about their viral dance videos and annual tap festival.
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.
          The Influence Of American Jewish Attitudes On Israeli Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
Following the re-election of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Nadine Epstein, editor-in-chief of Moment Magazine, about the American Jewish community's impact on Israeli politics.
          Nephew Of Robert E. Lee Grapples With Legacy Of American Race Relations In New Book      Comment   Translate Page      
Robert W. Lee tells NPR's Michel Martin what it's like to grapple with the legacy of his ancestor, Confederate General Robert E. Lee. He wrote about this in a memoir, "A Sin by Any Other Name."
          Barbershop: The Curious Case Of Julian Assange      Comment   Translate Page      
In the Barbershop, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with journalist Margaret Sullivan and former CIA deputy director John McLaughlin about whether Julian Assange's actions are heroic or treacherous.
          Cellist Yo-Yo Ma Plays Bach In Shadow Of Border Crossing      Comment   Translate Page      
The world-renowned cellist brought his Bach Project to the sister cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on Saturday.
          After Coachella Premiere, Childish Gambino's Film 'Guava Island' Is Streaming      Comment   Translate Page      
Following a major year for the "This Is America" rapper, Guava Island is a modestly stunning — and at times unnerving — extended music video about music's power to unite amid tyranny and greed.
          'Uncharted Waters': Union Tells Hollywood Writers To Fire Their Agents       Comment   Translate Page      
The abrupt directive on Friday followed a breakdown in talks over proposed changes to the agreement that has guided the basic business relationship between writers and agents for the past 43 years.
          Carmen on the Couch: Analyzing Bizet's Bold Heroine      Comment   Translate Page      
Denyce Graves as Carmen, at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Metropolitan Opera Archives

By Tom Huizenga 
Article via NPR

Every opera season the perennial favorite, Carmen, by Georges Bizet, takes the stage at opera houses in places like New York, London and Vienna (And Seattle!).

Carmen owes its longevity, in part, to Bizet's sparkling music, and to its fearless, flirtatious title character. But for all her sexual charisma, Carmen's own fate, in Bizet's opera, says something about how society views strong women.

Carmen is the supreme diva of the operatic femmes fatale trope. She smokes and drinks, runs with a band of smugglers and brings men to their knees just by crooning her breathy Habanera.

In her famous aria, Carmen sings, "Love is a rebellious bird that no one can tame..." It's the type of carefree mantra she lives by. Within minutes, she'll have a hapless soldier named Don Jose half-crazed with desire.

Sexual Symbols

Bizet's Carmen premiered in Paris in 1875, at an opera house accustomed to staging family-friendly dramas. Musicologist Susan McClary says those first Paris audiences were not exactly ready for a free-thinking, blazingly real woman, who works in a sweaty cigar factory.

"This opera is so loaded with sexual imagery, it's not to be believed," McClary says. "We see her rolling up these cigars on her bare thigh. And none of that kind of explicit sexuality had been on the operatic stage at all. And to have this woman who smokes and does exactly what she pleases just blew everybody's mind."

Carmen might have blown a few minds, but author Will Berger says that, oddly enough, she also pushed just the right buttons.
"Carmen hit the world stages at the very height of the Victorian era, and it really spoke to people," Berger says. "There was something about casting aside of conventions and all those niceties that we're supposed to have in civilized life. And there was something very appealing about a woman who just said, 'Here I am, I am woman, hear me roar."

Right up through today, Carmen's brand of in-your-face honesty and sexy confidence continues to appeal to audiences and those lucky enough to sing the role, such as mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves, who says she's learned much about being a woman in the process.

Role Models

"I'm a great admirer of this woman," Graves says. "I have drawn a lot of strength from who she is. I wish I could be more like her. She doesn't care. She really lives honestly, and that's attractive, I think."

But "attractive" may just be in the eye of the beholder. In the opera, Don Jose is attracted to Carmen, but after she seduces him, then dumps him for a bullfighter, he goes off his head and stabs her to death, and the curtain comes down.

So why does Carmen have to die? McClary says it's because Carmen is a hero to some, most notably feminists. But to others, Carmen is a threat.

"She stands for everything that can potentially go wrong with women," McClary says. "And just as we expect to see Dracula killed off at the end of a vampire movie, we expect to see this monstrous woman killed off."

McClary also says that, still, very few women characters who have power get to keep it. Like Carmen, they all must be punished in the end. But for Graves, Carmen's death means just the opposite.

"No, I don't think she's being punished," Graves says. "I think it's even an act of will on her part. And she says to him, 'If you're gonna kill me, kill me. Otherwise, get the heck out of my way.' But I've played her many times that she actually runs on to the blade itself, that she feels that he doesn't have the courage to do it himself, so she does it for him. I think it's extremely powerful."

Carmen, in the face of death, is fearless. According to Berger, her naturally sexy life-force is at a level which, even today, can be uncomfortable for many.

"I don't know of too many women who are as commanding and compelling as Carmen," Berger says. "I think if we saw an archetype as well drawn as Carmen, it would never get on television. People would not like it; it's just a little too disturbing.

Depending on the audience's perspective, Carmen is disturbing or delightful, a figure to be emulated and held up as a cautionary tale. She was a character far ahead of her time in 1875, and today, her story vibrantly spills out of the opera house, into our everyday lives.

Carmen plays at Seattle Opera May 4-19, 2019 at McCaw Hall. 
Tickets & info: seattleopera.org/carmen



          A World Leader, Hip-Hop Peers Celebrate Nipsey Hussle's Life In Los Angeles      Comment   Translate Page      
On Thursday, Los Angeles celebrated the life of the rapper Nipsey Hussle, who was murdered on March 31 there.
          Democratic Rep. Dave Loebsack will retire from competitive Iowa seat that swung from Obama to Trump      Comment   Translate Page      

On Friday, Democratic Rep. Dave Loebsack announced that he would not seek re-election in Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District. Loebsack leaves behind a southeastern Iowa seat that swung from 56-43 Obama to 49-45 Trump. However this district, which includes Davenport and Iowa City, did back Democratic gubernatorial Fred Hubbell 51-47 even as he was narrowly losing statewide to Republican incumbent Kim Reynolds. Team Red also failed to field a strong candidate against Loebsack last year despite Trump’s win.

Loebsack’s retirement ends a surprising political career. Back in 2006 Loebsack, a political science professor at Cornell College, launched a longshot bid against 15-term GOP Rep. Jim Leach. Leach, who had opposed the Iraq War, was one of the more liberal Republicans in the House, and he had won re-election 59-39 even as John Kerry was carrying his seat 55-44. Loebsack himself also didn’t get off to a strong start when he failed to turn in enough signatures to make the primary ballot. No other Democrat filed, though, and Loebsack was nominated at a special convention.

The general election campaign was an odd one where the two opponents went out of their way to stay positive. Leach, who had been a guest lecturer in Loebsack’s classroom (his campaign manager was also a former Loebsack student), went so far as to condemn mailers from the state Republican Party attacking the Democrat, and he even told the RNC that he wouldn’t caucus with the GOP in the next Congress if they didn’t stop.

Loebsack, for his part, said he was glad the DCCC wasn’t getting involved in his race. While he campaigned against the Bush administration and the Iraq War, Loebsack called Leach a “good man” in his ads. Neither candidate raised much money, and while 2006 was a strong year for Team Blue, it was still a huge surprise when Loebsack unseated Leach 51-49. Leach didn’t seem particularly angry about the upset, and he endorsed Barack Obama two years later.


          'Uncharted Waters': Union Tells Hollywood Writers To Fire Their Agents       Comment   Translate Page      
The abrupt directive on Friday followed a breakdown in talks over proposed changes to the agreement that has guided the basic business relationship between writers and agents for the past 43 years.
          Former 'Ebony' Publisher Declares Bankruptcy, And An Era Ends      Comment   Translate Page      
For millions of African-Americans who did not otherwise see themselves in the mainstream media, Ebony was more than a magazine. It was a public trust. This week marks its final chapter.
          Assange's Arrest And Free Speech      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Scott Simon talks with the ACLU's Ben Wizner about what the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange could mean for press freedoms.
          How Shrinking Newsrooms Impact Local Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
A study in Urban Affairs Review found shrinking newsrooms can potentially impact the number of candidates who run for mayor. NPR's Scott Simon talks to professor Meghan Rubado, co-author of the study.
          Journalist David Carr As A Father In 'All That You Leave Behind'      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Scott Simon asks Erin Lee Carr about her father, journalist David Carr, and her memoir, All That You Leave Behind.
          Guava Island      Comment   Translate Page      
Donald Glover (Childish Gambino) and Rihanna (Rihanna) star in the ~1h long film Guava Island [clip], which premiered at Coachella this year. It's available to stream for free on Amazon until 9pm EST TODAY (after that, available on the Amazon Prime video streaming service). It features several new songs, and new takes on old songs. If you appreciated This Is America, this is for you [NPR article].

          'Uncharted Waters': Union Tells Hollywood Writers To Fire Their Agents       Comment   Translate Page      
The abrupt directive on Friday followed a breakdown in talks over proposed changes to the agreement that has guided the basic business relationship between writers and agents for the past 43 years.
          The Influence Of American Jewish Attitudes On Israeli Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
Following the re-election of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Nadine Epstein, editor-in-chief of Moment Magazine, about the American Jewish community's impact on Israeli politics.
          Cellist Yo-Yo Ma Plays Bach In Shadow Of Border Crossing      Comment   Translate Page      
The world-renowned cellist brought his Bach Project to the sister cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on Saturday.
          'Uncharted Waters': Union Tells Hollywood Writers To Fire Their Agents       Comment   Translate Page      
The abrupt directive on Friday followed a breakdown in talks over proposed changes to the agreement that has guided the basic business relationship between writers and agents for the past 43 years.
          North Korea Threatens To Suspend Nuclear Talks With U.S.       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          'Uncharted Waters': Union Tells Hollywood Writers To Fire Their Agents       Comment   Translate Page      

Thousands of Hollywood writers have been told by the Writers Guild of America to fire their agents — a drastic move that could impinge the production of new TV shows and films.

The abrupt directive on Friday followed a breakdown in negotiations over proposed changes to the agreement that has guided the basic business relationship between writers and agents for the past 43 years.

With talks stalled ahead of a midnight deadline, the WGA sent its 13,000 writers an email with instructions to notify their agents in writing that they cannot represent them until signing a new code of conduct.

"We know that, together, we are about to enter uncharted waters," the message stated. "Life that deviates from the current system might be various degrees of disorienting. But it has become clear that a big change is necessary."

It was a bold move for a group accustomed to writing its own scripts. "I guess the idea of taking on our agents is something people never thought we would do," said David Goodman, the president of the Writers Guild of America West, in an interview with NPR.

"Studios and networks still need writers to do the work so until agents figure out that they need us more than we need them, we will carry this out," said Goodman.

At the center of the conflict is a complaint among writers that their agents are not just drastically out-earning them, but preventing them from receiving better pay. The dispute threatens to hinder production at a time when the major broadcast networks are typically staffing up for their fall lineups. It could also lead to job losses in the industry.

"This whole fight is really about the fact that in a period of unprecedented profits and growth of our business ... writers themselves are actually earning less," said Goodman.

A main point of contention involves what are known as packaging fees, the money that agents get from a studio when they provide a roster of talent for a film or TV project. Traditionally, agents would earn a 10 percent commission for the work their clients receive from a studio. But with packaging fees, they are compensated by the studios directly. "They are not incentivized to increase the income of those writers," Goodman said.

Writers are also protesting a shift in the business model in recent years at some of Hollywood's largest talent agencies. Agents have increasingly entered the film and TV businesses as producers, and writers contend that such a dual-hat arrangement represents a conflict of interest.

Goodman said that in order to break the impasse, the industry needs to return "to the traditional agent-writer relationship" where an agent takes 10 percent of a writer's income.

On Saturday, some writers posted images of the letters they had signed and sent to their agents, showing solidarity if not total support.

"I have an amazing agency that represents me," screenwriter, actor and comedian Patton Oswalt said on Twitter. "But I have an even better guild which stands for me."

"Dammit," wrote David Simon, a Baltimore-based author and television writer best known for The Wire. "Just realized that the [agency agreement] midnight deadline is PST. So I have to stay up another three hours and one minute to send a pic of my naked a** to [the Creative Artists Agency]."

The Association of Talent Agents, which represents the agencies, has promised more transparency when agencies are involved in the production of a film or TV show. The association committed to reopening talks on the issue after two years if the Writers Guild determines that members aren't benefiting.

The association also offered concessions leading up to Friday's breakdown, including a chance to share 80 percent of "a percentage" of their profits when packaging fees for a television series are involved.

The guild said that based on the offer they received from agents, that "percentage" amounted to 0.8 percent of the money agents make from packaging fees.

ATA also said agencies would spend $6 million over six years to foster a more inclusive environment and insisted they "are, and always have been, on the side of the writer."

In a statement, Karen Stuart, the executive director of the ATA, said Friday's failure "was driven by the Guild's predetermined course for chaos." She said it would ultimately harm artists.

"The WGA is mandating a 'Code of Conduct' that will hurt all artists, delivering an especially painful blow to mid-level and emerging writers, while dictating how agencies of all sizes should function."

Goodman said writers are already hurt. He called the proposal "a ridiculous offer given the fact that the writers are the reason that any television show succeeds."

Until the impasse is solved, members of the Guild have told writers they could turn to managers or lawyers to handle their business affairs.

Lawyers for the ATA threatened to sue the guild, contending that the union was violating California and New York licensing laws. As part of its argument, it said in a letter that the union "cannot 'delegate' authority it does not have."

Friday's breakdown in negotiations marked just the latest chapter in the Writers Guild's longstanding aversion to packaging fees. Goodman said the union sought reforms as far back as the 1970s.

"People are saying this is an unprecedented move, but it isn't in the sense that 43 years ago we tried to get rid of packaging and we failed and now it's gotten much worse," Goodman said.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Week In Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
We have a recap of the week in politics as President Trump talked immigration this week.
          Limericks      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit PETER SAGAL, HOST: Coming up, it's Lightning Fill In The Blank. But first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT - that's 1-888-924-8924 - or click the contact us link on our website. That's waitwait.npr.org. You can there find out about attending our weekly live shows back at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago and our upcoming shows in St. Louis on May 9 and July 18 at the Blossom Music Center in Ohio. And if you want to experience the thrill of our show without the hassle of listening to it, check out... (LAUGHTER) SAGAL: ...Our new interactive quiz for your smart speaker. Just say open the Wait Wait Quiz, and Bill and I will be there to ask you some fill-in-the-blank questions. You can even win the voice of your choice on your voicemail. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME. T J: Hey. This is T.J. (ph) calling in from Waterbury, Vt. SAGAL: Hey.
          What is worse for the environment, plastic grocery bags or paper grocery bags?      Comment   Translate Page      
In NPR (of all places), Greg Rosalsky reports,
Plastic haters, it's time to brace yourselves. A bunch of studies find that paper bags are actually worse for the environment. They require cutting down and processing trees, which involves lots of water, toxic chemicals, fuel and heavy machinery. While paper is biodegradable and avoids some of the problems of plastic, Taylor says, the huge increase of paper, together with the uptick in plastic trash bags, means banning plastic shopping bags increases greenhouse gas emissions. That said, these bans do reduce nonbiodegradable litter.

A 2011 study by the U.K. government found a person would have to reuse a cotton tote bag 131 times before it was better for climate change than using a plastic grocery bag once. The Danish government recently did a study that took into account environmental impacts beyond simply greenhouse gas emissions, including water use, damage to ecosystems and air pollution. These factors make cloth bags even worse. They estimate you would have to use an organic cotton bag 20,000 times more than a plastic grocery bag to make using it better for the environment.

...The most environment-friendly way to carry groceries is to use the same bag over and over again. According to the Danish study, the best reusable ones are made from polyester or plastics like polypropylene. Those still have to be used dozens and dozens of times to be greener than plastic grocery bags, which have the smallest carbon footprint for a single use.
Read more here.
          Clean up your cat litter      Comment   Translate Page      



the real story why Ecuador threw out Assnage: He didn't clean up the cat litter.

so what happened to the cat?

NPR report on Assange's cat.


Moreno explained that Assange treated his hosts disrespectfully; late last year the embassy implemented a series of rules for Assange, including a requirement to be responsible for the "well-being, food, hygiene and proper care of your pet." If Assange didn't, the embassy threatened to put the cat in a shelter. In other words, it is likely that Assange didn't effectively clean up after his cat's own wiki-leaks.
apparently he gave it to his family after the embassy threatened to take it away and put it in a pound.



If I find all of this absurd, it is because boys of all ages are notorious for being messy, so hiring a part time maid to clean up after him wouldn't cost a fortune, so why is the embassy making such a big thing about it? Or maybe buy a self cleaning litter box?

Because of course this is not about being messy: they were pressuring him to leave and a lot of his messiness was about protesting this.

On the other hand, I guess he hasn't read Jordan Peterson:


--------------------

I find it is ironic that he spent years isolated in an embassy for embarassing Hillary, but Chelsey Manning not only got a pardon but a free sex change operation for releasing information that endangered soldiers in Iraq.



          DEP to begin statewide sampling for six PFAS chemicals      Comment   Translate Page      

Pennsylvania environmental officials said on Friday they will soon begin testing for toxic PFAS chemicals in public water systems near likely sources of contamination including military bases, landfills and factories.

The Department of Environmental Protection said it will sample more than 300 water systems starting in May in a program that is due to last a year.

In a 66-page description of its sampling plan, the DEP’s Bureau of Safe Drinking Water said it aimed to identify known location and potential source of PFAS contamination across the state, assess the risk to drinking water sources, and select public water systems as a control group.

The bureau said it will test for six PFAS chemicals including PFOA and PFOS. It did not name specific locations for sampling but published state maps showing potential water sources for testing, and other places including industrial sites and airports. The map of potential water sources shows a concentration of sites in southeastern Pennsylvania including Lancaster, Berks, Lehigh, Chester, Montgomery, Bucks, Philadelphia and Delaware counties.

A full list of the sampling locations will be published when monitoring is complete, said DEP spokesman Neil Shader. He said the program will not be a comprehensive survey of all public water systems but a “representative sample” to determine the prevalence of PFAS chemicals.

Any system that exceeds the EPA’s health advisory limit will have to confirm its tests and to notify the public, Shader said.

PFAS chemicals have been found in the blood serum of 97 percent of the U.S. population, the plan description said, and in 38 U.S. states including Pennsylvania, although there is “limited occurrence data” in Pennsylvania.

The $250,000 initiative follows Pennsylvania’s announcement in February that it will begin to set its own health limits for PFOA and PFOS. The state announced its plan the day after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency did not commit to setting national limits as part of a long-awaited “Action Plan” to curb the chemicals.

“DEP will not hesitate to step up when the federal government fails to,” DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell said in a statement.

In the absence of federal regulation, and amid rising public concern about the chemicals’ risk to public health, some states have set their own strict limits on the most commonly found PFAS chemicals. New Jersey last September became the first state to regulate PFNA, and has recently adopted tough standards on PFOA and PFOS.

Pennsylvania does not set its own limits for the chemicals — which are linked to health conditions including cancer, low birth weights, and elevated cholesterol – but relies on an EPA lifetime health advisory of 70 parts per trillion (ppt) for PFOS and PFOA combined, a level that advocates say is much too lax to protect public health.

On April 15, the Wolf Administration is due to hold the latest public meeting of its PFAS Action Team, a panel of state officials who are charged with investigating the contamination and recommending cleanup strategies.

Some PFAS chemicals were used in consumer products like nonstick cookware and flame-retardant fabrics, starting in the 1940s. Although they are no longer made by U.S. manufacturers, they persist in many public and private water sources because they don’t break down in the environment.

The chemicals have also been used for decades in firefighting foam on military bases such as those near the eastern Pennsylvania town of Horsham, where water systems have been contaminated by PFAS chemicals. Local authorities there have taken their own measures to remove PFAS from water supplies, but local people are still concerned that the bases remain a source of contamination for groundwater.

Delaware Riverkeeper Network, an environmental group that has long campaigned for strict limits on the chemicals, welcomed DEP’s plans to investigate contamination but said the process is already later than it should have been and the plan means it will be two years or more before any maximum contaminant limits on the chemicals are in place.

“We need the sampling data as soon as it can be gathered and compiled so that we will not have to wait another year before DEP proposes maximum contaminant levels for PFAS compounds,” said DRN’s deputy director, Tracy Carluccio. “We needed action yesterday, not years from now.”

In January, the Navy canceled a plan to ship 4,500 tons of PFAS-contaminated soil from the former air station at Willow Grove near Horsham to a landfill in southern New Jersey. The landfill dropped its agreement to take the soil following media reports on the plan.

In 2013-15, the EPA tested for six PFAS chemicals in Pennsylvania as part of a national monitoring program. That sampling included Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, both of which were found to contain PFOA and PFOS below the EPA’s 70 ppt level.


          Trump executive order could affect future of stalled Constitution Pipeline      Comment   Translate Page      

President Donald Trump wants to make it easier for companies to transport natural gas from places like Pennsylvania to the Northeast.

He signed an executive order this week that would speed up pipeline permitting. It takes aim at states like New York that have blocked pipeline projects that would carry Marcellus Shale gas to markets in the Northeast, where gas is not always readily available. Trump’s order also opens the door to natural gas being transported by rail.

“Too often, badly needed energy infrastructure is being held back by special interest groups, entrenched bureaucracies and radical activists,” the president told a crowd gathered Wednesday at an International Union of Operating Engineers facility in Crosby, Texas before he signed several executive orders related to oil and gas.

Trump’s directive stems in part from New York’s denial of a water quality permit for the Constitution Pipeline, among other projects blocked by states under the federal Clean Water Act.

New York in 2016 halted the Constitution project, which would carry gas north from Susquehanna County. The fight over the pipeline continues to play out in court and among regulatory agencies.

In his executive order, Trump directs the Environmental Protection Agency to issue new permitting guidance to states. He did not explicitly say how states’ authority should change, but he said the EPA’s review should focus on “the need to promote timely Federal-State cooperation and collaboration” and “the appropriate scope of water quality reviews.”

Trump also asked the EPA to go a step further by formally revising its rules surrounding that portion of the Clean Water Act.

Pennsylvania’s natural gas industry welcomed Trump’s order.

“If you have the rules in place where the game is fair in terms of siting pipelines and critical infrastructure projects, then I think it opens the door for new development,” said David Spigelmyer, president of the Marcellus Shale Coalition, an industry trade group.

Still, the fate of the Constitution Pipeline is unclear.

Williams, the lead developer of the project, said in a statement that it “supports efforts to foster coordination, predictability and transparency in federal environmental review and permitting processes for energy infrastructure projects.” The company, however, declined to comment specifically on the president’s order and what it means for the future of the pipeline.

Mark Szybist, a senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council, said he anticipates the legal battle over the pipeline will continue following Trump’s order.

“I suspect that was at least the intent of this executive order, to change the outcome of projects like the Constitution Pipeline,” he said. “How well that intent will succeed I think remains to be seen.”

He pointed to a statement from New York’s governor, Democrat Andrew Cuomo, who called Trump’s executive order a “gross overreach” of federal power.

“States must have a role in the process for siting energy infrastructure like pipelines, and any efforts to curb this right to protect our residents will be fought tooth and nail,” Cuomo said.

Szybist also questioned to what extent pipeline permitting in Pennsylvania will be affected by the order, given that the state has not experienced some of the same high-profile fights over pipelines as its neighbors that have denied projects under the Clean Water Act. Nevertheless, he said it would be concerning if the order changes the way Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection issues water quality certifications, should it result in less protection.

For years, the gas industry in Pennsylvania has sought to build more pipelines to reach New England, where residents tend to face higher heating prices than the rest of the nation and rely more on fuels like heating oil.

Spigelmyer said some in the region last year used gas supplied by a ship that anchored in Boston Harbor. The gas it carried came from Russia.

“That’s not a good thing when you’re bolstering your nation’s energy supply from out of the country,” he said.

As an alternative to transporting gas by pipeline, Trump’s order also directs the U.S. Department of Transportation to propose a rule allowing liquefied natural gas to be carried by rail.

For that to happen, gas would need to be cooled until it liquefies, at which point it would be carried on tank cars and delivered to a facility that would heat it again to return to gas form.

Such a form of transportation is legal in Canada, and trains already carry liquefied gas on a limited basis in Alaska and Florida, according to Bloomberg.

“We move oil that way, we move other liquids that way,” Spigelmyer said. “It is a safe form of transportation, and it is an alternate form of transportation that also makes sense.

Still, he said, pipelines are the cheapest and most efficient way to move natural gas.

If gas-by-rail becomes a reality, it will likely draw an outcry over the potential for derailments, given that trains have crashed while carrying crude oil from North Dakota. One such derailment that occurred in Canada in 2013 resulted in a fiery explosion that killed 47 people.

“My guess is there would be a huge amount of pushback from communities that would be affected by those kinds of projects,” Szybist said, adding that he wondered whether the proposal is meant to prompt states to view pipelines more favorably.


          Pa. lawmakers push to eliminate litter and single-use plastic      Comment   Translate Page      

(Harrisburg) — Plastic straws, plastic bags, and Styrofoam food-takeout containers could be on their way out in Pennsylvania if some Democratic state lawmakers get the change they want.

The group has announced a package of 13 bills that tackle environmental and health problems posed by waste, litter and single-use plastic. The bills aim to alter the behavior of what they call a “throwaway society” with bans and taxes to punish use of plastic items that can be used only once, while pushing for incentives for recycling and waste reduction.

“When your food comes to you and it’s in a Styrofoam container, you’re unlikely to say, ‘No, I don’t want it anymore.’ They’re not going to give you the food in your hands, but you’re stuck,” said David Masur, executive director of PennEnvironment, who pushed for the bills. “So we need laws to balance out and have check and balances in a marketplace that often has us putting consumption over the things that are better for [our] planet, our health, our quality of life.”

The “Zero Waste PA” legislative package is led by State Rep. Tim Briggs of Montgomery County. In February, he introduced a bill that prohibits restaurants and stores from dispensing their food in plastic plates, cups, or any other polystyrene container, including Styrofoam — and he wanted to broaden the scope to try to solve the bigger waste and litter issue.

“Recycling is broken in Pennsylvania,” Briggs said at a news conference Wednesday morning in Harrisburg. “If it’s e-waste, if it’s what we recycle [at] the curb going to incinerators, going to the landfills … The whole system needs to be reworked.”

Wilfredo Lee, / The Associated Press Photo

FILE PHOTO: A large soft drink with a plastic straw from a McDonald’s restaurant is shown.

The package includes a bill from Montgomery County Rep. Mary Jo Daley that would prohibit plastic straws from being distributed, except at the request of a customer. Another measure, from Philadelphia Rep. Donna Bullock, would increase fines on illegal dumping. A 2-cent fee on non-reusable plastic bags at big grocery stores was presented by Philadelphia Reps. Brian Sims and Jared Solomon.

A bottle bill that gives 5 cents per container returned was announced by Bucks County Rep. Wendy Ulman. Legislation that would prohibit the distribution of products with packages made with non-recyclable plastics, unless the company selling the item takes the packaging back, was proposed by Chester County Rep. Melissa Shusterman. And a measure that puts a 20-cent deposit on cigarette packs was offered by Philadelphia Rep. Chris Rabb.

“Cigarette litter, 30 percent of all of our litter, is among the most toxic of all commonly littered items, containing a multiple of chemicals,” Rabb said at the news conference. “These chemicals casually tossed into our environment zip into our soil and our water supply. They contaminate our crops, our drinking water, and the animal and fish that we eat.”

Bucks County Rep. Perry Warren announced a bill that would reduce the number of plastic water bottles sent to landfills by requiring newly constructed state buildings and those undergoing renovations to water and pipe infrastructure to install water-bottle filling stations.

Another set of bills presented by Reps. Danielle Friel Otten, Parry Kim, Mary L. Isaacson, and Elizabeth Fiedler seeks to reduce waste by improving recycling and composting, or by increasing the disposal fees at landfills and incinerators.  And a bill from Rep. Mike Zabel of Delaware County calls for implementing best practices for electronic-waste recycling.

Fiedler, who represents a district in South Philadelphia, proposed increasing the disposal fee at municipal waste landfills to $8 per ton from $4, to reduce the amount of trash imported into the state from New York and New Jersey.

“It is important that we address the waste and trash that we produce, and some of these societal norms that we have that result in us producing more and more,” said Fiedler, a former reporter at WHYY. “As we all know, there is no Planet B, so we better take care of the one we have.”

The American Progressive Bag Alliance, representing the plastic-bag industry, has been actively lobbying in Pennsylvania and New Jersey to push back against bans and fees. Its representatives say plastic-bag taxes don’t reduce waste and litter, and instead make groceries more expensive for lower-income communities.

PennEnvironment’s Masur said that even though fees may increase the cost of some items by a few cents, taxpayers also pay the cost for cleaning streets and waterways.

“A lot of the bills we’re talking about today have been test-driven in other states or municipalities,” Masur said. “And I think Pennsylvania can tap into that to ensure that these laws are successful and follow that same track record of reducing our waste in our throwaway society.”

The legislative package is the first step in a journey that could last many years, Masur said. His organization’s next steps are to work for bipartisan support of the bills in the State House, getting partner legislation in the State Senate, and having public hearings that would lead to votes on the existing bills.

 

WHYY is the leading public media station serving the Philadelphia region, including Delaware, South Jersey and Pennsylvania. This story originally appeared on WHYY.org


          Gas, nuclear lobbies butt heads as Senate takes up nuclear-rescue bill      Comment   Translate Page      

Katie Meyer / WITF

Republican Senator Ryan Aument testifies in favor of his bill to save two of Pennsylvania’s five nuclear plants from early retirement.

(Harrisburg) — A bill aimed at saving two of Pennsylvania’s nuclear power plants from early retirement is getting an expectedly mixed reception in the state Senate.

The first committee hearing on the measure Wednesday saw nuclear and natural gas proponents clash over how to make Pennsylvania’s energy markets fair.

The proposal would recognize Pennsylvania’s five nuclear plants as carbon-free energy, and add them to the commonwealth’s Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard.

That law requires electric utilities to buy power from clean sources, like wind and solar. By adding nuclear to the mix, proponents hope to bolster it in a market increasingly dominated by natural gas.

Gas lobbyists argue nuclear plants are already mostly profitable, save Three Mile Island, which has only one reactor.

Marcellus Shale Coalition President Dave Spigelmyer said giving them a leg up is unfair.

“No real reason has been given to pass this legislation, other than we need the money to enhance our profit margin and to charge more for nuclear power,” he said. “This is a battle being waged against your constituents, the rate payer of Pennsylvania.”

The bill is expected to add about $1.53 per month to the average consumer’s electric bill, according to the Public Utility Commission.

Lancaster County Republican Senator Ryan Aument, who’s sponsoring the bill, didn’t dispute that. But he argued that Pennsylvania “will end up paying far more in the future if our nuclear power plants are permitted to prematurely retire.”

He is basing that assessment on an analysis from the Brattle Group, which studied potential impacts of all five of the commonwealth’s nuclear plants shutting down.

The researchers reported that the reduction of in-state energy production would likely drive electric utilities to purchase power from other states at a markup to consumers. That, they estimated, would result in a markup of around $6.6 billion over 10 years — about 37 percent of which would fall on residential customers.

A parallel bill in the House has gotten similar responses.

The Senate version has a few major differences. For one, it includes a provision that requires a nuclear plant to refund money from the AEPS credit if it fails to produce electricity. And it gives non-nuclear resources more opportunity to use the new tier 3 credits — a potential boost to renewables.

That lack of inclusion was a key reason environmental groups balked at the House’s initial proposal. But after the Senate bill was released, a representative for the Natural Resources Defense Council said it was “deeply flawed.”

Without intervention, the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor near Harrisburg is expected to close in September. The Beaver Valley plant outside Pittsburgh faces a 2021 retirement.


          Carnegie Mellon’s Pittsburgh smells app goes nationwide, crowdsourcing where the air is worst      Comment   Translate Page      

Amy Sisk / StateImpact Pennsylvania

Beatrice Dias with Carnegie Mellon University’s CREATE Lab is working with partners in Louisville, Kentucky to build a base of users for Smell MyCity.

Some Allegheny County residents use a smartphone app to report foul smells in their communities, and a new version of that app is now available to the rest of the country.

For three years, people in the Pittsburgh area have documented their experiences with odors with just a few taps of a finger via Smell PGH.

A screen shot of Smell PGH on April 4 shows numerous reports of foul odors in the community.

The app also allows users to view a map showing where others have made reports.

“We wanted to build a sense of community,” said Beatrice Dias, project director at Carnegie Mellon University’s CREATE Lab, which built the app in collaboration with local groups concerned about air quality. “You’re not alone in your experiences with pollution; all your neighbors are experiencing the same thing. That validation and that power of a community voice was important.”

Since 2016, the app has sent more than 20,000 reports to the Allegheny County Health Department, which analyzes them to identify trends.

Now, the lab is rolling out a new version of the app called Smell MyCity for people across the country, with support from the green cleaning products company Seventh Generation.

Anyone in the United States can use the app, but CMU is customizing some features for certain cities. The developers are working first with partners in Louisville, Ky. to build a base of users.

Data from the app is available for anyone to download, and some groups already plan to use it.

Ted Smith, deputy director of the Christina Lee Brown Envirome Institute at the University of Louisville’s medical school said university researchers will compare health data such as hospital admissions to smell reports to identify potential correlations.

“I really do hope that helps residents see that there’s somebody that actually does care about the thing they’re afraid of,” he said. “They’re afraid, potentially, that there’s a toxic emission that could be bad for their health.”

Odors in Louisville tend to come from the area’s rubber industry, coal power plants and a slaughterhouse, he said.

Like in Allegheny County, residents of Louisville can already go online to report bad odors to a local agency responsible for regulating air pollution, but they cannot see the breadth of reports across the community or easily find out what action, if any, officials take in response.

The community is cognizant of pollution problems. Smith said more than 1,000 people took part in a recent study where they carried GPS-enabled inhalers to use during asthma attacks.

“It was a tremendous project that showed us that air pollution was the single biggest predictor of asthma exacerbations,” Smith said.

Before CMU launched the Smell MyCity app, Smith’s high school son used code available online from Smell PGH to build a similar version for Louisville. He later did an internship with the CREATE Lab to help develop the national version.

Dias said the lab is also working with partners in Portland, Ore. and will likely promote the app there next.


          As baby boomers retire, power companies look to build the next generation of workers      Comment   Translate Page      

At a Duquesne Light facility in Pittsburgh, 10 high school students hunched over sheets of paper, pens in hand, as they sketched their dream homes.

“I’m just drawing an A-frame house with a garage on the side, a nice front porch,” said Louis Charlier of Beaver Area High School on a recent Thursday.

The students had to draw their homes from three separate angles: straight on, from the side and a bird’s-eye view. This was a lesson on blueprints, something they will become familiar with if they pursue careers with the electric power company.

The teens arranged their schedules to take this class for a few hours each afternoon for several weeks as part of Duquesne Light’s new student bootcamp.


“They take classes around mathematics, reading comprehension, and we’re also doing soft-skill classes on interview skills, resume-writing, as well as an OSHA 10 class and a CPR class,” said Selenna Gregg, manager of talent acquisition for Duquesne Light.

The bootcamp is a new effort by Duquesne Light, which serves Allegheny and Beaver counties, and the Community College of Allegheny County to prepare students for the Construction and Skilled Trade Selection System exam. Passing the test is the first step in applying for a skilled trade job at the company.

The camp could help shape the next generation of workers tasked with keeping the lights on. New workers for electric power companies and other utilities like natural gas and water are in demand across Pennsylvania and the rest of the country.

“The baby boomers are starting to retire,” said Gladys Brown, chairman of Pennsylvania’s Public Utility Commission.

The PUC estimates 28 percent of the state’s utility workforce will retire in the next five years.

With them goes institutional knowledge that needs to be passed along to new workers, Brown said.

“You need those people to provide for that bridge, that transition to train them,” she said.

While the situation is a challenge for utilities, she said it’s not dire. The PUC keeps close tabs on utilities’ performance to ensure that outages don’t become too frequent and that response times are reasonable.

“We want to make sure you have the appropriate skilled, trained personnel on-hand to deal with providing that reliable service,” Brown said.

Gregg said Duquesne Light has experienced the same retirement trend as the rest of the industry. Its training programs have helped to replace those workers.

Each year, as many as 24 people go through the 10-month electrical distribution technology program at CCAC, which prepares them for careers at Duquesne Light. They could work in the power supplier’s operation center or have a job that takes them into the field installing and repairing lines and other equipment associated with the company’s electricity systems.

Duquesne Light is assisting with drivers education training for bootcamp participants who do not know how to drive. If the students pursue careers with the power utility, they may need to drive bucket trucks, like this one pictured at the utility’s Preble Service Center in July 2018.

Duquesne Light plans to host another bootcamp this summer for high school students, who could go on to the CCAC program when they graduate. The power company is also holding a similar bootcamp for high school teachers.

“If teachers don’t know about the positions or some of the technical things that are out there for their students, they’re not able to talk to their students and share those experiences,” said Debbie Killmeyer, dean of workforce at CCAC.

It was a teacher at Charlier’s school who heard about the bootcamp from a Duquesne Light employee, and suggested he apply.

Charlier said he does not want to go to a traditional college.

“I’d rather just go straight into the workforce, do a trade or something along those lines,” he said.

On Day 2 of the camp, something Charlier heard from one of the company’s executives caught his attention.

“He told us that this job opportunity would be like having a $3-million lottery ticket,” he said.

That’s how much the students could make over the course of their careers if they work for Duquesne Light. Gregg said the starting salary for crafts-related jobs at the company is $65-$85,000, plus overtime.

“There’s plenty of jobs out there that pay really well and you don’t need a 4-year-degree for, and these jobs are needed,” Charlier said.

Power companies from Duquesne Light to First Energy to PECO are active in recruiting new workers, running programs and internships to give prospective employees hands-on experience.

The PUC is working on this issue too, having launched a utility careers campaign to promote the industry to young people, military veterans and others by talking up the positions at job fairs and other events. Brown said the PUC has involved a number of state agencies, schools and utility companies in the effort.

“I was realizing the magnitude of the retirement of our workers in-house, and I said let’s reach out to our utilities because I’m assuming they’re dealing with some of the same things,” she said.

For people considering utility careers, the next step after the Construction and Skilled Trade exam could make it or break it: pole school.

“A lot of people come in and they don’t realize if they’re scared of heights or if they’re able to climb to the top of a pole and then be able to work with their hands,” Gregg said.

Charlier’s not too worried. He’s looking forward to the challenge.

“I did well on all the practice exams, so I feel like I’m going to pass that test,” he said. “I feel like I can climb a pole.”


          'Uncharted Waters': Union Tells Hollywood Writers To Fire Their Agents       Comment   Translate Page      
Writers Guild of America West President David Goodman speaks in Los Angeles at the 2019 union award ceremony. The WGA instructed is writers to fire their agents on Friday.

Writers Guild of America West President David Goodman speaks in Los Angeles at the 2019 union award ceremony. The WGA instructed is writers to fire their agents on Friday.; Credit: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Sasha Ingber | NPR

Thousands of Hollywood writers have been told by the Writers Guild of America to fire their agents — a drastic move that could impinge the production of new TV shows and films.

The abrupt directive on Friday followed a breakdown in negotiations over proposed changes to the agreement that has guided the basic business relationship between writers and agents for the past 43 years.

With talks stalled ahead of a midnight deadline, the WGA sent its 13,000 writers an email with instructions to notify their agents in writing that they cannot represent them until signing a new code of conduct.

"We know that, together, we are about to enter uncharted waters," the message stated. "Life that deviates from the current system might be various degrees of disorienting. But it has become clear that a big change is necessary."

It was a bold move for a group accustomed to writing its own scripts. "I guess the idea of taking on our agents is something people never thought we would do," said David Goodman, the president of the Writers Guild of America West, in an interview with NPR.

"Studios and networks still need writers to do the work so until agents figure out that they need us more than we need them, we will carry this out," said Goodman.

At the center of the conflict is a complaint among writers that their agents are not just drastically out-earning them, but preventing them from receiving better pay. The dispute threatens to hinder production at a time when the major broadcast networks are typically staffing up for their fall lineups. It could also lead to job losses in the industry.

"This whole fight is really about the fact that in a period of unprecedented profits and growth of our business ... writers themselves are actually earning less," said Goodman.

A main point of contention involves what are known as packaging fees, the money that agents get from a studio when they provide a roster of talent for a film or TV project. Traditionally, agents would earn a 10 percent commission for the work their clients receive from a studio. But with packaging fees, they are compensated by the studios directly. "They are not incentivized to increase the income of those writers," Goodman said.

Writers are also protesting a shift in the business model in recent years at some of Hollywood's largest talent agencies. Agents have increasingly entered the film and TV businesses as producers, and writers contend that such a dual-hat arrangement represents a conflict of interest.

Goodman said that in order to break the impasse, the industry needs to return "to the traditional agent-writer relationship" where an agent takes 10 percent of a writer's income.

On Saturday, some writers posted images of the letters they had signed and sent to their agents, showing solidarity if not total support.

"I have an amazing agency that represents me," screenwriter, actor and comedian Patton Oswalt said on Twitter. "But I have an even better guild which stands for me."

"Dammit," wrote David Simon, a Baltimore-based author and television writer best known for The Wire. "Just realized that the [agency agreement] midnight deadline is PST. So I have to stay up another three hours and one minute to send a pic of my naked a** to [the Creative Artists Agency]."

The Association of Talent Agents, which represents the agencies, has promised more transparency when agencies are involved in the production of a film or TV show. The association committed to reopening talks on the issue after two years if the Writers Guild determines that members aren't benefiting.

The association also offered concessions leading up to Friday's breakdown, including a chance to share 80 percent of "a percentage" of their profits when packaging fees for a television series are involved.

The guild said that based on the offer they received from agents, that "percentage" amounted to 0.8 percent of the money agents make from packaging fees.

ATA also said agencies would spend $6 million over six years to foster a more inclusive environment and insisted they "are, and always have been, on the side of the writer."

In a statement, Karen Stuart, the executive director of the ATA, said Friday's failure "was driven by the Guild's predetermined course for chaos." She said it would ultimately harm artists.

"The WGA is mandating a 'Code of Conduct' that will hurt all artists, delivering an especially painful blow to mid-level and emerging writers, while dictating how agencies of all sizes should function."

Goodman said writers are already hurt. He called the proposal "a ridiculous offer given the fact that the writers are the reason that any television show succeeds."

Until the impasse is solved, members of the Guild have told writers they could turn to managers or lawyers to handle their business affairs.

Lawyers for the ATA threatened to sue the guild, contending that the union was violating California and New York licensing laws. As part of its argument, it said in a letter that the union "cannot 'delegate' authority it does not have."

Friday's breakdown in negotiations marked just the latest chapter in the Writers Guild's longstanding aversion to packaging fees. Goodman said the union sought reforms as far back as the 1970s.

"People are saying this is an unprecedented move, but it isn't in the sense that 43 years ago we tried to get rid of packaging and we failed and now it's gotten much worse," Goodman said.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


          Whistleblower Protections Key Tool To Investigators Probing Waste And Abuse Of Power       Comment   Translate Page      
In this March 24, 2019 photo, The White House is seen behind security barriers in Washington. A White House official turned whistleblower says dozens of people in President Donald Trump's administration were granted access to classified information despite "disqualifying issues" in their backgrounds including concerns about foreign influence, drug use and criminal conduct.

In this March 24, 2019 photo, The White House is seen behind security barriers in Washington. A White House official turned whistleblower says dozens of people in President Donald Trump's administration were granted access to classified information despite "disqualifying issues" in their backgrounds including concerns about foreign influence, drug use and criminal conduct.; Credit: Cliff Owen/AP

Tim Mak | NPR

Civil servant Tricia Newbold recently became a whistleblower, approaching a federal government watchdog and Congress to report senior officials overturning security clearance denials for White House staff.

She is protected from retaliation under the Whistleblower Protection Act, which marks its 30th anniversary this week. Since the law was enacted the number of people exposing government wrongdoing has gone up — and so has bipartisan support for protecting those who speak out.

But it's not without its risks. Robert MacLean was a federal air marshal in 2003 when he told the public that the Transportation Security Agency cancelled air marshal coverage on long-haul flights to cover budget shortfalls.

"Everybody in my neighborhood and my family thought I was insane, and I was fighting a futile fight," he told NPR. "It's infuriating because you know what the truth is. And the officials know what the truth is. But they're going to ignore you."

The TSA reversed its position, but it also fired him for releasing information about the threats to U.S. aviation. MacLean fought it, winning a Supreme Court battle for reinstatement in 2015. Then he was fired again this year.

If a whistleblower reports waste, fraud, abuse, illegality, or threats to public health or safety, they have legal rights.

The last three decades have seen a number of notable and sometimes controversial whistleblowers, such as Dr. David Graham, a researcher at the Food and Drug Administration who said his agency had ignored warnings that the painkiller Vioxx had lethal side effects; and Franz Gayl, a Marine corps whistleblower who raised the alarm about troops lacking properly armored vehicles that would protect them from IEDs. In both cases the government was forced to change their policies.

As the legal director of the Government Accountability Project, a nonpartisan law firm that aids whistleblowers, Tom Devine has worked with about 7,000 of them over the last 40 years.

He helps these individuals tell their stories by providing them a legal defense — and says he sees one similar trait in their motivations for going public.

"The common characteristic is that they have to act on their knowledge in order to be true to themselves," Devine said. "If they don't, what they concealed is something that will be haunting them like a cancer in their soul for the rest of their lives, particularly if there's some consequences from them not speaking out."

And more are choosing to speak out. The number of reports against waste, fraud and abuses at federal agencies has increased dramatically over the last thirty years.

The Office of Special Counsel, an independent agency unrelated to Special Counsel Robert Mueller, is tasked with protecting federal whistleblowers from retaliation.

In 1988, the office received just 120 whistleblower disclosures. Last year, the OSC received 1,559 new cases — the fifth year they have received more than 1,500.

"When I first came to the Government Accountability Project whistleblowers were generally considered nutty or traitors betraying their colleagues," Devine said. "Now whistleblowers are lionized as the public's eyes and ears."

And as the cultural view towards whistleblowers have changed, so have the legal protections, which have been updated over the past 30 years and most recently in 2012.

Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., who chairs the Oversight subcommittee that has jurisdiction over the law, says it's essential for keeping government honest.

"I'm glad we have it. I think it is an important tool in accountability," he told NPR.

At a time when the left and right can't seem to agree on legislative priorities or even which topics are worth congressional investigation, they both agree on whistleblower protection — but for different reasons.

Pete Sepp, from the conservative National Taxpayers Union, explains that, "as a fiscal conservative whistleblower protection means taxpayer protection." But Shanna DeVine, from the progressive advocacy group Public Citizen, told NPR that "whistleblowers are the public's eyes and ears to abuses of power that betray the public trust."

It's this broad consensus, formed by different ideological justifications, that is the strongest assurance of keeping or even strengthening these safeguards in years to come.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


          Trump Administration To Allow 2,700 Central American Children Into The U.S.      Comment   Translate Page      
Ana Garcia (left) and her daughter Genesis Amaya of Valley Stream, N.Y., were reunited through the Central American Minors program in 2016 before President Trump terminated the program.

Ana Garcia (left) and her daughter Genesis Amaya of Valley Stream, N.Y., were reunited through the Central American Minors program in 2016 before President Trump terminated the program.; Credit: Claudia Torrens/AP

Richard Gonzales | NPR

The Trump administration has agreed to settle a lawsuit with a dozen Central American families who challenged the government's cancellation of a program that was designed to reunite children in that region with their parents living in the U.S.

As a result, some 2,700 children living in Central America may be allowed to enter the U.S. at a time when the Trump administration is actively trying to dissuade other migrants from attempting to come to this country.

The program, called the Central American Minors program, was initiated during the Obama administration in 2014 in response to a surge of unaccompanied minors who sought to join their parents. Minors in Central America who had parents residing legally in the U.S. were eligible to apply for permanent residence as refugees, or for parole — a designation allowing someone to legally reside in the U.S. Over 1,335 minors arrived in the United States, according to a 2018 court order.

That order followed the Trump administration's termination of the program in August 2017. The government also rescinded parole for about 2,700 minors who already had been conditionally approved, but had not yet traveled to the U.S.

The International Refugee Assistance Project and the law firm Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP, filed suit on behalf of the families whose children essentially were in the pipeline when the administration canceled the program. The plaintiffs alleged that there was a "secret shutdown" of the program in the early days of the Trump administration, even as the government continued to solicit and accept funds from applicants to pay for medical examinations and travel to the U.S.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler ruled in December 2018 that the administration's mass revocation of the conditional approvals for the minors was illegal. In a March 1 ruling, she ordered the government to resume processing the children. But she did not compel the Department of Homeland Security to "reach any particular outcome with respect to the processing of any individual beneficiary."

Under the terms of the settlement, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service "agrees to process the approximately 2,700 individuals who were conditionally approved for parole prior to the CAM Parole program's termination and then issued rescission notices, as well as any later born children who are classified as add-ons."

According to a statement announcing the settlement, the International Refugee Assistance Project said, "The government anticipates most applicants will be approved for parole and allowed to travel to the U.S."

One plaintiff, identified in court documents only as "S.A.," had applied on behalf of her daughter and grandchild.

"My heart jumps and cries for joy because there are so many who need to escape danger. I have faith that I will be together with my daughter and grandson soon," she said in the IRAP statement.

"We are so pleased that after many years apart our clients will finally have the opportunity to reunite with each other in safety," said IRAP Litigation Staff Attorney Linda Evarts.

The Justice Department did not immediately respond to an email request for comment.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


          Viral Stars, The 'Syncopated Ladies,' Shake Up Tap Dancing      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with tap dancer Chloe Arnold, of the Syncopated Ladies, about their viral dance videos and annual tap festival.
                Comment   Translate Page      
Ts
Ts
Ts
Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits
New York Declares Health Emergency As Measles Spreads In Parts Of Brooklyn
How Probiotics Can Change Your Child's Life
Stop Calling Them Soft Skills; They're Essential Skills
Study: New parents experience sleep deprivation for up to 6 years
Parents, Going to Every One of Your Kids' Games Matters More Than You Know
How parenting can influence children’s eating habits
Explain this tutoring thing to me, please

          Nephew Of Robert E. Lee Grapples With Legacy Of American Race Relations In New Book      Comment   Translate Page      
Robert W. Lee tells NPR's Michel Martin what it's like to grapple with the legacy of his ancestor, Confederate General Robert E. Lee. He wrote about this in a memoir, "A Sin by Any Other Name."
          Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf On Trump And 'Sanctuary Cities' - NPR      Comment   Translate Page      
  1. Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf On Trump And 'Sanctuary Cities'  NPR
  2. Trump and Oakland mayor trade Twitter barbs over immigration policies  Fox News
  3. Oakland Mayor Duels With Trump Over Migrants: 'Oakland Welcomes All'  The Daily Beast
  4. View full coverage on Google News

          Writers Guild Of America Tells Writers To Fire Their Agents After Talks Fail - NPR      Comment   Translate Page      
Writers Guild Of America Tells Writers To Fire Their Agents After Talks Fail  NPR

Thousands of Hollywood writers have been told by the Writers Guild of America to fire their agents — a drastic move that could impinge the production of new TV ...

View full coverage on Google News
          The Wait Is Almost Over For The (Almost) Full Mueller Report To Be Released       Comment   Translate Page      
After a letter detailing the special counsel's principal findings — which the GOP saw as a vindication for Trump — the attorney general is expected to release the lengthy report, with redactions.
          The Wait Is Almost Over For The (Almost) Full Mueller Report To Be Released       Comment   Translate Page      
After a letter detailing the special counsel's principal findings — which the GOP saw as a vindication for Trump — the attorney general is expected to release the lengthy report, with redactions.
          'I Love You, But You're Wrong,' And Other Salvos On The Front Lines Of Civility      Comment   Translate Page      
Don't talk politics with strangers, we're told. But these days, conversations with even those closest to us can be fraught. How are friends, families keeping things civil across the political divide?
          Pete Buttigieg Helped Transform South Bend As Mayor, But Some Feel Left Out      Comment   Translate Page      
On the campaign trail he talks a lot about how being mayor since 2012 of the once-industrial city in northern Indiana has prepared him to be president of the United States.
          Noah's Wife Gets A Name In 'Naamah'      Comment   Translate Page      
Sarah Blake's new book retells the biblical flood from the point of view of Noah's wife — who never has a name in the Bible, but who nevertheless helped humanity (and all those animals) survive.
          Watch BTS Further Its Quest For World Domination On The 'SNL' Stage      Comment   Translate Page      
The multilingual boy-band juggernaut, SNL's first musical guest from South Korea, performed kinetically choreographed renditions of "Boy With Luv" and "MIC Drop."
          Sweden And Assange      Comment   Translate Page      
Staffan Sonning of Sweden's Sveriges Radio talks about proposals to extradite Julian Assange to Sweden, years after Swedish prosecutors issued an arrest warrant on rape allegations.
          'Stockholm': A Hostage Situation And How 'Stockholm Syndrome' Came To Be      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to Noomi Rapace about her latest film, Stockholm, which covers the hostage situation that coined the term "Stockholm syndrome."
          Peeling Back The Reasons Behind The Onion Shortage      Comment   Translate Page      
Weather issues in the U.S. and elsewhere have contributed to an onion shortage. NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with Shay Myers, is a third-generation farmer growing onions in Idaho and Oregon.
          Hollywood Writers Vs. Agents      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to writer and producer Keli Goff about members of the Writers Guild of America being told to fire their agents en masse.
          How Philadelphia Mandated Vaccinations In 1991      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Dr. Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, about the last time the U.S. mandated measles vaccinations.
          U.N. Envoy To Libya On Situation On The Ground      Comment   Translate Page      
As fighting continues outside Libya's capital, NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Ghassan Salamé, U.N. envoy to Libya about what the international community is doing to negotiate a ceasefire.
          Detained Immigrants Organize Hunger Strikes      Comment   Translate Page      
In 2019 alone, detained immigrants have organized hunger strikes in at least seven different detention facilities across the U.S.
          Assessing The Democratic Presidential Field From South Carolina      Comment   Translate Page      
In the last couple decades, South Carolina has emerged as an important early state primary. NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to Jaime Harrison, associate chairman of the Democratic National Committee.
          How The Rock 'N Play Baby Sleeper Became Popular And Why It Was Recalled      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with baby sleep consultant and author Alexis Dubief about the recall of Fisher-Price's Rock 'n Play sleepers, which have had a devoted following among parents.
          Get Paid To Stay In Bed, For Space Science      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Jennifer Ngo-Anh of the European Space Agency about their planned study during which subjects will stay in bed for two months.
          Orioles' Chris Davis Ends Hitless Streak      Comment   Translate Page      
Chris Davis of the Baltimore Orioles on Saturday succeeded breaking out of his 0-for-54 hitless streak.
          Sudanese Activist On What Comes Next      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to Sudanese activist and protester Mayada Hassanain about President Omar al-Bashir being ousted and women's roles in the protests.
          Sunday Politics: Mueller Report Expectations      Comment   Translate Page      
This week, Congress and the public await the expected release of the Mueller report — or at least what Attorney General William Barr is willing to let them see.
          Sunday Puzzle: A Piece Of Cake      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer and Weekend Edition puzzlemaster Will Shortz play a word game with WAMU listener Ryan Saunders of Washington, D.C.
          How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?      Comment   Translate Page      
Software that can replace doctors for certain tasks has a big responsibility. The Food and Drug Administration is now figuring out how to determine when computer algorithms are safe and effective.
          Get Paid To Stay In Bed, For Space Science      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Jennifer Ngo-Anh of the European Space Agency about their planned study during which subjects will stay in bed for two months.
          3 Decades In, Bruce Hornsby's Style Is Constantly Evolving       Comment   Translate Page      
The Grammy-winning pianist and composer branches out from his soundtrack work to create his latest album, Absolute Zero.
          Watch BTS Further Its Quest For World Domination On The 'SNL' Stage      Comment   Translate Page      
The multilingual boy-band juggernaut, SNL's first musical guest from South Korea, performed kinetically choreographed renditions of "Boy With Luv" and "MIC Drop."
          How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?      Comment   Translate Page      
Software that can replace doctors for certain tasks has a big responsibility. The Food and Drug Administration is now figuring out how to determine when computer algorithms are safe and effective.
          With Indian Elections Underway, The Vote Is Also A Referendum On Hindu Nationalism      Comment   Translate Page      
Many see India's election as a turning point in which the country may seek to redefine itself via Hinduism, its majority faith. Secularism has become "a four-letter word," says one expert.
          'Debatable' List Of '100 Most Jewish' Foods Leaves Plenty Of Room For Kibbitzing      Comment   Translate Page      
As families around the country fill their freezers with matzo balls and gefilte fish in preparation for the coming Passover Seder, a new book asks: What does it mean for a food to be Jewish?
          'I Love You, But You're Wrong,' And Other Salvos On The Front Lines Of Civility      Comment   Translate Page      
Don't talk politics with strangers, we're told. But these days, conversations with even those closest to us can be fraught. How are friends, families keeping things civil across the political divide?
          Pete Buttigieg Helped Transform South Bend As Mayor, But Some Feel Left Out      Comment   Translate Page      
On the campaign trail he talks a lot about how being mayor since 2012 of the once-industrial city in northern Indiana has prepared him to be president of the United States.
          Get Paid To Stay In Bed, For Space Science      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Jennifer Ngo-Anh of the European Space Agency about their planned study during which subjects will stay in bed for two months.
          Sweden And Assange      Comment   Translate Page      
Staffan Sonning of Sweden's Sveriges Radio talks about proposals to extradite Julian Assange to Sweden, years after Swedish prosecutors issued an arrest warrant on rape allegations.
          'Stockholm': A Hostage Situation And How 'Stockholm Syndrome' Came To Be      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to Noomi Rapace about her latest film, Stockholm, which covers the hostage situation that coined the term "Stockholm syndrome."
          Peeling Back The Reasons Behind The Onion Shortage      Comment   Translate Page      
Weather issues in the U.S. and elsewhere have contributed to an onion shortage. NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with Shay Myers, is a third-generation farmer growing onions in Idaho and Oregon.
          Hollywood Writers Vs. Agents      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to writer and producer Keli Goff about members of the Writers Guild of America being told to fire their agents en masse.
          How Philadelphia Mandated Vaccinations In 1991      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Dr. Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, about the last time the U.S. mandated measles vaccinations.
          U.N. Envoy To Libya On Situation On The Ground      Comment   Translate Page      
As fighting continues outside Libya's capital, NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Ghassan Salamé, U.N. envoy to Libya about what the international community is doing to negotiate a ceasefire.
          Detained Immigrants Organize Hunger Strikes      Comment   Translate Page      
In 2019 alone, detained immigrants have organized hunger strikes in at least seven different detention facilities across the U.S.
          Assessing The Democratic Presidential Field From South Carolina      Comment   Translate Page      
In the last couple decades, South Carolina has emerged as an important early state primary. NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to Jaime Harrison, associate chairman of the Democratic National Committee.
          How The Rock 'N Play Baby Sleeper Became Popular And Why It Was Recalled      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with baby sleep consultant and author Alexis Dubief about the recall of Fisher-Price's Rock 'n Play sleepers, which have had a devoted following among parents.
          Get Paid To Stay In Bed, For Space Science      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Jennifer Ngo-Anh of the European Space Agency about their planned study during which subjects will stay in bed for two months.
          Orioles' Chris Davis Ends Hitless Streak      Comment   Translate Page      
Chris Davis of the Baltimore Orioles on Saturday succeeded breaking out of his 0-for-54 hitless streak.
          Sudanese Activist On What Comes Next      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to Sudanese activist and protester Mayada Hassanain about President Omar al-Bashir being ousted and women's roles in the protests.
          Sunday Puzzle: A Piece Of Cake      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer and Weekend Edition puzzlemaster Will Shortz play a word game with WAMU listener Ryan Saunders of Washington, D.C.
          How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?      Comment   Translate Page      
Software that can replace doctors for certain tasks has a big responsibility. The Food and Drug Administration is now figuring out how to determine when computer algorithms are safe and effective.
          3 Decades In, Bruce Hornsby's Style Is Constantly Evolving       Comment   Translate Page      
The Grammy-winning pianist and composer branches out from his soundtrack work to create his latest album, Absolute Zero.
          3 Decades In, Bruce Hornsby's Style Is Constantly Evolving       Comment   Translate Page      
The Grammy-winning pianist and composer branches out from his soundtrack work to create his latest album, Absolute Zero.
          How The Rock 'N Play Baby Sleeper Became Popular And Why It Was Recalled      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with baby sleep consultant and author Alexis Dubief about the recall of Fisher-Price's Rock 'n Play sleepers, which have had a devoted following among parents.
          Democratic Candidate Pete Buttigieg Leans On Record South Bend Mayor - NPR      Comment   Translate Page      
  1. Democratic Candidate Pete Buttigieg Leans On Record South Bend Mayor  NPR
  2. SE Cupp has a message to GOP resisting LGBTQ progress  CNN
  3. How Mayor Pete Started to Look Presidential  POLITICO
  4. Rob Smith: I’m gay and support Mike Pence – don’t believe Pete Buttigieg’s claim that Pence is anti-gay  Fox News
  5. An early spotter of 'Mayor Pete's' rising star  Los Angeles Times
  6. View full coverage on Google News

          'Stockholm': A Hostage Situation And How 'Stockholm Syndrome' Came To Be      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Sweden And Assange      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Limericks      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit PETER SAGAL, HOST: Coming up, it's Lightning Fill In The Blank. But first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT - that's 1-888-924-8924 - or click the contact us link on our website. That's waitwait.npr.org. You can there find out about attending our weekly live shows back at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago and our upcoming shows in St. Louis on May 9 and July 18 at the Blossom Music Center in Ohio. And if you want to experience the thrill of our show without the hassle of listening to it, check out... (LAUGHTER) SAGAL: ...Our new interactive quiz for your smart speaker. Just say open the Wait Wait Quiz, and Bill and I will be there to ask you some fill-in-the-blank questions. You can even win the voice of your choice on your voicemail. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME. T J: Hey. This is T.J. (ph) calling in from Waterbury, Vt. SAGAL: Hey.
          Sunday Politics: Mueller Report Expectations      Comment   Translate Page      
This week, Congress and the public await the expected release of the Mueller report — or at least what Attorney General William Barr is willing to let them see.
          Assessing The Democratic Presidential Field From South Carolina      Comment   Translate Page      
In the last couple decades, South Carolina has emerged as an important early state primary. NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to Jaime Harrison, associate chairman of the Democratic National Committee.
          Sunday Politics: Mueller Report Expectations      Comment   Translate Page      
This week, Congress and the public await the expected release of the Mueller report — or at least what Attorney General William Barr is willing to let them see.
          'I Love You, But You're Wrong,' And Other Salvos On The Front Lines Of Civility      Comment   Translate Page      
Don't talk politics with strangers, we're told. But these days, conversations with even those closest to us can be fraught. How are friends, families keeping things civil across the political divide?
          Pete Buttigieg Helped Transform South Bend As Mayor, But Some Feel Left Out      Comment   Translate Page      
On the campaign trail he talks a lot about how being mayor since 2012 of the once-industrial city in northern Indiana has prepared him to be president of the United States.
          The Wait Is Almost Over For The (Almost) Full Mueller Report To Be Released       Comment   Translate Page      
After a letter detailing the special counsel's principal findings — which the GOP saw as a vindication for Trump — the attorney general is expected to release the lengthy report, with redactions.
          'Stockholm': A Hostage Situation And How 'Stockholm Syndrome' Came To Be      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to Noomi Rapace about her latest film, Stockholm, which covers the hostage situation that coined the term "Stockholm syndrome."
          Hollywood Writers Vs. Agents      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to writer and producer Keli Goff about members of the Writers Guild of America being told to fire their agents en masse.
          'Uncharted Waters': Union Tells Hollywood Writers To Fire Their Agents       Comment   Translate Page      
The abrupt directive on Friday followed a breakdown in talks over proposed changes to the agreement that has guided the basic business relationship between writers and agents for the past 43 years.
          How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?      Comment   Translate Page      
Software that can replace doctors for certain tasks has a big responsibility. The Food and Drug Administration is now figuring out how to determine when computer algorithms are safe and effective.
          Peeling Back The Reasons Behind The Onion Shortage      Comment   Translate Page      
Weather issues in the U.S. and elsewhere have contributed to an onion shortage. NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with Shay Myers, is a third-generation farmer growing onions in Idaho and Oregon.
          How The Rock 'N Play Baby Sleeper Became Popular And Why It Was Recalled      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with baby sleep consultant and author Alexis Dubief about the recall of Fisher-Price's Rock 'n Play sleepers, which have had a devoted following among parents.
          Detained Immigrants Organize Hunger Strikes      Comment   Translate Page      
In 2019 alone, detained immigrants have organized hunger strikes in at least seven different detention facilities across the U.S.
          'I Love You, But You're Wrong,' And Other Salvos On The Front Lines Of Civility      Comment   Translate Page      
Don't talk politics with strangers, we're told. But these days, conversations with even those closest to us can be fraught. How are friends, families keeping things civil across the political divide?
          Pete Buttigieg Helped Transform South Bend As Mayor, But Some Feel Left Out      Comment   Translate Page      
On the campaign trail he talks a lot about how being mayor since 2012 of the once-industrial city in northern Indiana has prepared him to be president of the United States.
          How To Keep Things Civil (Or Not) When It Comes To Politics - NPR      Comment   Translate Page      
How To Keep Things Civil (Or Not) When It Comes To Politics  NPR

Don't talk politics with strangers, we're told. But these days, conversations with even those closest to us can be fraught. How are friends, families keeping things ...


          Sunday Puzzle: A Piece Of Cake      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer and Weekend Edition puzzlemaster Will Shortz play a word game with WAMU listener Ryan Saunders of Washington, D.C.
          After Decades Of Comics, 'Cathy' Cartoonist Found Writing 'So Liberating'      Comment   Translate Page      
Cathy Guisewite drew her comic strip for more than 30 years. Her new book is called Fifty Things that Aren't My Fault. Writing essays "was like coming home and taking off the Spanx," she says.
          Noah's Wife Gets A Name In 'Naamah'      Comment   Translate Page      
Sarah Blake's new book retells the biblical flood from the point of view of Noah's wife — who never has a name in the Bible, but who nevertheless helped humanity (and all those animals) survive.
          The Influence Of American Jewish Attitudes On Israeli Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
Following the re-election of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Nadine Epstein, editor-in-chief of Moment Magazine, about the American Jewish community's impact on Israeli politics.
          Hollywood Writers Vs. Agents      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to writer and producer Keli Goff about members of the Writers Guild of America being told to fire their agents en masse.
          How The Rock 'N Play Baby Sleeper Became Popular And Why It Was Recalled      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with baby sleep consultant and author Alexis Dubief about the recall of Fisher-Price's Rock 'n Play sleepers, which have had a devoted following among parents.
          'Uncharted Waters': Union Tells Hollywood Writers To Fire Their Agents       Comment   Translate Page      
The abrupt directive on Friday followed a breakdown in talks over proposed changes to the agreement that has guided the basic business relationship between writers and agents for the past 43 years.
          With Indian Elections Underway, The Vote Is Also A Referendum On Hindu Nationalism - NPR      Comment   Translate Page      
  1. With Indian Elections Underway, The Vote Is Also A Referendum On Hindu Nationalism  NPR
  2. How Narendra Modi has tried to co-opt Bollywood to push his cult of personality  Telegraph.co.uk
  3. India’s election is a remarkable exercise in democracy; but can violence be kept in the margins?  The Independent
  4. View full coverage on Google News

          Sunday Puzzle: A Piece Of Cake      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer and Weekend Edition puzzlemaster Will Shortz play a word game with WAMU listener Ryan Saunders of Washington, D.C.
          How The Rock 'N Play Baby Sleeper Became Popular And Why It Was Recalled      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with baby sleep consultant and author Alexis Dubief about the recall of Fisher-Price's Rock 'n Play sleepers, which have had a devoted following among parents.
          Peeling Back The Reasons Behind The Onion Shortage      Comment   Translate Page      
Weather issues in the U.S. and elsewhere have contributed to an onion shortage. NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with Shay Myers, is a third-generation farmer growing onions in Idaho and Oregon.
          Detained Immigrants Organize Hunger Strikes      Comment   Translate Page      
In 2019 alone, detained immigrants have organized hunger strikes in at least seven different detention facilities across the U.S.
          'I Love You, But You're Wrong,' And Other Salvos On The Front Lines Of Civility      Comment   Translate Page      
Don't talk politics with strangers, we're told. But these days, conversations with even those closest to us can be fraught. How are friends, families keeping things civil across the political divide?
          Pete Buttigieg Helped Transform South Bend As Mayor, But Some Feel Left Out      Comment   Translate Page      
On the campaign trail he talks a lot about how being mayor since 2012 of the once-industrial city in northern Indiana has prepared him to be president of the United States.
          How Philadelphia Mandated Vaccinations In 1991      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Dr. Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, about the last time the U.S. mandated measles vaccinations.
          How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?      Comment   Translate Page      
Software that can replace doctors for certain tasks has a big responsibility. The Food and Drug Administration is now figuring out how to determine when computer algorithms are safe and effective.
          How Philadelphia Mandated Vaccinations In 1991      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Hollywood Writers Vs. Agents      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Peeling Back The Reasons Behind The Onion Shortage      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          'Stockholm': A Hostage Situation And How 'Stockholm Syndrome' Came To Be      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Sweden And Assange      Comment   Translate Page      
Staffan Sonning of Sweden's Sveriges Radio talks about proposals to extradite Julian Assange to Sweden, years after Swedish prosecutors issued an arrest warrant on rape allegations.
          How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?      Comment   Translate Page      
When Merdis Wells visited the diabetes clinic at the University Medical Center in New Orleans about a year ago, a nurse practitioner checked her eyes to look for signs of diabetic retinopathy, the most common cause of blindness. At her next visit, in February of this year, artificial intelligence software made the call. The clinic had just installed a system that's designed to identify patients who need follow-up attention. The Food and Drug Administration cleared the system — called IDx-DR — for use in 2018. The agency said it was the first time it had authorized the marketing of a device that makes a screening decision without a clinician having to get involved in the interpretation. It's a harbinger of things to come. Companies are rapidly developing software to supplement or even replace doctors for certain tasks. And the FDA, accustomed to approving drugs and clearing medical devices, is now figuring out how to make sure computer algorithms are safe and effective. Wells was one of
          With Indian Elections Underway, The Vote Is Also A Referendum On Hindu Nationalism      Comment   Translate Page      
Indian elections are often called the world's largest exercise in democracy. This month, nearly 900 million voters are eligible to cast ballots in national elections that started Thursday and will continue for more than five weeks. They are deciding whether or not to re-elect Prime Minister Narendra Modi and members of his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, or BJP. Their votes will also make clear the country's level of support for a growing trend in India's politics: Hindu nationalism. "The shape of India is at stake," says Milan Vaishnav, who directs the South Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment in Washington, D.C. "One of the important things this election is going to determine is India's future as a secular republic that embraces pluralism and adheres to the founders' notion that India's unity is strengthened by its diversity." Modi's record has been mixed: In his five years in office, India's economy has grown robustly , but unemployment has also risen to a 40-year high. There was
          'Debatable' List Of '100 Most Jewish' Foods Leaves Plenty Of Room For Kibbitzing      Comment   Translate Page      
It's hard to talk about Jewish culture without talking about food. The bagels, the brisket, the babka. Oh, the babka. Ask anyone who is spending this weekend filling their freezer with matzo balls for the upcoming Passover Seder, and they'll tell you that food is intertwined with Jewish culture and history — to the point,where it can become a theology in and of itself, the stage on which all sorts of Jewish values are performed. It's not surprising to learn that the code of Jewish law is called the Shulchan Aruch — the set table. And that the commentary on the book is the Mappah — the tablecloth. But that said, what exactly does it mean for a food to be Jewish ? Alana Newhouse, editor of Tablet Magazine , the online journal which brands itself as a new read on Jewish life, attempts to answer this question (or operate from the place of having answered it) with a newly published book, The 100 Most Jewish Foods: A Highly Debatable List . In a series of short essays, contributors wax on
          'I Love You, But You're Wrong,' And Other Salvos On The Front Lines Of Civility      Comment   Translate Page      
A lawyer and her future son-in-law argue furiously about politics on Facebook, each accusing the other of ignoring "the facts." A newly married couple gets into an uncomfortably heated argument as they watch the confirmation hearings of then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, until one finally leaves the room. "I love you, but you're wrong," she says. A Mexican-American college student argues with her Trump-supporting mother — also Mexican-American — about how she could possibly accept the idea of a border wall. These, of course, are not isolated stories: Political differences can drive a wedge through even the closest families and friendships. A 2017 Reuters/Ipsos poll found that 13 percent of respondents said the 2016 election had caused them to end a relationship with a friend or relative. Nearly 40 percent said the election had provoked at least one argument with a loved one. More broadly, Americans say they're worried that the United States is growing more polarized and that
          Pete Buttigieg Helped Transform South Bend As Mayor, But Some Feel Left Out      Comment   Translate Page      
When Molly Hewitt left South Bend, Ind., for college, she didn't think she'd return to live there again. Since the 1960s, the city had suffered the same brain drain that plagued many other Midwestern cities faced with industrial decline. "The goal was always to be successful enough that you don't have to come back to South Bend," she said. But while she was away, things were turning around. Hewitt's parents kept her in the loop and she decided to give another chance to the city led by Democratic mayor Pete Buttigieg. "I came back, honestly because of Pete and I've seen a lot of my friends do that and a lot of people who didn't grow up here that want to come to South Bend," she said. Now Hewitt is 23, living in South Bend and volunteering for the campaign of James Mueller , the candidate Buttigieg endorsed to replace him in this year's mayoral election. Buttigieg, 37, is running for president . He's expected to officially announce his candidacy on Sunday. On the campaign trail he speaks
          The Wait Is Almost Over For The (Almost) Full Mueller Report To Be Released       Comment   Translate Page      
Democrats in Congress and an overwhelming majority of the American public are eagerly awaiting the expected release this week of the Mueller report. First came the wait for special counsel Robert Mueller to conclude his investigation on Russia's interference in the 2016 presidential election . That happened three weeks ago — but after Attorney General William Barr released a four-page summary of the nearly 400-page report, there's been a new anticipation — and growing acrimony — for the report to be released to members of Congress and the public. But even when it is, it's unlikely the politically divisive debate that's been the hallmark of President Trump's tenure in office will be resolved. Barr's initial summary letter on March 24, two days after Mueller delivered his report to the new attorney general, was met with glee from the White House, as he wrote that the lengthy investigation did not find that the Trump campaign "conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to
          The Influence Of American Jewish Attitudes On Israeli Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Finally today, let's talk about tap dance. And we're not talking about politicians trying to get out of answering hard questions. And we're not even talking about another image you might have of old guys in tuxedos from the 1940s. No, we're talking about the Syncopated Ladies, an all-female tap squad that has become an Internet sensation for their tight moves set to popular music, think Prince and Beyonce. (SOUNDBITE OF SYNCOPATED LADIES PERFORMANCE) MARTIN: You might have caught them on the TV show "So You Think You Can Dance" or featured on Beyonce's home page. Two sisters, Maud and Chloe Arnold, founded the group. They're here in Washington, D.C., this weekend for their annual concert and showcase. So we thought this was a good time to hear more about the group and how they're changing the look of tap. And Chloe Arnold is with us now to represent both sisters. And she's with us now. Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. CHLOE ARNOLD: Thank you Michel. I'm
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Over the course of just two weeks, two longtime autocratic rulers have been driven from power - Omar al-Bashir in Sudan and Abdelaziz Bouteflika in Algeria. In both cases, the question now is, what comes next? And will these countries see full regime change or just more of the same? We wanted to take up that question with Abderrahim Foukara. He's the Washington, D.C., bureau chief of Al Jazeera, and he's with us in our studios now in Washington, D.C., to help us understand the regional picture. Abderrahim, thanks so much for joining us. ABDERRAHIM FOUKARA: Thank you, Michel. MARTIN: So how do you understand what's happening in the region right now? FOUKARA: Well, I understand it as a continuation of what started happening way back in 2011. A lot of governments in the region thought that at some point after 2011, things started to go back to normal. But obviously, many of the reasons why we had the 2011 uprisings in the first
          Viral Stars, The 'Syncopated Ladies,' Shake Up Tap Dancing      Comment   Translate Page      
MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Finally today, let's talk about tap dance. And we're not talking about politicians trying to get out of answering hard questions. And we're not even talking about another image you might have of old guys in tuxedos from the 1940s. No, we're talking about the Syncopated Ladies, an all-female tap squad that has become an Internet sensation for their tight moves set to popular music, think Prince and Beyonce. (SOUNDBITE OF SYNCOPATED LADIES PERFORMANCE) MARTIN: You might have caught them on the TV show "So You Think You Can Dance" or featured on Beyonce's home page. Two sisters, Maud and Chloe Arnold, founded the group. They're here in Washington, D.C., this weekend for their annual concert and showcase. So we thought this was a good time to hear more about the group and how they're changing the look of tap. And Chloe Arnold is with us now to represent both sisters. And she's with us now. Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. CHLOE ARNOLD: Thank you Michel. I'm
          Cellist Yo-Yo Ma Plays Bach In Shadow Of Border Crossing      Comment   Translate Page      
World-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma brought his Bach Project to the sister cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on Saturday. The "Day of Action" featured performances in both cities to celebrate the relationship between the two communities. Ma played the opening notes of Johann Sebastian Bach's Suite No. 1 for Unaccompanied Cello in a park next to the Juarez-Lincoln International Bridge, one of the crossings that connect the U.S. and Mexican cities. The Laredo performance took place on an elevated stage before an audience of officials and onlookers. Concerns over possible rain disappeared as Ma began to play in the morning sunshine. Texas Public Radio via / YouTube It was part of his Bach Project, which uses the composer's 300-year-old music to explore connections between cultures. The project has taken Ma all over the world. On Friday it brought him to Laurie Auditorium at Trinity University in San Antonio, and on Saturday it brought him to Laredo, within a few feet of the
          Stop & Shop Strike: Customers Find Mixed Bag Of Closings, Semi-Opened Stores      Comment   Translate Page      
Grocery chain Stop & Shop said on Friday, April 12 that a majority of its Connecticut stores are still open even though union workers have gone on strike.
          Fresh Air Weekend: Henry Winkler; Rob Delaney      Comment   Translate Page      
Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week: 'I Never Had A Plan B': Henry Winkler On His Career, From The Fonz To 'Barry': The actor talks with Fresh Air 's Terry Gross about struggling with typecasting after Happy Days, his family's immigration story and about how he found out in his 30s that he had dyslexia. Wily And Clever, Billie Eilish's Debut Album Sounds Like No One Else: The 17-year-old California singer-songwriter's album, When We Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? keeps listeners guessing. Her frame of reference is vast — ranging from glam rock to folk music. Rob Delaney On Wrapping Up 'Catastrophe' And Working Through Grief: Delaney co-wrote the final season of his Amazon series shortly after the death of his young son. Catastrophe
          Former 'Ebony' Publisher Declares Bankruptcy, And An Era Ends      Comment   Translate Page      
Ebony magazine was more than a publication — to black America, it was a public trust. It held a place of prominence in millions of African-American households whose members did not otherwise see themselves in the mainstream media. So back in 2015, when Johnson Publishing Company announced it was spinning off its flagship magazine, Ebony , and also its news magazine sibling, Jet , people knew something was up. "They were just waiting for the other shoe to drop," the late Ken Smikle, a longtime observer of the Johnson Publishing Company's evolution, told NPR's Michel Martin. Smikle founded Target Market News, a Chicago-based service that tracks black consumer power and patterns for the business market. He felt JPC was in for a rough ride. This week, the other shoe finally dropped: JPC announced it was filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection. The company says it's selling the remainder of its assets, a comprehensive archive of photos from some of black America's most pivotal 20th
          Can This Breakfast Cereal Help Save The Planet?      Comment   Translate Page      
This past week in San Francisco, food writers and environmentalists gathered to taste some breakfast cereal. This particular cereal had an ingredient — the milled seeds of a little-known plant called Kernza — that's the result of a radical campaign to reinvent agriculture and reverse an environmentally disastrous choice made by our distant ancestors. The campaign began 40-some years ago with a scientist-environmentalist named Wes Jackson . He argued that humanity took a wrong turn, thousands of years ago, when it came to rely on crops like wheat and rice for basic sustenance. These "annual" crops need replanting each year, "which means that if you're going to get your seed to germinate, you've got to destroy the vegetation at the surface," clearing away anything that might compete with the fragile seedlings, Jackson said . As farmers use tillage tools or herbicides to get rid of competing vegetation, they inevitably wipe away habitat for birds and insects. Bare soil washes away and
          Under Employers' Gaze, Gen Z Is Biting Its Tongue On Social Media      Comment   Translate Page      
Malak Silmi was taking her first real journalism class last January when her professor said something that changed her life: Watch what you post on social media because it might just come back to bite you. Silmi's Twitter account at the time was one she'd had since she was 14. It was a public profile with her content ranging from memes and status updates to opinions on foreign policy. But she decided something had to change if she wanted to be taken seriously as a journalist. So, she deactivated it. "I understand the need to censor oneself, but sometimes I don't think it's fair," said the 19-year-old. "Even liking on Twitter is hard because people can see what you like — it pops up on their timeline even if they're not looking through your account." Silmi and many of her peers say they worry about being unable to express any opinions on social media out of fear of self-sabotaging a potential career opportunity. The oldest members of Generation Z are around 22 years old — now entering
          Get Paid To Stay In Bed, For Space Science      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Hollywood Writers Vs. Agents      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          U.N. Envoy To Libya On Situation On The Ground      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          How The Rock 'N Play Baby Sleeper Became Popular And Why It Was Recalled      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Peeling Back The Reasons Behind The Onion Shortage      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Opinion: A Showcase Of 'Uncaged Art' By Children Once Detained      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Scott Simon explores an art exhibit in El Paso, Texas, by unaccompanied minors detained at the now-closed Tornillo Children's Detention center.
          Assange's Arrest And Free Speech      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Scott Simon talks with the ACLU's Ben Wizner about what the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange could mean for press freedoms.
          How Shrinking Newsrooms Impact Local Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
A study in Urban Affairs Review found shrinking newsrooms can potentially impact the number of candidates who run for mayor. NPR's Scott Simon talks to professor Meghan Rubado, co-author of the study.
          Saturday Sports: NBA Playoffs, Baseball Season Begins      Comment   Translate Page      
ESPN's Howard Bryant talks with Scott Simon about the start of the NBA playoffs and some of the story lines from the early days of baseball season.
          Examining Sanders' Medicare-For-All Proposal      Comment   Translate Page      
Julie Rovner, chief Washington correspondent for Kaiser Health News, describes the latest Medicare-for-all bill by Sen. Bernie Sanders and the options for single-payer coverage proposed by lawmakers.
          Meeting Netanyahu's Young Supporters      Comment   Translate Page      
Young Israeli voters turned out for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in elections this week, highlighting the right-wing trends among those who were raised in a time without much hope for peace.
          More Possible Graves Found At Florida School      Comment   Translate Page      
Workers doing cleanup at a now-closed reform school in Florida have found 27 sites that may be unmarked graves. Researchers previously found more than 50 graves of boys who died at the school.
          What's Next In Sudan      Comment   Translate Page      
President Omar al-Bashir was ousted from power. A transitional government will now run the country for two years. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Ahmed Soliman of Chatham House about what's next.
          Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf On Trump And 'Sanctuary Cities'      Comment   Translate Page      
President Trump said he is considering sending detained immigrants in the country illegally to "sanctuary cities." Scott Simon gets reaction from Mayor Libby Schaaf of Oakland, a "sanctuary city."
          Journalist David Carr As A Father In 'All That You Leave Behind'      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Scott Simon asks Erin Lee Carr about her father, journalist David Carr, and her memoir, All That You Leave Behind.
          'Little Woods' And The Rising Talent Of Nia DaCosta      Comment   Translate Page      
The film Little Woods stars Tessa Thompson as a former drug runner whose sister gets pregnant and has no health insurance or money. It was written and directed by first-timer Nia DaCosta.
          Remembering World War II Pilot Dick Cole      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Scott Simon talks to author Laura Hillenbrand about the life of World War II pilot Dick Cole, the last surviving member of the Doolittle Raid. He died this week at age 103.
          Georgetown Students Vote To Fund Reparations For School's Slavery Connections      Comment   Translate Page      
Georgetown University students voted to set up a fund to pay reparations to the descendants of slaves sold by the school. NPR's Scott Simon talks with Hannah Michael, who helped organize the effort.
          Army Reservist On Transgender Military Ban      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Scott Simon talks to Elliot Sommer, a graduate student in the Army Reserves, about the Trump administration's policy barring transgender personnel from serving in the military.
          Week In Politics      Comment   Translate Page      
We have a recap of the week in politics as President Trump talked immigration this week.
          Watch BTS Further Its Quest For World Domination On The 'SNL' Stage      Comment   Translate Page      
The multilingual boy-band juggernaut, SNL's first musical guest from South Korea, performed kinetically choreographed renditions of "Boy With Luv" and "MIC Drop."
          'Stockholm': A Hostage Situation And How 'Stockholm Syndrome' Came To Be      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?      Comment   Translate Page      
Software that can replace doctors for certain tasks has a big responsibility. The Food and Drug Administration is now figuring out how to determine when computer algorithms are safe and effective.
          How Philadelphia Mandated Vaccinations In 1991      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Get Paid To Stay In Bed, For Space Science      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Peeling Back The Reasons Behind The Onion Shortage      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          How The Rock 'N Play Baby Sleeper Became Popular And Why It Was Recalled      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Hollywood Writers Vs. Agents      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Sweden And Assange      Comment   Translate Page      
Staffan Sonning of Sweden's Sveriges Radio talks about proposals to extradite Julian Assange to Sweden, years after Swedish prosecutors issued an arrest warrant on rape allegations.
          U.N. Envoy To Libya On Situation On The Ground      Comment   Translate Page      
As fighting continues outside Libya's capital, NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Ghassan Salamé, U.N. envoy to Libya about what the international community is doing to negotiate a ceasefire.
          Sudanese Activist On What Comes Next      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to Sudanese activist and protester Mayada Hassanain about President Omar al-Bashir being ousted and women's roles in the protests.
          With Indian Elections Underway, The Vote Is Also A Referendum On Hindu Nationalism      Comment   Translate Page      
Many see India's election as a turning point in which the country may seek to redefine itself via Hinduism, its majority faith. Secularism has become "a four-letter word," says one expert.
          German Lawmakers Consider Nationalizing Private Apartments To House The Poor      Comment   Translate Page      

While Mario Draghi continues to lament the lack of inflation that the ECB's massive balance sheet - now at 41% of Europe's GDP -  has failed to spark, and is contemplating even more aggressive measure to create higher prices, to one group of people, the ECB's reflationary efforts have been more than successful: Berlin renters who are furious that the median rent has more than doubled since 2011, soaring past 10 euros a square meter, meaning a 1,000-square-foot apartment costs more than $1,100 a month (still be a bargain in most other major cities),

And as the anger over soaring rents grows, so do the protests: last weekend, 50,000 protesters took part in a march against rent increases in Germany's capital city, which was organized by an affordable housing advocacy group in an effort to collect signatures for a referendum that would push the city to expropriate apartments from large landlords, and transfer some of the city's increasingly expensive residential rental properties to public ownership.

Protestors with a banner reading ’Expropriate Deutsche Wohnen and Co.’ in Berlin on April 6; Getty Images.

If the group gathers enough signatures — about 20,000 — the city's government will have to consider a plan to seize more than 250,000 apartments from their corporate owners, The Associated Press reported.

The proposal targets for-profit companies that own more than 3,000 apartments in Berlin: "These are companies that are coming in and seeing a really profitable market," Thomas McGath, a spokesperson for the group that organized the campaign, told NPR. "It's not your normal mom and pop landlord."

In other words, far from not sparking inflation, the ECB has not only doubled Berlin rents, but sparked a historic backlash that may result in the confiscation and the nationalization of big, corporate chunks of the housing market.

And here's where it gets especially troubling for the ECB: under German law, the plan technically could happen. As NPR reports, Article 15 of the German Constitution states that "land, natural resources and means of production may, for the purpose of nationalisation, be transferred to public ownership."

Furthermore, while Germany has the lowest proportion of home owners in the European Union, renters are by far in the majority in Berlin. That makes rental costs a political issue. Merkel’s government has taken tentative steps by passing legislation to limit rent increases and pledging to invest more than 6 billion euros in affordable housing.

Ah the irony: East Germany, in its passionate desire to "tear down this wall", never really considered the long-term consequences of a free market (even if one manipulated entirely by the ECB), and is suddenly feeling nostaglic for the good, old days of communism, where things such as private property did not exist.

"At the beginning, some of the fathers of the constitution thought, 'Well, there could be a situation where the market ... gets out of control and then it could be important to get this regulation," Ralf Schoenball, a reporter for the German newspaper Der Tagesspiegel, told KCRW Berlin. But Schoenball said the article has never been used before.

Well, congratulations, Mario Draghi: your monetary policies are about to force the first European nation to revert back to socialism.

As for those who think that Germany's anger at soaring rents is a flash in the pan and will soon be over, think again. As Bloomberg reports, during last weekend's demonstration, a blond-haired girl carried a wooden placard as she marched with her parents and thousands of others at a demonstration against soaring rents. Her sign had a stark message: “My future? Sleeping under bridges.”

The girl’s poignant protest highlights the emotionally charged nature of the housing debate in Germany, and Berlin in particular. In the capital city, where residents have been buffeted by a sudden surge in costs, a movement is gaining momentum for a radical solution: nationalizing big chunks of the housing market.

Protesters in Berlin carry a giant "rent shark" at a march against rent increases on Saturday. Michael Sohn/AP

Furthermore, unlike any typical, disorganized grassroots movement, this one is very clear in their demands: the organizers have started collecting signatures for a referendum to push the city to expropriate apartments from large landlords - companies that own more than 3,000 units like Deutsche Wohnen SE and Vonovia SE.

The advocacy group has named its campaign "Expropriate Deutsche Wohnen & Co," which translates as take possession of the real estate company Deutsche Wohnen, which owns about 160,000 residential and commercial units.

"There are a lot of stories about the Deutsche Wohnen ... that they raise rental fees, that they try to get rid of tenants with old contracts with low rental fees," Schoenball told KCRW Berlin. "A lot of tenants are afraid that they could be put out of their apartment."

The final straw for the activists according to Blocame last year, when Deutsche Wohnen agreed to buy 800 residential and commercial units on Karl Marx Allee, an imposing Stalinist boulevard in the former communist east. Residents fearing rent increases mobilized, and the city sought to block the deal in court. Naturally, the property company - one of the main winners of Berlin’s housing boom - has rejected demands to turn over its property.

“We won’t allow our assets to be expropriated,” Deutsche Wohnen Chief Executive Officer Michael Zahn said during a panel discussion in Berlin this week. “That’s just not going to happen. We’re not living in a banana republic."

We wouldn't be so sure: the activists need to collect 20,000 within six months and another 170,000 by February. While pushing the state to buy apartments won’t increase supply, campaigners argue that the measure would send a signal to landlords that they need to play fair or risk losing their assets.

Of course, landlords are merely responding to market supply and demand  - if rents this high were uneconomical they wouldn't exist. The question is why are such high prices suddenly affordable. For the answer, look to this man, who has injected trillions in both Europe's capital markets and, to a far lesser extent, the economy. The result are rents that are unaffordable for the majority of the population, but since they were never the marginal price setters, well.... take your protest from Berlin to Frankfurt, and ideally inside the lobby of the ECB.

"Expropriation is creating a lot of emotions right now," Zahn told AP in an email. "But it won't create a single apartment." AP also reported that the company said, on average, its apartments are about 645 square feet and cost about the equivalent of $650 to rent, and that the company follows government rules for calculating permissible rent increases based on neighborhood averages.

So will Berliners be successful in pushing through the first nationalization of property in modern German times? It remains to be seen: if the campaign can pass its first hurdle and collect 20,000 signatures, the city's government will be tasked with drafting a counterproposal that satisfies the grassroots group. If the government fails, the group will need to rally another 170,000 signers to move the proposal to a referendum and then to a ballot, where a majority will be required to pass it.

As Bloomberg adds, the chances of the referendum’s success may not be so far-fetched. The German constitution allows for expropriation in the interests of “socialization” in return for adequate compensation. Berlin has a vibrant track record of civic activism, with a 2014 referendum successfully forcing the city to back off plans to sell parts of the former Tempelhof airfield to developers.

While most mainstream politicians, including Chancellor Angela Merkel and Berlin’s mayor, are against using taxpayer money to buy apartments, there has been tentative support. Robert Habeck - co-leader of the Greens, the second-strongest party in Germany in recent polls - has said state housing purchases need to be considered to counter speculation.

The risk is that such state intervention could scare away investors needed to bolster supply, which is the only real long-term solution. The German construction industry association warned that compensation for expropriated owners could run to 36 billion euros ($41 billion), enough money to build over 220,000 rental units on government land.

“What we really need to do is build, build and build again,” said Stefan Koerzell, a senior official at the German Trade Union Confederation, which supports the referendum. The growing crisis is a “wake-up call” for politicians, he said at a press conference in Berlin.

And since a flood of supply isn't happening any time soon, the schism between renters and property owners is only set to grow, potentially with dire consequences:  on a panel with the Deutsche Wohnen CEO, Rouzbeh Taheri - one of the leaders of the referendum campaign - said he and other activists were treated like “pesky mosquitoes” by the property company. As public backing grows, he had a warning: “Try spending a night with a thousand mosquitoes and see what happens.”


          'Debatable' List Of '100 Most Jewish' Foods Leaves Plenty Of Room For Kibbitzing      Comment   Translate Page      
As families around the country fill their freezers with matzo balls and gefilte fish in preparation for the coming Passover Seder, a new book asks: What does it mean for a food to be Jewish?
          NPR and Assange/Wikileaks      Comment   Translate Page      

I've been listening to National Public Radio's coverage this week on the arrest of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange and the reporting has generally been abysmal. In other words, it has been par for the course.

At least four things have stood out to me in the NPR  coverage I have heard. First, the NPR reporting on the withdrawn (but possibly soon-to-be resumed) Swedish sexual assault investigation has consistently failed to fully report Assange's position. As Wired noted nearly two years ago: "Assange has always maintained that extradition to Sweden was a thin ruse intended to make him vulnerable to further extradition to the United States, where it's widely believed that a secret grand jury for years was investigating him for WikiLeaks-related crimes." (I offer no judgment on the veracity of Assange's protestations that he was innocent of the Swedish allegations.)

Second, the range of guests NPR has hosted on the Assange segments has generally run the gamut from "I don't like Assange much" to "I really dislike the treacherous Assange". For instance, on the day Assange was arrested NPR interviewed Leon Panetta, secretary of defense and CIA director during Obama administration.

(NPR thought it not worth mentioning that Panetta was also Bill Clinton's OMB director and, later, chief of staff or that Panetta endorsed Hillary Clinton in 2016. Less than three months before the election, Panetta also went to bat for her regarding alleged Clinton Foundation improprieties during her tenure as Secretary of State. In 2017, Clinton blamed Wikileaks, in part, for her 2016 loss to Donald Trump. And why mention that less than a year ago the DNC filed a lawsuit against Wikileaks?)

Predictably, Panetta is in favor of the extradition and prosecution of Assange: "So I think ... as a result of the impact of releasing this classified information that he ought to be subject to the laws of the United States and face our system of justice." He also raised the Clinton defeat: "Well, there's no question that there was a huge amount of attention, particularly to WikiLeaks and the impact of WikiLeaks on the 2016 election. There's no question that as a result of the information that he was able to release, it had a huge impact in terms of our politics ..." In response to a question about a recent Tweet by Edward Snowden on Assange's arrest, Panetta avoided commenting on the substance of Snowden's position and launched an ad hominem attack.

Third, NPR on-air personalities and guests have repeatedly made (or declined to challenge the accuracy or relevance of) the claim that Assange/Wikileaks are not covered by the 1st Amendment because they allegedly released classified material without redactions of sensitive material.

Just today, NPR hosted former CIA deputy director John McLaughlin, who asserted Assange is not a "legitimate journalist", in part, because Assange allegedly declined to redact material that "mainstream journalists" wanted him to remove and, further, that Assange wouldn't even listen "to that case [for redactions]". McLaughlin makes this claim twice in the segment and it is never challenged.

I am unaware of any "not enough redactions" exception to the freedom of the press. Moreover, in October 2010, CNN reported:
With the posting of 400,000 classified documents from the Iraq war, WikiLeaks has shown a much heavier hand redacting compared to its previous publication of documents.

After the leak in July of more than 70,000 Afghanistan War documents, the website was heavily criticized by the U.S. government, the military and human rights groups for failing to redact names of civilians in the documents, putting them at risk of retaliation by the Taliban.
Assange's role in the alleged failure to redact names in the July leak is not discussed in the CNN article, which does go on to say concerning later releases: "An initial comparison of a few documents redacted by WikiLeaks to the same documents released by the Department of Defense shows that WikiLeaks removed more information from the documents than the Pentagon" (emphasis added). Yep, Wikileaks apparently withheld more information than the US military but you're not likely to learn that on NPR.

In the same piece CNN also reported: "Even with redaction, the Pentagon is critical of the documents' release, saying the site had no right to publish and is not equipped to understand what information is harmful." This seems to suggest that Wikileaks failure to redact what the military wanted redacted was due to incompetence or negligence, not malice. In any case, where does the 1st Amendment require journalists to keep secret what the government wants kept secret?

Finally, it is striking that NPR's coverage has featured very little discussion of the substance of the actual charges against Assange' let alone the substance of the material Chelsea Manning provided for Wikileaks to publish (see e.g. the video below). The unsealed federal grand jury indictment is only seven pages long and pretty straightforward but NPR has instead covered ancillary issues, such as Assange's cat, with the seeming goal of smearing and convicting Assange in the court of public opinion.

Assange's purported crime appears to be agreeing to help Manning crack a government password (Indictment, para. 7). However, the indictment also indicates that Assange's assistance did not extend to him actively accessing a restricted government computer system. Thus, paragraph 9 of the indictment speaks of "the portion of the password Manning gave to Assange". At first glance this seems analogous to asking Assange, from afar, for help opening a physical combination safe. It's akin to Assange saying "try this combination" while not turning the dial himself or even being in the same room.

If it's illegal for a journalist to help someone from afar break the password of a computer file or crack a safe then would it also be illegal to open/unseal a stolen envelope clearly marked "Top Secret" and containing classified material or turn the pages of a stolen document clearly marked "Top Secret"? What about helping to decipher an encrypted text? If not, why not? What's the substantive difference between these acts?

To be clear, if Assange sat at a keyboard and unlawfully attempted to access classified files while they were still stored on a government system then that would seem to be an overt, illegal act. However, that's not what Assange is accused of doing.

He is accused of conspiring to help Chelsea Manning do that and, under the particular circumstances, that seems a little fuzzier, especially when something as important as the 1st Amendment is in play. But as Glenn Greenwald puts it:
Neither the most authoritarian factions of the Trump administration behind this prosecution, nor their bizarre and equally tyrannical allies in the Democratic Party, care the slightest about press freedoms. They only care about one thing: putting Julian Assange behind bars, because (in the case of Trump officials) he revealed U.S. war crimes and because (in the case of Democrats) he revealed corruption at the highest levels of the DNC that forced the resignation of the top 5 officials of the Democratic Party and harmed the Democrats’ political reputation.
###

Collateral Murder - short version


collateralmurder.wikileaks.org



###

Download the US indictment of Assange here (PDF): https://www.justice.gov/usao-edva/press-release/file/1153481/download

Here, in no particular order, are some alternative views on the Assange arrest that you're not likely to hear represented on NPR:

          At Least 3 People Dead As Severe Weather Moves Across Southern U.S.      Comment   Translate Page      
Two children were killed in eastern Texas during a storm when a tree fell on the car in which they were traveling. And, in Hamilton, Miss., a man was found dead after a tree fell on his trailer.
          Watch live: Pete Buttigieg to officially announce 2020 presidential campaign - NBC News      Comment   Translate Page      
  1. Watch live: Pete Buttigieg to officially announce 2020 presidential campaign  NBC News
  2. How Mayor Pete Started to Look Presidential  POLITICO
  3. Democratic Candidate Pete Buttigieg Leans On Record South Bend Mayor  NPR
  4. Rising star? 7 hurdles facing Democrat Pete Buttigieg's 2020 presidential campaign  USA TODAY
  5. Rob Smith: I’m gay and support Mike Pence – don’t believe Pete Buttigieg’s claim that Pence is anti-gay  Fox News
  6. View full coverage on Google News

          Get Paid To Stay In Bed, For Space Science      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          We Got Nice Things In Your Nice Things!      Comment   Translate Page      


It's Palm Sunday, and you know what that means! Time to read one of Kurt Vonnegut's OK but not essential collections! Also, it means it's time to take a little time from the banal evils of the week and read some nice stuff, because dang, you look tense. You should relax some. Here, put your feet up.


Let's Pester A Historian, Shall We? (Be Nice, You)

We're actually taking a week off from Yr Wonkette Book Club; we're halfway through Winter War: Hoover, Roosevelt, and the First Clash Over the New Deal, by Erich Rauchway, a New Deal scholar and history prof at UC Davis. It's a darn good book about Herbert Hoover's attempts to undermine the incoming president and the New Deal, and how that clash helped shape the outlooks of Democratic and Republican politics for much of the 20th Century. And, well, RIGHT NOW:

Also, Herbert Hoover was SUCH a butt!

As an extra-special bonus this month, Dr. Rauchway has offered to participate in our little ol' Book Club. Go ahead and follow him on the Twitters, and then ask him any questions you have about Winter War, the New Deal, FDR 'n' Hoover, and related topics. Please be sure to include the hashtag #WinterWarWonkette so's he finds your question -- if you just toss a brilliant question out there with no tag, how the heck would he even see it? And if you don't use the Twitters, email your question to me at doktorzoom at-sign wonkette dot com, and I will pass them on for you! We'll compile the bestest Q&A; dialogues for a midweek Wonkette story!

Also, Dr. Rauchway weighed in on Friday's most important cultural event, the teaser trailer for the ninth Star Wars movie:

The man knows how to nerd. No, do not pester him with your fan theories on Jar Jar Binks. Like, not even if you think he was loosely based on Hoover's secretary of Labor, William N. Doak. Haha, Doak.

We'll finish Winter War for next Sunday, so if you haven't obtained a copy yet, hit the Amazon linky and Yr Wonkette gets a nice kickback!

OK, Fine, Another History Thing!

If you aren't yet following Princeton historian Kevin Kruse, you're missing some of the best stuff happening on Twitter. He's an expert at debunking rightwing nonsense with wit and ample documentation. He's also one of three historians who weighed in this weekend on the vital question, "Does It Matter That the President Knows Nothing About History?" (Spoiler: fuck yes!) He'll also be one of several historians featured in this year's edition of Samantha Bee's "Not the White House Correspondents' Dinner," whee! And if you wanna talk academic cred, this week, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Needless to say, one side effect of Kruse's public service crops up surprisingly often: some dip who's been convinced of utter nonsense by Dinesh D'Souza or other hucksters will tell Kruse he knows nothing at all about REAL history, leading to this sort of exchange:

(The person who told Kruse she knows nothing? A Candace Owens fan with an AM radio show, who insists Kruse knows nothing about "data and accurate black history" because he only writes to please white people. No, she offers no actual data or history; she just knows.)

As tribute, a true hero of America sent Kruse some new business cards.

Time To Help Pay Gahan Wilson Back For All Those Laughs

This one, we're afraid, isn't exactly nice, although it's about somebody whose work probably made you laugh and perhaps cringe a little. Cartoonist Gahan Wilson, whose work appeared regularly in Playboy, The New Yorker, and the National Lampoon for decades, has advanced dementia, and his son in law is running a GoFundMe to raise money for his longterm memory care. Yr Wonkette is terrified of the copyright police, so we'll only link to some of his work that other people have put on the interwebs. But you probably recognize the signature, the style, and the wonderfully sick sense of humor.

The Arizona Republic published a very sweet piece on Wilson, who still draws, but isn't sure of who the people around him are and often doesn't recognize his own cartoons. His wife, Nancy Winters, died in March, and they had been doing OK together in an assisted living facility, but now Wilson needs more expensive care. And everybody whose sense of humor was warped by his should chip in and help with that, if you can afford that. Yes, GoFundMe and the kindness of strangers is no way to run a healthcare system, but it's what we're stuck with. For now.

gahanmom www.youtube.com

Yo Yo Ma ROCKS!

You probably already knew that, particularly if you watched "The West Wing." But yesterday, the cellist played concerts in the cross-border twin cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

It was part of his Bach Project, which uses the composer's 300-year-old music to explore connections between cultures. [...]

"As you all know, as you did and do and will do, in culture, we build bridges, not walls," he said. After his performance, he gestured to the bridge to his right. "I've lived my life at the borders. Between cultures. Between disciplines. Between musics. Between generations."

A single concert was originally planned to take place on the bridge between the two cities, and officials in both cities were up for that, but they eventually decided it would cause too much disruption to close the bridge even temporarily. So instead it became two concerts, held in parks right next to the border on each side. Works for us!

Cellist Yo-Yo Ma Plays Bach In Shadow Of Border Crossing youtu.be


All Hail Japan's Cat Lord!

This is just incredibly cute and neato: Japan's Bicchu Matsuyama Castle, built in 1240, was badly damaged by heavy rains in 2018. After that, tourists stopped visiting, and revenues fell sharply. Around the same time, a very friendly stray cat started hanging around the castle. The kittycat picked up the nickname "Sanjuro" (after a local samurai) and became a social media star. Tourism picked up, especially when the nonprofit that manages the castle named the handsome kitty the lord of the castle.


Looks like SOME countries know which orange celebrities deserve at least a ceremonial job. Also, we look forward to the inevitable anime in which Shinjuro is an anthropomorphic samurai kittycat.


Holy Crap Science Is Cool!

Everybody was excited about the Black Hole photos released this week! So were we! We're also lazy, so here, have a video 'splainer!

First Image of a Black Hole! youtu.be

You Want Cute Critters? Here, Have Cute Critters!


Otter pup being hand-reared at Chicago zoo youtu.be


You know, you really shouldn't anthropomorphize animals like that. They don't like it.

Also, some guy on Twitter found Granny Weatherwax's kitten, You, but said in the thread he wasn't looking for name suggestions. But c'mon, this is clearly You.

We are now dead of cute and ready to go to brunch, too. Have an excellent relaxing Sunday, pester Eric Rauchway with your #WinterWarWonkette questions, and we will all dive back into the daily horribleness tomorrow!

[Winter War at Amazon (Hardcover: $19.48, Kindle ebook: $18.99) / Eric Rauchway on Twitter / Kevin Kruse on Twitter / NPR / Arizona Republic / GoFundMe for Gahan Wilson / WaPo / Japan Times / Japan Tourism]

Yr Wonkette is supported by reader donations. You should send us money, you! Even if you are not a little white kitten!

How often would you like to donate?

Select an amount (USD)


          Orioles' Chris Davis Ends Hitless Streak      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          How Philadelphia Mandated Vaccinations In 1991      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Hollywood Writers Vs. Agents      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
          Pete Buttigieg Helped Transform South Bend As Mayor, But Some Feel Left Out      Comment   Translate Page      
Mayor Pete Buttigieg in downtown South Bend, Ind., in January, 2019. First elected in 2011, Buttigieg has based his presidential candidacy, in part, around the revival of South Bend that he's helped engineer.

Mayor Pete Buttigieg in downtown South Bend, Ind., in January, 2019. First elected in 2011, Buttigieg has based his presidential candidacy, in part, around the revival of South Bend that he's helped engineer.; Credit: Nam Y. Huh/AP

Jennifer Weingart | NPR

When Molly Hewitt left South Bend, Ind., for college, she didn't think she'd return to live there again. Since the 1960s, the city had suffered the same brain drain that plagued many other Midwestern cities faced with industrial decline.

"The goal was always to be successful enough that you don't have to come back to South Bend," she said.

But while she was away, things were turning around. Hewitt's parents kept her in the loop and she decided to give another chance to the city led by Democratic mayor Pete Buttigieg.

"I came back, honestly because of Pete and I've seen a lot of my friends do that and a lot of people who didn't grow up here that want to come to South Bend," she said. Now Hewitt is 23, living in South Bend and volunteering for the campaign of James Mueller, the candidate Buttigieg endorsed to replace him in this year's mayoral election.

Buttigieg, 37, is running for president. He's expected to officially announce his candidacy on Sunday. On the campaign trail he speaks a lot about how being mayor of South Bend since 2012 has prepared him to be president.

"We transformed the trajectory of our city," Buttigieg said in an interview on Morning Edition in January. "This is a community that was written off as dying at the beginning of this decade. Now it's growing again."

South Bend's population is up more than 1,000 people since 2010 following decades of hemorrhaging tens of thousands of residents.

Investment in the city's downtown, public private partnerships, economic development — including turning the long vacant Studebaker auto plant, which closed its doors in 1963, into a tech hub — have been credited with the change.

"There's a definite difference in how it used to be versus how it is now," said Jake Mitchell, who went to high school with Buttigieg. "Just kind of an intangible feeling. You know, everything seems nicer, cleaner."

But others in this once-industrial town feel left out, despite what Buttigieg has done.

"You're doing a lot for downtown and you're building hotels and apartments that people who are native to this town can't even afford, even the people with college degrees," said activist Lisa DeBerry. "So it's like, who are you developing that for?"

Early in his first term Buttigieg set a goal to knock down 1,000 blighted houses in a thousand days - which the city exceeded.

"And that's certainly helped," said Jack Colwell, a long time columnist for the South Bend Tribune. "Neighborhoods where there had been these vacant houses they were drug houses, gangs used them, they were eyesores."

A lot of the housing stock in South Bend comes from the heyday of the Studebaker plant, which employed thousands of workers.

Now, most of the deteriorated neighborhoods are historically minority and lower income. And when the houses started coming down, teacher Regina Williams-Preston says she stepped up and got involved with others there.

"The people rose up and said, 'Hey, we need help out here. Don't knock down our communities, give us help. It's our tax dollars, invest in us,'" she recalled.

"And that's when we got two million dollars of investment in home repair and two million more invested in new construction for affordable homes," added Williams-Preston, who is now a council member and is also running to replace Buttigieg as the mayor of South Bend when his second term ends Dec. 31.

Williams-Preston said she felt that working with Buttigieg as a mayor, part of the job was preparing him for the next step.

Jason Critchlow, another mayoral candidate, who used to be the county Democratic Party chair, said Buttigieg didn't turn the city around on his own.

"I think there's a feeling here that it's disingenuous to pretend that one person had solely to do with any of the progress made here in South Bend," Critchlow said. "I think there's been literally decades of public servants that have gotten us to where we are today."

And it's still far from a complete turnaround. More than a quarter of the population still lives at or below the poverty line, compared to the national average of around 14 percent.

DeBerry, the activist, says Buttigieg shouldn't become president."That's like a mother having her own children and not taking care of them and then wants foster children," she said, expressing a feeling she says is shared by many who were left behind by the city's transformation. "It's like no, we're not going to give you more."

Williams-Preston says she hopes that if Buttigieg becomes president, he would take the lessons he learned in South Bend forward.

"You could really be like the president of the United States one day. It's up to us, like the people of South Bend to make sure you're ready for that task."

Buttigieg was an improbable mayor — he was only 29 when he was first elected. And he's hoping his experience since then in South Bend will land him in another improbable place - the White House.

Copyright 2019 WVPE 88.1 Elkhart/South Bend. To see more, visit WVPE 88.1 Elkhart/South Bend.

This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.


          NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 14, 2019): Liar, Liar, Pants on Fire      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 14, 2019): Liar, Liar, Pants on Fire:
Q: Think of a word for a deceitful person. Move the middle letter to the end and you'll get another word for a deceitful person. What words are these?
Hint: Many fish
          Remembering Dick Cole, Who Risked His Life In WWII Doolittle Raid      Comment   Translate Page      
Cole died last week at age 103. He was the last surviving member of the celebrated 1942 air raid by the United States on the Japanese mainland, which at the time was regarded as a suicide mission.
          Barbershop: The Curious Case Of Julian Assange - NPR      Comment   Translate Page      
Barbershop: The Curious Case Of Julian Assange  NPR

In the Barbershop, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with journalist Margaret Sullivan and former CIA deputy director John McLaughlin about whether Julian ...


          Remembering Dick Cole, Who Risked His Life In WWII Doolittle Raid       Comment   Translate Page      

World War II pilot Dick Cole, the last surviving member of the Doolittle Raid, died last week at age 103.

Cole was renowned aviation pioneer Jimmy Doolittle's co-pilot in April 1942 on what was regarded as a suicide mission – the first counterattack against the Japanese mainland after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor. The raid caused Japan to contract its forces and start a battle with the United States over Midway Atoll, a small ring shaped island between North America and Asia. This battle, which the U.S. won, shifted the tide of the war into America's favor.

A memorial service for Cole will be held at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph in Texas on April, 18 — exactly 77 years after the raid occurred.

Laura Hillenbrand, the author of Seabiscuit and Unbroken, knew Cole and wanted to write a book about him.

"[the pilots] were very likely to die ... and everyone had the opportunity to back out. Not a single man did," including Cole, Hillenbrand told NPR's Scott Simon for Weekend Edition.


Interview Highlights

On why the mission was so dangerous

The United States was really knocked back by Pearl Harbor. And after that, the Japanese were just on a winning streak. And the United States could do nothing about it because they had no land base from which to launch bombers and go after Japan. And they had what I think is kind of an insane idea, which is they were going to take 16 B-25s, which are medium-sized bombers. They were going to hoist them onto the carrier Hornet, sail it out off the Japanese coast and launch them ... They had a plan that was going to take the planes over Japan, bomb Japan and then head on to friendly bases in China. And Japanese boats spotted their task force way early. They had to launch right at that moment. And they did. And the men knew they did not have enough fuel to make it.

On what happened to Lt. Col. Dick Cole during the mission

They flew over Japan, and they looked down. Cole remembered seeing people waving up and smiling at them as they flew over. They thought they were friendly planes ... They headed out over the China Sea, and they started to run out of fuel. And a tail wind caught them and carried them over the Chinese coast. And then their fuel ran out in the darkness in a wild thunderstorm over the mountains of China. And Cole had to jump out of the plane. He had never even practiced parachuting. He'd had no training at all. And he just dove out of the plane headfirst.

He walked for a day, and he found a building with a nationalist Chinese flag hanging over it. And a soldier was there — a Chinese soldier — and invited him in. And, the man took him to a dark room, and there was Jimmy Doolittle ... And from then, it was a race to get out of where they were because the Japanese were hunting them.

On why the mission was a success

The Japanese were so confident that they were spreading out over the globe and not concentrating their forces. And when this raid happened, that terrified them. And they contracted their forces. And they decided to take aim for Midway Atoll, which, if they could claim it, would give them a land base, making America more vulnerable and making themselves safer. And essentially, the raid lured them into that. We had the Battle of Midway. The United States won it triumphantly. And it turned the course of the war. So these guys - these 80 men on 16 planes - turned the course of history with that little raid.

On Cole's life after the war

He was a - kind of an institution at the Doolittle Raider reunions that were held every year. And they had a tradition there. The city of Tucson had made up 80 silver goblets inscribed with the names of the 80 men from the raid. And the names were written on one side right-side up and another side upside down. And each year, the men would privately gather and drink brandy in a toast to whoever had passed away the previous year. And then that man's goblet would be turned upside down. And there was one goblet that was still upright. And it actually still is now. But there's going to be a ceremony to turn over the very last one because they're all gone now.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          At Least 3 People Dead As Severe Weather Moves Across Southern U.S.       Comment   Translate Page      

Severe weather that moved across the southern U.S. on Saturday left at least three people dead and ravaged numerous homes in its path.

Two children, ages 3 and 8, were killed in eastern Texas when a tree fell on the car in which they were traveling. Angelina County Sheriff Greg Sanches said in a statement that the children, who were in the car with their parents during the storm, were pronounced dead on the scene.

"They were at the wrong place at the wrong time," Capt. Alton Lenderman of the Angelina County Sheriff's Office told The New York Times. "The tree fell just as they were going under it."

In central Texas, approximately a dozen people were injured in Franklin where a tornado was confirmed by the National Weather Service, according to The Dallas Morning News.

In a preliminary damage report, the National Weather Service assigned the tornado an EF-3 rating, saying peak winds reached around 140 mph in Franklin.

Video from the area showed damage to houses with roofs ripped off.

In North Texas, The Dallas Morning News reported hail, ranging from pea-sized to baseball-sized, falling throughout the region.

As the storm moved east, at least one man was killed by a tornado in the northern Mississippi, according to Monroe County Coroner Alan Gurley.

During a press conference, Monroe County Road Manager Sonny Clay said the man died when a tree fell on his trailer in Hamilton, Miss. At least 19 others were injured and taken to hospitals for treatment, the AP reports.

In Alabama, a possible tornado damaged some buildings, power lines and trees in the southeastern part of the state Sunday morning, according to the AP, but no injuries were reported.

In preparation for the inclement weather reaching Georgia, the Augusta National announced it would move up the start time on Sunday for Round 4 of the Masters in hope that play would finish before thunderstorms reached the golf course, according to CBS.

The severe weather is expected to continue into late Sunday evening. According to AccuWeather, regions from Ohio to Pennsylvania and southern New York to northern Florida are at risk of damaging winds and flash flooding.

According to The Washington Post's Capital Weather Gang, the potential for isolated tornadoes also exists and could affect the Mid-Atlantic region.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


          Orioles' Chris Davis Ends Hitless Streak       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Sunday Puzzle: A Piece Of Cake       Comment   Translate Page      

On-air challenge: Every answer is a word or name in which the second syllable sounds like the letter "K." The syllable is always accented, and there's at least one syllable after it.

Example: Flowering tree that grows in warm climates --> ACACIA

1. Time off from work when you travel somewhere

2. Mount Etna or Mount St. Helens

3. 17-year locust

4. Distracting from real life, as fantasy novels

5. A place

6. One's profession

7. Irish dramatist Seán

8. National park along the coast of Maine

9. Kind of map projection

10. Dirty tricks, sleight of hand

11. Lacking the skill to do something

12. Occurring naturally on a 24-hour cycle

Last week's challenge: Name a country. Remove its last letter. The remaining letters can be rearranged to spell a word that means "country" in that country's main language. What country is it?

Challenge answer: SPAIN --> PAIS (which means "country" in Spanish)

Winner: Ryan Saunders of Washington, D.C.

This week's challenge: Think of a word for a deceitful person. Move the middle letter to the end and you'll get another word for a deceitful person. What words are these?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday, April 18 at 3 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Sweden And Assange       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          'Stockholm': A Hostage Situation And How 'Stockholm Syndrome' Came To Be       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Peeling Back The Reasons Behind The Onion Shortage       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Hollywood Writers Vs. Agents       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          How Philadelphia Mandated Vaccinations In 1991       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          U.N. Envoy To Libya On Situation On The Ground       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Detained Immigrants Organize Hunger Strikes       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio. To see more, visit WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio.

          Assessing The Democratic Presidential Field From South Carolina       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          How The Rock 'N Play Baby Sleeper Became Popular And Why It Was Recalled       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Get Paid To Stay In Bed, For Space Science       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Sudanese Activist On What Comes Next       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Sunday Politics: Mueller Report Expectations       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          3 Decades In, Bruce Hornsby's Style Is Constantly Evolving       Comment   Translate Page      

In 1986, Bruce Hornsby became famous for his single "The Way It Is." But since then, he has embraced the constant evolution of his musical style throughout his career, experimenting with jazz, classical and even country. Never the same kind of musician, Hornsby has jammed on the accordion with the Grateful Dead and composed movie soundtracks for Spike Lee. His latest album, Absolute Zero, out now, is an embodiment of this constant motion, spiraling into whatever creative vision Hornsby has next.

Throughout his ambitious exploration of genre and sound, Hornsby says he always follows his own instinct. "I'm just interested in my older age and trying to make a sound that I haven't quite heard before," Hornsby says. "This record shows different ways that I'm trying to do that."

The album features skitter-y piano, doleful strings, bubbling percussion, and inspiration drawn from other fields Hornsby admires like science and literature fiction. One track, "White Noise" is specifically based on his favorite work by David Foster Wallace, The Pale King. "It's kind of a book about boredom. It's a book about IRS regional examination centers and the workers there," Hornsby explains. "So this song is about tax return examiners and CPAs is as American heroes."

Hornsby's latest exploration, Absolute Zero, is out now via Zappo Productions. Hornsby joined NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer to talk about searching for inspiration in unlikely places and how Absolute Zero came together. Hear their conversation in the audio link.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?       Comment   Translate Page      

When Merdis Wells visited the diabetes clinic at the University Medical Center in New Orleans about a year ago, a nurse practitioner checked her eyes to look for signs of diabetic retinopathy, the most common cause of blindness.

At her next visit, in February of this year, artificial intelligence software made the call.

The clinic had just installed a system that's designed to identify patients who need follow-up attention.

The Food and Drug Administration cleared the system — called IDx-DR — for use in 2018. The agency said it was the first time it had authorized the marketing of a device that makes a screening decision without a clinician having to get involved in the interpretation.

It's a harbinger of things to come. Companies are rapidly developing software to supplement or even replace doctors for certain tasks. And the FDA, accustomed to approving drugs and clearing medical devices, is now figuring out how to make sure computer algorithms are safe and effective.

Wells was one of the first patients at the clinic in early February to be tested with the new device, which can be run by someone without medical training. The system produces a simple report that identifies whether there are signs that a patient's vision is starting to erode.

Wells had no problem with the computer making the call. "I think that's lovely!" she says.

"Do I still get to see the pictures?" Wells asks nurse practitioner Debra Brown. Yes, Brown replies.

"I like seeing me because I want to take care of me, so I want to know as much as possible about me," Wells says.

The 60-year-old resident of nearby Algiers, La., leans into the camera, which has an eyepiece for each eye.

"It's just going to be like a regular picture," Brown explains. "But when we flash, the light will be a little bright."

Once Wells is in position, Brown adjusts the camera.

"Don't blink!" she says. "3-2-1-0!" The camera flashes and captures the image. Three more flashes and the exam is done.

She says still planning to examine the images and backstop the computer's conclusion. That reassures Wells.

The test is quick and easy, which is by design. People with diabetes are supposed to get this screening test every year, but many don't. Brown says the new system could allow the clinic to screen a lot more patients for diabetic retinopathy.

That's the hope of the system's inventor, Michael Abramoff, an ophthalmologist at the University of Iowa and company founder.

"The problem is many people with diabetes only go to an eye-care provider like me when they have symptoms," he says. "And we need to find [retinopathy] before then. So that's why early detection is really important."

Abramoff spent years developing a computer algorithm that could scan retina images and automatically pick up early signs of diabetic retinopathy. And he wanted it to work in clinics, like the one in New Orleans, rather than in ophthalmologists' offices.

Developing the computer algorithm wasn't the hard part.

"It turns out the biggest hurdle, if you care about patient safety, is the FDA," he says.

That hurdle is essential for public safety, but not an easy one for a brand-new technology — especially one that makes a medical call without an expert on hand.

Often medical software gets an easy road to market, compared with drugs. Software is handled through the generally less rigorous pathway for medical devices. For most devices, the evaluation involves a comparison with something already on the market.

But this technology for detecting diabetic retinopathy was unique, and a patient's vision is potentially on the line.

When Abramoff approached the FDA, "of course they were uncomfortable at first," he says, "and so we started working together on how can we prove that this can be safe."

Abramoff needed to show that the technology was not just safe and effective but that it would work on a very diverse population, since all sorts of people get diabetes. That ultimately meant testing the machine on 900 people at 10 different sites.

"We went into inner cities, we went into southern New Mexico to make sure we captured all those people that needed to be represented," he says.

All the sites were primary care clinics, because the company wanted to demonstrate that the technology would well without having an ophthalmologist on hand.

That extensive test satisfied the FDA that the test would be broadly useable, and reasonably accurate. IDx-DR surpassed the FDA's requirement. Test results that indicated eye disease needed to be correct at least 85 percent of the time, while those finding no significant eye damage needed to be correct at least 82.5 percent of the time.

"It's better than me, and I'm a very experienced retinal specialist," Abramoff says.

The FDA helped guide the company's software through its regulatory process, which is evolving to accommodate inventions flowing out of artificial intelligence labs.

Bakul Patel, associate director for digital health at the FDA, says that in general, the FDA expects more evidence and assurances for technologies that have a greater potential to cause harm if they fail.

Some software is completely exempt from the FDA process. A simple tweak in a routine piece of software may not require any FDA review at all. The rules get tighter for a change that could substantially alter the performance of an artificial intelligence algorithm.

The agency has years of experience approving software that is part of medical devices, but new algorithms are creating new challenges.

For one thing, the agency needs to be wary of approving an algorithm that's based on a particular set of patients, if it's not clear that it will be effective in different groups. An algorithm to identify skin cancer may be developed primarily on white patients and may not work on patients with darker skin.

And many algorithms, once on the market, will continue to gather data that can be used to improve their performance. Some programs outside of health science continually update themselves to accomplish that. That raises questions about how and when updated software needs another round of review.

"We realize that we have to re-imagine how we look at these things, and allow for the changes that go on, especially in this space," Patel says.

To do that, the FDA is testing out a whole new approach to clearing algorithms. The agency is experimenting with a system called precertification that puts more emphasis on examining the process that companies use to develop their products, and less emphasis on examining each new tweak. Continued monitoring is another element of this strategy.

"We're going to take this concept and take it on a test run," Patel says.

Because many algorithms will likely be in a state of continual evolution, "it's really important when a system is deployed in the real world that we monitor those systems to make sure that they're performing the way we expect," says Christina Silcox, a researcher at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy.

She's enthusiastic about the prospects of AI in medicine, while alert to some of the challenges the FDA will face.

"Right now we might see an update to a medical device every 18 months," she says. "In software you might expect to see one every two weeks or every month."

Seemingly minor software glitches can occasionally have serious unintended consequences. One of the worst cases involved a radiation therapy machine that, in the 1980s, gave huge overdoses of radiation to some patients because of a software bug.

Researchers looking at more recent incidents identified 627 software recalls by the FDA from 2011 through 2015. Those included 12 "high risk" devices such as ventilators and a defibrillator.

Patel certainly doesn't want to see a high-profile failure, because that could set back a promising and rapidly growing industry.

One challenge that's beyond the FDA's scope is figuring out how to resolve conflicting conclusions from rival devices. Genetic tests that are used to guide cancer treatment, for example, already provide conflicting treatment recommendations, says Isaac Kohane, a pediatrician who heads the biomedical informatics department at Harvard Medical School. "Guess what," he says, "The same thing is going to happen with these AI programs."

"We're going to have built-in disagreements and no doctor and no patient will know what is right," he says.

Indeed, IDx isn't the only company that interested in using an algorithm to identify early signs of diabetic retinopathy. Among its competitors is Verily, one of Google's sister companies, which is currently deploying its technology in India. (Google is among NPR's financial supporters).

"Actually I'm quite bullish in the long term," Kohane says, as he looks out on the burgeoning field of AI. "In the short term, it's wild land grab."

He says we need the equivalent of Consumer Reports in this area to help resolve these disagreements and identify superior technologies. He would also like reviews to examine not simply whether a technology performs as expected, but if it's an improvement for patients. "What you really want is to get healthy," he says.

The cost of the camera and set-up for the IDx-DR systems is around $20,000, a company spokesperson said in an email. There are options to rent or lease-to-own the camera that can reduce the upfront costs.

The list price for each exam is $34, the spokesperson said. But it varies depending on factors including patient volume.

A technically accurate piece of software doesn't automatically lead to better health.

At the diabetes clinic in New Orleans, for example, the system replaced a service that also checked for another cause of blindness, glaucoma.

Nurse practitioner Brown visually scans Wells' images for signs of glaucoma, but that wouldn't happen when the work is handed off to someone who lacks her expertise. Instead, the diabetes clinic staff will refer patients to get another appointment for that test.

Wells also got something that future patients might not – a review of her retina images, so she could see for herself any suspected issues. That interaction with a health care professional was also an important moment to talk about her diet and what she can do to stay healthy.

Chevelle Parker, another nurse practitioner, points to some silvery lines inside the eye's blood vessels.

"That happens when your sugar levels are high," Parker explains. "It can also be an indication of diabetic retinopathy. So we're going to do a referral and send you on for complete testing."

The software did its intended job. While Wells seemed a bit upset by the news, at least she has found out about this concern early, while there's still time to protect her vision.

You can reach NPR Science Correspondent Richard Harris at rharris@npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          With Indian Elections Underway, The Vote Is Also A Referendum On Hindu Nationalism       Comment   Translate Page      

Indian elections are often called the world's largest exercise in democracy. This month, nearly 900 million voters are eligible to cast ballots in national elections that started Thursday and will continue for more than five weeks.

They are deciding whether or not to re-elect Prime Minister Narendra Modi and members of his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, or BJP.

Their votes will also make clear the country's level of support for a growing trend in India's politics: Hindu nationalism.

"The shape of India is at stake," says Milan Vaishnav, who directs the South Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment in Washington, D.C. "One of the important things this election is going to determine is India's future as a secular republic that embraces pluralism and adheres to the founders' notion that India's unity is strengthened by its diversity."

Modi's record has been mixed: In his five years in office, India's economy has grown robustly, but unemployment has also risen to a 40-year high. There was an outbreak of violence this winter, when India exchanged airstrikes with its arch-rival and nuclear-armed neighbor, Pakistan.

There has also been an elevation of Hindu-centric policy and discourse. Supporters call it Hindu pride, or Hindutva — Hindu-ness, the feeling of being Hindu. Others call it Hindu nationalism, an ideology of Hindu hegemony — and a danger to the republic.

While Hinduism is India's majority religion (almost 80 percent of Indians are Hindu), Hindu nationalism is political. It's the idea that Hindu faith and culture should help shape the state and its policies — and it negates the contributions of others.

Hindu nationalism has roots in the 19th century, when it emerged as a backlash to the ideas of liberal Hindu reformers, British and Portuguese colonialism and Christian missionaries. It has gained prominence in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, especially under Modi and his Hindu nationalist BJP.

But it's often at odds with the secularism enshrined in India's constitution. Many see this election as a turning point in which India may decide to redefine itself according to its majority Hindu faith.

Beef bans, politician-monks, new names

The last five years under Modi have seen shifts, both gradual and not, as Hindu nationalists have grown increasingly assertive, inserting their priorities into Indian policy, laws and daily life.

The ideology of a Hindu nationalist group called the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) — where Modi spent his formative years — has become especially prominent in recent years. The RSS is an all-male Hindu volunteer corps that says it aims to promote Hinduism in civic life. But its critics accuse it of stirring hatred and violence toward India's minorities.

One RSS priority that has become law in several Indian states in recent years is a ban on cow slaughter and the consumption or sale of beef. Hindus consider cows sacred. Police enforce the bans, punishable with up to 10 years in jail in some states or municipal fines in others.

But self-appointed cow vigilantes — laypeople, sometimes affiliated with the RSS or BJP — have also taken it upon themselves to investigate and sometimes attack and even kill people suspected of dealing in beef on the black market.

The victims are often Muslims or lower-caste Hindus who traditionally consume and trade in beef and have been deprived of their livelihoods due to the new laws. There's been a rash of mob lynchings targeting those minorities in recent years. Between May 2015 and December 2018, at least 44 people — 36 of them Muslim — were killed in cow vigilante violence across 12 Indian states, according to Human Rights Watch. Hundreds more have been injured.

Meanwhile, Hindu monks and priests have risen to power in politics and business. Baba Ramdev, a monk and yoga guru with close ties to Modi, runs of one of the fastest-growing consumer goods empires in India, selling food, cosmetics and medicine based on ancient Hindu healing traditions.

The chief minister of Uttar Pradesh, India's most populous state, with more than 200 million residents, is a Hindu priest. Yogi Adityanath is a prominent member of Modi's party and a vocal Hindu nationalist, infamous for anti-Muslim rhetoric. His state government has enacted a beef ban and renamed cities and landmarks that previously had names rooted in Islam.

For example, the city of Allahabad, built in the 16th century by Muslim rulers of the Mughal Empire, was officially renamed last year as Prayagraj, a word that references an earlier Hindu settlement and pilgrimage site there.

Hindu nationalists argue that for centuries, British and Mughal dominance influenced how they view their own history — and they're now finally reinterpreting it through authentic Hindu eyes.

"India was subjugated under those Muslim rulers. People feel there was some injustice, and history has not been presented and narrated and understood in the way that it should have been understood," says Yogeshwar Tewari, head of the history department at Allahabad University (whose name remains unchanged for now). "Every nation goes through course correction."

The extent of what Tewari calls "subjugation" of Hindus is a question that has divided historians. But for many Indian Hindus, Muslim place names are like Confederate statues in the American South — reminders of a painful history, some of which are now being removed. During parts of the Mughal era, some Hindu temples were desecrated or destroyed, and for a time, a tax was levied on non-Muslims.

Others see the name changes as a dangerous process of erasing the history of an era in which the Mughals united India's disparate kingdoms, codified human rights and left behind some of the country's best-known architecture, including the Taj Mahal.

Today, more than 180 million Muslims make up nearly one-sixth of India's population, a bigger proportion of India than African-Americans are in the U.S.

"What is very clear from the kinds of alliances being made for the elections is that the purpose is to consolidate the Hindu vote," says historian Romila Thapar, professor emerita at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi. "Minority groups are shunted out or subordinated. As long as the majority is in the ascendency, it doesn't really matter what the conditions for minorities are. Fifty years ago, 70 years ago, everyone was equal. Today, it's majoritarianism."

Shrinking space for secularism

That sense of Hindu primacy is squeezing other voices out, Thapar warns.

"As rationalists, we are dismissed because we are told, 'You're not people of faith. You don't understand,'" she says. "Now the question is, is politics going to be run by people of faith?"

In 1947, when India won its freedom from British colonial rule, the territory was partitioned into a new Muslim state — Pakistan — and a secular, pluralistic state, India.

At the time, India's founding fathers — including the freedom fighter Mohandas Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru, who became the country's first prime minister — concluded that only a pluralistic democracy could hold together India's myriad ethnic groups, languages and castes.

Hindu nationalists were outraged. They had lobbied unsuccessfully for a Hindu state, with laws to be shaped by Hindu scripture. They accused Gandhi and Nehru of appeasing minorities by treating them as equals to Hindus under the law. Months later, a Hindu nationalist assassinated Gandhi.

Gandhi's death silenced any debate over his and Nehru's vision for a secular India. The RSS, to which Gandhi's assassin belonged, was banned after the murder — the first of three RSS bans, though all have been overturned and the group remains legal today. Nehru's daughter Indira Gandhi and grandson Rajiv Gandhi went on to become elected prime ministers of India with the Congress party, which has dominated Indian politics for most of the post-independence era.

India voted the Hindu nationalist BJP into power briefly in 1996, and then again in 1998 and 2014. If Modi is reelected this spring and serves another full five-year term, his would be the longest streak of non-Congress party rule in modern Indian history.

These days, even major secular political parties like the Congress party don't talk about secularism anymore, says Vaishnav.

"One of the most remarkable things about the 2019 election is how little opposition politicians are talking about secularism. It's a four-letter word," he says. "That's something that BJP and its Hindu nationalist allies have succeeded in bringing about."

The question now is whether Indians voting over the next five weeks will endorse that vision for their country.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          After Decades Of Comics, 'Cathy' Cartoonist Found Writing 'So Liberating'       Comment   Translate Page      

Cathy Guisewite, the creator of the "Cathy" comic strip, didn't really want the character to be named after her. People would think that "Cathy" was based on her own life, she reasoned, and ... they would be right. Or, at least, they wouldn't be wrong.

"Cathy was kind of my heart," Guisewite says. "Other stronger characters in the strip like Andrea were more my brain. But Cathy was kind of my heart, that was me."

When "Cathy" hit the newspapers in 1976, it struck a chord with a lot of women. Fans identified with her self-deprecating humor and her relentless insecurity about her looks and love life. Detractors railed against the strip for reinforcing stereotypes of women.

Now, more than 40 years after Cathy's debut, Guisewite has published a book of essays called Fifty Things that Aren't My Fault. And in it, she responds to some of Cathy's critics.

"Some people thought my work reinforced the negative stereotype of women being obsessed with shopping, weight and love," she writes. "But it wasn't my fault we still live in a world that partly judges women by what we wear, how much we weigh, and whether or not and who or how we love. Not my fault that with every glorious new possibility for women came an extra sense of isolation when we not only couldn't keep up but were told we shouldn't talk about the things that held us back."

By her mid 20s, Guisewite had a successful career in advertising. She was eager to take advantage of all the new opportunities that were opening up for women. But being single and independent had its drawbacks. She felt caught between what she calls "the two Bettys" — the 1950s icon of the ideal homemaker Betty Crocker, and the new, vibrant, feminist voice of Betty Friedan. She wanted what both had to offer.

"I wanted a career," Guisewite says. "I wanted my independence. I wanted to put off marriage and children, and have my own success. But I also really wanted a boyfriend. You know? I was in my mid 20s. I wanted someone to love me."

Guisewite found humor in her own insecurities and an outlet for them in the comic strip. (For all the jokes Guisewite made over the years about her character's obsession with food and weight, she herself is tiny.) Clearly she was not alone in feeling unsure of her footing in the new world that had been opened by feminism.

Guisewite retired the comic strip in 2010 when she needed more time for her aging parents and her teenage daughter. As she commuted between the two, she began jotting down her thoughts, which is how the book got started.

"When I started writing these essays, it was like coming home and taking off the Spanx," she says. "This was so liberating. I loved getting to write longer and more thoughtfully about a lot of the same things I wrote about in the strip."

Guisewite still uses humor to sift through her feelings and she still obsesses over food, and clothes, and the people she loves. But she hopes she's gained some wisdom over the years that she can share with very different generation of women.

Young women lined up recently to meet Guisewite after a book event at The Wing — a communal workspace and social club for women — in New York's SoHo neighborhood. This generation has inherited the feminism that was brand new when Guisewite was young. And Guisewite fan Stephanie Roman says they are still grappling with some of the same issues.

"I'm a body image coach, so the whole theme about food, and dieting, and trying to accept ourselves, and willpower and lack of willpower — whatever it might be — is still definitely a big thread in my life," Roman says.

A lot of these women remember reading the "Cathy" comic strip as kids. Jessica Schwartz sports a Cathy button that reads: "I don't have time for this mid-life crisis."

"Cathy was such a real-seeming woman," Schwartz explains. "I mean, screaming, and pulling her hair out, and freaking out about tiny things — literally the most relatable comic figure ever."

As Schwartz approaches Guisewite, she pulls something out of her bag ... it's a cake pan, in the shape of Cathy's face. "Oh my God, you have the cake pan," Guisewite says, recognizing the merch. Schwartz shows Guisewite photos of the Cathy cakes (and a meatloaf) she's made over the years.

As Guisewite takes in the array of desserts made in Cathy's image, it's clear she's delighted her character means so much to these young women. Guisewite hopes this new book will feel like a friend ... the kind who knows exactly what to say when you need some reassurance.

As for Guisewite's advice to this new generation of women? Never lose your sense of humor.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          'Debatable' List Of '100 Most Jewish' Foods Leaves Plenty Of Room For Kibbitzing       Comment   Translate Page      

It's hard to talk about Jewish culture without talking about food. The bagels, the brisket, the babka. Oh, the babka.

Ask anyone who is spending this weekend filling their freezer with matzo balls for the upcoming Passover Seder, and they'll tell you that food is intertwined with Jewish culture and history — to the point,where it can become a theology in and of itself, the stage on which all sorts of Jewish values are performed. It's not surprising to learn that the code of Jewish law is called the Shulchan Aruch — the set table. And that the commentary on the book is the Mappah — the tablecloth. But that said, what exactly does it mean for a food to be Jewish?

Alana Newhouse, editor of Tablet Magazine, the online journal which brands itself as a new read on Jewish life, attempts to answer this question (or operate from the place of having answered it) with a newly published book, The 100 Most Jewish Foods: A Highly Debatable List. In a series of short essays, contributors wax on about dishes from Mitteleuropa to the Middle East, probing through lines of history and sentiment (and making a collective case as to why the latter may be more important than the former).

From the outset (well, actually from the subtitle), Newhouse acknowledges this is loaded territory.

"This is not a list of today's most popular Jewish foods, or someone's idea of the tastiest, or even the most enduring," Newhouse lays out in the introduction. "What's here, instead, are the foods that contain the deepest Jewish significance — the ones that, throughout the history of our people (however you date it), have been most profoundly inspired by the rhythms of the Jewish calendar and the contingencies of the Jewish experience."

Significance and profound inspiration can of course be in the eye (or stomach) of the beholder. But the list is admirable. Sure, we could quibble with some of the choices (say, omitting Crisco's fine Jewish history). But the book details what are clearly the greatest hits: the deli stalwarts, the Israeli favorites, the convenience foods that targeted the kosher market and became ingrained in diaspora tradition. Or, as Newhouse puts it, "the salty, the sweet, the dense, the light, the beautiful, and the undeniably brown, stretching back over thousands of years of civilization and from nearly every region of the planet."

But for those looking for a full picture of the histories and resonances of the particular foods that made the list — well, they may be somewhat disappointed.

This book grew out of an online project, and often it shows. Like a lot of quick turnaround writing of the Internet age, many pieces in this book are lightly sourced, and some more about clever constructions (that, say, some of the top bagel joints aren't run by Jews) than deeper-level history and fact (many of them still are, also: *Talmudic shrug*).

Zac Posen's article on borscht simply tells you that it is pink, and he developed a recipe for it, and life has sweet and sour moments. (Lea Zeltserman thankfully comes in with a beautiful meditation on how this food, which defines Russian-Jewish cuisine, actually fits into the stories and tables of those Jews who lived through the Soviet era). And fine fish chef Eric Ripert weighs in on gefilte fish, just to ultimately tell you that it is ... not that bad?

More troubling are the entries that not only sidestep the rich stories of how particular foods became "Jewish," but consciously disregard these histories in a deliberate attempt to nationalize them. Writer Liel Leibovitz urges readers to "Forget the heated arguments about [hummus'] true national origins," because all you need to know is that it's the official dip of the NFL. And his entry for shakshuka shrugs, "So what if the Moroccans make it, too. Never mind that the Tunisians eat it for breakfast each weekend, or that it delights the Greeks and satiates the Algerians: Shakshuka is Israeli now." These are clearly attempts to be cheeky (humor being a fine Jewish value), but the glib gloss on appropriation can be difficult to stomach. As is editor Alana Newhouse's essay joking that terrible store-bought cookies served at temple are more of a threat to American Judaism than the BDS movement calling for an economic boycott to force Israel to recognize Palestinian statehood.

That said, there are some beautiful meditations on food and family and feeling within these pages. Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett writes an homage to everything that could be made from the whole chickens her mother and grandmother would get from the kosher butcher. The feet ended up enriching soup (after careful cleaning and prepping); the neck bones would add flavor and bits of meat to the broth; the neck skin would be stuffed with filling and sewn up with white cotton thread. The bird itself would be roasted to golden-crisp perfection, while the eyerlekh, the unhatched chicken eggs found inside freshly slaughtered chickens, would be floated in soup. (Because of salmonella-testing regulations, they aren't easily found anymore.)

There are stories of beloved grandmothers, of the wealth of Yiddish words for dill, and of the surprising role of sugar cereals in Orthodox homes. (They're a Sabbath morning treat, when religious prohibitions on work mean adherents can't cook the usual hot breakfast.) Leah Koenig (who provides context and commentary throughout the book) explains how after the destruction of the temple, religious rites were transferred to the Sabbath table, making breads like challah akin to a divine offering. And MaNishtana reflects on the special resonances of a Seder meal — and the mortar of charoset in particular — for African American Jews, for whom the legacy of slavery is lived on a daily basis.

There are also the personal recollections that are downright hilarious — like Josh Malina's story of his grandmother's gribenes (chicken skin cracklings), and his own adoption thereof. ("For an elegant vegetarian version, simply don't eat anything at all.") And Wayne Hoffman serves up a pitch-perfect ode to the (shared) used tea bag on his parents' kitchen counter.

The book comes with 60 recipes, but that's almost beside the point. (And who can agree on the definitive version anyways?) This is about how food is tied up in sentiment, and the role it can play in life. These are the stories of snacks people ate when they came home from school, memories from the holiday table, treats from the sorts of bakeries that don't exist anymore. Its very existence is an engagement in the fine Jewish tradition of debate, and there is clearly room for the arguments to continue. But The 100 Most Jewish Foods is also a love letter — to food, family, faith and identity, and the deliciously tangled way they come together.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Noah's Wife Gets A Name In 'Naamah'       Comment   Translate Page      

"And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the Earth."

So begins the story of the flood in Genesis — God's decision to restart creation by sparing two of every animal, and just one family from the deluge.

The ark carries the family of Noah and his sons, plus a pair of every living creature. It also carries Noah's wife, who is not named in the Bible, but who goes on to become the matriarch of all future generations.

Sarah Blake's new book Naamah gives that woman a name, a story, and a purpose. "What really struck me about Noah's wife was the way that she was so stuck," Blake says. "I was writing the book at a time when I was feeling very stuck." She was re-reading Genesis, she adds, and she was startled to realize just how long the voyage lasted. "Really, it's over a year that they're on the ark, just looking out over water. It's months and months and months until even the very tops of mountains appear. I was just overwhelmed by the idea of just looking across all the water and just having no idea what was to come for Naamah and her family."


Interview Highlights

On the dirty, smelly reality of life on an ark full of animals

It seemed like a totally terrifying prospect to me, to not only know that you had to keep them alive because you were the only reason life would continue post-flood, but then also that they were dangerous ... you know, even if you go to a farm that's lovely, it still smells. ... And I'm really interested in biology and bodies — you know, as much as we are shedding and getting oily, so are the animals, but she has to not only take care of herself, but take care of all of them and their super-varied needs.

On writing a lot of sex on the ark

To me, it really is a book about bodies and physicality and survival, and when I think about these things, to me, I'm thinking about bodies and their existence in the world, and how many ways we have to take care of our bodies, and pleasure has to do with that, and sex has to do with that, and I wanted to be really true to what that experience was going to be like.

On Naamah's conflicted relationship with God

I think she's so flummoxed by how they've gotten into this position, and why her, and why not others, and what it could mean, all these conversations that he seems to have with other people, and not with her — and yet to keep putting her in these positions of godliness, where she's in charge of everything, and she has to make sure things survive, and yet she doesn't get to hear his reasoning, or know him. So I think she's just coming from a point of utter frustration at the start of the book, and then she's learning how to deal with that over the course of it.

On writing the weirder, more supernatural parts of the book

Any students I've had, they'll tell you that's kind of my go-to phrase, is "make it weirder." I think weirdness is where you get into why we differ, person to person. If you say, "what does thunder sound like?" everybody will say the same first few words. But if you say, "OK, make it more specific, make it weirder," then everyone starts to differ. Everyone's very unique perspective as a person comes out as you get towards weirdness.

This piece was produced for radio by Dana Cronin and Barrie Hardymon, and adapted for the Web by Petra Mayer.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Watch BTS Further Its Quest For World Domination On The 'SNL' Stage       Comment   Translate Page      

A multilingual K-pop juggernaut, BTS mashes up pop, hip-hop, rock and dance music with huge, infectious energy and kinetic choreography. It's one of the biggest bands in the world, and as of this weekend, it's got a Saturday Night Live performance under its belt too. The South Korean septet has built a fan base that's broad (its videos are viewed many hundreds of millions of times each), deep (its fans tend to be intensely devoted, especially on social media) and fully worldwide (its new record, Map of the Soul: Persona, is almost certain to top the U.S. album charts this week).

Every generation gets its own crop of boy bands, but BTS feels like an unusually potent force: Its sound seems to straddle the whole world, the songs are catchy as anything and each member brings enormous charisma to the mix. Lots of bands can seem strangely diminished by the SNL stage on TV, but on Saturday night, BTS filled every inch of the frame with flashy motion — tight choreography, bright colors, bold energy — as it performed "Boy With Luv" (from Map of the Soul) and "MIC Drop" (from 2018's Face Yourself).

That BTS has crossed over into the U.S. mainstream pop-cultural consciousness is no surprise; the group has been ascending for years amid a prolific burst of thematically ambitious albums and EPs. But this new surge feels like a genuine tipping point: The SNL appearance dominated social media all weekend, and BTS will drop another heavily hyped spectacle at the Billboard Music Awards on May 1. The group will team up with Halsey — a guest on the studio version of "Boy With Luv" — for the latter performance, the news of which broke during commercials Saturday night. Twitter was extremely excited, so strap in: SNL was just the beginning.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.


          'I Love You, But You're Wrong,' And Other Salvos On The Front Lines Of Civility       Comment   Translate Page      

A lawyer and her future son-in-law argue furiously about politics on Facebook, each accusing the other of ignoring "the facts."

A newly married couple gets into an uncomfortably heated argument as they watch the confirmation hearings of then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, until one finally leaves the room. "I love you, but you're wrong," she says.

A Mexican-American college student argues with her Trump-supporting mother — also Mexican-American — about how she could possibly accept the idea of a border wall.

These, of course, are not isolated stories: Political differences can drive a wedge through even the closest families and friendships. A 2017 Reuters/Ipsos poll found that 13 percent of respondents said the 2016 election had caused them to end a relationship with a friend or relative. Nearly 40 percent said the election had provoked at least one argument with a loved one.

More broadly, Americans say they're worried that the United States is growing more polarized and that civility — respect, courtesy, kindness — is slipping away in many aspects of their lives. From road rage to Twitter feuds to the rancor at the highest levels of government, polls show that Americans think incivility is at crisis levels.

Recently, NPR has been traveling the country to explore how people are grappling with the idea of civility in polarizing times.

Here are five stories about the shaky line that people walk to keep things civil — or not — in their most intimate relationships.


'I Love You, But You're Wrong'

When Patricia "P." Price met Simone Perry in 2016, she was surprised when Simone told her she was Republican. As P. explains, "Black, lesbian and Republican — it doesn't go in the same sentence." They got married a year later, and Simone Perry became Simone Price.

Simone, who initially supported Ted Cruz and voted for Gary Johnson in 2016, says P. is more interested in "how I carry myself and how I treat people than who I support politically." P., a Democrat who voted for Hillary Clinton, says Simone is much more engaged in politics than she is and wins 90 percent of their political debates.

But several months ago, a debate flared into a fight that P. was not willing to concede. The confirmation hearings for Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court were on TV, and P. says she was "completely turned off" by his demeanor.

Simone, on the other hand, sympathized with Kavanaugh's need to defend himself. She remembers asking P., "If someone we love is ever accused of something, are we going to grant them the benefit of the doubt?"

The argument got angry, uncomfortable. Both women say they often use prayer or meditation to calm themselves if they're fighting, but this political moment called for more immediate action: When P. felt she couldn't take it anymore, she walked out and went upstairs.


The Fight Stays On Facebook

Christopher Kilpatrick and Cheryl Hume are about as politically different as two people can be. Chris, 38, describes himself as a "far-right kind of guy" who voted for Trump. Cheryl, his 58-year-old future mother-in-law, voted for Hillary Clinton and donates to causes like refugee resettlement and prisoner re-entry programs. They see each other only a few times a year but connect frequently on Facebook, where they clash over everything from Trump's border wall to the latest conspiracy theory.

Their back-and-forth can get barbed — they sometimes attack each other for being ignorant — but before things get too nasty, one of them changes the subject. "How's Kathy doing?" Cheryl might ask.

Kathy is Chris' fiancée and Cheryl's foster daughter. Both Chris and Cheryl say it's their mutual love for Kathy that helps them put their political differences in perspective.

When the family gets together, Chris and Cheryl say, they avoid talking politics, partly to spare Kathy the misery of playing referee, but partly, they say, because they genuinely enjoy each other's company. Chris calls Cheryl "big hearted," and Cheryl describes Chris as a "good guy."

But when they return home from a family gathering, Chris and Cheryl retreat to their respective corners on social media and resume sparring. Happily for them, Kathy doesn't pay that much attention to Facebook.


The Reluctant Mediator

Lorraine Bank, 67, says she thinks her children were raised right and "instilled with good values." But somewhere along the way — through school, TV or the workplace — she thinks her two daughters "got brainwashed." Politically, the sisters lean liberal, while Lorraine is a staunch conservative. She says she and her husband mention Trump often enough so their children "know we think he's a good president, but we don't rub it in."

That's not always enough for daughter Valerie, 28, who voted for Clinton in 2016. She says she has to steel herself when she visits her parents.

"I do breathing exercises," she says. "Before I get into a conversation, I give myself a pep talk and say, 'I'm going to keep calm, I'm not going to engage, and if someone tries to bait me, I'm not going to take the bait.' "

Sometimes she has a few drinks to calm herself down. If all else fails, she leaves the room.

For the past few years, Valerie has had to deal with an additional family stress: Her older sister, Sarah, stopped talking to their mother after a serious fight. (Sarah declined to participate in this story.)

As their mother, Lorraine, tells it, after a series of political disagreements, she and Sarah got into a "final straw" argument about gay marriage shortly before the 2016 election. At one point, Lorraine referred to gays as "fags," and although she says she later apologized, Sarah still refuses to speak to her.

"I pray every day that whatever is wrong, she can get over it and she'll wake up and know we still love her," Lorraine says.

Now, on the few family occasions where everyone is together, Sarah won't interact directly with her mother. Valerie plays the reluctant mediator, trying to knit together a conversation between two people who can no longer find the words.


From 'Oh Crap' To A Lasting Friendship

In 2016, Michael Beale and Francesco Mazza were assigned to be freshman roommates at High Point University in North Carolina. And before they met, they each formed an instant impression of the other.

Michael remembers that Francesco was wearing a bright red "Make America Great Again" hat in his Facebook profile photo.

"And I thought to myself, 'Oh crap, I gotta live with this kid for a year,' " Michael says.

Francesco recalls that Michael's Facebook page had a picture of Bob Marley on it.

"So I'm like, 'Jesus, Mary and Joseph, he's probably like some hippie liberal,' " Francesco recalls. (Michael actually voted for Libertarian Gary Johnson. And for the record, he doesn't remember a Bob Marley picture: "It was probably me at a Grateful Dead concert," he says.).

Despite their respective knee-jerk reactions, both men decided to approach the year with open-mindedness — a trait that helped them avoid arguments and eventually build a friendship that has sustained to this day. Now 21-year-old juniors, the two recently returned from a spring break trip to Florida.

And almost since the day they met, they haven't been afraid to debate politics.

"Michael will ask how I think Trump is doing," says Francesco. "If I think he's doing something stupid, I'll say so."

Francesco, the son of a police officer, grew up around guns in Norristown, Pa. Michael was raised in Connecticut near Sandy Hook Elementary School, where a devastating mass shooting made him wonder why anyone would own a gun.

Whenever there's a shooting in the news, they find themselves going back and forth about gun policy. Like many of their political debates, these conversations can be eye-opening — but rarely, they admit, mind changing.


'We Go Slowly, Trying Not To Hurt Each Other'

Nancy Richer, a 55-year-old Mexican-American, was born in Texas and spent half of her life in Mexico. Her daughter, Daniela Garduno, 19, was born in Mexico but grew up mostly north of the border. Each woman says she feels a stronger pull to one side of the Mexican-American hyphen: Nancy identifies more with her American side, Daniela with her Mexican side.

And that can cause tension. Daniela is against the border wall, while her mother supports it.

Nancy says she is proud of her older friends who went through the immigration process legally: "They had to wait 18 years. They had to pay. They had to go through all the process," she says. "Why not the others?"

Daniela says she's confused that her mother, a Trump supporter, "can be Mexican and at the same time advocate for rights that are very anti-immigrant, anti-Latino." She says she sometimes regrets that she and her mother aren't more politically aligned and can't have the relaxed, head-nodding conversations that some of her school friends have with their parents.

At the same time, both mother and daughter say they try to be respectful of each other's opinions, which helps keep their political arguments to a gentle roar.

"When I'm having these issues with my mom," Daniela says, "I'll distance myself from the political part of it — I separate my mother from the politics."

Of her daughter, Nancy says, "When I see that she's responding as if I'm attacking her — instead of her points of view — that's when I stop. ... We go slowly, trying not to hurt each other."

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Pete Buttigieg Helped Transform South Bend As Mayor, But Some Feel Left Out       Comment   Translate Page      

Updated at 3:26 p.m. ET

When Molly Hewitt left South Bend, Ind., for college, she didn't think she'd return to live there again. Since the 1960s, the city had suffered the same brain drain that plagued many other Midwestern cities faced with industrial decline.

"The goal was always to be successful enough that you don't have to come back to South Bend," she said.

But while she was away, things were turning around. Hewitt's parents kept her in the loop and she decided to give another chance to the city led by Democratic mayor Pete Buttigieg.

"I came back, honestly because of Pete and I've seen a lot of my friends do that and a lot of people who didn't grow up here that want to come to South Bend," she said. Now Hewitt is 23, living in South Bend and volunteering for the campaign of James Mueller, the candidate Buttigieg endorsed to replace him in this year's mayoral election.

Buttigieg, 37, officially announced his candidacy for the presidency on Sunday. On the campaign trail he speaks a lot about how being mayor of South Bend since 2012 has prepared him to be president.

"We transformed the trajectory of our city," Buttigieg said in an interview on Morning Edition in January. "This is a community that was written off as dying at the beginning of this decade. Now it's growing again."

South Bend's population is up more than 1,000 people since 2010 following decades of hemorrhaging tens of thousands of residents.

Investment in the city's downtown, public private partnerships, economic development — including turning the long vacant Studebaker auto plant, which closed its doors in 1963, into a tech hub — have been credited with the change.

"There's a definite difference in how it used to be versus how it is now," said Jake Mitchell, who went to high school with Buttigieg. "Just kind of an intangible feeling. You know, everything seems nicer, cleaner."

But others in this once-industrial town feel left out, despite what Buttigieg has done.

"You're doing a lot for downtown and you're building hotels and apartments that people who are native to this town can't even afford, even the people with college degrees," said activist Lisa DeBerry. "So it's like, who are you developing that for?"

Early in his first term Buttigieg set a goal to knock down 1,000 blighted houses in a thousand days - which the city exceeded.

"And that's certainly helped," said Jack Colwell, a long time columnist for the South Bend Tribune. "Neighborhoods where there had been these vacant houses they were drug houses, gangs used them, they were eyesores."

A lot of the housing stock in South Bend comes from the heyday of the Studebaker plant, which employed thousands of workers.

Now, most of the deteriorated neighborhoods are historically minority and lower income. And when the houses started coming down, teacher Regina Williams-Preston says she stepped up and got involved with others there.

"The people rose up and said, 'Hey, we need help out here. Don't knock down our communities, give us help. It's our tax dollars, invest in us,'" she recalled.

"And that's when we got two million dollars of investment in home repair and two million more invested in new construction for affordable homes," added Williams-Preston, who is now a council member and is also running to replace Buttigieg as the mayor of South Bend when his second term ends Dec. 31.

Williams-Preston said she felt that working with Buttigieg as a mayor, part of the job was preparing him for the next step.

Jason Critchlow, another mayoral candidate, who used to be the county Democratic Party chair, said Buttigieg didn't turn the city around on his own.

"I think there's a feeling here that it's disingenuous to pretend that one person had solely to do with any of the progress made here in South Bend," Critchlow said. "I think there's been literally decades of public servants that have gotten us to where we are today."

And it's still far from a complete turnaround. More than a quarter of the population still lives at or below the poverty line, compared to the national average of around 14 percent.

DeBerry, the activist, says Buttigieg shouldn't become president."That's like a mother having her own children and not taking care of them and then wants foster children," she said, expressing a feeling she says is shared by many who were left behind by the city's transformation. "It's like no, we're not going to give you more."

Williams-Preston says she hopes that if Buttigieg becomes president, he would take the lessons he learned in South Bend forward.

"You could really be like the president of the United States one day. It's up to us, like the people of South Bend to make sure you're ready for that task."

Buttigieg was an improbable mayor — he was only 29 when he was first elected. And he's hoping his experience since then in South Bend will land him in another improbable place - the White House.

Copyright 2019 WVPE 88.1 Elkhart/South Bend. To see more, visit WVPE 88.1 Elkhart/South Bend.

          At Least 3 People Dead As Severe Weather Moves Across Southern U.S.      Comment   Translate Page      
Two children were killed in eastern Texas during a storm when a tree fell on the car in which they were traveling. And, in Hamilton, Miss., a man was found dead after a tree fell on his trailer.
          Watch BTS Further Its Quest For World Domination On The 'SNL' Stage      Comment   Translate Page      
The multilingual boy-band juggernaut, SNL's first musical guest from South Korea, performed kinetically choreographed renditions of "Boy With Luv" and "MIC Drop."
          The Wait Is Almost Over For The (Almost) Full Mueller Report To Be Released      Comment   Translate Page      
After a letter detailing the special counsel's principal findings — which the GOP saw as a vindication for Trump — the attorney general is expected to release the lengthy report, with redactions.
          Severe storms leave damage across parts of north Georgia - FOX 5 Atlanta      Comment   Translate Page      
  1. Severe storms leave damage across parts of north Georgia  FOX 5 Atlanta
  2. At Least 3 People Dead As Severe Weather Moves Across Southern U.S.  NPR
  3. Southern states brace for severe weather; tornado warnings issued  Fox News
  4. Tornado watch: Severe thunderstorms possible today across Cincinnati  WLWT Cincinnati
  5. 6 dead after severe weather rips through the South  ABC News
  6. View full coverage on Google News

          At Least 3 People Dead As Severe Weather Moves Across Southern U.S. - NPR      Comment   Translate Page      
  1. At Least 3 People Dead As Severe Weather Moves Across Southern U.S.  NPR
  2. Severe weather threat to aim for eastern US into Sunday night  AccuWeather.com
  3. Southern states brace for severe weather; tornado warnings issued  Fox News
  4. Tornado watch: Severe thunderstorms possible today across Cincinnati  WLWT Cincinnati
  5. 6 dead after severe weather rips through the South  ABC News
  6. View full coverage on Google News

          Peeling Back The Reasons Behind The Onion Shortage      Comment   Translate Page      
Weather issues in the U.S. and elsewhere have contributed to an onion shortage. NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with Shay Myers, is a third-generation farmer growing onions in Idaho and Oregon.
          'Debatable' List Of '100 Most Jewish' Foods Leaves Plenty Of Room For Kibbitzing      Comment   Translate Page      
As families around the country fill their freezers with matzo balls and gefilte fish in preparation for the coming Passover Seder, a new book asks: What does it mean for a food to be Jewish?
          High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out      Comment   Translate Page      
A study of siblings finds those who have a stress-related disorder have a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event, compared to their less-stressed brothers and sisters.
          Tiger Woods Wins His 5th Masters Title, Marking A Career Comeback      Comment   Translate Page      
Sunday's victory at Augusta came nearly 11 years after Woods' last major title and capped a remarkable personal comeback for Woods after facing career-threatening injuries.
          Opinion: A Showcase Of 'Uncaged Art' By Children Once Detained      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Scott Simon explores an art exhibit in El Paso, Texas, by unaccompanied minors detained at the now-closed Tornillo Children's Detention center.
          High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out      Comment   Translate Page      
A study of siblings finds those who have a stress-related disorder have a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event, compared to their less-stressed brothers and sisters.
          Playwright Suzan-Lori Parks Handles Heavy Themes In Racial Drama 'White Noise'      Comment   Translate Page      
Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks is back with a new controversial play. "White Noise" centers on a group of four interracial friends who get caught up in a contract that gets out of hand.
          #NPRPoetry Month: Lauren Alleyne      Comment   Translate Page      
It's National Poetry Month, and for our series #NPRPoetry, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with poet Lauren Alleyne. Alleyne combed Twitter for her favorite original poems.
          Breaking Down The Hollywood Dispute Between Writers And Agents      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Kim Masters, editor-at-large for The Hollywood Reporter, about the ongoing dispute between writers and agents.
          Understanding Changes To The Tax Code      Comment   Translate Page      
Kay Bell, a writer for the Don't Mess With Taxes blog, talks with NPR's Michel Martin about changes in the tax code this year.
          AG Barr Prepares To Release Redacted Mueller Report      Comment   Translate Page      
Attorney General William Barr is preparing to release a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report. It summarizes years of investigation into 2016 election interference.
          Tiger Woods Wins 2019 Masters      Comment   Translate Page      
In a surprise comeback, Tiger Woods wins his first major title in more than a decade.
          Can Julian Assange Legally Be Extradited To The U.S.?      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with John Bellinger, former State Department legal adviser, about the possibility of Julian Assange being extradited to the United States.
          Trump Administration Considers Transferring Immigrants to 'Sanctuary Cities'      Comment   Translate Page      
Hogan Gidley, White House principal deputy press secretary, talks with NPR's Michel Martin about President Trump's proposal to relocate detained migrants to so-called sanctuary cities.
          #NPRPoetry Month: Lauren Alleyne      Comment   Translate Page      
It's National Poetry Month, and for our series #NPRPoetry, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with poet Lauren Alleyne. Alleyne combed Twitter for her favorite original poems.
          After Decades Of Comics, 'Cathy' Cartoonist Found Writing 'So Liberating'      Comment   Translate Page      
Cathy Guisewite drew her comic strip for more than 30 years. Her new book is called Fifty Things that Aren't My Fault. Writing essays "was like coming home and taking off the Spanx," she says.
          'Debatable' List Of '100 Most Jewish' Foods Leaves Plenty Of Room For Kibbitzing      Comment   Translate Page      
As families around the country fill their freezers with matzo balls and gefilte fish in preparation for the coming Passover Seder, a new book asks: What does it mean for a food to be Jewish?
          Noah's Wife Gets A Name In 'Naamah'      Comment   Translate Page      
Sarah Blake's new book retells the biblical flood from the point of view of Noah's wife — who never has a name in the Bible, but who nevertheless helped humanity (and all those animals) survive.
          Sunday Session: April 14, 2019      Comment   Translate Page      
Amina Claudine Myers
Here's a roundup of various music-related items of interest that have shown up in one of StLJN's various inboxes or feeds over the past week:

* Nenette Evans: My Life With Bill (AllAboutJazz.com)
* The Eclectic Mr. Klein (Jazz Times)
* Harold Danko: His Own Sound, His Own Time (AllAboutJazz.com)
* ECM @ 50 (AllAboutJazz.com)* “The most in depth concert in over 35 years”: Rod Stewart and Jeff Beck to reunite on stage (NME.com)
* Ed Palermo Enjoys a ‘Lousy Day’ with New Album (DownBeat)
* Alan Lomax’s Massive Music Archive Is Online: Features 17,000 Historic Blues & Folk Recordings (OpenCulture.com)
* Interview: Pianist Amina Claudine Myers (JazzRightNow.com)
* Knocking on doors in search of Philadelphia’s jazz history (WHYY)
* Jazz Heavyweights Herbie Hancock And Kamasi Washington Announce Joint Tour (NPR)
* Keystone Korner Club Revived in Baltimore (Jazz Times)
* Emmet Cohen Wins American Pianists Association Competition (DownBeat)
* Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks Dig Deep (DownBeat)
* George Benson talks back (Offbeat)
* Inside the Barry Harris Method (Jazz Times)
* Ambient in Outer Space: Seven Artists Exploring the Final Frontier (Bandcamp.com)
* Works of Wadada Leo Smith Celebrated at Third CREATE Festival (DownBeat)
* Four-year legal battle over estate of legendary blues musician Muddy Waters continues in DuPage courtroom (Chicago Tribune)
* AIM’s Gee Davy on the future of generative Artificial Intelligence in music (MusicBusinessWorldwide.com)
* Angel of Harlem: How a patron saint to a forgotten generation of musicians came to face her greatest challenge yet (ABC News)
* Space for the Wrong: An Interview with Frederic Rzewski (Atavist.com)
* Jazzman Dave Douglas finds inspiration in Dizzy Gillespie (Houston Chronicle)
* Hi-Fi Cocktail Bars Aren’t Just for Tokyo Anymore (Bloomberg.com)
* Holographic Frank Zappa Plays Guitar Solo in New Tour Promo (Rolling Stone)
* Berklee's Institute Of Jazz And Gender Justice Aims To Combat Sexism In Jazz (WBUR)
* The Songsmiths of Sesame Street (The Atlantic)
* Spotify, the Decline of Playlists and the Rise of Podcasts (Music Industry Blog)
          Playwright Suzan-Lori Parks Handles Heavy Themes In Racial Drama 'White Noise'      Comment   Translate Page      
Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks is back with a new controversial play. "White Noise" centers on a group of four interracial friends who get caught up in a contract that gets out of hand.
          #NPRPoetry Month: Lauren Alleyne      Comment   Translate Page      
It's National Poetry Month, and for our series #NPRPoetry, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with poet Lauren Alleyne. Alleyne combed Twitter for her favorite original poems.
          Breaking Down The Hollywood Dispute Between Writers And Agents      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Kim Masters, editor-at-large for The Hollywood Reporter, about the ongoing dispute between writers and agents.
          Understanding Changes To The Tax Code      Comment   Translate Page      
Kay Bell, a writer for the Don't Mess With Taxes blog, talks with NPR's Michel Martin about changes in the tax code this year.
          AG Barr Prepares To Release Redacted Mueller Report      Comment   Translate Page      
Attorney General William Barr is preparing to release a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report. It summarizes years of investigation into 2016 election interference.
          Tiger Woods Wins 2019 Masters      Comment   Translate Page      
In a surprise comeback, Tiger Woods wins his first major title in more than a decade.
          Can Julian Assange Legally Be Extradited To The U.S.?      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with John Bellinger, former State Department legal adviser, about the possibility of Julian Assange being extradited to the United States.
          Trump Administration Considers Transferring Immigrants to 'Sanctuary Cities'      Comment   Translate Page      
Hogan Gidley, White House principal deputy press secretary, talks with NPR's Michel Martin about President Trump's proposal to relocate detained migrants to so-called sanctuary cities.
          Sunday weather: Round 1 of storms over, but more severe storms possible later - WLOS      Comment   Translate Page      
  1. Sunday weather: Round 1 of storms over, but more severe storms possible later  WLOS
  2. At Least 3 People Dead As Severe Weather Moves Across Southern U.S.  NPR
  3. Southern states brace for severe weather; tornado warnings issued  Fox News
  4. Severe weather threat to aim for eastern US into Sunday night  AccuWeather.com
  5. Tornado Watch until 9 PM  LEX18 Lexington KY News
  6. View full coverage on Google News

          High Stress Can Lead To Heart Attacks, Sibling Study Finds. Here's How To Relax : Shots - Health News - NPR      Comment   Translate Page      
High Stress Can Lead To Heart Attacks, Sibling Study Finds. Here's How To Relax : Shots - Health News  NPR

A study of siblings finds those who have a stress-related disorder have a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event, compared to their ...




Next Page: 10000

Site Map 2018_01_14
Site Map 2018_01_15
Site Map 2018_01_16
Site Map 2018_01_17
Site Map 2018_01_18
Site Map 2018_01_19
Site Map 2018_01_20
Site Map 2018_01_21
Site Map 2018_01_22
Site Map 2018_01_23
Site Map 2018_01_24
Site Map 2018_01_25
Site Map 2018_01_26
Site Map 2018_01_27
Site Map 2018_01_28
Site Map 2018_01_29
Site Map 2018_01_30
Site Map 2018_01_31
Site Map 2018_02_01
Site Map 2018_02_02
Site Map 2018_02_03
Site Map 2018_02_04
Site Map 2018_02_05
Site Map 2018_02_06
Site Map 2018_02_07
Site Map 2018_02_08
Site Map 2018_02_09
Site Map 2018_02_10
Site Map 2018_02_11
Site Map 2018_02_12
Site Map 2018_02_13
Site Map 2018_02_14
Site Map 2018_02_15
Site Map 2018_02_15
Site Map 2018_02_16
Site Map 2018_02_17
Site Map 2018_02_18
Site Map 2018_02_19
Site Map 2018_02_20
Site Map 2018_02_21
Site Map 2018_02_22
Site Map 2018_02_23
Site Map 2018_02_24
Site Map 2018_02_25
Site Map 2018_02_26
Site Map 2018_02_27
Site Map 2018_02_28
Site Map 2018_03_01
Site Map 2018_03_02
Site Map 2018_03_03
Site Map 2018_03_04
Site Map 2018_03_05
Site Map 2018_03_06
Site Map 2018_03_07
Site Map 2018_03_08
Site Map 2018_03_09
Site Map 2018_03_10
Site Map 2018_03_11
Site Map 2018_03_12
Site Map 2018_03_13
Site Map 2018_03_14
Site Map 2018_03_15
Site Map 2018_03_16
Site Map 2018_03_17
Site Map 2018_03_18
Site Map 2018_03_19
Site Map 2018_03_20
Site Map 2018_03_21
Site Map 2018_03_22
Site Map 2018_03_23
Site Map 2018_03_24
Site Map 2018_03_25
Site Map 2018_03_26
Site Map 2018_03_27
Site Map 2018_03_28
Site Map 2018_03_29
Site Map 2018_03_30
Site Map 2018_03_31
Site Map 2018_04_01
Site Map 2018_04_02
Site Map 2018_04_03
Site Map 2018_04_04
Site Map 2018_04_05
Site Map 2018_04_06
Site Map 2018_04_07
Site Map 2018_04_08
Site Map 2018_04_09
Site Map 2018_04_10
Site Map 2018_04_11
Site Map 2018_04_12
Site Map 2018_04_13
Site Map 2018_04_14
Site Map 2018_04_15
Site Map 2018_04_16
Site Map 2018_04_17
Site Map 2018_04_18
Site Map 2018_04_19
Site Map 2018_04_20
Site Map 2018_04_21
Site Map 2018_04_22
Site Map 2018_04_23
Site Map 2018_04_24
Site Map 2018_04_25
Site Map 2018_04_26
Site Map 2018_04_27
Site Map 2018_04_28
Site Map 2018_04_29
Site Map 2018_04_30
Site Map 2018_05_01
Site Map 2018_05_02
Site Map 2018_05_03
Site Map 2018_05_04
Site Map 2018_05_05
Site Map 2018_05_06
Site Map 2018_05_07
Site Map 2018_05_08
Site Map 2018_05_09
Site Map 2018_05_15
Site Map 2018_05_16
Site Map 2018_05_17
Site Map 2018_05_18
Site Map 2018_05_19
Site Map 2018_05_20
Site Map 2018_05_21
Site Map 2018_05_22
Site Map 2018_05_23
Site Map 2018_05_24
Site Map 2018_05_25
Site Map 2018_05_26
Site Map 2018_05_27
Site Map 2018_05_28
Site Map 2018_05_29
Site Map 2018_05_30
Site Map 2018_05_31
Site Map 2018_06_01
Site Map 2018_06_02
Site Map 2018_06_03
Site Map 2018_06_04
Site Map 2018_06_05
Site Map 2018_06_06
Site Map 2018_06_07
Site Map 2018_06_08
Site Map 2018_06_09
Site Map 2018_06_10
Site Map 2018_06_11
Site Map 2018_06_12
Site Map 2018_06_13
Site Map 2018_06_14
Site Map 2018_06_15
Site Map 2018_06_16
Site Map 2018_06_17
Site Map 2018_06_18
Site Map 2018_06_19
Site Map 2018_06_20
Site Map 2018_06_21
Site Map 2018_06_22
Site Map 2018_06_23
Site Map 2018_06_24
Site Map 2018_06_25
Site Map 2018_06_26
Site Map 2018_06_27
Site Map 2018_06_28
Site Map 2018_06_29
Site Map 2018_06_30
Site Map 2018_07_01
Site Map 2018_07_02
Site Map 2018_07_03
Site Map 2018_07_04
Site Map 2018_07_05
Site Map 2018_07_06
Site Map 2018_07_07
Site Map 2018_07_08
Site Map 2018_07_09
Site Map 2018_07_10
Site Map 2018_07_11
Site Map 2018_07_12
Site Map 2018_07_13
Site Map 2018_07_14
Site Map 2018_07_15
Site Map 2018_07_16
Site Map 2018_07_17
Site Map 2018_07_18
Site Map 2018_07_19
Site Map 2018_07_20
Site Map 2018_07_21
Site Map 2018_07_22
Site Map 2018_07_23
Site Map 2018_07_24
Site Map 2018_07_25
Site Map 2018_07_26
Site Map 2018_07_27
Site Map 2018_07_28
Site Map 2018_07_29
Site Map 2018_07_30
Site Map 2018_07_31
Site Map 2018_08_01
Site Map 2018_08_02
Site Map 2018_08_03
Site Map 2018_08_04
Site Map 2018_08_05
Site Map 2018_08_06
Site Map 2018_08_07
Site Map 2018_08_08
Site Map 2018_08_09
Site Map 2018_08_10
Site Map 2018_08_11
Site Map 2018_08_12
Site Map 2018_08_13
Site Map 2018_08_15
Site Map 2018_08_16
Site Map 2018_08_17
Site Map 2018_08_18
Site Map 2018_08_19
Site Map 2018_08_20
Site Map 2018_08_21
Site Map 2018_08_22
Site Map 2018_08_23
Site Map 2018_08_24
Site Map 2018_08_25
Site Map 2018_08_26
Site Map 2018_08_27
Site Map 2018_08_28
Site Map 2018_08_29
Site Map 2018_08_30
Site Map 2018_08_31
Site Map 2018_09_01
Site Map 2018_09_02
Site Map 2018_09_03
Site Map 2018_09_04
Site Map 2018_09_05
Site Map 2018_09_06
Site Map 2018_09_07
Site Map 2018_09_08
Site Map 2018_09_09
Site Map 2018_09_10
Site Map 2018_09_11
Site Map 2018_09_12
Site Map 2018_09_13
Site Map 2018_09_14
Site Map 2018_09_15
Site Map 2018_09_16
Site Map 2018_09_17
Site Map 2018_09_18
Site Map 2018_09_19
Site Map 2018_09_20
Site Map 2018_09_21
Site Map 2018_09_23
Site Map 2018_09_24
Site Map 2018_09_25
Site Map 2018_09_26
Site Map 2018_09_27
Site Map 2018_09_28
Site Map 2018_09_29
Site Map 2018_09_30
Site Map 2018_10_01
Site Map 2018_10_02
Site Map 2018_10_03
Site Map 2018_10_04
Site Map 2018_10_05
Site Map 2018_10_06
Site Map 2018_10_07
Site Map 2018_10_08
Site Map 2018_10_09
Site Map 2018_10_10
Site Map 2018_10_11
Site Map 2018_10_12
Site Map 2018_10_13
Site Map 2018_10_14
Site Map 2018_10_15
Site Map 2018_10_16
Site Map 2018_10_17
Site Map 2018_10_18
Site Map 2018_10_19
Site Map 2018_10_20
Site Map 2018_10_21
Site Map 2018_10_22
Site Map 2018_10_23
Site Map 2018_10_24
Site Map 2018_10_25
Site Map 2018_10_26
Site Map 2018_10_27
Site Map 2018_10_28
Site Map 2018_10_29
Site Map 2018_10_30
Site Map 2018_10_31
Site Map 2018_11_01
Site Map 2018_11_02
Site Map 2018_11_03
Site Map 2018_11_04
Site Map 2018_11_05
Site Map 2018_11_06
Site Map 2018_11_07
Site Map 2018_11_08
Site Map 2018_11_09
Site Map 2018_11_10
Site Map 2018_11_11
Site Map 2018_11_12
Site Map 2018_11_13
Site Map 2018_11_14
Site Map 2018_11_15
Site Map 2018_11_16
Site Map 2018_11_17
Site Map 2018_11_18
Site Map 2018_11_19
Site Map 2018_11_20
Site Map 2018_11_21
Site Map 2018_11_22
Site Map 2018_11_23
Site Map 2018_11_24
Site Map 2018_11_25
Site Map 2018_11_26
Site Map 2018_11_27
Site Map 2018_11_28
Site Map 2018_11_29
Site Map 2018_11_30
Site Map 2018_12_01
Site Map 2018_12_02
Site Map 2018_12_03
Site Map 2018_12_04
Site Map 2018_12_05
Site Map 2018_12_06
Site Map 2018_12_07
Site Map 2018_12_08
Site Map 2018_12_09
Site Map 2018_12_10
Site Map 2018_12_11
Site Map 2018_12_12
Site Map 2018_12_13
Site Map 2018_12_14
Site Map 2018_12_15
Site Map 2018_12_16
Site Map 2018_12_17
Site Map 2018_12_18
Site Map 2018_12_19
Site Map 2018_12_20
Site Map 2018_12_21
Site Map 2018_12_22
Site Map 2018_12_23
Site Map 2018_12_24
Site Map 2018_12_25
Site Map 2018_12_26
Site Map 2018_12_27
Site Map 2018_12_28
Site Map 2018_12_29
Site Map 2018_12_30
Site Map 2018_12_31
Site Map 2019_01_01
Site Map 2019_01_02
Site Map 2019_01_03
Site Map 2019_01_04
Site Map 2019_01_06
Site Map 2019_01_07
Site Map 2019_01_08
Site Map 2019_01_09
Site Map 2019_01_11
Site Map 2019_01_12
Site Map 2019_01_13
Site Map 2019_01_14
Site Map 2019_01_15
Site Map 2019_01_16
Site Map 2019_01_17
Site Map 2019_01_18
Site Map 2019_01_19
Site Map 2019_01_20
Site Map 2019_01_21
Site Map 2019_01_22
Site Map 2019_01_23
Site Map 2019_01_24
Site Map 2019_01_25
Site Map 2019_01_26
Site Map 2019_01_27
Site Map 2019_01_28
Site Map 2019_01_29
Site Map 2019_01_30
Site Map 2019_01_31
Site Map 2019_02_01
Site Map 2019_02_02
Site Map 2019_02_03
Site Map 2019_02_04
Site Map 2019_02_05
Site Map 2019_02_06
Site Map 2019_02_07
Site Map 2019_02_08
Site Map 2019_02_09
Site Map 2019_02_10
Site Map 2019_02_11
Site Map 2019_02_12
Site Map 2019_02_13
Site Map 2019_02_14
Site Map 2019_02_15
Site Map 2019_02_16
Site Map 2019_02_17
Site Map 2019_02_18
Site Map 2019_02_19
Site Map 2019_02_20
Site Map 2019_02_21
Site Map 2019_02_22
Site Map 2019_02_23
Site Map 2019_02_24
Site Map 2019_02_25
Site Map 2019_02_26
Site Map 2019_02_27
Site Map 2019_02_28
Site Map 2019_03_01
Site Map 2019_03_02
Site Map 2019_03_03
Site Map 2019_03_04
Site Map 2019_03_05
Site Map 2019_03_06
Site Map 2019_03_07
Site Map 2019_03_08
Site Map 2019_03_09
Site Map 2019_03_10
Site Map 2019_03_11
Site Map 2019_03_12
Site Map 2019_03_13
Site Map 2019_03_14
Site Map 2019_03_15
Site Map 2019_03_16
Site Map 2019_03_17
Site Map 2019_03_18
Site Map 2019_03_19
Site Map 2019_03_20
Site Map 2019_03_21
Site Map 2019_03_22
Site Map 2019_03_23
Site Map 2019_03_24
Site Map 2019_03_25
Site Map 2019_03_26
Site Map 2019_03_27
Site Map 2019_03_28
Site Map 2019_03_29
Site Map 2019_03_30
Site Map 2019_03_31
Site Map 2019_04_01
Site Map 2019_04_02
Site Map 2019_04_03
Site Map 2019_04_04
Site Map 2019_04_05
Site Map 2019_04_06
Site Map 2019_04_07
Site Map 2019_04_08
Site Map 2019_04_09
Site Map 2019_04_10
Site Map 2019_04_11
Site Map 2019_04_12
Site Map 2019_04_13
Site Map 2019_04_14