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          'Arab Spring 2.0' is a reboot full of bugs      Comment   Translate Page      
The acts of hope and courage shown in Algeria and Sudan over the past weeks felt ever so fleetingly like a reprise of 2011's broad social awakening across the Arab world. But "Arab Spring 2.0," as it has been called, is a reboot full of bugs that many users may seek to uninstall.
          Algeria: magistrati, boicotteremo voto      Comment   Translate Page      
Giudici in raduno, non supervisioneremo il processo elettorale
          Algeria: arrestati 108 'infiltrati'      Comment   Translate Page      
Polizia li accusa delle violenze sfociate durante manifestazione
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.
           Comment on Algeria’s ‘Revolution of Smiles’: Where will it lead? by Misterioso       Comment   Translate Page      
Similar occurrences are now taking place in Sudan. https://www.aljazeera.com/topics/country/sudan.html We can be sure that Arab dictatorships, including Saudi Arabia, certain Gulf states and Egypt are alarmed and keeping a close eye on unfolding events.
          Chevron to acquire Anadarko Petroleum for $33 billion      Comment   Translate Page      

Chevron positioned itself to become the dominant oil producer in the field that is driving the U.S. shale revolution when it said Friday that it was buying Anadarko Petroleum for $33 billion.

The acquisition is the largest takeover in the global oil industry in three years and signals that shale drilling, which was once dominated by small and nimble independent companies, has now become a battleground for oil giants. It also demonstrates that the largest oil companies believe that they can profitably drill in shale fields even when crude oil prices are much lower than they were a decade ago.

In buying Anadarko, San Ramon’s Chevron is picking up major oil and natural gas projects in the Gulf of Mexico, Colorado, Mozambique, Algeria and Ghana. But most of all, it is building on its position in the Permian Basin of West Texas and New Mexico, which recently passed Saudi Arabia’s Ghawar field as the world’s most productive oil field.

More than a dozen oil and gas pipelines serving the Permian are expected to be completed by the middle of 2020, potentially increasing exports from the Gulf of Mexico region to 8 million from 2 million barrels a day.

Anadarko and Chevron have a 75-mile stretch of contiguous acreage in the Permian, which should help the companies reduce production and transportation costs. About a third of total U.S. oil production comes from the basin, which is largely responsible for the production and export boom of recent years.

“This is a compelling transaction,” Chevron CEO Michael Wirth told analysts. “We intend to accelerate activity in Anadarko’s Permian acreage.”

Chevron is the world’s 10th largest company producing oil and gas, and Anadarko ranks 41st, according to Rystad Energy, a consulting firm. Once the merger is completed by the end of the year, Chevron will climb to seventh...


          THANKS, W!:      Comment   Translate Page      
Algeria in revolt: "We woke up and you will pay!": The abdication of President Bouteflika is a historic victory for the Algerian people -- but the struggle for a true democratic transition is far from over. (Hamza Hamouchene, 12 April 2019, Open Democracy)

Nine years ago, Algeria seemed to be immune to this revolutionary fever and was viewed as the exception to the rule, despite harboring the same set of conditions for revolt. At the time, the government suggested that Algeria already had its "spring" over two decades earlier, referring to the short-lived democratic transition following weeks of demonstrations in October 1988 that forced the regime to give way to political pluralism and an independent press. However, these gains in civil liberties and the "democratic transition" were aborted by the military coup and the civil war of the 1990s.

In addition to ongoing forms of repression, collective memories of hundreds of thousands of deaths and brutal state violence underpinning the eradication of the Islamist opposition may help explain the failure of an uprising to take root in Algeria during the 2010-2011 period. The spectre of the civil war and the fear of bloody violence have been further exacerbated by the intervention in Libya, the counter-revolution in Egypt and the carnage and foreign interference in Syria.

Additionally, oil and gas revenues -- which prices peaked in the late 2000s -- were used to purchase social peace domestically and to secure international acquiescence. Domestically, the hydrocarbon bonanza was used to pacify the population and prevent the intensification of popular anger. Externally, by virtue of being the third largest provider of natural gas to Europe after Russia and Norway, and given the dwindling production in the North Sea and the Ukrainian crisis, Algeria hoped it could leverage this position to play an even more important role in securing Europe's energy supplies, and by extension Western collusion and approval.

These factors do no longer constitute a brake on people's desire for meaningful change as popular discontent from below converged with a deep crisis within the ruling classes leading to the indignation of the oppressed to burst forth and find its expression in the streets.

Algeria has been undergoing an acute multi-dimensional crisis for some time now. The country has been experiencing a political crisis for decades -- in particular since the 1992 military coup and the ensuing brutal civil war. The origins of this crisis date back to the colonial era, though its most recent manifestations are the direct result of the politics of a parasitic accumulation and entrenched corruption: a militaro-oligarchic nexus that denies the Algerian people their right to self-determination and dispenses with popular legitimacy for the benefit of domestic and international capital.

This crisis has been exacerbated by several factors, not in the least by the ailing Bouteflika's general absence from the political stage. The crisis has been compounded by intra-elite power struggles, culminating in the fall of Algeria's long-term king maker, the Military Intelligence Agency (DRS) Chief in 2015 and the cocaine scandal of 2018, which led to the sacking of the head of police, a few generals and other high functionaries in the Ministry of Defense.

In a context of the failure of the institutionalized opposition and social movements to articulate and carry out a viable alternative, we predicted in 2016 that the slump in oil prices may just hammer the final nail in the coffin of a rentier, non-productive and de-industrialized economy that is highly dependent on oil and gas exports, the main source of foreign currency.....With the oil prices plummeting and with foreign currency reserves (estimated at $179 billion at the end of 2014) deemed to not last beyond 2016-2017, the 1988 experience could easily be replicated and the crisis has the potential to escalate into a full explosion that will threaten the country's national security and possibly its territorial integrity.

The recent events come at a time of an acute economic crisis characterized by crippling austerity measures following the decline of oil and gas export revenues, coupled with an intensification of infighting and divisions within the ruling elites after the imposition of the candidacy of Bouteflika for a fifth term at the helm of the state.

The triad of power consisting of the presidency, military intelligence (DRS) and the armed forces' high command showed its first signs of weakness in 2008 when the DRS started clashing with the two other centers of power. In 2019 the split was complete, when the decisive entrance of the people unto the political stage effectively forced the armed forces' high command to distance itself from the presidency. The military clearly intervened to put an end to Bouteflika's reign in order to safeguard the regime in place.

Such public displays of rivalry and dispute are symptomatic of the deep-seated contradictions and instability of the current ruling block and the crisis of hegemony within it, which has opened up new spaces for resistance.

This is a significant moment in the popular dynamic that started in February 2019 as this is only one victory in the long struggle for radical change that must include the overthrow of Major General Gaid Salah too; a key loyal figure in Bouteflika's regime and a supporter of his fifth term before backtracking under the pressure of the growing popular movement. The army leadership is definitely not to be trusted, as was made clear by Major General Salah's initial threats towards movement before adopting a more conciliatory tone. The Algerian people need to be more vigilant and determined than ever in order to halt the counter-revolutionary forces from hijacking this historic uprising.

Now that Bouteflika resigned, it is absolutely necessary to implement a truly democratic transition, and the people should not yield to calls for applying article 102 of the constitution, which would allow the leader of the upper house to take over and to organize elections in 90 days after the presidency has been declared vacant by the constitutional council (as the incumbent is too ill to exercise his functions).

Basically, if applied to the letter, this will keep the current system in place and will not guarantee free and transparent elections. The people are asking for popular sovereignty which cannot be curtailed by rigid legalistic and constitutionalist arguments. This is a unique moment in Algeria's history to impose a new revolutionary paradigm, which go beyond legal and constitutional frameworks in order to radically challenge the status quo and create a fundamental break with the oppressive system in place.

There are already several proposals to resolve the crisis and to initiate a kind of a transition that will satisfy peoples' demands and give them back their stifled sovereignty. The army command must not interfere with this process and must stick to its constitutional role of guaranteeing national security. Algerians did not revolt to replace some oppressors with others.

For this reason, the balance of forces must be shifted significantly towards the masses by maintaining the resistance (marches, occupations of public spaces, general strikes, etc) to force the army command to yield to people's demand for system change entailing the removal of the entire old political guard.

Converting the most brutal dictatorship in the region into a multi-confessional democracy demonstrated that no regime is immune.

          Algeria magistrates to boycott election      Comment   Translate Page      
Algeria's magistrates, who play a key role overseeing the country's elections, said Saturday they would boycott a July 4 presidential election in support of the protest movement.
          Sudan's Military Says It Has Taken Control And Arrested President Omar Al-Bashir      Comment   Translate Page      
After nearly 30 years in power, Bashir is removed from power and detained by his own military. 


Sudan's Military Says It Has Taken Control And Arrested President Omar Al-Bashir

By James Doubek, Laurel Wamsley | NPR

A military council has taken control of Sudan and arrested its longtime president, Omar al-Bashir, the country's military said Thursday. The move comes after opposition protesters recently gained new momentum in demanding al-Bashir leave office.

Sudan's defense minister, Awad Mohamed Ahmed Ibn Auf, said the "regime" had been removed and its head arrested, as he announced the coup in a televised statement.

The minister said a transitional military council will rule the country for two years before any democratic elections will take place.

Sudan awoke early to word from the state news agency that the military would be making an announcement — news that sent thousands of people flooding to the site where protesters have been calling for al-Bashir's ouster for months.

There has been so much anticipation for this moment, NPR's Halima Gikandi reports, that "some people were cheering but not really knowing what they were cheering for, and what was going to happen." In one sign of change, activists said many of their colleagues had been released from state prisons.

or protesters, the moment is bittersweet. Their primary demand has been for al-Bashir to step down. But their second demand was for a transitional government to move the country toward a democracy — and on Thursday, there were no indications of that happening.

The woman who has become an icon of the protests, Alaa Salah, tweeted that the military's announcement was unacceptable: "The people do not want a transitional military council. Change will not happen with Bashir's entire regime hoodwinking Sudanese civilians through a military coup. We want a civilian council to head the transition."

It's unclear what will happen next, but many Sudanese fear a military takeover. And with a number of military forces and government agencies now free to assert themselves, the political picture seems more complicated than ever.

"On one hand, you have the army, which in the past few days has been seeming to protect protesters," Gikandi explains. "And on the other hand, you have the national intelligence agency, which has been known to have done human rights violations. So what does it mean now for demonstrators to be seeing that the military is taking over, and installing a two-year transitional government, consisting of all of those various intelligence agencies?"

The opposition protests began in December over the price of bread, after the government ended subsidies. But the demonstrations soon spread to political concerns, and protesters demanded al-Bashir's ouster. Since Saturday, tens of thousands have maintained a protest vigil near the military headquarters in Sudan's capital, Khartoum.

The country's armed forces have been deployed around the capital's main roads and bridges, the BBC reports, and the city's main airport is closed.

The Sudanese Professionals Association, the civil society group that has led protests since December, had called on residents to mobilize on Thursday for a sit-in. The group tweeted that the military leadership must "hand over power to the people."

Sudan's current crisis "cannot be addressed through another military coup," the group said. The SPA called for protests to continue until power is handed over to a civil transitional government.

"We will not accept Bashir's aides as part of the new situation," protester Mohamed Adam told Reuters. "Those people have killed protesters."

Media reports say the current swell of protesters is largely peaceful. The SPA said it advocated a peaceful "approach to revolution and change."

Sudanese security forces killed at least 14 people on Tuesday, NPR previously reported. But according to the BBC, the army stepped in to protect protesters from at least two attacks by forces loyal to al-Bashir.

His ouster comes just a week after Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika resigned, following weeks of mass protests against his 20-year rule. Since 2011, a number of the Arab world's longest-serving leaders have lost power: Tunisia's Ben Ali, Libya's Moammar Gadhafi, Yemen's Ali Abdullah Saleh, Egypt's Hosni Mubarak, and now Bouteflika and al-Bashir.

Now all eyes are on the Sudanese military, which has a long history of coups in the country.

Sudan gained independence from the U.K. and Egypt in 1956. Just two years later, chief of staff Lt. Gen. Ibrahim Abboud took power in a bloodless coup.

Riots and strikes in 1964 led to the military giving up control.

But Col. Gaafar Muhammad Nimeiri led a second military coup in 1969, according to the U.S. State Department's history. Nimeiri became prime minister, and the military banned political parties and dissolved parliament. He survived multiple coup attempts before succumbing to another military coup in 1985.

Gen. Abdel Rahman Swar al-Dahab led the military overthrow of Nimeiri in that coup. This time the military handed over power to a civilian government of Prime Minister Sadiq al-Mahdi after elections in 1986.

Al-Mahdi only lasted three years in power afterward. Al-Bashir, with the support of military officers and an Islamist political party, took power as leader of a junta in his own coup on June 30, 1989.

Al-Bashir had been in power almost 30 years. The International Criminal Court in the Hague issued warrants for al-Bashir's arrest in 2009 and 2010 for genocide and crimes against humanity in Sudan's Darfur region.

But those arrest warrants have not been carried out, with al-Bashir traveling to South Africa in 2015 and Chad in 2010 and returning home.

          Belgium-Brussels: ENI - Water and Environment Support Mechanism (WES)      Comment   Translate Page      
BE-Brussels: ENI - Water and Environment Support Mechanism (WES) Location — ENI Southern region: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Israel(1), Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Palestine(2), Tunisia and Syria(3) Service Prior Information Notice 1. Publication reference EuropeAid/140231/DH/SER/MULTI 2. Procedure Restricted 3. Programme title EU for Green MED III and sustainable transport 4. Financing European Neighbourhood Instrument (ENI) 5. Contracting Authority European Union , represented by the European Commission, on behalf of and for the account of the partner countries Brussels , BELGIUM 6. Nature of contract Fee-based 7. Contract description In the framework of transport cooperation within the Union for the Mediterranean and the implementation of the related Regional Transport Action Plan this project will support activities in the area of Logistics of Motorways of the Sea connections. It will as such follow-up on the LogisMed Training Activities project and previous EuroMed Motorways of the Sea projects (MedaMOS). Activities will include, amongst others, technical assistance, capacity building, awareness rising and support to demonstration projects. 8. Indicative budget 3 000 000 EUR 9. Intended timing of publication of the contract notice 30.4.2019 10. Additional information N/a 11. Legal basis(4) Regulation (EU) No 236/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11.3.2014 laying down common rules and procedures for the implementation of the Union's instruments for financing external action and Regulation (EU) No 232/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11.3.2014 establishing a European Neighborhood Instrument. Please be aware that after the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the EU, the rules of access to EU procurement procedures of economic operators established in third countries will apply to candidates or tenderers from the United Kingdom depending on the outcome of negotiations. In case such access is not provided by legal provisions in force at the time of contract award, candidates or tenderers from the United Kingdom could be rejected from the procurement procedure. Remarks: There must be a minimum period of 30 calendar days between the publication of this prior information notice and the publication of the corresponding Contract Notice. No applications or requests for information should be sent at this stage. (1) See Guidelines on the eligibility of Israeli entities and their activities in the territories occupied by Israel since June 1967 for grants, prizes and financial instruments funded by the EU from 2014 onwards on: http://eurlex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2013.205.01.0009.01.ENG (2) This designation shall not be construed as recognition of a state of Palestine and is without prejudice to the individual positions of the Member States on this issue. (3) Cooperation with Syria is temporary suspended until notice from the European Commission. (4) Please state any specificity that might have an impact on rules on participation (such as geographic or thematic or long/short term).
          Katibu Mkuu CCM, Dk Bashiru Ally Atahadharisha Nchi Kuingia Kwenye Machafuko      Comment   Translate Page      
Katibu Mkuu wa CCM, Dk Bashiru Ally amesema endapo wananchi wanyonge hawatatendewa haki, kuna hatari ya nchi kuingia kwenye machafuko yanayoendelea kutoka katika nchi nyingine za Afrika.

Alikuwa akirejea machafuko yaliyosambaa katika nchi za kiarabu hasa Tunisia na Libya na kusababisha viongozi wao kuondolewa madarakani.

Pia vuguvugu jipya limeibuka katika nchi nyingine za Sudan, ambako maandamano ya amani yamemuondoa Rais Omar al Bashir na Algeria ambako kiongozi wa muda mrefu, Abdelaziz Bouteflika aliondolewa pia kutokana na maandamano ya amani ya wananchi.

Jana, akizungumza katika mkutano ulioandaliwa na Mtandao wa Vikundi vya Wakulima (Mviwata) kwa ajili ya kumbukumbu ya Waziri Mkuu wa zamani, Hayati Edward Sokoine mjini Morogoro, Dk Bashiru alisema bila ya kusimamia misingi ya haki na usawa, nchi haiwezi kuepuka yanayoendelea katika nchi hizo.

Huku akitoa mfano wa madereva wa bodaboda, Dk Bashiru alisema wamekuwa wakinyanyaswa na polisi, jambo alilosema linaweza kuchochea machafuko aliyoyafananisha na yaliyotokea nchini Tunisia mwaka 2011.

“Ndiyo maana mnaona mrundikano wa pikipiki kwenye vituo vya polisi na maeneo mengine,” alisema.

“Kwa hiyo akienda kwa kosa la Sh22,000 ili akomboe pikipiki tena ya mkopo, anakuta bili ya Sh104,000. Lakini mimi nikikamatwa polisi ananiambia utalipa baada ya siku saba, siyo pikipiki.

“Kwa nini kosa la pikipiki ni sawa na kosa la lori na ukikosa unalipa Sh30,000? Nijibuje mimi? Kwa nini kosa la lori anapewa muda wa kulipa sisi tunawekwa ndani? Katika nchi ile ile na sheria zile zile?

“Unajibuje huku umeahidi chama cha kutenda haki, Rais wa wanyonge? Wanakuangalia wanakuona tapeli. Ndiyo mwanzo wa nchi kuingia kwenye machafuko.”

Credit:Mwananchi

          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.
          Tazama Hapa Makundi yote sita ya AFCON 2019..... Tanzania imepangwa Kundi C na timu za Senegal, Algeria na Kenya.       Comment   Translate Page      
Hatua  ya upangaji wa makundi ya michuano ya Afcon ya Afrika imepangwa jana nchini Misri ambapo tayari Tanzania imewajua wapinzani wake watakaomenyana nao mwezi Juni nchini Misri.

Hafla hiyo ambayo ilihudhuriwa na wajumbe kutoka Tanzania wakiongozwa na Rais wa Shirikisho la Soka Tanzania, Wallace Karia pamoja na Kocha Mkuu wa timu ya Tanzania, Emmanuel Ammunike ilishuhudiwa na Dunia nzima kupitia SuperSport

Tanzania ambayo inashiriki kwa mara ya kwanza fainali hizo baada ya miaka 39, imepangwa Kundi C na timu za Senegal, Algeria na Kenya. 

AFCON 2019 itaanza June 20 2019 mchezo wa ufunguzi ukiwa wa Misri wenyeji dhidi ya Zimbabwe na kumalizika July 19 2019.


          Fellázadtak a bírák Algériában, nem felügyelik a csaló választásokat      Comment   Translate Page      

Elegük lett belőle, hogy a hatalom velük takarózik, miközben választási csalást követ el.


          Lack of Change in Algeria May Hurt Economy - Lawmaker      Comment   Translate Page      
ALGIERS (Sputnik) - Lack of change in Algeria will keep people in the streets and hurt the economy, triggering new protests over economic hardships, an opposition legislator told Sputnik on Saturday.
          Algéria 1000 Dinars emlék bankjegy (UNC) 2005 - Jelenlegi ára: 11 999 Ft      Comment   Translate Page      

Algéria 1000 Dinars emlék bankjegy (UNC) 2005
Jelenlegi ára: 11 999 Ft
Az aukció vége: 2019-04-14 01:34
          4/14/2019: WORLD: Violence erupts as protests against government continue      Comment   Translate Page      

HUNDREDS of thousands of Algerians took to the streets yesterday in one of the largest demonstrations the country has seen since its president resigned last week, demanding that the interim successor and other elites also step down. But in a sign that...
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions       Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          Algeria magistrates to boycott election      Comment   Translate Page      
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          Algeria: Protesters Demand Bouteflika Allies Step Down      Comment   Translate Page      
[Deutsche Welle] Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of Algiers and other Algerian cities to demand the ruling elite step down from power. They were the first rallies since elections were announced for July.
          US warns citizens to ‘reconsider travelling to Nigeria’      Comment   Translate Page      

The US department of state has cautioned its citizens to “reconsider travel to Nigeria because violent crime, such as armed robbery, assault, carjacking, terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, rape and piracy, is common throughout the country.”

In a travel advisory recently released on its website, which contains information on the safety and security of US travellers, Nigeria was listed among 35 countries with a “K” indicator that indicates where its citizens could be at risk of getting kidnapped or taken hostage.

“The new “K” indicator is part of our ongoing commitment to provide clear and comprehensive travel safety information to U.S. citizens so they can make informed travel decisions,” the department said.



“The Travel Advisories for 35 countries have been updated to include a “K” indicator for the risk of kidnapping and/or hostage taking: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iran, Iraq, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Mali, Mexico, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russian Federation, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine (in Russian-controlled eastern Ukraine), Venezuela, and Yemen.”

While Nigeria was placed on level 3, the US department of state issued a level 4 travel alert for Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states.

“The security situation in northeast Nigeria is fluid and unpredictable, particularly in Borno and Yobe States and northern Adamawa State,” the department said.

“Terrorist groups based in the Northeast target churches, schools, mosques, government installations, educational institutions, and entertainment venues. Approximately two million of Nigerians have been displaced as a result of the violence in northeast Nigeria.”

The 35 countries were placed in four levels of travel with respect to their safety and security risk.
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.
          Algeria magistrates to boycott election      Comment   Translate Page      
Algerian lawyers and judges gather to support the independence of the judiciary outside the Justice Ministry in Algiers on April 13, 2019. Magistrates who play a key role overseeing the country's elections, say they will boycott a July 4 presidential election (Picture by AFP)

Algeria's magistrates, who play a key role overseeing the country's elections, said Saturday they would boycott a July 4 presidential election in support of the protest movement.

The post Algeria magistrates to boycott election appeared first on Nehanda Radio.


          Bryson Hull: In Sudan and Algeria, echoes of ‘Arab Spring’ don’t mean democracy has arrived      Comment   Translate Page      
General Omar Zain Al Abideen

By Bryson Hull

The headlines out of Sudan and Algeria this week look for all the world like tales of people power prevailing after months of protests against autocratic rulers.

In both countries, the military have pushed out long-serving leaders whose actions sparked peaceful but unyielding protests, echoing the Arab Spring upheavals of 2011. That should spell success for the protesters and it does.

But a closer look shows that the power structures behind the autocrats learned as much as protesters did from the mass demonstrations that were the hallmark of the Arab Spring in Egypt, Tunisia and other nations.

The post Bryson Hull: In Sudan and Algeria, echoes of ‘Arab Spring’ don’t mean democracy has arrived appeared first on Nehanda Radio.


          Algeria activists fear tougher police tactics after Friday clashes      Comment   Translate Page      
Author: 
Caroline Nelly Perrot | AFP
article author: 
ID: 
1555168893096354600
Sat, 2019-04-13 15:10

ALGIERS: Algerian civil society groups voiced concern Saturday about toughening police tactics, a day after officers in riot gear clashed with protesters, and reaffirmed their commitment to peaceful pro-democracy rallies.
Friday’s initially peaceful rally in central Algiers deteriorated into the worst street violence seen so far since marches began in mid-February demanding an end to the 20-year-rule of president Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who finally resigned on April 2, and his regime.

Main category: 

          Clashes In Algiers On Eighth Friday Of Protests      Comment   Translate Page      
Clashes erupted in Algiers on Friday as protestors tossed back tear gas grenades and attacked police vehicles after a huge demonstration demanding the departure of figures close to ousted leader Abdelaziz Bouteflika, AFP journalists said. For the eighth Friday in a row, vast crowds marched through the Algerian capital pressing demands for B ...
          Comment on Algeria protests keep up pressure on regime by g40      Comment   Translate Page      
NDIZVO ZVIKUDA ZANU PFEERORISTS
          THANKS, W!:      Comment   Translate Page      
Algeria in revolt: "We woke up and you will pay!": The abdication of President Bouteflika is a historic victory for the Algerian people -- but the struggle for a true democratic transition is far from over. (Hamza Hamouchene, 12 April 2019, Open Democracy)

Nine years ago, Algeria seemed to be immune to this revolutionary fever and was viewed as the exception to the rule, despite harboring the same set of conditions for revolt. At the time, the government suggested that Algeria already had its "spring" over two decades earlier, referring to the short-lived democratic transition following weeks of demonstrations in October 1988 that forced the regime to give way to political pluralism and an independent press. However, these gains in civil liberties and the "democratic transition" were aborted by the military coup and the civil war of the 1990s.

In addition to ongoing forms of repression, collective memories of hundreds of thousands of deaths and brutal state violence underpinning the eradication of the Islamist opposition may help explain the failure of an uprising to take root in Algeria during the 2010-2011 period. The spectre of the civil war and the fear of bloody violence have been further exacerbated by the intervention in Libya, the counter-revolution in Egypt and the carnage and foreign interference in Syria.

Additionally, oil and gas revenues -- which prices peaked in the late 2000s -- were used to purchase social peace domestically and to secure international acquiescence. Domestically, the hydrocarbon bonanza was used to pacify the population and prevent the intensification of popular anger. Externally, by virtue of being the third largest provider of natural gas to Europe after Russia and Norway, and given the dwindling production in the North Sea and the Ukrainian crisis, Algeria hoped it could leverage this position to play an even more important role in securing Europe's energy supplies, and by extension Western collusion and approval.

These factors do no longer constitute a brake on people's desire for meaningful change as popular discontent from below converged with a deep crisis within the ruling classes leading to the indignation of the oppressed to burst forth and find its expression in the streets.

Algeria has been undergoing an acute multi-dimensional crisis for some time now. The country has been experiencing a political crisis for decades -- in particular since the 1992 military coup and the ensuing brutal civil war. The origins of this crisis date back to the colonial era, though its most recent manifestations are the direct result of the politics of a parasitic accumulation and entrenched corruption: a militaro-oligarchic nexus that denies the Algerian people their right to self-determination and dispenses with popular legitimacy for the benefit of domestic and international capital.

This crisis has been exacerbated by several factors, not in the least by the ailing Bouteflika's general absence from the political stage. The crisis has been compounded by intra-elite power struggles, culminating in the fall of Algeria's long-term king maker, the Military Intelligence Agency (DRS) Chief in 2015 and the cocaine scandal of 2018, which led to the sacking of the head of police, a few generals and other high functionaries in the Ministry of Defense.

In a context of the failure of the institutionalized opposition and social movements to articulate and carry out a viable alternative, we predicted in 2016 that the slump in oil prices may just hammer the final nail in the coffin of a rentier, non-productive and de-industrialized economy that is highly dependent on oil and gas exports, the main source of foreign currency.....With the oil prices plummeting and with foreign currency reserves (estimated at $179 billion at the end of 2014) deemed to not last beyond 2016-2017, the 1988 experience could easily be replicated and the crisis has the potential to escalate into a full explosion that will threaten the country's national security and possibly its territorial integrity.

The recent events come at a time of an acute economic crisis characterized by crippling austerity measures following the decline of oil and gas export revenues, coupled with an intensification of infighting and divisions within the ruling elites after the imposition of the candidacy of Bouteflika for a fifth term at the helm of the state.

The triad of power consisting of the presidency, military intelligence (DRS) and the armed forces' high command showed its first signs of weakness in 2008 when the DRS started clashing with the two other centers of power. In 2019 the split was complete, when the decisive entrance of the people unto the political stage effectively forced the armed forces' high command to distance itself from the presidency. The military clearly intervened to put an end to Bouteflika's reign in order to safeguard the regime in place.

Such public displays of rivalry and dispute are symptomatic of the deep-seated contradictions and instability of the current ruling block and the crisis of hegemony within it, which has opened up new spaces for resistance.

This is a significant moment in the popular dynamic that started in February 2019 as this is only one victory in the long struggle for radical change that must include the overthrow of Major General Gaid Salah too; a key loyal figure in Bouteflika's regime and a supporter of his fifth term before backtracking under the pressure of the growing popular movement. The army leadership is definitely not to be trusted, as was made clear by Major General Salah's initial threats towards movement before adopting a more conciliatory tone. The Algerian people need to be more vigilant and determined than ever in order to halt the counter-revolutionary forces from hijacking this historic uprising.

Now that Bouteflika resigned, it is absolutely necessary to implement a truly democratic transition, and the people should not yield to calls for applying article 102 of the constitution, which would allow the leader of the upper house to take over and to organize elections in 90 days after the presidency has been declared vacant by the constitutional council (as the incumbent is too ill to exercise his functions).

Basically, if applied to the letter, this will keep the current system in place and will not guarantee free and transparent elections. The people are asking for popular sovereignty which cannot be curtailed by rigid legalistic and constitutionalist arguments. This is a unique moment in Algeria's history to impose a new revolutionary paradigm, which go beyond legal and constitutional frameworks in order to radically challenge the status quo and create a fundamental break with the oppressive system in place.

There are already several proposals to resolve the crisis and to initiate a kind of a transition that will satisfy peoples' demands and give them back their stifled sovereignty. The army command must not interfere with this process and must stick to its constitutional role of guaranteeing national security. Algerians did not revolt to replace some oppressors with others.

For this reason, the balance of forces must be shifted significantly towards the masses by maintaining the resistance (marches, occupations of public spaces, general strikes, etc) to force the army command to yield to people's demand for system change entailing the removal of the entire old political guard.

Converting the most brutal dictatorship in the region into a multi-confessional democracy demonstrated that no regime is immune.

          Ministry: More than 5.7 million Umrah visas issued so far      Comment   Translate Page      
Author: 
spa
ID: 
1555188214568258900
Sat, 2019-04-13 23:42

RIYADH: The number of Umrah visas issued this year has reached 5,730,842, of which 5,273,075 pilgrims have arrived in the Kingdom, according to data provided by the Hajj Ministry.
There are 472,043 pilgrims still in the Kingdom, with 330,560 in Makkah and 141,483 in Madinah, the Saudi Press Agency reported.
Most pilgrims — 4,706,764 — came to the Kingdom by air, while 504,116 entered by land and 62,195 arrived by sea.
The largest number of pilgrims are from Pakistan (1,222,459) followed by Indonesia (808,698), India (513,031), Egypt (31,604), Turkey (250,713), Yemen (246,992), Malaysia (243,793), Algeria (226,538), Iraq (185,051) and Jordan (148,041).
The weekly data also included the number of Saudi staff within Umrah companies and institutions. There are 10,481 Saudis including 8,674 males and 1,807 females.
The General Presidency for the Affairs of the Two Holy Mosques has intensified its services around the clock, including cleaning, maintenance and operation works in the mataf, the Masa’a, the vault, King Fahd’s Expansion, and all the mosque’s levels and compounds.
A guidance service educates pilgrims and visitors on religious matters, and guides them in the proper performance of their rituals.
Developing Hajj and Umrah organizations and services in the Kingdom is among the top priorities of the Saudi government.
The Vision 2030 reform plan aims to attract more than 30 million Umrah pilgrims, and provide them with excellent services and an outstanding experience.

Main category: 
Shoura studies Umra visa extension proposalSaudi Arabia issues more than 4.1 million Umrah visas
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Finally today, let's talk about tap dance. And we're not talking about politicians trying to get out of answering hard questions. And we're not even talking about another image you might have of old guys in tuxedos from the 1940s. No, we're talking about the Syncopated Ladies, an all-female tap squad that has become an Internet sensation for their tight moves set to popular music, think Prince and Beyonce. (SOUNDBITE OF SYNCOPATED LADIES PERFORMANCE) MARTIN: You might have caught them on the TV show "So You Think You Can Dance" or featured on Beyonce's home page. Two sisters, Maud and Chloe Arnold, founded the group. They're here in Washington, D.C., this weekend for their annual concert and showcase. So we thought this was a good time to hear more about the group and how they're changing the look of tap. And Chloe Arnold is with us now to represent both sisters. And she's with us now. Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. CHLOE ARNOLD: Thank you Michel. I'm
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Finally today, let's talk about tap dance. And we're not talking about politicians trying to get out of answering hard questions. And we're not even talking about another image you might have of old guys in tuxedos from the 1940s. No, we're talking about the Syncopated Ladies, an all-female tap squad that has become an Internet sensation for their tight moves set to popular music, think Prince and Beyonce. (SOUNDBITE OF SYNCOPATED LADIES PERFORMANCE) MARTIN: You might have caught them on the TV show "So You Think You Can Dance" or featured on Beyonce's home page. Two sisters, Maud and Chloe Arnold, founded the group. They're here in Washington, D.C., this weekend for their annual concert and showcase. So we thought this was a good time to hear more about the group and how they're changing the look of tap. And Chloe Arnold is with us now to represent both sisters. And she's with us now. Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. CHLOE ARNOLD: Thank you Michel. I'm
          4/13/2019: WORLD: MASS NUMBERS PROTEST ARMY AND RULING ELITE      Comment   Translate Page      

ALGIERS, ALGERIA Hundreds of thousands of Algerians took the streets Friday in one of the largest demonstrations the country has seen since its president resigned last week, demanding that his interim successor and other elites also step down. But in...
          Algeria's magistrates threaten to boycott July presidential poll      Comment   Translate Page      
Judges say they will not oversee the vote if it is held under same judicial framework and Bouteflika-era institutions.
          4/14/2019: NEWS: Algeria protests call for broader change after departure of Bouteflika      Comment   Translate Page      

Despite the fact that President Abdelaziz Bouteflika resigned nearly two weeks ago, hundreds of thousands of protesters are still taking to the streets of Algeria demanding more comprehensive change. On Friday, mass rallies across the capital led to...
          Clashes between demonstrators, security forces in Algeria, 108 arrested, 80 injured      Comment   Translate Page      

Protesters demanding removal of all Bouteflika’s men

The post Clashes between demonstrators, security forces in Algeria, 108 arrested, 80 injured appeared first on Daily News Egypt.


          Algeria's magistrates threaten to boycott July presidential poll      Comment   Translate Page      

More than 100 magistrates staged a protest outside the justice ministry on Saturday [Mohamed Messara/EPA-EFE] Algeria‘s magistrates, who play a key role overseeing the country’s elections, said on Saturday they would boycott a July 4 presidential election in support of the protest movement. Protesters have held vast rallies calling for allies of overthrown president Abdelaziz […]

The post Algeria's magistrates threaten to boycott July presidential poll appeared first on RocketNews | Top News Stories From Around the Globe.


          North Africa: The Time Bomb That Could Blow Up Europe      Comment   Translate Page      

190409-Algeria-GettyImages-1135901542.jpg


          Algeriassa osa tuomareista sanoo boikotoivansa presidentinvaaleja, myös mielenosoittajat torjuvat vaalit      Comment   Translate Page      
Tuomareilla on merkittävä rooli vaalien järjestämisessä Algeriassa, sillä he muun muassa valvovat vaaliluetteloita.
          4/13/2019: WORLD: MASS NUMBERS PROTEST ARMY AND RULING ELITE      Comment   Translate Page      

ALGIERS, ALGERIA Hundreds of thousands of Algerians took the streets Friday in one of the largest demonstrations the country has seen since its president resigned last week, demanding that his interim successor and other elites also step down. But in...
          Algerians renew marches as anger mounts at army and interim leader      Comment   Translate Page      
AFP_1FL2DG

Heavy police deployment and repeated volleys of water cannon didn't deter masses of Algerians from packing the streets of the capital Friday, insisting that their revolution isn't over just because the president stepped down.


           Comment on Algeria's magistrates threaten to boycott July presidential poll by Algeria’s magistrates threaten to boycott July presidential poll | Rock Hit       Comment   Translate Page      
[…] Source link […]
          4/13/2019: WORLD: MASS NUMBERS PROTEST ARMY AND RULING ELITE      Comment   Translate Page      

Hundreds of thousands of Algerians took the streets Friday in one of the largest demonstrations the country has seen since its president resigned last week, demanding that his interim successor and other elites also step down. But in a sign that the...
          Rais TFF aihofia Senegal, asema hana shaka na Algeria, Kenya      Comment   Translate Page      
Rais wa Shirikisho la mpira wa miguu Tanzania (TFF), Walace Karia amesema kundi C ambalo Tanzania im
          KARIA AIHOFIA KENYA AFCON      Comment   Translate Page      
RAIS wa Shirikisho la soka Tanzania (TFF) Wallace Karia amesema kazi ipo kubwa kuwazuia Kenya kwenye mechi za fainali za kombe la mataifa Afrika, Afcon hatua ya makundi. Katika droo iliyopangwa mjini Cairo, Misri na Shirikisho la soka Afrika, CAF juzi, Tanzania, Taifa Stars imepangwa kundi C pamoja na jirani zake Kenya, Senegal na Algeria.
          We are ready, says Stars coach after Afcon draw      Comment   Translate Page      
Taifa Stars players celebrate after qualifying for the Africa Cup of Nations (Afcon) finals to be held in Egypt from June 21 to July 19. PHOTO| MAJUTO OMARY In Summary. Taifa Stars will have their first match against Senegal on June 23, before a date with Kenya four days later on June 27, and July 1 against Algeria Advertisement.
          Game of Thrones and climate change: brace yourselves, summer is coming!      Comment   Translate Page      
Photo: Public domain via PXhere. https://pxhere.com/en/photo/780571 By Cassia Moraes Imagine a world where political clans fight for power while ignoring a threat never seen before—and which could annihilate their societies without much consideration for human-made boundaries. That narrative could describe the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones, set for release on April 14, … Continua la lettura di Game of Thrones and climate change: brace yourselves, summer is coming!
          14 April, Paris: Stand with the Palestinian people!      Comment   Translate Page      

Sunday, 14 April 3:00 pm La Fontaine des Innocents Paris, France More info: http://www.europalestine.com/spip.php?article127 We had no illusions whatsoever about the Israeli elections, knowing as Gideon Levy wrote that the choice was between apartheid and… apartheid ( http://www.europalestine.com/spip.php?article128 ) And the fact that the coalition that will be in power is proud to be even more extreme-right that the previous one, does not apparently shock our president Macron nor our dear mainstream media. A fifth mandate for Netanyahou (worse than Bouteflika in Algeria) where is the problem ? Yet, the new violation of International law with the announcement by Netanyahou of the annexation (partial or total) of the Westbank, after claiming that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel and annexing the Syrian Golan, cannot let us mute as our political leaders are. No more than the hunger strike started on Tuesday by 150 Palestinian political prisoners protesting against the repression and constant deterioration of their situation in Israeli jails, decided by the Israeli government. (http://www.europalestine.com/spip.php?article140) Has the Palestinian youth made so many sacrifices with hundreds of killed and thousands of seriously injured in one year, despite their courageous choice of a non-armed resistance, for such results ? Let’s follow the example of the young American Jews who are rebelling against the Israel policy and who are demonstrating in a spectacular way in the United States  : http://www.europalestine.com/spip.php?article131 and http://www.europalestine.com/spip.php?article135. BIG RALLY ON THIS SUNDAY 14 APRIL IN PARIS ! COME IN NUMBERS TO SUPPORT PALESTINIANS AND THEIR CALL TO BOYCOTT THE OCCUPIER FROM 15:00 to 18:00 A LA FONTAINE DES INNOCENTS  METRO-RER : CHATELET-LES HALLES  Tout comme les Palestiniens, nous n’attendions rien des élections israéliennes qui viennent de permettre à Netanyahou un cinquième mandat (il bat Bouteflika…).  Comme l’a très bien écrit le journaliste israélien Gideon Levy dans Haaretz ce week-end, le choix se situait pour les électeurs entre voter apartheid ou … apartheid ( http://www.europalestine.com/spip.php?article128 ), et ils voté, à une écrasante majorité, pour l’apartheid et la continuation de l’occupation. Que le gouvernement qui va être formé s’affiche encore plus à l’extrême-droite, n’est pas fait pour choquer Macron, ni nos commentateurs avisés des médias aux ordres.  Mais après les annonces foulant allègrement aux pieds le droit international, sur “Jérusalem capitale d’Israël”, puis l’annexion du Golan syrien, Netanyahou annonce maintenant qu’il va procéder à l’annexion de tout ou partie de la Cisjordanie ! Peut-on rester sans réagir, comme le font nos dirigeants ? Peut-on par ailleurs ignorer les 150 prisonniers politiques palestiniens qui viennent de démarrer une grève de la faim (et qui refusent également de boire) ? Un mouvement qui risque fort de s’élargir et de se durcir, étant donné la répression à leur encontre, et la détérioration drastique de leurs conditions de détention, décidée par le gouvernement israélien, qui ne se contente pas de violer chaque jour la Convention de Genève, en emprisonnant ces résistants sur le territoire de l’occupant. (http://www.europalestine.com/spip.php?article140) Toute cette jeunesse palestinienne a-t-elle fait autant de sacrifices, avec des centaines de morts, des milliers de blessés, depuis un an, malgré le choix courageux d’une résistance non armée, pour un tel résultat ? Comme les jeunes juifs américains qui se révoltent actuellement contre la politique israélienne, et qui manifestent de manière spectaculaire  : http://www.europalestine.com/spip.php?article131 et http://www.europalestine.com/spip.php?article135 montrons que nous ne sommes pas anesthésiés, mais solidaires des occupés contre les occupants fascistes. RASSEMBLEMENT CE DIMANCHE 14 AVRIL À PARIS ! SOYONS NOMBREUX À MANIFESTER NOTRE INDIGNATION ET À SOUTENIR L’APPEL PALESTINIEN AU BOYCOTT DE L’OCCUPANT ! RV : DE 15 H À 18 H À LA FONTAINE DES INNOCENTS À PARIS MÉTRO-RER : CHÂTELET-LES HALLES 

The article 14 April, Paris: Stand with the Palestinian people! appeared first on Samidoun: Palestinian Prisoner Solidarity Network.


          Sudan General      Comment   Translate Page      

Sudan's army replaced the first head of the military government with another general, who is not linked with Bashir's crimes.

That article says the Sudanese seem to think the new general is better. However, this article says that protesters demand a more credible change.

Protests against military government in Sudan have brought together the Christian minority with the Muslim protesters.


          Algeria's magistrates threaten to boycott July presidential poll      Comment   Translate Page      
Judges say they will not oversee the vote if it is held under same judicial framework and Bouteflika-era institutions.
          Streets of Sudan flood with thousands of protesters - Daily Mail      Comment   Translate Page      
  1. Streets of Sudan flood with thousands of protesters  Daily Mail
  2. New Sudan leader promises civilian government amid deadly protests  Sky News
  3. Sudan and Algeria have ousted leaders, but revolutions rarely end happily  The Guardian
  4. My Father Died Before He Could See al-Bashir Fall  The New York Times
  5. Why women led the uprising in Sudan  Washington Post
  6. View full coverage on Google News

          Algerians reject new interim president      Comment   Translate Page      
(MENAFN) On Friday, Algerians arranged wide scale protests to express their refusal towards the appointment of Abdelkader Bensalah as interim president.The marches were carried out...
          Sudan protesters demand civilian government in talks with military rulers      Comment   Translate Page      

Alliance leaders say they will continue sit-in ‘until all our demands are met’

Sudanese protest organisers have presented demands to the country’s new military rulers, urging the creation of a civilian government, the group spearheading demonstrations has said.

Thousands remained encamped outside Khartoum’s army headquarters overnight and into Sunday to keep up the pressure on the military council that took power after ousting veteran leader Omar al-Bashir on Thursday.

Related: Sudan dares to dream: first Bashir fell, then the spy chief

Related: Sudan and Algeria have ousted leaders, but revolutions rarely end happily

Related: I saw the brutality of Bashir’s regime. Now Sudan can rediscover a lost identity | Nesrine Malik

Continue reading...
          'murica...      Comment   Translate Page      
Jenny Beth Martin, co-founder and national coordinator of Tea Party Patriots, told Breitbart News that the rallies were inspired by President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address, where he pledged, “America will never be a socialist country … ever.”

“That inspired us to do this,” Martin said.

But, Martin said, the event is about more than opposing the left’s agenda.

“The people taking part in the rallies are not just standing against socialism, but are also standing up for liberty and freedom,” 

More here.

~~~

So many 'Patriots' are so utterly clueless about the topic upon which they bloviate.

'Patriots' do not accept welfare from The State.  

'Patriots' do not work in professions that impose violations of Rightful Liberty upon their countrymen.

And the absurdity of the Tea Party holding 'rallies' on 'Tax Day' to protest 'Socialism' and oppressive government is beyond my ability to properly articulate.  The stunning failure to understand the reality in front of them is mind-boggling.

Socialism is not the problem.  Communism is not the problem.  Anarchy is not the problem.  Fascism is not the problem.  Racism is not the problem.

The problem is now and has always been with the -ist, not the -ism.

Social-ists are the problem.  Commun-ists are the problem.  Anarch-ists are the problem.

Don't fight the -ism - that is folly.

Extirpate the -ists - reduce the gene pool of the garbage.

No man or woman has ever died from an -ism.

Death is always at the hands of the -ists...

Back to the dim-wits currently struggling with knotted panties over 'Socialism' - here's a list of all the countries in the world with LOWER personal income tax rates than 'murica.  

Country
Range %
39.6 : 35
47 : 38
47.5 : 38.52
38 : 38
44 : 38
37.5 : 35
37 : 37
36 : 0
36 : 20
56.1 : 36
35.88 : 30
35 : 25
35 : 28
35 : 30
35 : 35
35 : 35
35 : 35
35 : 35
35 : 35
35 : 35
35 : 35
37 : 35
40 : 30
40 : 35
40 : 35
40 : 35
50 : 35
34 : 34
35 : 33.5
33 : 29
33 : 33
33 : 33
38.5 : 33
39 : 33
32 : 32
35 : 32
45 : 32
30 : 25
30 : 30
30 : 30
30 : 30
30 : 30
30 : 30
30 : 30
30 : 30
30 : 30
35 : 25
35 : 30
35 : 30
35 : 30
28 : 25
27.5 : 27.5
27 : 27
25 : 20
25 : 25
25 : 25
25 : 25
25 : 25
30 : 25
33 : 25

          Viral photo shows hope as dictators fall in Sudan, Algeria      Comment   Translate Page      
More than eight years after the Arab Spring broke out in the Middle East and North Africa, the autumn of the autocrats could be underway in Sudan and Algeria. Sudanese leader Omar al-Bashir was booted from power Thursday, following a week in which thousands of protesters camped out in the country’s capital, Khartoum. Earlier this...
          How the military piggybacked on populist uprisings in Algeria and Sudan      Comment   Translate Page      

Within the last two weeks, protests that are being called “Arab Spring 2.0” have led to the fall of presidents in Algeria and Sudan. But these aren’t just people’s revolutions: In both cases, the army stepped in, purportedly in support of the anti-government demonstrators.

In Algeria, a general...


          How the military piggybacked on populist uprisings in Algeria and Sudan      Comment   Translate Page      

Within the last two weeks, protests that are being called “Arab Spring 2.0” have led to the fall of presidents in Algeria and Sudan. But these aren’t just people’s revolutions: In both cases, the army stepped in, purportedly in support of the anti-government demonstrators.

In Algeria, a general...


          4/13/2019: THE WORLD: Algerians call for army, ruling elite to step down      Comment   Translate Page      
ALGIERS — Hundreds of thousands of Algerians took to the streets Friday in one of the largest demonstrations the country has seen since its president resigned last week, demanding that the interim successor and other elites also step down. But in a...
          Algeriassa osa tuomareista sanoo boikotoivansa presidentinvaaleja, myös mielenosoittajat torjuvat vaalit      Comment   Translate Page      
Algeriassa yli sata tuomaria järjesti mielenosoituksen oikeusministeriön edessä pääkaupunki Algerissa lauantaina. He ilmoittivat tukevansa mielenosoittajia ja boikotoivansa presidentinvaaleja, jotka on määrä järjestää 4. heinäkuuta.Protestoineet tuomarit kuuluvat uuteen ammatilliseen ryhmittymään, joka...
          How the military piggybacked on populist uprisings in Algeria and Sudan      Comment   Translate Page      

Within the last two weeks, protests that are being called “Arab Spring 2.0” have led to the fall of presidents in Algeria and Sudan. But these aren’t just people’s revolutions: In both cases, the army stepped in, purportedly in support of the anti-government demonstrators.

In Algeria, a general...


          Computational Methods and Experimental Testing in Mechanical Engineering: Selected Papers from the 6th Algerian Congress on Mechanics, CAM 2017, November 26-30, 2017, Constantine, Algeria / Taoufik Boukharouba... [et al.], editors      Comment   Translate Page      
Online Resource
          How the military piggybacked on populist uprisings in Algeria and Sudan      Comment   Translate Page      

Within the last two weeks, protests that are being called “Arab Spring 2.0” have led to the fall of presidents in Algeria and Sudan. But these aren’t just people’s revolutions: In both cases, the army stepped in, purportedly in support of the anti-government demonstrators.

In Algeria, a general...


          How the military piggybacked on populist uprisings in Algeria and Sudan      Comment   Translate Page      

Within the last two weeks, protests that are being called “Arab Spring 2.0” have led to the fall of presidents in Algeria and Sudan. But these aren’t just people’s revolutions: In both cases, the army stepped in, purportedly in support of the anti-government demonstrators.

In Algeria, a general...


          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Over the course of just two weeks, two longtime autocratic rulers have been driven from power - Omar al-Bashir in Sudan and Abdelaziz Bouteflika in Algeria. In both cases, the question now is, what comes next? And will these countries see full regime change or just more of the same? We wanted to take up that question with Abderrahim Foukara. He's the Washington, D.C., bureau chief of Al Jazeera, and he's with us in our studios now in Washington, D.C., to help us understand the regional picture. Abderrahim, thanks so much for joining us. ABDERRAHIM FOUKARA: Thank you, Michel. MARTIN: So how do you understand what's happening in the region right now? FOUKARA: Well, I understand it as a continuation of what started happening way back in 2011. A lot of governments in the region thought that at some point after 2011, things started to go back to normal. But obviously, many of the reasons why we had the 2011 uprisings in the first
          Algeria protests: Youth lead the movement for change      Comment   Translate Page      
Long-serving leader Abdelaziz Bouteflika may be gone, but many say this is just the start.
          ielts onlin on LEGIT IELTS(ieltsdoctor@outlook.com)buy original ielts/nebosh/gre/pte/gmat/toelt with your desired scores      Comment   Translate Page      

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          4/14/2019: INTERNATIONAL NEWS: With Bouteflika gone, protesters in Algeria demand more change      Comment   Translate Page      

ALGIERS (Reuters) – Hundreds of thousands of protesters demanding the departure of Algeria’s ruling elite rallied in the North African nation’s capital on Friday, and police reported nearly 200 arrests after clashes that left more than 80 officers...
          Arab Spring comes later in Sudan and Algeria      Comment   Translate Page      
The armed forces of Algeria and Sudan, which pushed out the long-serving rulers of those countries after mass protests, are following a script that has failed millions of Arabs since the 2011 uprisings.

          Algeria protests: Youth lead the movement for change      Comment   Translate Page      
Read on THE NEWS http://the-news.fyi/algeria-protests-youth-lead-the-movement-for-change-5-33034/
          Algeria protests: Youth lead the movement for change      Comment   Translate Page      
Read on THE NEWS http://the-news.fyi/algeria-protests-youth-lead-the-movement-for-change-4-33032/
          Algeria protests: Youth lead the movement for change      Comment   Translate Page      
Read on THE NEWS http://the-news.fyi/algeria-protests-youth-lead-the-movement-for-change-3-33030/
          Algeria protests: Youth lead the movement for change      Comment   Translate Page      
Read on THE NEWS http://the-news.fyi/algeria-protests-youth-lead-the-movement-for-change-2-33028/
          Algeria protests: Youth lead the movement for change      Comment   Translate Page      
Read on THE NEWS http://the-news.fyi/algeria-protests-youth-lead-the-movement-for-change-33026/
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Over the course of just two weeks, two longtime autocratic rulers have been driven from power - Omar al-Bashir in Sudan and Abdelaziz Bouteflika in Algeria. In both cases, the question now is, what comes next? And will these countries see full regime change or just more of the same? We wanted to take up that question with Abderrahim Foukara. He's the Washington, D.C., bureau chief of Al Jazeera, and he's with us in our studios now in Washington, D.C., to help us understand the regional picture. Abderrahim, thanks so much for joining us. ABDERRAHIM FOUKARA: Thank you, Michel. MARTIN: So how do you understand what's happening in the region right now? FOUKARA: Well, I understand it as a continuation of what started happening way back in 2011. A lot of governments in the region thought that at some point after 2011, things started to go back to normal. But obviously, many of the reasons why we had the 2011 uprisings in the first
          Product For Sale: Colonial Twilight: The French-Algerian War, 1954-62      Comment   Translate Page      

by CaveHinds

$40.00 for Board Game: Colonial Twilight: The French-Algerian War, 1954-62
Condition: Very Good
Location: United States
          Thread: Colonial Twilight: The French-Algerian War, 1954-62:: Strategy:: Govt Loses FULL Scenario Tie (31-36): 2 Campaigns, 23 Event Cards      Comment   Translate Page      

by MPMelanchthon

Taught an experienced gamer who has 3 COIN games but hasn't played any of them. Took about 90 minutes of teaching time with strategy and tactic tips. He played FLN.

1st Campaign: 2 Events then Propaganda (3)
2nd Campaign: 21 Events then Propaganda (22)

FLN wins:

FLN 31 (15 bases + 16 Oppose)
Govt 36 (29 Commitment + 7 Support)

Game took an unusual turn for the better for the Govt when the 2nd Event Card was #16 NATO with the Govt being 1st Eligible and the Govt rolled a 5, putting 5 Fr Troops into Available. The very next card was propaganda. Govt paid 1 Commitment to put 1 Fr Troop and 2 Fr Police into Available. Govt now has all of its Fr Troops in Available or in Algeria.

In response, the FLN player decided to build his Mtn Bases and Opposition quickly into the 2nd campaign, which he knew would go at least 10 Events (and ended up going 21 Events before the 2nd Propaganda round). This allowed the Govt to Mobilize on the 5th Event Card in the 2nd campaign, bringing in 13 pieces (1 Fr Troop, 11 Fr Police, 1 Base)

In the long 2nd campaign that followed the FLN did NOT play Suez Crisis (do mainly to low resources) but did play Morocco & Tunisia Independent. With the Govt having lots of Fr Troops but facing a long campaign the FLN builds bases and opposition as quickly and efficiently as possible. FLN player avoided entering any cities. Engages in a methodical creation of Guerrillas, then bases, always protecting Mountain bases with sufficient underground Guerrillas. FLN player uses Rally/Extort to maintain Guerrilla force levels, resources, and to put Guerrillas back underground to prevent Govt Assaults.

With FLN player opening up Morocco & Tunisia (14th Event in 2nd campaign) and Govt police fighting strong in border areas, the Govt works aggressively to take Tlemcen and Souk Ahras. Govt destroys 3 FLN bases. Takes and holds both sectors.

Final situation: Govt has support in all 3 cities and controls, but lacks support, in Souk Ahras, Sidi Bel Abbes, and Tlemcen. FLN has all 15 bases and opposition in all other populated spaces.

Number of FLN bases destroyed: 3 (Tlemcan-2 and Souk Ahras).
Number of Sectors Resettled: 0.
Number of Commitment lost to FLN choice of Event Cards: -2
Number of Commitment lost due to Propaganda round adjustment: -1
Number of Commitment gained to Govt by Govt's choice of Event Cards: +3

Govt forced to play Coup d'etat on 8th Event Card in 2nd campaign, when #2 Balky Conscripts came out and Govt had yet to fully deploy its large Fr Police force in Available. Govt won die roll 4:1. +1 Commitment.

Govt never has Napalm.

In 2nd campaign a "cat and mouse" use of FLN Rally followed by Terror and Govt Sweeps followed by Assaults ensues. FLN took away Govt Support in Tlemcen and Sidi Bel Abbes. Govt finally cleans out Souk Ahras and is ready to build Support but Progaganda card hits with game tied.

Govt had reached its 36 victory condition on the 14th Event card of the 2nd campaign, only to have the FLN use Terror to reduce it on the 16th. Govt recovers back to 36 on the 17th. And sustains 36 afterwards. But the Propaganda comes out after 21 Events and the FLN achieved its 31 Victory condition on the 21st Event of the 2nd campaign.

Key Mistake by Govt: The 18th Event card in the 2nd campaign was #31 Intimidation. Govt took this to prevent Terror from setting space to Neutral and to deny FLN desperately needed resources. And the 19th was #44 Paranoia. Govt also took this to deny movement of large FLN forces built up across Wilaya borders and deny FLN the ability to flip its exposed Guerrillas (due to repeated Extortion) underground. But Govt should have done Train Operation to create Support in a Sector and, if possible, another Train afterwards to do same in a different sector. As long as even one more sector had had Govt Support, Govt would've broken the tie in its favor.
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      
Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Over the course of just two weeks, two longtime autocratic rulers have been driven from power - Omar al-Bashir in Sudan and Abdelaziz Bouteflika in Algeria. In both cases, the question now is, what comes next? And will these countries see full regime change or just more of the same? We wanted to take up that question with Abderrahim Foukara. He's the Washington, D.C., bureau chief of Al Jazeera, and he's with us in our studios now in Washington, D.C., to help us understand the regional picture. Abderrahim, thanks so much for joining us. ABDERRAHIM FOUKARA: Thank you, Michel. MARTIN: So how do you understand what's happening in the region right now? FOUKARA: Well, I understand it as a continuation of what started happening way back in 2011. A lot of governments in the region thought that at some point after 2011, things started to go back to normal. But obviously, many of the reasons why we had the 2011 uprisings in the first
          How the military piggybacked on populist uprisings in Algeria and Sudan      Comment   Translate Page      

Within the last two weeks, protests that are being called “Arab Spring 2.0” have led to the fall of presidents in Algeria and Sudan. But these aren’t just people’s revolutions: In both cases, the army stepped in, purportedly in support of the anti-government demonstrators.

In Algeria, a general...


          How the military piggybacked on populist uprisings in Algeria and Sudan      Comment   Translate Page      

Within the last two weeks, protests that are being called “Arab Spring 2.0” have led to the fall of presidents in Algeria and Sudan. But these aren’t just people’s revolutions: In both cases, the army stepped in, purportedly in support of the anti-government demonstrators.

In Algeria, a general...


           Comment on Ultra Off Road Simulator 2019 Alaska PC Game Free Download by Nassim       Comment   Translate Page      
Thank you the PC Games for the ultra nice game library, this is a best website where we can spend days and days, i did downloaded many games that work perfectly, no need for extra additions, the Games worth much and are very sophisticated, It makes me live my childhood again, no age limitation, the end-user interface is perfect, nice graphics, well remastered and very adaptive games. Thank you for the Library and the Game adaptation for computer, Thanks for CODEX and All the developers team efforts to make this possible, All that library for free. Nassim From Algeria
          How the military piggybacked on populist uprisings in Algeria and Sudan      Comment   Translate Page      

Within the last two weeks, protests that are being called “Arab Spring 2.0” have led to the fall of presidents in Algeria and Sudan. But these aren’t just people’s revolutions: In both cases, the army stepped in, purportedly in support of the anti-government demonstrators.

In Algeria, a general...


          Algeria and Sudan Must Avoid Egypt's Fate      Comment   Translate Page      
Ahmed Aboudouh, Independent
The history of Arab uprisings has been both stupid and brutal apart from when the generals stood aside
          Arab Spring comes later in Sudan and Algeria      Comment   Translate Page      
The armed forces of Algeria and Sudan, which pushed out the long-serving rulers of those countries after mass protests, are following a script that has failed millions of Arabs since the 2011 uprisings.

          Honour Award for Dietmar Hopp      Comment   Translate Page      

There's always something happening at TSG – whether it's on or off the pitch. In our "Box-to-box" series, we bring you exciting and interesting stories from the first team, the U23s, the academy and the women's team.

Saturday

Honour Award for Dietmar Hopp

Dietmar Hopp was presented with the Honour Award for his social involvement at the Radio Regenbogen gala in Rust on Friday 12 April. The TSG Hoffenheim patron's foundation has donated more than €720 million for charitable purposes, which makes Hopp "one of the most generous donors in the world".

The special award has only been given a few times in the 22-year history of the award ceremony, with previous recipients including Helmut Kohl, Hans-Dietrich Genscher, Mikhail Gorbachev, Johannes Heesters, Miyako Saigai und Thomas Gottschalk. The Honour Award was presented to Mr. Hopp by EU commissioner and the former premier of Baden-Württemberg Günther H. Oettinger.

20190413 sap tsg hoffenheim hopp regenbogen award

Wednesday

TSG Fan Day with Dennis Geiger at Heidelberg Zoo

On Saturday 13 April, TSG Hoffenheim will be spending the whole day at Heidelberg Zoo to mark the exciting occasion that is TSG Fan Day. There will be lots of fun and games for the younger fans and the HOFFEXPRESS will be in operation too. In addition, there is a competition where the winner can claim a signed shirt as well as tickets for the home game against Hertha Berlin on Sunday. Among the attendees will be TSG player Dennis Geiger, who will be at the zoo from 13:00 CET to sign autographs and take photos with fans. All zoo-goers who appear in a TSG shirt will be given a €2 discount on their ticket price.

190410 TSG Fantag Zoo 16zu9

Tuesday

All-time table: TSG close in on 500th Bundesliga point

TSG Hoffenheim are only two points away from reaching a major Bundesliga landmark. A win in their home game against Hertha Berlin on Sunday (13:30 CET/Live Ticker at achtzehn99.de) would see the club cross the 500-point threshold in the German top flight. TSG currently have 498 points (369 matches played) following their furious 4-0 victory away to FC Ausburg. They currently sit in 26th place in the all-time Bundesliga table, directly below Bayer Uerdingen (543 points).

Monday

"Team of the Round" quadruple for Belfodil

There was more good news for Ishak Belfodil on the day after the emphatic 4-0 victory away to FC Augsburg. The striker, who scored three goals at the WWK Arena, was included in the "Team of the Round" by "Sportschau", "kicker", "BILD" and "DAZN". It is the second consecutive week that the Algerian forward has been heavily represented in the selections, having previously been nominated by three media outlets for his role in the 4-1 win at Bayer Leverkusen the weekend before.

20190408 sap tsg hoffenheim belfodil augsburg


          Arab Spring Arrives Late in Algeria: New Elections Called      Comment   Translate Page      

Baba Aye discusses the protests in Algeria, the colonial legacy that still shapes the country’s politics today, and the decision of independence hero Bouteflika to step down


           Comment on Free Unlocking of Mobilis Algeria Huawei E5573cs-322 (Firmware 21.329.62.00.216) by Kamlesh Kumar       Comment   Translate Page      
routerunlock.com RRLVJ-T7QHD-BAQ3K-U5LAG-P8VSE-VQE84-84ANG-RMGRG-8LVAS-T9848-AKFLR-JCVFN-Z9F3T-G9U2B-33QK6-KQKQY-FSHKL
          'Debatable' List Of '100 Most Jewish' Foods Leaves Plenty Of Room For Kibbitzing       Comment   Translate Page      

It's hard to talk about Jewish culture without talking about food. The bagels, the brisket, the babka. Oh, the babka.

Ask anyone who is spending this weekend filling their freezer with matzo balls for the upcoming Passover Seder, and they'll tell you that food is intertwined with Jewish culture and history — to the point,where it can become a theology in and of itself, the stage on which all sorts of Jewish values are performed. It's not surprising to learn that the code of Jewish law is called the Shulchan Aruch — the set table. And that the commentary on the book is the Mappah — the tablecloth. But that said, what exactly does it mean for a food to be Jewish?

Alana Newhouse, editor of Tablet Magazine, the online journal which brands itself as a new read on Jewish life, attempts to answer this question (or operate from the place of having answered it) with a newly published book, The 100 Most Jewish Foods: A Highly Debatable List. In a series of short essays, contributors wax on about dishes from Mitteleuropa to the Middle East, probing through lines of history and sentiment (and making a collective case as to why the latter may be more important than the former).

From the outset (well, actually from the subtitle), Newhouse acknowledges this is loaded territory.

"This is not a list of today's most popular Jewish foods, or someone's idea of the tastiest, or even the most enduring," Newhouse lays out in the introduction. "What's here, instead, are the foods that contain the deepest Jewish significance — the ones that, throughout the history of our people (however you date it), have been most profoundly inspired by the rhythms of the Jewish calendar and the contingencies of the Jewish experience."

Significance and profound inspiration can of course be in the eye (or stomach) of the beholder. But the list is admirable. Sure, we could quibble with some of the choices (say, omitting Crisco's fine Jewish history). But the book details what are clearly the greatest hits: the deli stalwarts, the Israeli favorites, the convenience foods that targeted the kosher market and became ingrained in diaspora tradition. Or, as Newhouse puts it, "the salty, the sweet, the dense, the light, the beautiful, and the undeniably brown, stretching back over thousands of years of civilization and from nearly every region of the planet."

But for those looking for a full picture of the histories and resonances of the particular foods that made the list — well, they may be somewhat disappointed.

This book grew out of an online project, and often it shows. Like a lot of quick turnaround writing of the Internet age, many pieces in this book are lightly sourced, and some more about clever constructions (that, say, some of the top bagel joints aren't run by Jews) than deeper-level history and fact (many of them still are, also: *Talmudic shrug*).

Zac Posen's article on borscht simply tells you that it is pink, and he developed a recipe for it, and life has sweet and sour moments. (Lea Zeltserman thankfully comes in with a beautiful meditation on how this food, which defines Russian-Jewish cuisine, actually fits into the stories and tables of those Jews who lived through the Soviet era). And fine fish chef Eric Ripert weighs in on gefilte fish, just to ultimately tell you that it is ... not that bad?

More troubling are the entries that not only sidestep the rich stories of how particular foods became "Jewish," but consciously disregard these histories in a deliberate attempt to nationalize them. Writer Liel Leibovitz urges readers to "Forget the heated arguments about [hummus'] true national origins," because all you need to know is that it's the official dip of the NFL. And his entry for shakshuka shrugs, "So what if the Moroccans make it, too. Never mind that the Tunisians eat it for breakfast each weekend, or that it delights the Greeks and satiates the Algerians: Shakshuka is Israeli now." These are clearly attempts to be cheeky (humor being a fine Jewish value), but the glib gloss on appropriation can be difficult to stomach. As is editor Alana Newhouse's essay joking that terrible store-bought cookies served at temple are more of a threat to American Judaism than the BDS movement calling for an economic boycott to force Israel to recognize Palestinian statehood.

That said, there are some beautiful meditations on food and family and feeling within these pages. Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett writes an homage to everything that could be made from the whole chickens her mother and grandmother would get from the kosher butcher. The feet ended up enriching soup (after careful cleaning and prepping); the neck bones would add flavor and bits of meat to the broth; the neck skin would be stuffed with filling and sewn up with white cotton thread. The bird itself would be roasted to golden-crisp perfection, while the eyerlekh, the unhatched chicken eggs found inside freshly slaughtered chickens, would be floated in soup. (Because of salmonella-testing regulations, they aren't easily found anymore.)

There are stories of beloved grandmothers, of the wealth of Yiddish words for dill, and of the surprising role of sugar cereals in Orthodox homes. (They're a Sabbath morning treat, when religious prohibitions on work mean adherents can't cook the usual hot breakfast.) Leah Koenig (who provides context and commentary throughout the book) explains how after the destruction of the temple, religious rites were transferred to the Sabbath table, making breads like challah akin to a divine offering. And MaNishtana reflects on the special resonances of a Seder meal — and the mortar of charoset in particular — for African American Jews, for whom the legacy of slavery is lived on a daily basis.

There are also the personal recollections that are downright hilarious — like Josh Malina's story of his grandmother's gribenes (chicken skin cracklings), and his own adoption thereof. ("For an elegant vegetarian version, simply don't eat anything at all.") And Wayne Hoffman serves up a pitch-perfect ode to the (shared) used tea bag on his parents' kitchen counter.

The book comes with 60 recipes, but that's almost beside the point. (And who can agree on the definitive version anyways?) This is about how food is tied up in sentiment, and the role it can play in life. These are the stories of snacks people ate when they came home from school, memories from the holiday table, treats from the sorts of bakeries that don't exist anymore. Its very existence is an engagement in the fine Jewish tradition of debate, and there is clearly room for the arguments to continue. But The 100 Most Jewish Foods is also a love letter — to food, family, faith and identity, and the deliciously tangled way they come together.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          How the military piggybacked on populist uprisings in Algeria and Sudan      Comment   Translate Page      

Within the last two weeks, protests that are being called “Arab Spring 2.0” have led to the fall of presidents in Algeria and Sudan. But these aren’t just people’s revolutions: In both cases, the army stepped in, purportedly in support of the anti-government demonstrators.

In Algeria, a general...


          4/13/2019: WORLD: MASS NUMBERS PROTEST ARMY AND RULING ELITE      Comment   Translate Page      

ALGIERS, ALGERIA Hundreds of thousands of Algerians took the streets Friday in one of the largest demonstrations the country has seen since its president resigned last week, demanding that his interim successor and other elites also step down. But in...
          In Algeria And Sudan, Protesters Reject Military Rule In Regime Transitions      Comment   Translate Page      

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Abderrahim Foukara, Al Jazeera's Washington, D.C. bureau chief, about the recent regime changes in Algeria and Sudan.




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