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          Maccast 2019.03.10      Cache   Translate Page      

A podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 696. Apple said to be too ‘involved’ in original content. New AirPods may charge fast. Consumers put Amazon above Apple on Privacy. Apple acquires Lighthouse patents. Foldable glass may be in iPhone’s future. Melbourne tells Apple they don’t want their store. Apple updates iPhone repair policies. Siri’s accent may be improving. New art on Apple Music Playlists. Change Keychain Password Suggestions. How to do folder encryption. BootCamp in a Apple CPU world. Shortcuts directories. Thing of the Moment: iDevices Dimmer Switch

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          Zuckerberg’s new privacy essay shows why Facebook needs to be broken upZuckerberg describes Facebook...      Cache   Translate Page      

Zuckerberg’s new privacy essay shows why Facebook needs to be broken up

Zuckerberg describes Facebook as a town square. It isn’t. Facebook is a company that brought in more than $55 billion in advertising revenue last year, with a 45% profit margin. This makes it one of the most profitable business ventures in human history. It must be understood as such.

Facebook has minted money because it has figured out how to commoditize privacy on a scale never before seen. A diminishment of privacy is its core product. Zuckerberg has made his money by performing a sort of arbitrage between how much privacy Facebook’s 2 billion users think they are giving up and how much he has been able to sell to advertisers. He says nothing of substance in his long essay about how he intends to keep his firm profitable in this supposed new era. That’s one reason to treat his Damascene moment with healthy skepticism.

“Frankly we don’t currently have a strong reputation for building privacy protective services,” Zuckerberg writes. But Facebook’s reputation is not the salient question: its business model is. If Facebook were to implement strong privacy protections across the board, it would have little left to sell to advertisers aside from the sheer size of its audience. Facebook might still make a lot of money, but they’d make a lot less of it.

Zuckerberg’s proposal is a bait-and-switch. What he’s proposing is essentially a beefed-up version of WhatsApp. Some of the improvements might be worthwhile. Stronger encryption can indeed be useful, and a commitment to not building data centers in repressive countries is laudable, as far as it goes. Other principles that Zuckerberg puts forth would concentrate his monopoly power in worrisome ways. The new “platforms for private sharing” are not instead of Facebook’s current offering: they’re in addition to it. “Public social networks will continue to be very important in people’s lives,” he writes, an assertion he never squares with the vague claim that “interacting with your friends and family across the Facebook network will become a fundamentally more private experience.”

By narrowly construing privacy to be almost exclusively about end-to-end encryption that would prevent a would-be eavesdropper from intercepting communications, he manages to avoid having to think about Facebook’s weaknesses and missteps. Privacy is not just about keeping secrets. It’s also about how flows of information shape us as individuals and as a society. What we say to whom and why is a function of context. Social networks change that context, and in so doing they change the nature of privacy, in ways that are both good and bad.


          Bad Database Encryption      Cache   Translate Page      

I ran across a blog about encrypted databases linked from Bruce Schneier's blog. I follow his musings and writings on security ,and he recommended we read it with this sentence: "Even the summary is too much to summarize, so read it." Good enough for me, so I clicked the link and read about encrypted databases.

I like the idea of stronger encryption in databases, and I've given a few talks on the subject. At times there are attendees that will debate that encryption in the database doesn't do a lot of good. Often they dismiss the idea of TDE, since administrators can still read the data and break the encryption, and normal users aren't affected. Many also note that database encryption does nothing for data on the wire, which is true. Most people want to do the encryption and decryption on the client, which has other challenges and is fairly hard to do well.

Read the rest of Bad Database Encryption


          How to Track Online Malevolent Identities in the Act      Cache   Translate Page      

CircleID CircleID: Want to be a cybersleuth and track down hackers?

It may sound ambitious considering that malevolent entities are extremely clever, and tracing them requires certain skills that may not be easy to build for the typical computer user.

But then again, the best defense is offense. And learning the basics of sniffing out cybercriminals may not only be necessary nowadays, it has become essential for survival on the Web. So where can you begin?

Place Honeypots

Hackers take great care to cover their tracks. So, it's important to catch them with their hand in the cookie jar. You can do so by setting up a bait — called a honeypot — to lure them out. It can take the form of a spammable domain or an easily hackable virtual machine which can appear as legitimate targets.

Once attacked, honeypots help you observe what intruders do to the system, know the tricks that they employ to infect devices, and subsequently find ways to counter them. Such forensic evidence enables law enforcers to track unsolicited access and then locate and catch perpetrators.

Reverse-Engineering Malware

Let's say that despite all the precautions, malware still succeeded in infiltrating your company's system. Instead of losing sleep, you can use the infection to understand how the malicious program operates and what it's been engineered to do, such as what vulnerabilities it's been designed to exploit.

This process is called reverse engineering. It involves disassembling the program to be able to analyze and retrieve valuable information on how it is used or when it was created. It is extremely helpful in finding substantial evidence such as encryption keys or other digital footprints that can lead investigators to the cybercriminals.

Leverage WHOIS Information

When a complaint is received over a dangerous website, the first step in the investigation is to identify the operator of the suspect domain.

This can be done by querying the domain name registry where the site has been registered. A whois database download service, for example, enables users to retrieve the WHOIS data that contains the name, location, and contact details of domain registrants. With this information in hand, security teams can report the matter to law enforcement agents who can then track down malicious operators and apprehend them on the spot.

Inspect Files' Metadata

Once in possession of files and devices from a suspicious entity, you can analyze the evidence that is saved in them and discover crucial details that can be followed back to the source.

Word, Excel, or PowerPoint files, for example, contain relevant information, called metadata, that can blow a hacker's cover. They include the name of the person that created the file, the organization, the computer, and the local hard drive or network server where the document was saved.

It is also important to analyze the grammar used in comments that are embedded in the software code. Socio-cultural references, nicknames, language, and even the use of emojis — all can reveal clues on the nationalities of the criminals or their geographical location.

Go On with Tracerouting

One of the best ways to catch perpetrators is by identifying their IP addresses. However, they usually hide these IPs by spoofing or by bouncing communications from different locations. Luckily, no matter how shrewd and clever these individuals may be, malicious addresses can still be identified through an approach called tracerouting.

The technique works by showing the hostnames of all the devices within the range of your computer and a target machine. More often than not, the last machine's hostname address belongs to the hacker's Internet Service Provider. With the ISP known, investigators can then pinpoint the geographical location and the areas where the culprit is probably situated.

* * *

Every time you venture online, you're exposed to malevolent entities that can harm your system and disrupt business operations. Knowing how to trace the source of an attack can stop it in its tracks and prevent the intervention from happening again.
Written by Jonathan Zhang, Founder and CEO of Threat Intelligence PlatformFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Cybersecurity, Malware, Spam, Whois

The post How to Track Online Malevolent Identities in the Act appeared first on iGoldRush Domain News and Resources.


          How To Actually Break Up Big Tech      Cache   Translate Page      

Last week, I wrote about Elizabeth Warren's big plan to break up big tech and why I thought her plan (a) would not work and (b) was based on a fairly shocking number of factual errors. Not everyone agreed (indeed, many people have disagreed). Many of those who disagreed, though, seemed to only do so because they hate the big internet companies, and thus they seemed happy about any attack on them, no matter how pointless. Others attacked me personally, insisting that my detailed explanation of why I found Warren's plan laughably naive was really just because I "love big tech." Finally, some demanded to know what my plan would be. And while I think it's somewhat silly to imply that you cannot critique a bad plan if you can't come up with another plan (sometimes, doing nothing is the best plan), I've been meaning to write some more about this anyway, and here's a good opportunity.

Contrary to the strawman beliefs some insist I have, I am quite worried about the market power of many large companies these days, and how that might be stifling competition. As I've argued for over twenty years on this site, the single biggest driver of innovation is competition. And I want to see more competition to get more innovation. My issue is that doing so through regulatory means is fraught with significant risks -- ones that could very much do the opposite. Highly regulated industries are not known for being competitive and innovative for the most part. They tend to enable only big entities -- who can deal with the regulations -- to exist and crowd out startups. On top of that, thanks to regulatory capture and the crony nature of our political system these days, you also end up with just a few big companies who now focus on what we've referred to in the past as political innovation rather than technological or entrepreneurial innovation. It's a recipe for stagnation, not innovation and competition.

My second big concern with the plans people have been floating is that they ignore the reality of why some of the tech companies have gotten so big and so successful. For the most part, they're in highly networked industries, where it's not just "winner takes all" but in many ways size and dominance of the network is fundamental to their operation. Network effects can lead to dominant positions, for the fairly obvious reason that the bigger they are, the better they are for everyone involved. For all of Warren's talk of breaking up companies, note that she was only talking about chipping off a few of their peripheral acquisitions: not taking an axe to their core business.

And that's because she recognizes that as much as people scream to "break up big tech," there's no reasonable way to do that without making the overall offerings a lot less useful for the public. How do you break up Facebook's social network? Do you say half the world can't use it and have to use the BookFace spinoff instead? You could, of course, cleave off Instagram and Whatsapp, but that doesn't really change Facebook's overall global dominance. The reason Facebook is so powerful is that it connects the entire globe. There is no place to make a reasonable cut to split that up. Google is powerful because of its search engine. How do you break that up? Do you say for searches on topic X you use Google, but for searches on topic Y you have to use Elgoog? You could cut off Doubleclick from Google, but then you still have a massive search engine and a massive internet ads company. And while I guess you could cut off Amazon's web services piece from it store, that doesn't change the main "competition" complaint most people have about Amazon, which is the size of its footprint in e-commerce. But again, it got there not through predatory practices, but because it's so convenient and easy for most people that they actually get tremendous benefit from it.

But, that presents a dilemma. And while lots of people seem to think there are easy answers to this (just like they think there are easy answers to "content moderation") there are not. This is a really complex issue, and like nearly all super complex issues, the easy solutions tend to look appealing, while actually making everything a hell of a lot worse.

So I will make a suggestion for how I'd like to "break up" big tech, while admitting that since this is a complex topic with no easy answer, I could be wrong. But so could everyone else. And I've been digging through the details on this stuff for many years now, and I do think my plan makes the most sense. Later this year, I have a big academic paper on this topic coming out with a lot more details, so in the meantime expect a bunch more posts on this topic leading up to that.

The idea goes back to one I raised back in 2015 in the context of content moderation: that we need to move to a world of protocols, not platforms. This is the world of the earlier internet, dominated by open protocols with a variety of competitive apps built on top. Instead of Twitter, there was IRC. Instead of Reddit, there was Usenet. And you had a choice of clients and servers and could move around if you didn't like the policies of one or the other.

In the world of protocols, you still get the global connectivity benefit, but without the lockdown control and silos (and, potentially, the questionable privacy practices). In a world of protocols, there may be a global network, but you get competition at every other level. You can have competitive servers, competitive apps and user interfaces, competitive filters, competitive business models, and competitive forms of data management. If you don't like how one app provider handles privacy, you move to another -- but because you're using the same protocol, you don't lose everything you're doing with it, you're just entering through a new door that you like better. If you don't like the way one provider handles content moderation, you change it or move to another.

And, yes, I noted competition at the business model level as well -- because that's important. We could see lots of interesting attempts at creating different services with different business models that go beyond the limited options (pay with your data, freemium, advertising, etc.) today. One option might be in the form of cryptocurrency or token tied to the protocol. While I can already hear half of you rolling your eyes, this is a model that is at least worth exploring. A cryptocurreny or token tied to a protocol takes away much of the incentive for the really terrible business models everyone complains about. You don't need to spy on everyone if just getting more usage in general increases the value of the currency. And encouraging business models that don't require collecting data on everyone is something we should celebrate, not mock. But, cryptocurrency isn't the only such solution either. I've been playing around with a few attempts at new protocol-based systems these days that purposely eschew the cryptocurrency/token model, and are exploring other models instead. The point is that there are other ways of making this work, and more options is better.

However, if we were in a world where the major services and functions we used online were protocols instead of platforms, it would move the power and control out to the ends of the network, rather than centralizing it on the servers of a few giant companies. We'd still get the benefits of the network effects of the systems, but without the centralized control. We'd still be able to get innovation at various levels, but without relying on a single entity to determine what's best. We'd still get the convenience of powerful services, but without the opaque decision making of a single entity. It's an approach that could actually work.

That still leaves the question of how do we get there from here. And there are a lot of challenges in that. But I don't think declaring large platforms as "platform utilities" gets us any closer to that vision -- and if anything seems to drive us away from it. I'll be writing some more posts on how we get towards a world of protocols instead of platforms, and the many hurdles in the way, in the coming weeks and months. However, there are two key approaches to making it happen: either bottom up or top down. And both could work -- but both could be difficult.

The bottom up approach is people designing new protocols from scratch and building a new userbase. That presents a huge number of challenges in terms of building up the userbase, but it's not impossible. New startups pop on the scene all the time, and some of them even succeed. And I already know of at least 6 or 7 attempts at building these kinds of protocols from scratch. And while they're all fairly small, some are building up at least some traction and are interesting to follow and experiment with. The benefit to this approach is you have no legacy to deal with, making things easier to design and the entire setup more nimble. The cons, obviously, are the lack of a userbase and the basic "empty room" problem: how do you get someone to use a social application when there's nothing to do there and no one to connect with?

The "top down" approach would be to convince an existing internet giant to move towards such a world. It's unlikely that any company today would agree to flip the switch entirely and open up their platform into an open protocol. But I would argue that it's not as far out and unrealistic an idea as many assume. In the last six months, I've had in-depth conversations with four large internet companies about this approach, and they were surprisingly more open to at least considering what it would mean than I initially expected. And while I may go into more detail in later posts, I'll give three quick reasons why the big tech firms may actually decide it makes sense to give up their silos in the long run:

  1. It gets them away from proposals like Warren's to "break up" their business, which they know would create a giant mess. By opening up their core code for anyone to use and pushing the power out to the ends of the network, the companies are effectively "breaking themselves up.
  2. It takes them off the hook for all of the platform liability that is getting dumped on them these days. There are all sorts of competing and impossible demands on these platforms concerning how they moderate content, with tons of people being upset no matter what decision is made, and various people and (especially) politicians now looking to dump massive liability on the platforms themselves. If they turn their system into a protocol, they actually get rid of much of that headache. There will still be questions about content moderation, but it becomes a very different problem -- one to where there can be many different approaches, with competition at the filter level. We didn't used to blame email providers for spam, but thanks to the open protocols of email, it allowed all sorts of innovative spam filtering services to spring up. Given how much of a headache content moderation and platform liability has become of late -- and the fact it's likely to become an even bigger headache over time -- at some point, companies are going to realize an open protocols approach is a solution to that problem.
  3. The possibility of new business models. This is important. Lots of people insist that no giant platform would willingly give up so much control, because it's entirely antithetical to business models built off of collecting all the data. And that's true. But, that's why I'm eager to see how new business models shake out in this space, because it might lessen the "we collect all your data" business model reliance and open up new opportunities that could even be more lucrative (especially if they create opportunities where people start abandoning services that don't respect their privacy).
There still are plenty of reasons why the big platforms are unlikely to do this in the near future (and I'm pretty sure a clueless Wall St. would punish any company that tried), but as various trends continue to move along, it may become more and more appealing.

Notice that all of that could very well happen without a massive policy intervention from the government. However, there are certainly policy ideas that could help move this along a lot faster. Of course, moving these policy proposals forward would require a more detailed understanding of how technology and technology innovation really works, because the key isn't enforcing breakups or trying to codify "fairness" guidelines with new rules -- it's taking away some of the existing legal and regulatory tools that make it easy and appealing to build vertically-integrated walled gardens, which aren't always obvious to people who aren't immersed in the tech policy space since they are presented as having other purposes:

  1. Get rid of most patents (if we're talking real antitrust, we'd start by getting rid of these government-granted monopolies). Perhaps you could start with "software" ones, though defining what is a "software" patent is hard enough. Patents hinder competition and would create huge problematic thickets in a world of protocols where we want widespread competition at every other level. Without patent thickets and patent trolls, we'd see a lot more competition, especially in taking different approaches to providing interfaces and filters for the same kinds of content.
  2. Dump the ridiculous CAFC ruling on API copyrights and make it clear that there is not copyright on interfaces, meaning that you could actually have much more interoperability and people building new systems to connect to third party products.
  3. Get rid of Section 1201 of the DMCA and its anti-circumvention rules. Again, this blocks competition and interoperability. Indeed, Section 1201 is a huge barrier to this kind of future, in that it would allow companies to effectively block out competitive third party services through "technological protection measures." Without 1201, it would make it much easier for almost anyone to create a new competitive interface for an existing protocol-based service.
  4. Make sure that full encryption is supported as a fundamental right of end users. This becomes important, as a protocol-based system should also lead to a booming new market for databanks that will store your encrypted data, giving you total control over it and who it is shared with (and for what purposes). But if there are mandated backdoors or some other crap, you completely destroy such a market. Encryption makes this possible.
  5. Get the SEC to stop thinking of cryptocurrency as just a financial tool and to recognize it's something entirely different. Sure, you need them to deal with the out-and-out scams, but as it stands right now, the SEC is talking about crazy ideas like how any crypto system should need to go through "clinical trials" like drugs. Ideas like that would simply snuff out any possibility of the above ever happening. People don't realize how much of this future may be held back by a myopic SEC who is viewing all of this through a single lens.
There's more, but those steps would open up a lot of opportunity for a protocols-based system to take hold. And when it really happens, no one's going to worry about "breaking up" big tech anymore, because it won't even be necessary.



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          Mozilla launches free in-browser (any browser) file-sharing service      Cache   Translate Page      

Mozilla today debuted a free file-sharing service that works with - but doesn't require - Firefox and touted the service's security and privacy traits.

"Send uses end-to-end encryption to keep your data secure from the moment you share to the moment your file is opened," wrote Nick Nguyen, Mozilla's vice president of product strategy. "You can [also] choose when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add an optional password for an extra layer of security."

To read this article in full, please click here


          St6000nm0024 Seagate 7200rpm 6tb Encryption No 128mb Cache Sata 12gb S      Cache   Translate Page      
St6000nm0024 Seagate 7200rpm 6tb Encryption No 128mb Cache Sata 12gb S
          PGP/GPG Encrypt Me....      Cache   Translate Page      
It's amazing what technology makes you go through just to secure your shizzle. I actually knew people who knew Phil Zimmerman when he was getting flack about publishing/writing/creating PGP back in the early 90's (I believe the story goes that he shared the same attorneys as one of my friend in the group we were in)...

So when I finally got back on the net I, of course, downloaded PGP and put up a public key onto pgp.mit.edu. Heh... that was long ago and I've had 2 keys lost since then. So last night was the search to try and revoke lost keys. The way that it's designed, there is no way you can revoke a key without the secret key (which were lost to the floppy discs of time).

Therefore, I had to create NEW keys with information in them saying that the OLD keys were no longer valid, sign them then publish them onto the PGP keyservers. What a pain in the ass! Then on top of that, I have to get my NEW keys signed and authenticated.

Which made me thing... hmm.. we have MySpace.. but the problem is that even though I know these people, PGP is no where simple enough for everyday encryption. It takes a bit of education just to get them to create a key, sign it, post it up THEN have people sign YOUR key with THEIR key so you can start building your "Web of Trust".

Really, trust starts with identity verification then works outward...

I remember places where if you had a notarized copy of your license/passport and sent it into a key signing company, you could build that web of trust. Those places are long gone. Instead they do parties now where one can "sign" your certificate. Still not easy enough for most people but it's better than nothing.

I wonder if there is a way to do a "Web of Trust" that can involve current technology. There's gotta be a better way...

And on that note... my PGP/GPG public key:

-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.6 (GNU/Linux)
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AQAAAAAAAAAAAQIDBAUGBwgJCgv/xAC1EAACAQMDAgQDBQUEBAAAAX0BAgMABBEF
EiExQQYTUWEHInEUMoGRoQgjQrHBFVLR8CQzYnKCCQoWFxgZGiUmJygpKjQ1Njc4
OTpDREVGR0hJSlNUVVZXWFlaY2RlZmdoaWpzdHV2d3h5eoOEhYaHiImKkpOUlZaX
mJmaoqOkpaanqKmqsrO0tba3uLm6wsPExcbHyMnK0tPU1dbX2Nna4eLj5OXm5+jp
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EQACAQIEBAMEBwUEBAABAncAAQIDEQQFITEGEkFRB2FxEyIygQgUQpGhscEJIzNS
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APdvskYXAGKrNaAZNZ1xdaqur2lkk8W113TN5fP4c1Nb3N5M2oSNcARRsUiwo4I6
5rdKSFCty7E/kkZwDTNghjlmlGFRSee5qCdr+LRAwvm+0yMAsmxeOfTFJql/apb/
AGW5uvLTKq0jD7xz0rOqnbQ1WIctDzXwV8O7LxlPeeK/FAe8e5ncW8LMQqopwCcf
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6DxCkd1rn2Z1ZuY9oVsfNnj9a1dKEmrmccRVpp8jscNqSeHrC0juby114LIcIPKU
E0V2/wAQUU2FjEyj7xJH4UU1SpW+El4rE/zM3FUSeJpZf+eSAfpTIcf2PdP/AM9J
Saks3/f6rOexI/IUy350W0Xj95Lz+Zrqf+X5XOW+l/X8ya5G2DTovV1rkLiwEPxM
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tOzPPPH3irV762tJYLBY7ZTnY+dsn6VmeHvGiv4fv9OuIGDq261Qv9wHkgfjXV+K
tNvNO8M2sEVtFfRvFmW4uAXZT7dhXmFtDZ6O8t1IiNcNGRFzkA464/Gs3FXukdMZ
e6S3t+13Jl85xyTXl15H5d5Mg6ByBXa3uqJb25bOXYHFcxqc8gYWRRD91t235skZ
61zxi0y6jTR7H8BtYcamthLC+DA+yRRleo6+ld9e3Pn/ABB2jI2TIuPpg1wPwW8M
3sGvGa4u1W3jg3eXH1fJHBPpXXzzD/hYUrHoLjH5LXTFXfyOOUrGv8RJdz2CD0c/
yoqHxYTPqNgG7Qs3P4UU4w0J5mdDBKq6FqM4P35HwaniG220qIfxDd+lYrXaReDc
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          Mozilla launches free in-browser (any browser) file-sharing service      Cache   Translate Page      

Mozilla today debuted a free file-sharing service that works with - but doesn't require - Firefox and touted the service's security and privacy traits.

"Send uses end-to-end encryption to keep your data secure from the moment you share to the moment your file is opened," wrote Nick Nguyen, Mozilla's vice president of product strategy. "You can [also] choose when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add an optional password for an extra layer of security."

To read this article in full, please click here


           Comment on What I Did to Prep This Week – Week 34 – Mar 3rd – Mar 9th 2019 by The Ohio Prepper       Cache   Translate Page      
Zulu 3-6, <blockquote>True, the Internet and GPS are completely separate systems, but the government could always change the encryption on the GPS so civilian receivers would be useless. Sort of a MILNET for GPS, if you will.</blockquote> There is no encryption per. se.; but, the current system does have what is called <strong>SA<strong> or <strong>”Selective Availability”</strong> that was turned off by President Clinton, since DGPS made it all but useless. SA will add or subtract pseudo random values to the ephemeris data, making the position calculations of the earth stations off, by meters to miles, with the military stations knowing the correct position offsets; however, with the advent of cellular networks, DGPS (Differential GPS) was created, initially by the surveying industry. How it works is a GPS receiver is placed at a fixed known position, and when it calculates the position from the GPS satellite data, if it doesn’t match the known position, the difference (differential) is calculated and sent via the cellular network to the surveyors in the field, whose equipment makes the proper corrections. It’s basically making the original SA obsolete. It’s kind of a real world Spy vs. Spy vs. Spy kind of thing. LOL. <blockquote>Not that I think it is a realistic near term possibility, but if we get into a serious shooting match with some other country, it could easily happen as the military GPS is different from the civilian GPS. Many other countries rely on the civilian GPS as they do not have access to the military encryption.</blockquote> Only the signals are different since all use the same satellite constellation, with different data streams used for decoding. <blockquote>Some countries (China comes to mind) are building their own GPS network.</blockquote> The US has begun launching its new upgrade, more accurate GPS III" satellites starting back on December 23rd. The spacecraft, is called "Vespucci," and was deployed into medium Earth orbit about 2 hours after liftoff by a Space-X Falcon rocket. Actually Russia already has asatellite system called GLONASS and you can purchase receivers for it or for both the US & Russian systems. China’s system is called BeiDou; but, I don’t know much about it. The EU has its Galileo program to launch another constellation of navigation satellites and I understand that the UK is also working on its own Sat Nav system. There is already so much space junk in orbit, I don’t see how NORAD keeps track; but, supposedly they do. <blockquote>In any event, the US military scaled back their manual land navigation training for a number of years, but now they are bring it back. Special Ops always kept up their manual landnav, but regular forces only worked the basics. I always used manual landnav as GPS was only just coming into semi-common use when I retired from the military.</blockquote> Land navigation is a good skill to have; but, unfortunately I don’t think too many civilians have a clue either. Prior to GPS I traveled all over this country with books of maps like the Road Atlas and the state Gazetteer, e.g. “Ohio Gazetteer” While we use a GPS in the vehicle, it’s a GPS device (Tom Tom), that contains the maps of all of north America in its memory, with lifetime updates every so often. Some use their smart phones with apps like Waze that don’t contain all of the needed maps, and downloads them in pieces when needed, assuming you are in a coverage area, meaning that no bars or no internet yields no maps. We still keep appropriate maps in the vehicles as a backup. Your take on the Venezuela power problem is spot on, and like the collective farms of the USSR, being run by party apparatchiks with no farming experience causing widespread starvation, I don’t see much of a future for Venezuela and hopefully its current regime. Even bringing those farmers back to the scorched fields of the USSR didn’t magically make food appear.
           Comment on What I Did to Prep This Week – Week 34 – Mar 3rd – Mar 9th 2019 by Zulu 3-6       Cache   Translate Page      
TOP, True, the Internet and GPS are completely separate systems, but the government could always change the encryption on the GPS so civilian receivers would be useless. Sort of a MILNET for GPS, if you will. Not that I think it is a realistic near term possibility, but if we get into a serious shooting match with some other country, it could easily happen as the military GPS is different from the civilian GPS. Many other countries rely on the civilian GPS as they do not have access to the military encryption. Some countries (China comes to mind) are building their own GPS network. In any event, the US military scaled back their manual land navigation training for a number of years, but now they are bring it back. Special Ops always kept up their manual landnav, but regular forces only worked the basics. I always used manual landnav as GPS was only just coming into semi-common use when I retired from the military. A big part of the power outage in Venezuela stems from the fact that the majority of their power comes from one big generation facility that is now shut down. Most of the skilled operators have flown the coop too. Restarting the generators is a tricky process that unskilled operators are screwing up causing sub-stations to blow-up and burn. Even if all the skilled operators came back to work today, there would still be serious issues because of damaged equipment, generators, and sub-stations. Things are REALLY going to get ugly in that country soon. But, socialism is sooooo great!
          POS Upgrades: What Retail Stores Should Do With Outdated Equipment      Cache   Translate Page      
Is retail the leader in data breaches? People mistakenly think it is. The truth is financial institutions, healthcare, and government agencies are where most breaches occur. However, retail is in the top 10. The problems are numerous. Retailers may not realize they need powerful firewalls and point-to-point encryption when transmitting credit and debit card details.Think […]
          How To Actually Break Up Big Tech      Cache   Translate Page      

Last week, I wrote about Elizabeth Warren's big plan to break up big tech and why I thought her plan (a) would not work and (b) was based on a fairly shocking number of factual errors. Not everyone agreed (indeed, many people have disagreed). Many of those who disagreed, though, seemed to only do so because they hate the big internet companies, and thus they seemed happy about any attack on them, no matter how pointless. Others attacked me personally, insisting that my detailed explanation of why I found Warren's plan laughably naive was really just because I "love big tech." Finally, some demanded to know what my plan would be. And while I think it's somewhat silly to imply that you cannot critique a bad plan if you can't come up with another plan (sometimes, doing nothing is the best plan), I've been meaning to write some more about this anyway, and here's a good opportunity.

Contrary to the strawman beliefs some insist I have, I am quite worried about the market power of many large companies these days, and how that might be stifling competition. As I've argued for over twenty years on this site, the single biggest driver of innovation is competition. And I want to see more competition to get more innovation. My issue is that doing so through regulatory means is fraught with significant risks -- ones that could very much do the opposite. Highly regulated industries are not known for being competitive and innovative for the most part. They tend to enable only big entities -- who can deal with the regulations -- to exist and crowd out startups. On top of that, thanks to regulatory capture and the crony nature of our political system these days, you also end up with just a few big companies who now focus on what we've referred to in the past as political innovation rather than technological or entrepreneurial innovation. It's a recipe for stagnation, not innovation and competition.

My second big concern with the plans people have been floating is that they ignore the reality of why some of the tech companies have gotten so big and so successful. For the most part, they're in highly networked industries, where it's not just "winner takes all" but in many ways size and dominance of the network is fundamental to their operation. Network effects can lead to dominant positions, for the fairly obvious reason that the bigger they are, the better they are for everyone involved. For all of Warren's talk of breaking up companies, note that she was only talking about chipping off a few of their peripheral acquisitions: not taking an axe to their core business.

And that's because she recognizes that as much as people scream to "break up big tech," there's no reasonable way to do that without making the overall offerings a lot less useful for the public. How do you break up Facebook's social network? Do you say half the world can't use it and have to use the BookFace spinoff instead? You could, of course, cleave off Instagram and Whatsapp, but that doesn't really change Facebook's overall global dominance. The reason Facebook is so powerful is that it connects the entire globe. There is no place to make a reasonable cut to split that up. Google is powerful because of its search engine. How do you break that up? Do you say for searches on topic X you use Google, but for searches on topic Y you have to use Elgoog? You could cut off Doubleclick from Google, but then you still have a massive search engine and a massive internet ads company. And while I guess you could cut off Amazon's web services piece from it store, that doesn't change the main "competition" complaint most people have about Amazon, which is the size of its footprint in e-commerce. But again, it got there not through predatory practices, but because it's so convenient and easy for most people that they actually get tremendous benefit from it.

But, that presents a dilemma. And while lots of people seem to think there are easy answers to this (just like they think there are easy answers to "content moderation") there are not. This is a really complex issue, and like nearly all super complex issues, the easy solutions tend to look appealing, while actually making everything a hell of a lot worse.

So I will make a suggestion for how I'd like to "break up" big tech, while admitting that since this is a complex topic with no easy answer, I could be wrong. But so could everyone else. And I've been digging through the details on this stuff for many years now, and I do think my plan makes the most sense. Later this year, I have a big academic paper on this topic coming out with a lot more details, so in the meantime expect a bunch more posts on this topic leading up to that.

The idea goes back to one I raised back in 2015 in the context of content moderation: that we need to move to a world of protocols, not platforms. This is the world of the earlier internet, dominated by open protocols with a variety of competitive apps built on top. Instead of Twitter, there was IRC. Instead of Reddit, there was Usenet. And you had a choice of clients and servers and could move around if you didn't like the policies of one or the other.

In the world of protocols, you still get the global connectivity benefit, but without the lockdown control and silos (and, potentially, the questionable privacy practices). In a world of protocols, there may be a global network, but you get competition at every other level. You can have competitive servers, competitive apps and user interfaces, competitive filters, competitive business models, and competitive forms of data management. If you don't like how one app provider handles privacy, you move to another -- but because you're using the same protocol, you don't lose everything you're doing with it, you're just entering through a new door that you like better. If you don't like the way one provider handles content moderation, you change it or move to another.

And, yes, I noted competition at the business model level as well -- because that's important. We could see lots of interesting attempts at creating different services with different business models that go beyond the limited options (pay with your data, freemium, advertising, etc.) today. One option might be in the form of cryptocurrency or token tied to the protocol. While I can already hear half of you rolling your eyes, this is a model that is at least worth exploring. A cryptocurreny or token tied to a protocol takes away much of the incentive for the really terrible business models everyone complains about. You don't need to spy on everyone if just getting more usage in general increases the value of the currency. And encouraging business models that don't require collecting data on everyone is something we should celebrate, not mock. But, cryptocurrency isn't the only such solution either. I've been playing around with a few attempts at new protocol-based systems these days that purposely eschew the cryptocurrency/token model, and are exploring other models instead. The point is that there are other ways of making this work, and more options is better.

However, if we were in a world where the major services and functions we used online were protocols instead of platforms, it would move the power and control out to the ends of the network, rather than centralizing it on the servers of a few giant companies. We'd still get the benefits of the network effects of the systems, but without the centralized control. We'd still be able to get innovation at various levels, but without relying on a single entity to determine what's best. We'd still get the convenience of powerful services, but without the opaque decision making of a single entity. It's an approach that could actually work.

That still leaves the question of how do we get there from here. And there are a lot of challenges in that. But I don't think declaring large platforms as "platform utilities" gets us any closer to that vision -- and if anything seems to drive us away from it. I'll be writing some more posts on how we get towards a world of protocols instead of platforms, and the many hurdles in the way, in the coming weeks and months. However, there are two key approaches to making it happen: either bottom up or top down. And both could work -- but both could be difficult.

The bottom up approach is people designing new protocols from scratch and building a new userbase. That presents a huge number of challenges in terms of building up the userbase, but it's not impossible. New startups pop on the scene all the time, and some of them even succeed. And I already know of at least 6 or 7 attempts at building these kinds of protocols from scratch. And while they're all fairly small, some are building up at least some traction and are interesting to follow and experiment with. The benefit to this approach is you have no legacy to deal with, making things easier to design and the entire setup more nimble. The cons, obviously, are the lack of a userbase and the basic "empty room" problem: how do you get someone to use a social application when there's nothing to do there and no one to connect with?

The "top down" approach would be to convince an existing internet giant to move towards such a world. It's unlikely that any company today would agree to flip the switch entirely and open up their platform into an open protocol. But I would argue that it's not as far out and unrealistic an idea as many assume. In the last six months, I've had in-depth conversations with four large internet companies about this approach, and they were surprisingly more open to at least considering what it would mean than I initially expected. And while I may go into more detail in later posts, I'll give three quick reasons why the big tech firms may actually decide it makes sense to give up their silos in the long run:

  1. It gets them away from proposals like Warren's to "break up" their business, which they know would create a giant mess. By opening up their core code for anyone to use and pushing the power out to the ends of the network, the companies are effectively "breaking themselves up.
  2. It takes them off the hook for all of the platform liability that is getting dumped on them these days. There are all sorts of competing and impossible demands on these platforms concerning how they moderate content, with tons of people being upset no matter what decision is made, and various people and (especially) politicians now looking to dump massive liability on the platforms themselves. If they turn their system into a protocol, they actually get rid of much of that headache. There will still be questions about content moderation, but it becomes a very different problem -- one to where there can be many different approaches, with competition at the filter level. We didn't used to blame email providers for spam, but thanks to the open protocols of email, it allowed all sorts of innovative spam filtering services to spring up. Given how much of a headache content moderation and platform liability has become of late -- and the fact it's likely to become an even bigger headache over time -- at some point, companies are going to realize an open protocols approach is a solution to that problem.
  3. The possibility of new business models. This is important. Lots of people insist that no giant platform would willingly give up so much control, because it's entirely antithetical to business models built off of collecting all the data. And that's true. But, that's why I'm eager to see how new business models shake out in this space, because it might lessen the "we collect all your data" business model reliance and open up new opportunities that could even be more lucrative (especially if they create opportunities where people start abandoning services that don't respect their privacy).
There still are plenty of reasons why the big platforms are unlikely to do this in the near future (and I'm pretty sure a clueless Wall St. would punish any company that tried), but as various trends continue to move along, it may become more and more appealing.

Notice that all of that could very well happen without a massive policy intervention from the government. However, there are certainly policy ideas that could help move this along a lot faster. Of course, moving these policy proposals forward would require a more detailed understanding of how technology and technology innovation really works, because the key isn't enforcing breakups or trying to codify "fairness" guidelines with new rules -- it's taking away some of the existing legal and regulatory tools that make it easy and appealing to build vertically-integrated walled gardens, which aren't always obvious to people who aren't immersed in the tech policy space since they are presented as having other purposes:

  1. Get rid of most patents (if we're talking real antitrust, we'd start by getting rid of these government-granted monopolies). Perhaps you could start with "software" ones, though defining what is a "software" patent is hard enough. Patents hinder competition and would create huge problematic thickets in a world of protocols where we want widespread competition at every other level. Without patent thickets and patent trolls, we'd see a lot more competition, especially in taking different approaches to providing interfaces and filters for the same kinds of content.
  2. Dump the ridiculous CAFC ruling on API copyrights and make it clear that there is not copyright on interfaces, meaning that you could actually have much more interoperability and people building new systems to connect to third party products.
  3. Get rid of Section 1201 of the DMCA and its anti-circumvention rules. Again, this blocks competition and interoperability. Indeed, Section 1201 is a huge barrier to this kind of future, in that it would allow companies to effectively block out competitive third party services through "technological protection measures." Without 1201, it would make it much easier for almost anyone to create a new competitive interface for an existing protocol-based service.
  4. Make sure that full encryption is supported as a fundamental right of end users. This becomes important, as a protocol-based system should also lead to a booming new market for databanks that will store your encrypted data, giving you total control over it and who it is shared with (and for what purposes). But if there are mandated backdoors or some other crap, you completely destroy such a market. Encryption makes this possible.
  5. Get the SEC to stop thinking of cryptocurrency as just a financial tool and to recognize it's something entirely different. Sure, you need them to deal with the out-and-out scams, but as it stands right now, the SEC is talking about crazy ideas like how any crypto system should need to go through "clinical trials" like drugs. Ideas like that would simply snuff out any possibility of the above ever happening. People don't realize how much of this future may be held back by a myopic SEC who is viewing all of this through a single lens.
There's more, but those steps would open up a lot of opportunity for a protocols-based system to take hold. And when it really happens, no one's going to worry about "breaking up" big tech anymore, because it won't even be necessary.



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          Thailand Decides To Make Its Terrible Cybersecurity Law Even Worse      Cache   Translate Page      

More censorship and encryption-breaking is on the way, thanks to the Thai government's broad interpretation of the term "cybersecurity." The government has been leaning heavily on American social media companies to disappear content critical of… you guessed it, the government. To keep the king from being insulted too often (or for too long), the government is also exploring undermining website encryption and holding service providers directly (and criminally) responsible for the words and deeds of their users.

Another round of amendments has made Thailand's cybersecurity law worse. It seems almost impossible, given its history. And yet here we are, watching as the government gives itself everything it wants, leaving citizens with the dubious privilege of generating tons of data the government can access at will.

The bill (available in Thai) was amended late last year following criticism over potential data access, but it passed the country’s parliament with 133 positives votes and no rejections, although there were 16 absentees.

There are concerns around a number of clauses, chiefly the potential for the government — which came to power via a military coup in 2014 — to search and seize data and equipment in cases that are deemed issues of national emergency. That could enable internet traffic monitoring and access to private data, including communications, without a court order.

Naturally, everyone but the government is concerned about these amendments. The Asia Internet Coalition has issued a statement expressing these concerns. All of its concerns are valid. And, considering the history of this law and this government, all are likely to be ignored.

The bugs listed in the AIC's statement are considered features by a government that has a long history of silencing dissent and jailing critics.

Protecting online security is a top priority; however, the Law’s ambiguously defined scope, vague language and lack of safeguards raises serious privacy concerns for both individuals and businesses, especially provisions that allow overreaching authority to search and seize data and electronic equipment without proper legal oversight. This would give the regime sweeping powers to monitor online traffic in the name of an emergency or as a preventive measure, potentially compromising private and corporate data.

Vague language and a lack of safeguards. Overreaching authority and lack of oversight. That's exactly what the Thai government wants. This is deliberate. This is what's wanted by governments all over the world. The US government wants this. So does the Australian government. The UK government has spent most of the past decade refining its overreach and scaling back its oversight.

This isn't just a Thai problem. It's a government problem. But the Thai problem is made worse by its disturbing (and ancient) lese majeste laws, which add some old school twists to its cyber pretensions. But the script is otherwise identical: the same ideas pushed by other governments, using the same "security" pitch to strip citizens of their protections and privacy.



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           RSA Conference 2019: What You Need to Know       Cache   Translate Page      

As the rain fell outside on the Moscone Center this past week in downtown San Francisco, the 2019 RSA Conference inside was full of cybersolutions.

The RSA Conference is the largest, and probably most significant, single ongoing global cybersecurity event on the planet. It brings together people, companies and ideas from all over the world — and serves as a smorgasbord of security ideas new and old.

And yes, the expectations for such an event are very high. These are some of the top questions I use to analyze and evaluate the RSA Conference (RSAC) every year:

Where’s the WOW? Did I learn anything new (or different that changed my mind) on an important security topic? Who are the new and persevering cyberindustry thought leaders that I need to continue follow? How will emerging technology features and security tools change the world (for better or worse)? What will we (still) be talking about (from this show) five or 10 years from now?

As I have said in past years, it is amazing, overwhelming, intimidating and exhausting for attendees. With formal and informal sessions, a huge show floor full of company products and demonstrations, breakfasts, lunches and dinners, vendor parties, and numerous side events (and full competing conferences) happening at the same time, it is physically impossible to do it all.

RSAC Details for 2019

This year’s RSA Conference website is full of materials that you can use, even if you didn’t attend the event. The information is organized in easy-to-use categories such as speakers, tracks and spotlights. The reported attendance was more than 42,500, although it seemed larger than last year due to the expanded show floor.

You can also watch numerous RSA Conference video presentations here.  

The mainline media coverage of the conference appeared to be down as compared to other years that offered front-page articles from many major newspapers. However, much of that coverage in 2018 was related to a lack of women keynotes and presenters, which did not happen this year. In fact, it appeared that RSAC organizers went out of their way to have numerous all-women sessions and dozens of top women presenters in every track and in most panel sessions.

Business Wire offered these main RSA Conference talking points describing the 2019 event details:

"An expanded keynote program with 31 keynote presentations on two stages. West Stage keynotes featured sponsor keynotes, panels and esteemed guest speakers, and South Stage keynotes utilized the newly opened Moscone Center South to bring highly coveted sessions from industry experts to a broader audience. 740 speakers across 621 sessions and more than 700 companies on the expo floors. Key session and seminar presentations included: Building Security In — DevSecOps; Noopur Davis, SVP, Chief Product and Information Security Officer, Comcast Building Identity for an Open Perimeter; Tejas Dharamshi, Senior Security Software Engineer, Netflix, Inc. Cybersecurity Tips, Tools and Techniques for Your Professional Toolbag; Ronald Woerner, IT Risk and Compliance Consultant, DirectDefense How to Eliminate a Major Vulnerability in the Cybersecurity Workforce; Laura Bate, Policy Analyst, New America; Danielle Santos, Program Manager, NIST The Fine Art of Creating a Transformational Cybersecurity Strategy; Jinan Budge, Principal Analyst, Forrester Research; Andrew Rose, Chief Security Officer, Vocalink, a Mastercard Company Threat Hunting Using 16th-Century Math and Sesame Street; Vernon Habersetzer Sr., Enterprise Technical Expert, Walmart Axonius was named “RSA Conference 2019’s Most Innovative Startup” by the Innovation Sandbox’s judges’ panel comprised of technology, venture and security industry thought leaders. The Award for Excellence in the field of Mathematics was given to Tal Rabin, manager of cryptographic research, Thomas J. Watson Research Center. …”

Threat Post offered this good recap of the 2019 RSA Conference.  

CRN.com provided these 30 hot new cybersecurity products announced at RSA.

And Bank Info Security offered their interviews and highlights from RSAC.

Dan Lohrmann’s Top Presentations from RSAC 2019

From my perspective, here are a few of the presentations that grabbed my attention. This list is a diverse mix of different formats, styles and ideas. (Side Note: My criteria for a WOW is an unexpected talk that has unique, new materials. Or, a presenter who has a track record of success over many years who continues to deliver new insights and perspectives that are intriguing, helpful and useful.)

1. Tales of a Teenage Security Supergirl — This presentation by Kyla Guru was simply amazing for a 16-year-old girl still in high school. Definitely a WOW to remember. It is empowering for Gen Z, and a brief talk you should show to your teenage relatives and friends for a ton of reasons — if for nothing else to inspire them in public communications. The nonprofit BitsnBytes cybersecurity platform has a very bright future, as does this young lady.

2. A View from the Front Lines of Cybersecurity by FireEye — This session includes Sandra Joyce, Vice President and Head of Global Intelligence Operations, FireEye and Kevin Mandia, Chief Executive Officer, FireEye. I am almost always impressed with Kevin Mandia, and he brought some good and bad news — with detailed industry trends to watch.

He discussed a few nation-states cyberattacks and trends:

North Korea financially motivated group that also uses destructive malware for distraction. Iranian threat actors — going after individuals. China — military actions in cyber. Russia targeted safety systems at an ICS plant — shut down a plant.

What’s next? Brazen actions, and people will get hurt — secondary and tertiary effects are out of control.

Also, more compartmentalizing is happening with Balkanization and new rules. Kevin warned that those who fail to abide by them with have a very different Internet experience.

 

3. The Five Most Dangerous New Attack Techniques and How to Counter Them — with Alan Paller from SANS and Heather Mahalik, the Director of Forensics Engineering at ManTech. Great session, and always good to hear from Alan and Heather as well as the others on this panel.  

 

  

4. RSA Sandbox — Here was one of several excellent sessions from this Sandbox series of panels and presentations.

  5. In the Wake of an Attack: Thoughts from a Seasoned CISO with Dr. Hugh Thompson, Program Committee Chair, RSA Conference, and Bob Lord, Chief Security Officer, DNC.

Hugh also did very nice job in the closing interview with Tina Fey, which is described here in an article by Dark Reading.

 

6. And last, but certainly not least, I really like the RSAC Launch Pad, which highlights companies such as NulD in the popular Shark Tank format.

Watch Ethan Landow, Head of Strategy and Operations and the NulD Judges, including Theresia Gouw, Founding Partner, Aspect Ventures.

Closing Thoughts on RSA 2019

One big early buzz at this year’s RSA Conference was the announcement about Adi Shamir’s visa snub from the U.S. government.

“Adi Shamir, the S in the renowned RSA encryption system, didn't take his usual place on the Cryptographers' Panel at this year's RSA Conference in San Francisco — because he couldn't get a visa from the U.S. government. And he's not alone.

Shamir — the 2002 Turing Award co-winner and a member of the U.S., French, and Israeli Academy of Sciences and Britain's Royal Society — lives in Israel, and applied for a U.S. visa two months ago to attend the information security conference, the largest of its type in the world, which is being held this week in California. Shamir, along with Ron Rivest and Leonard Adleman, invented the widely used RSA cryptosystem, and cofounded RSA Security, which has been running the RSA Conference since 1991. …”

On a personal level, I always enjoy the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) luncheon on Thursday for networking and important updates from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). It was wonderful news to hear that Kelvin Coleman is the new NCSA executive director, and he is the perfect person for that role in my opinion. The update on DHS' new cyberagency was also excellent from Jeanette Manfra who is the assistant director of cybersecurity for the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA).     

The RSA Conference will remain in San Francisco for (at least) one more year, so we'll plan to be back for another cyberextravaganza in 2020.   


          Комментарий на странице "Документация по GeSHi" от Гость Mavis      Cache   Translate Page      
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          See Apple FBI before the drama should know most Android mobile phone is not encrypted-war3.replays.net      Cache   Translate Page      
Look at the apple FBI drama before the most know: Android mobile phone is not encrypted as early as 2011, Google provides encryption options for the Android system, but it is hidden in the advanced settings in the complex system project. In 2014, the original Android system began to actively ask the user when the […]
          How to Track Online Malevolent Identities in the Act      Cache   Translate Page      

CircleID CircleID: Want to be a cybersleuth and track down hackers?

It may sound ambitious considering that malevolent entities are extremely clever, and tracing them requires certain skills that may not be easy to build for the typical computer user.

But then again, the best defense is offense. And learning the basics of sniffing out cybercriminals may not only be necessary nowadays, it has become essential for survival on the Web. So where can you begin?

Place Honeypots

Hackers take great care to cover their tracks. So, it's important to catch them with their hand in the cookie jar. You can do so by setting up a bait — called a honeypot — to lure them out. It can take the form of a spammable domain or an easily hackable virtual machine which can appear as legitimate targets.

Once attacked, honeypots help you observe what intruders do to the system, know the tricks that they employ to infect devices, and subsequently find ways to counter them. Such forensic evidence enables law enforcers to track unsolicited access and then locate and catch perpetrators.

Reverse-Engineering Malware

Let's say that despite all the precautions, malware still succeeded in infiltrating your company's system. Instead of losing sleep, you can use the infection to understand how the malicious program operates and what it's been engineered to do, such as what vulnerabilities it's been designed to exploit.

This process is called reverse engineering. It involves disassembling the program to be able to analyze and retrieve valuable information on how it is used or when it was created. It is extremely helpful in finding substantial evidence such as encryption keys or other digital footprints that can lead investigators to the cybercriminals.

Leverage WHOIS Information

When a complaint is received over a dangerous website, the first step in the investigation is to identify the operator of the suspect domain.

This can be done by querying the domain name registry where the site has been registered. A whois database download service, for example, enables users to retrieve the WHOIS data that contains the name, location, and contact details of domain registrants. With this information in hand, security teams can report the matter to law enforcement agents who can then track down malicious operators and apprehend them on the spot.

Inspect Files' Metadata

Once in possession of files and devices from a suspicious entity, you can analyze the evidence that is saved in them and discover crucial details that can be followed back to the source.

Word, Excel, or PowerPoint files, for example, contain relevant information, called metadata, that can blow a hacker's cover. They include the name of the person that created the file, the organization, the computer, and the local hard drive or network server where the document was saved.

It is also important to analyze the grammar used in comments that are embedded in the software code. Socio-cultural references, nicknames, language, and even the use of emojis — all can reveal clues on the nationalities of the criminals or their geographical location.

Go On with Tracerouting

One of the best ways to catch perpetrators is by identifying their IP addresses. However, they usually hide these IPs by spoofing or by bouncing communications from different locations. Luckily, no matter how shrewd and clever these individuals may be, malicious addresses can still be identified through an approach called tracerouting.

The technique works by showing the hostnames of all the devices within the range of your computer and a target machine. More often than not, the last machine's hostname address belongs to the hacker's Internet Service Provider. With the ISP known, investigators can then pinpoint the geographical location and the areas where the culprit is probably situated.

* * *

Every time you venture online, you're exposed to malevolent entities that can harm your system and disrupt business operations. Knowing how to trace the source of an attack can stop it in its tracks and prevent the intervention from happening again.
Written by Jonathan Zhang, Founder and CEO of Threat Intelligence PlatformFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Cybersecurity, Malware, Spam, Whois

The post How to Track Online Malevolent Identities in the Act appeared first on iGoldRush Domain News and Resources.


          Breaking the 100bps barrier with Matrix, meshsim & coap-proxy      Cache   Translate Page      
Hi all, Last month at FOSDEM 2019 we gave a talk about a new experimental ultra-low-bandwidth transport for Matrix which swaps our baseline HTTPS+JSON transport for a custom one built on CoAP+CBOR+Noise+Flate+UDP.  (CoAP is the RPC protocol; CBOR is the encoding; Noise powers the transport layer encryption; Flate compresses everything uses predefined compression maps). The […]
          MediaBerkman: Privacy’s Blueprint - The Battle to Control the Design of New Technologies      Cache   Translate Page      
In this talk, Professor Woodrow Hartzog argues that the law should require software and hardware makers to respect privacy in the design of their products. Against the often self-serving optimism of Silicon Valley and the inertia of tech evangelism, privacy gains will come from better rules for products, not users. The current model of regulating use fosters exploitation. Hartzog speaks on the need to develop the theoretical underpinnings of a new kind of privacy law that is responsive to the way people actually perceive and use digital technologies. The law can demand encryption. It can prohibit malicious interfaces that deceive users and leave them vulnerable. It can require safeguards against abuses of biometric surveillance. It can, in short, make the technology itself worthy of our trust. For more info about this event visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2019-03-05/privacys-blueprin

          Broker Center - Broker-center.com      Cache   Translate Page      
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          Australia isn't buying local cyber and the rest of the world might soon follow      Cache   Translate Page      
Early Stage technology investor and partner at Amadeus Capital, Alex van Someren, has warned the encryption-busting legislation hasn't made Australia an attractive place to buy cyber from.
          Product Review: EAP737 Wireless Access Point for High-density Environments      Cache   Translate Page      
Wireless Access Point


The subject of today's article is the wireless access point, designed for use in public space with high-density environments (hospitals, educational institutions, large office spaces, etc.). With impressive features and functions for this purpose, EAP737 is not lacking laconic aesthetics in the appearance. The high-quality, fireproof matte plastic housing and light weight of EAP737 bring positive impression with pleasant tactile sensations.


High-quality, fireproof matte plastic housing

Port side

The main features of EAP737:

    Support up to 32 SSIDs with 802.1Q VLAN
    802.3at PoE GbE uplink port
    Wireless QoS 802.11e
    Support up to 256 users:
  • 128 on 2.4 GHz, and 128 on 5 GHz

    Support up to 1.2 Gbps data rates:
  • 2.4 GHz: Up to 300 Mbps
  • 5 GHz: Up to 867 Mbps

    Dual-radio 2x2:2 MU-MIMO
    Beamforming
    Built-in Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)
    Standalone or centrally managed by 4ipnet WHG gateway-controller

Full description can be found on the product page:

Let's take a look at some of the specifications mentioned above.

One of the interesting features is the built-in Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) for location services (indoor location tracking), for example, iBeacon.

Built-in bluetooth Low Energy
2x2:2 MU-MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) is a method of spatial coding of a signal that can increase the channel bandwidth in which data transmission and data reception are carried out by several antennas.

Beamforming - beamforming technology focuses on transmitting signal towards the users to improve the channel from the access point to the client. The technology is implemented by omni-directional antennas and analysis of the data received from the receiver. As a result, the enhanced signal allows more data to be transmitted to customers.

By supporting up to 32 SSIDs (16 per radio), EAP737 can create up to 32 virtual access points that have different authentication methods and encryptions based on access policies.

PoE GbE uplink port - the access point can be powered via PoE, and its operation will only consume 14.4 W, which makes it possible to utilize class 3 PoE switches that supply up to 15.4 W per port.

The user authentication options is also worth mentioning, as for today 4ipnet offers a great variety of choices. Users can register via Facebook, email, guest portal, as well as one-time passwords via SMS. For all this, you would surely need a controller.

The device can be both wall-mount and ceiling-mount. There’s nothing stands out of the accessories which consists of a network cable, a power supply and a mounting bracket.

The combination of the technologies - beamforming, QoS, high speed data transfer, and increased bandwidth (several devices in one MU-MIMO group can transmit data simultaneously), and a reliable and productive element base, altogether give this access point the ability to work in places with a large and a diverse amount of users.

We will not describe the user interface today, as in the previous article we have a rather detailed presentation of its components (there we talked about EAP767, EAP727, and for EAP737 it’s basically the same).
The configuration was performed through the APM100 controller, and its step-by-step Setup Wizard.

Setup Wizard

The purpose of this article is to present EAP737, and to conduct a small test of the data transfer rate to the best of our capabilities. To test the maximum bandwidth of the channel, two methods were used. The first was a common transfer of a large file (1C database file, 3GB) from a PC with a gigabit channel (PC with Intel Gigabit CT Desktop Adapter -> HP ProCurve Gigabit Switch -> EAP737 -> PC with Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265). The second test was conducted by using the iPerf utility, or rather, its modification Jperf-2.0.2.

In order to know the maximum channel bandwidth threshold, the test on the 2.4 GHz has not been conducted.

So, under the operation mode (the type of wireless connection) 802.11ac and the frequency of 5GHz, the adapter of the connecting user Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265 has (according to the Intel specification) the maximum speed of 867 Mbps, TX/RX Streams 2X2, 802.11ac, 2.4GHz, 5GHz. Both PCs have SSD disks and 8 GB RAMs. No additional settings for network adapters and access points were made (all by default), except for specifying the 5GHz mode and 802.11ac standard respectively. Although to get the best possible result, it would probably be necessary to optimize, but time was not enough for fine tuning and depth study of all data, and it is unlikely that this would change the situation much.

A simple file transfer from one SSD to another over the network showed the following result: the average data acquisition rate varied at about 500 Mbps (460-490 Mbps), and the maximum rate was 560 Mbps.

Test statistics

The 50-57 Mbps write speed to the disk roughly corresponded to the network performance.
Network performance

In the settings of the iPerf utility, we gradually increased the following parameters: TCP window size (the size of the 32KB socket buffer), maximum size of the TCP segment, buffer length of the queue for reading/writing. The general results were similar to those of transferring the 1C database file.

Eventually, the maximum result (maximum load per channel) was achieved by setting the TCP window size to 800 Mbit during 60 seconds testing in 1 and 4 streams. Processes (streams) simply divided the approximately 500 Mbpschannel, although allowing us to slightly increase the average summing index.

 4 parallel streams testing
4 parallel streams testing
It’s a bit unclear why the start indicators were so overstated, but almost immediately they got reduced to a level of 400-500 Mbps.

1 stream testing
1 stream testing

This is an approximately thirty-second chart of one stream testing; the speed varies on average from 450 to 500 Mbps.
We can observe the same result when testing for reception/transmission. First, the data was transferred to the server part of Jperf with an average of 460-480 Mbps; next, the data reception varied in the same range, sometimes exceeding the 500 Mbps threshold.
Test statistics
All in all, after testing, we can conclude that the EAP737 shows a very good result, an average of 500 Mbps, expectedly underachieving to the declared maximum of 867 Mbps (5 GHz). Obviously, by using several such access points, load balancing policy, quotas, the second range of 2.4 GHz, etc., the channel performance of 500 Mbps will be enough to allow a lot of users to access the network.




          NATO selects BlackBerry’s SecuSUITE for Government to secure its calls      Cache   Translate Page      
BlackBerry's SecuSUITE for Government was built for National Security and today, BlackBerry has announced that the NATO Communications and Information (NCI) Agency have awarded BlackBerry a contract to use the services for encrypted communications. "Eavesdropping on calls is one of the easiest ways to gain access to private information," said Dr. Christoph Erdmann, SVP of BlackBerry Secusmart, BlackBerry. "We are extremely proud that the NCI Agency, a world leader in the development and use of technology that keeps NATO nations secure, has put its trust in BlackBerry's software to secure their voice communication. No matter the operating system or 'thing' used to communicate, BlackBerry's arsenal of cybersecurity technology ensures our customers' data remains private." When BlackBerry acquired Secusmart five years ago, they were already established as a leader in high-security voice and data encryption and anti-eavesdropping solutions, this new contract highlights the ongoing nee...
          Firefox Send Leaves Beta, Service Provides Free File Transfers with End-to-End Encryption      Cache   Translate Page      
From the Mozilla Blog: Firefox Send (send.firefox.com) is a free encrypted file transfer service that allows users to safely and simply share files from any browser. Additionally, Send will also be available as an Android app in beta later this week. Now that it’s a keeper, we’ve made it even better, offering higher upload limits and […]
          Introducing Firefox Send, Providing Free File Transfers while Keeping your Personal Information Private      Cache   Translate Page      
Nick Nguyen, The Mozilla Blog, Mar 12, 2019
Icon

Firefox Send is a simple file-sharing application that mostly it just works. It uses the Web Cryptography JavaScript API with the AES-GCM algorithm for encryption; this is supported by most browsers (Firefox, Chrome, Edge) but not older and less secure browsers (Internet Explorer 11). Navigate to the Send web page, log in with a Firefox UserID, and upload a file. You'll be given a download link to share. The link expires after a preset number of downloads (up to 100)  or after after a certain time has elapsed (up to one week). You do not have to have a Firefox UserID to access the file with the download link, but the sender can protect it with a password.

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

          Wuhan opens to Mount Huangshan Airlines-mine_清翼      Cache   Translate Page      
Wuhan opened to Mount Huangshan route Airlines layout of high-speed rail not directly through the city newspaper (reporter Ju Di) yesterday, Tianhe Airport began to implement 2016-2017 winter sailing season flight plan. The reporter found from the flight plan, the flight season, three aircraft and foreign airlines in Wuhan to open a new encryption, to […]
          complete the payment process by Token encryption 缥缈尊者      Cache   Translate Page      
Apple Pay China Shenzhou car into the first Chinese login support APP- technology Sohu apple powder long-awaited Apple Pay finally landed in February 18th China, Shenzhou car became the first to support Apple Pay service APP, Apple users can choose apple to pay recharge. Apple Pay is a payment function of mobile phone based on […]
          What is a first-degree burn?      Cache   Translate Page      

First-degree burns are a common and painful household occurrence, especially for children and older adults. They often happen when someone touches something hot, such as a stove, curling iron, or hair straightener.
Staying out in the sun too long without sunscreen or other forms of protection is also a frequent cause of first-degree burns. Researchers report, however, that 80 percent of burns affecting young children are due to accidental scalding with hot liquids or objects.

What are the symptoms?

Most first-degree burns are not very big, and usually present as a red, dry area of skin.
Typically, first-degree burns do not break the skin or cause blisters to form.
The best-known and most common symptom of a first-degree burn is red skin.
Other symptoms include:
·         pain
·         soreness in the burned area, which lasts for 2 –3 days
·         skin that may be warm to the touch
·         swelling
·         dry skin
·         peeling
·         itching
·         a temporary change in skin color caused by peeling

Doctors define first-degree burns as superficial burns because they only affect the top layer of the skin.
First-degree burns vary from more severe burns in that they do not penetrate deep into the skin and other tissues.
Other burns have the following characteristics:
·         Second degree burns: These burns go through the epidermis and reach the top of the second layer of the skin, which is known as the dermis. These burns are more likely to blister and are generally more painful and swollen.
·         Third-degree burns: This type of burn penetrates the first and second layers of skin to the third and lowest level of the skin, known as the hypodermis. With these deeper burns, the affected area may appear white, like the surface of a burned piece of charcoal.
·         Fourth-degree burns: This type of burn goes through all three layers of the skin and damages the muscle, bone, nerves, and fat that is lying underneath. There is no pain with fourth-degree burns because damage to the nerves prevents any feeling.

Home treatment is the most common way to treat a first-degree burn.
Even though most first-degree burns do not require treatment by a medical professional, it is still crucial to treat these injuries carefully.
Make sure to keep the wounds clean, protected, and free of infection.

Home remedies

Steps for treating a first-degree burn at home:
·         Remove clothing, watches, rings, and other jewelry near or covering the surrounding burned area.
·         Plunge the burned area into cool (not ice cold) water right away, and keep it there for about 10 minutes. If it is not possible to submerge the burned area in water, then apply cold, wet compresses to the area until the pain subsides. Never apply ice directly to a burn.
·         Gently clean the burned area with mild soap and water.
·         The American Academy of Dermatology recommend applying petroleum jelly to the burn every 8 to 12 hours. Do not use butter or toothpaste on a first-degree burn, because this can increase the risk of infection and prevent healing.
·         Keep the burned area covered with a non-stick bandage. Change the dressing three times a week, as long as there is no infection. If the burn seems infected, change the bandage every day.
·         Do not pop any blisters that may develop as this can increase the risk of infection and scarring.
·         Take over-the-counter (OTC) pain medications, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, to reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation.
·         Drink plenty of fluids.
If the burn does not show signs of healing within 48 hours, or if it seems to be getting worse, seek prompt medical care.




          Offer - Download Video Encryption Android App at Google Play store - INDIA      Cache   Translate Page      
Get High Definition Video encryption android app at Edukrypt for Video lectures and tutorials. You can download Video encryption android app at Google play store and then use it. For more details call: +91-885-128-6001 or visit https://www.edukrypt.com/
          How to Have Secret Conversation on Facebook?      Cache   Translate Page      
After WhatsApp, Facebook has now implemented end-to-end encryption option in its Messenger app. Users need to enable the Secret Conversation option to get started. This feature also comes with a self-destruct option for extra security. By following some simple steps, you can enable this option on your device.



Anyone using the Facebook Messenger app now has access to a feature called Secret Messages. Just like WhatsApp, users will now be able to activate end-to-end encryption, meaning outside sources like the government and even Facebook itself can't read the chats.

The feature was announced back in July but has taken time to roll out to Facebook Messenger's one billion users.

How to activate Facebook's secret messages?

1. Open the Facebook Messenger app and tap the "compose message" icon in the top right of the screen.
2. Tap on the Secret Conversation option.



3. Toggle the Secret Conversations On. It’ll show a small popup telling that “This will be the only device you can send and receive messages.” This means that you can set up the encrypted messages on only one device. To proceed, tap Turn On in the pop-up. So, the app will ask you to set the phone you're using as your default device - meaning the conversation won't show up on any other phones or tablets you've got linked to your Facebook account. Hit the "Make Default" option to continue.



4. Now come back to the Messenger home screen and tap on the Write Message bottom. This option might be present at top or bottom locations, depending on your device (Android or iOS). You'll now be able to have a conversation that is encrypted end-to-end. You'll know it's secret because Facebook has given the chat window a natty black makeover.



5. From the top right corner, choose the secret message option. Turn it on. Now you are ready to chat with a friend. Select a friend and get started.
6. Please note that if your friend hasn’t enabled the Secret Conversations option, he/she won’t be able to see them. So, ask them to turn it on.
7. Encrypted messages on Messenger also come with an option to self-destruct the texts. You just need to tap on the clock icon to send the message with self-destruct option.
8. From the top right corner in a Secret Conversation, you can see the Device Keys and compare it with the ones on your friend’s device to ensure the security of the chat.



How to switch devices?

To change which device you use for secret conversations, start a new secret conversation from the new device. Be warned though that by changing devices, previous secret conversations will no longer be visible on your old device or your new device.

How to delete Secret Conversations?

To delete all secret conversations, tap the profile icon, select Secret Conversations and choose Delete Secret Conversations and Delete All. The messages will still be visible on your friend's device.

How to check your messages are encrypted?

When Secret Conversations are enabled, both people in the secret conversation have a device key. This can be compared to verify that the messages are end-to-end encrypted. Facebook said that this verification process is optional and the messages will be encrypted whether or not you compare device keys.

To view a conversation's device keys, open a conversation, tap their name and tap Device Keys.

Sources and Additional Information:



          Connecting to eskimo.com with a modern ssh      Cache   Translate Page      
     Because modern ssh has disabled some older less secure encryption protocols, by default you will not be able to connect with the shell server ‘eskimo.com’.  To fix this add the following to your /etc/ssh/ssh_config file: Host eskimo.com      KexAlgorithms … Continue reading
          Update - Trial - Folder Lock v7.7.9      Cache   Translate Page      
Folder Lock is an easy to use, yet full-featured, software to lock, encrypt and backup your sensitive files and folders. The program uses 256-bit on-the-fly AES encryption to create password protecte....
          Firefox Send Is a Free File Transfer Service Featuring Encryption       Cache   Translate Page      
Mozilla has announced Firefox Send is now available for use as a free file transfer service with built-in end-to-end encryption. Send allows users to safely and simply share files from any browser without having to worry about their private information existing in the cloud. Send will be available as an Android app in beta later this week. Users can set when their file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add an optional password for an extra layer of security. Send allows for fast file transfers of up to 1GB with an option to transfer 2.5GB if users sign up for a free Firefox account. Recipients only have to click a link to download the file. We know there are several cloud sharing solutions out there, but as a continuation of our mission to bring you more private and safer choices, you can trust that your information is safe with Send. As with all Firefox apps and services, Send is Private By Design, meaning all of your files are protected and we stand by our mission to handle your data privately and securely. Discussion
          "Pocket" VPN Appliances to Ease Deployment of Remote Extensions      Cache   Translate Page      

Some of you may be familiar with some work I did in the past to simplify the deployment of remote extensions using a combination of openvpn on a 3cx server and a SNOM 370 IP phone. In this case, we used the built in vpn client on the SNOM 370 to connect back to the 3cx server running OpenVPN and provide simple and secure remote extension setup. If you want to read more on this you can find it here... http://3cxblog.worksighted.com/2008/09/first-post-test.html


This work still left us faced with the problem that, while this is great for 1 model of phone on the market today, what about everyeone else? And what if a company already has a VPN infrastructure in place (like many companies do) and perhaps does not want to (or is not permitted to) leverage a secondary OpenVPN infrastructure? How are these users to deal with remote extensions?


The inherent design of SIP w/ RTP makes it reasonably complicated to "easily" traverse firewalls since we are dealing with a lot of 2-way connectionless traffic. It becomes somewhat "hit-and-miss" to get remote extensions working properly (for the lay user anyway). Throw into this mix the fact that many ISP are now offering their own voice services and in some cases bocking service or degrading quality for users not on their voice solutions and we have a nice recipe for a solution that's more complicated than it's worth.


If a true VPN exists from Site A to Site B, the implementation of the remote extension become quite simple since we have full internal visibility between the phone and the 3cx server. While this is typical for branch offices where they can justify VPN endpoint devices at each site, what about the typical home tele-worker who needs an extension? We certainly cannot justify expensive equipment at user's homes and, as well, certainly do not want to deal with attempting to modify users home equipment to create patch work VPNs or battle against dynamic IPs and port-forwards. Yikes!


What we need is a simple, easy to deploy, easy to manage, inexpensive vpn solution for remote workers.


Enter the "pocket" vpn appliance....


It seemed to me that what we needed was a tiny hardware VPN appliance that could sit in front of a remote phone and provide true, IPSEC VPN capabilities, irrelevant of the phone being used.
After spending some time hunting around I came across this interesting product from ZyXEL. The ZyWALL Personal Firewall P1. It is a tiny, wallet sized, IPSEC VPN appliance designed for mobile workers. Now, they are intending it to function for a PC, but I see no reason why it couldn't work for an IP phone. Take a look here....
http://www.zyxel.com/web/product_family_detail.php?PC1indexflag=20040908175941&display=6244&CategoryGroupNo=0E8EA8FA-AF7D-434F-A527-F337AB9A3A51


I realize there would likely be some complexities getting this to work with different brands of VPN concentrators at the head-end, but in concept, I believe this to be fairly do-able. It would provide drastically simplified deployment of remote phones as well as security and encryption.
I'm interested to hear what others have to say about this possibility. Obviously it does not need to be this particular product, but something similar anyway.


Happy 3CXing!!!!


Best,

Mike


          NSC_BUILDER Beta v0.81-d      Cache   Translate Page      
Nintendo Switch Cleaner and Builder. A batchfile based in hacbuild and Nut's python libraries, designed to erase titlerights encryption from nsp files and make multicontent nsp/xci files. NSC_Builder is the merged Project that continues xci_builder and Nut_Batch_Cleaner. Source code included.
          Mozilla launches free in-browser (any browser) file-sharing service      Cache   Translate Page      

Mozilla today debuted a free file-sharing service that works with - but doesn't require - Firefox and touted the service's security and privacy traits.

"Send uses end-to-end encryption to keep your data secure from the moment you share to the moment your file is opened," wrote Nick Nguyen, Mozilla's vice president of product strategy. "You can [also] choose when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add an optional password for an extra layer of security."

To read this article in full, please click here


          Practical Applications of Improved Gaussian Sampling for Trapdoor Lattices      Cache   Translate Page      
Lattice trapdoors are an important primitive used in a wide range of cryptographic protocols, such as identity-based encryption (IBE), attribute-based encryption, functional encryption, and program obfuscation. In this paper, we present software implementations of the Gentry-Peikert-Vaikuntanathan (GPV) digital signature, IBE and ciphertext-policy attribute-based encryption (CP-ABE) schemes based on an efficient Gaussian sampling algorithm for trapdoor lattices, and demonstrate that these three important cryptographic protocols are practical. One important aspect of our implementation is that it supports prime moduli, which are required in many cryptographic schemes. Also, our implementation uses bases larger than two for the gadget matrix whereas most previous implementations use the binary base. We show that the use of higher bases significantly decreases execution times and storage requirements. We adapt IBE and CP-ABE schemes originally based on learning with errors (LWE) hardness assumptions to a more efficient Ring LWE (RLWE) construction. To the best of our knowledge, ours are the first implementations employing the Gaussian sampling for non-binary bases of the gadget matrix. The experimental results demonstrate that our lattice-based signature, IBE and CP-ABE implementations, which are based on standard assumptions with post-quantum security, provide a performance comparable to the recent state-of-the-art implementation works based on stronger/non-post-quantum assumptions.
          Secure Tensor Decomposition for Big Data Using Transparent Computing Paradigm      Cache   Translate Page      
The exponential growth of big data places a great burden on current computing environment. However, there exists a vast gap in the approaches that can securely and efficiently process the large scale heterogeneous data. This paper, on the basis of transparent computing paradigm, presents a unified approach that coordinates the transparent servers and transparent clients to decompose tensor, a mathematical model widely used in data intensive applications, to a core tensor multiplied with a number of truncated orthogonal bases. The structured, semi-structured as well as structured data are transformed to low-order sub-tensors, which are then encrypted using the Paillier homomorphic encryption scheme on the transparent clients. The cipher sub-tensors are transported to the transparent servers for carrying out the integration and decomposition operations. Three secure decomposition algorithms, namely secure bidiagonalization algorithm, secure singular value decomposition algorithm, and secure mode product algorithm, are presented to generate the bidiagonal matrices, truncated orthogonal bases, and core tensor respectively. The homomorphic operations of the three algorithms are carried out on the transparent servers, while the non-homomorphic operations, namely division and square root, are performed on the transparent clients. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is promising for secure tensor decomposition for big data.
          Private Internet Access 2019 review: A new app with the same great price      Cache   Translate Page      

Private Internet Access 2019 in brief:

  • P2P allowed: Yes
  • Business location: Denver, CO
  • Number of servers: 3,275
  • Number of country locations: 33
  • Monthly cost: $40 billed annually
  • VPN protocol: OpenVPN
  • Data encryption: AES-128 (GCM)
  • Data Authentication: (GCM)
  • Handshake: RSA 2048-bit

Private Internet Access is a favorite third-party VPN for many users, but its biggest drawback was that the user interface was too utilitarian. That changed recently with an overhaul of PIA’s Windows desktop app. Here’s our look at the latest version of PIA.

To read this article in full, please click here


          Firefox Send Allows Users To Share Files Up to 2.5 GB With End-to-end Encryption      Cache   Translate Page      

Mozilla, the developers of the Firefox browser has introduced a service that simplifies the process of sharing large files securely over the internet. The service is called Firefox send and it originally debuted back in August 2017 as a ‘Test Pilot’ experiment. The company has announced that the service is now available for general public use. 

Firefox Send Features and Benefits

The concept behind the service is to allow users to share files electronically via a secure and simplified platform. The newly publicised Firefox send allows users to send files up to 2.5 GB in size in an end-to-end encrypted manner. Other notable services including Gmail only allows sharing files which are much smaller in size in comparison to Mozilla’s platform. Specifically, Gmail only allows sharing files that have a maximum size of 25 MB. Files greater than this size are shared via Google Drive which again takes up allotted cloud storage.

Another advantage that Mozilla send offers is automatically expiring links. The automatically expiring links can be set on the basis of two different facets. The user can either choose a period or the number of downloads before the link goes void. Users have an option of choosing between 1 to 100 number of downloads or 5 minutes to 7 days in terms of time period. Also, the user can set a password which they can share with other users they intend to share the files with.

Also Read: PUBG Mobile 0.11.5 Beta Update Introduces New Weapons, Vehicles & More

Noteworthy, the user must log in with a valid Mozilla account in order to set the time period to 7 days or the number of downloads to greater than 1. Overall, it is a simple and nifty tool that is free to use and can come in handy at times. 

 

 

 

The post Firefox Send Allows Users To Share Files Up to 2.5 GB With End-to-end Encryption appeared first on iGyaan Network.


          PlusMe Camera - Previously BeautyPlus Me v1.5.0.11      Cache   Translate Page      
The best camera for selfies! Use the greatretouch and filters to amaze!Formerly known as BeautyPlus Me, this light app uses less space on your phone and is available in 12 regional languages like Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Gujarati, Bengali, Telugu, Kannada etc.

The easiest photo editing and sharing app with the best filters, fun effects and beautification tools. Download now!

Features:

Take beautiful photos:
Incredible filters that help you take beautiful photos on the go! PlusMe helps you capture and remember all the precious moments in your lives.

Professional Photo Editing Tools:
Choose from a wide variety of beautifying features. You can smoothen and blur out blemishes and retouch your photos with ease. It’s time to share the most beautiful version of your life!

About Meitu

With over 900 Million users around the world, Meitu is a leading beauty and lifestyle app developer as well as a global innovator in mobile video and photography, including proprietary facial recognition and virtual “try-on” technologies for makeup, hair and fashion. Learn more at us.meitu.com.

Share your Picture with us!

In order to improve upon and provide the best services to you, PlusMe collects limited user information including your device ID. We provide the highest form of encryption and privacy protection for our user's data and don't use this information for any commercial purpose. For more details please check our Privacy Policy.PlusMe Camera - Previously BeautyPlus Mehttps://lh3.googleusercontent.com/CxuR8mTHw4DPa3VeZoDHiC0OAADBitRLhgzQsKXB3GIDHVIscPoYFXkmNAprTTQnyA=w200https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/s3rS10XrtJOocQqpkOK8RhcPzy3mCg8U-1SIu6M2H9olYtRdhoGw1Fs0knt9hBwhNXpm=w700https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.meitu.beautyplusmeMEITUMEITUPhotographyPhotography1.5.0.11March 12, 20194.1 and up28.15M4.5Rated for 3+10,000,000 - 20,000,000Important Updates!
Let's have more fun~�221,400157,92236,54615,5113,9817,440DOWNLOAD APK
          REMOVE KODI AND REINSTALL NEWEST VERSION 18.1 WITH THE BEST BUILD FOR MOVIES AND LIVE TV      Cache   Translate Page      

🔐Get protected military grade encryption when watching Kodi and TV apps🔐 NEWTECH CHANNEL EXCLUSIVE SPECIAL DEAL ⚠️57% ⚠️OFF: $5.20/month 👉 http://bit.ly/vpn60off These tutorial teaches you the following: BEST KODI NEWEST KODI KODI ON FIRESTICK KODI KODI 18.1 Remember all content is also available on http://streamtips.info How to GET KODI WORKING again? How to get APK’s […]

The post REMOVE KODI AND REINSTALL NEWEST VERSION 18.1 WITH THE BEST BUILD FOR MOVIES AND LIVE TV appeared first on Kodi 17 Krypton.


          HOTTEST FREE MOVIE APP IS THIS BETTER THAN TERRARIUM TV OR CYBERFLIX? LINKS GALORE!      Cache   Translate Page      

🔐Get protected military grade encryption when streaming NEWTECH CHANNEL EXCLUSIVE SPECIAL DEAL ⚠️60% ⚠️OFF: CYBER WEEKEND DEAL!!! 👉

The post HOTTEST FREE MOVIE APP IS THIS BETTER THAN TERRARIUM TV OR CYBERFLIX? LINKS GALORE! appeared first on Kodi 17 Krypton.


          webform_encrypt 8.x-1.0-alpha3      Cache   Translate Page      

Release notes

Changes since 8.x-1.0-alpha2:

Download Size md5 hash
webform_encrypt-8.x-1.0-alpha3.tar.gz 18.96 KB d8cd24ed946aae662449e5fe1b001a07
webform_encrypt-8.x-1.0-alpha3.zip 30.93 KB eef841655062654876d5032685ba5272
Last updated: 13 Mar 2019 at 07:33 UTC
Official release from tag: 
8.x-1.0-alpha3
Core compatibility: 
Release type: 
Short description: 
Recommended by the project’s maintainer.
Packaged Git sha1: 
8ff8b4f16aa5d854769ea0d152bbe3163a4f23c9

          IBM Makes Quiet Entry into the Crypto Custody Space      Cache   Translate Page      

CoinSpeaker
IBM Makes Quiet Entry into the Crypto Custody Space

A New York investment firm, Shuttle Holdings announced that they will launch the beta version of a custody solution for digital assets built on IBM’s private cloud and encryption technologies, later this month.

IBM Makes Quiet Entry into the Crypto Custody Space


          Zuckerberg's turn to encypted messaging suggests that policing Facebook doesn't work      Cache   Translate Page      

With his decision to emphasize encrypted messaging, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has effectively accepted that the fight to police the platform against bad actors and other excesses can't be won.

Why it matters: The future of global messaging is now much different — not the remarkable, if profoundly flawed, public square of more than 2 billion members that Facebook has become, but a fractured one, with the world chatting and spending money on smaller platforms and in countless separate channels.


Zuckerberg might not have made such a climactic decision unless pushed commercially. Some 15 million Americans stopped using Facebook last year, according to a new study, and Wired's Molly Wood calls Zuckerberg's move an effort to get in front of a coming "collapse" of his core business.

But the shift also coincides with intense global public and political pressure over unabated abuse of the platform to spread hate, divide societies, traffic in humans, and commit murder, all of which proved exceedingly difficult to stop.

What's happening: Zuckerberg announced the move last week in a long statement, setting Facebook on a course of building out a private, encrypted dimension of the platform that will ultimately eclipse the current public square.

  • Experts surveyed by Axios are skeptical: Some said encryption and private channels will not rid Facebook of abuse, which they said may now be even harder to police. Others — after years of Facebook's slow, grudging admission of the truth going on behinds its walls — simply were not prepared to take Zuckerberg at his word (see below for more).
  • Neither Zuckerberg nor anyone else at Facebook has publicly thrown in the towel. ("Z would NEVER acknowledge that it is too hard for him to do anything!" said Brian Balogh, a history professor at the University of Virginia.)
  • Yet, even if he did not say so explicitly, there was no getting around the main takeaway: His tacit admission that the current state of affairs at Facebook, with all of its calamitous social and political effects, is not repairable.

"Facebook was originally not designed as a public medium, so I think a return to its original friends-and-family focus makes sense for them to better match their users’ expectations," Deb Roy, a professor at MIT and former chief media scientist at Twitter, tells Axios.

  • "Human roles that typically not only police bad behavior but more generally moderate and facilitate behavior were never part of Facebook’s system design," Roy said.
  • "Now with billions of users, it may indeed be impossible to retrofit such roles in an effective way."

In a statement, a Facebook spokesperson said:

"That’s a fundamental misreading of the announcement. First, as we’ve repeatedly made clear, we have built new products, hired tens of thousands of new people to keep our platform safe, and are a different company than we were in 2016. Second, as Mark pointed out, this announcement will take a real amount of time to implement and public sharing on social networks will always be important.”

The big picture: In a previous post, we asked experts to imagine a world without Facebook. None could — all found the platform too useful to too many people, and admonished any government that would try to take it down.

Just half a year later, it's hard to find any clear Facebook defenders — and that's the case with Zuckerberg's attempt at reform as well. Here are a couple of questions I heard while canvassing experts:

Can Zuckerberg be believed at all?

  • Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasia Group, has his doubts. "It’s hard to see how they end [the current Facebook business] model without ending their business success along with it," he said.
  • Tiffany Li, head of the Initiative on Intermediaries and Information at Yale Law School, agrees: "What’s really important is seeing if Facebook makes any actual changes to make their products and services safer. We’ve seen them apologize for privacy violations before, and we’ve heard them promise to do better many times before — without much to show for it."

But, if he can be believed, will the situation only become worse?

  • "From my perspective, this move to consolidated privacy is going to make it more difficult to assess the ways in which Facebook is manipulated. ... Media manipulators will adapt to this tactic and it will be harder to assess or take down content that is considered private," said Joan Donovan, director of the Technology and Social Change Research Project at Harvard's Kennedy School.
  • "If Facebook is encrypted, Zuckerberg and his employees won't know what is in the messages and won't be responsible for downgrading or deleting racist, threatening, anti-scientific, and politically manipulative content from domestic and foreign actors. Facebook is off the hook," said Andrew Feenberg, a philosophy professor at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver.

The bottom line: Fifteen years after launching Facebook in his dorm room, Zuckerberg is again reinventing his creation. But Tim Derdenger, a professor at Carnegie Mellon, says the network effects of huge numbers of customers can work in exponential reverse as people leave you. In other words, Zuckerberg has no time to waste. "They need to move fast."


          Network Analyzer Pro v3.5.1 [Paid] [Latest]      Cache   Translate Page      

Wifi signal meter: – Both graphical and textual representation showing network channels and signal strengths – Channel usage graph – see per-channel utilization – Wifi network type (WEP, WPA, WPA2) – Wifi encryption (AES, TKIP) – BSSID (router MAC address), manufacturer, WPS support – Bandwidth (Android 6 and newer only) LAN scanner: – Fast and reliable detection of all network devices – Vendor name, IP, and MAC addresses of all discovered devices – NetBIOS, mDNS (bonjour), LLMNR, and DNS name where available – Pingability test of discovered devices – IPv6 availability and discovered IPv6 addresses – Wake on LAN (WOL) including remote WOL – Scan of custom IP ranges – Possibility to set custom device name – Filtering and search

The post Network Analyzer Pro v3.5.1 [Paid] [Latest] appeared first on APK4Free.net.


          The best apps for making notes on your smartphone      Cache   Translate Page      

The life rhythms of modern people are quite intense and it's impossible to remember every single piece of the information we receive. You can write down the list of your daily tasks (meetings, mails, calls and etc.) in a regular notebook, but it's very inconvenient.

Android note taking apps are a much better option. In this review we're going to talk about the best of them:

  1. Google Keep
  2. ColorNote Notepad Notes
  3. FairNote
  4. Omni Notes
  5. Evernote
  6. Standard Notes

Google Keep is a perfect notebook stored in the "cloud”

This free app is available to everyone who has Android 4.0.3 and above. Saving a shopping list or a todo-list has never been easier. Google Keep is suitable for adding short memos with different content:

  • todo-lists and their status;
  • photos or images;
  • text and hyperlinks;
  • voice notes (Google Keep automatically transforms them into text).

Note taking app features:

  • common access to files;
  • quick navigation (search by text or color tags);
  • content filter by criteria: lists, images and links;
  • different color detection of memos and creation of labels and drawings;
  • time or geolocation reminders and synchronization with "Google Calendar".

Notes are regularly synchronized with the server. It's easy to access them from a phone or tablet, as well as from a computer at keep.google.com.

Download Google Keep

ColorNote Notepad Notes is an organizer for every day

It's a very simple note app with a stylish and thought out to the last detail interface.

There are two versions of ColorNote: a program for creating todo lists and a widget for your desktop.

The main capabilities of this note organizer:

  • combination of memos by color;
  • creation of todo checklists;
  • synchronization with a calendar via internet;
  • password protection;
  • placement of bright notes on a desktop and a change of the font type;
  • back up of the content to a memory card;
  • sound notifications;
  • custom view: table or list;
  • advanced search by date, background color or alphabet.

When making a note you can refer to other memos, address book contacts or terms from Wikipedia.

In spite of the lack of common access feature, ColorNote notes manager is a worthy alternative to other similar programs.

Download ColorNote

FairNote app for maximum safety

Note app for Android which main aim is to protect its content. The advantages of this app:

  • no limitation by the number of notes characters;
  • convenient sorting by themes (different colors for each theme);
  • a note can be shared via other programs easily;
  • text encryption and password setting;
  • backup creation and integration with Dropbox and Google Drive;
  • shortcuts and widget display on your desktop;
  • text files import / export.

Notes are displayed on the screen in a list or grid and their types are the following: text and checklists. Notes can be sorted by date, alphabet, labels or color. Reminders are a kind of safety net, which will inform you about a planned meeting or a friendly visit in time.

Free and paid versions of this app can be found on Google Play. The features of its paid version:

  • encryption of all files in one click;
  • you scan your fingerprint instead of typing a password.

Synchronization between different devices and co-editing of files are absent. Which is, perhaps, the only significant drawback of the Android note app.

Download FairNote

Omni Notes is the best notepad app for outdated phones

Many owners of budget or outdated gadgets are looking for a simple and easy program with decent functionality which won't slow down the operation of Android early versions. You'll enjoy Omni Notes app flexible settings, user-friendly navigation and other features.

What type of notes you can make via it:

  • text;
  • photo;
  • lists with marks indicating the completion of tasks.

After you give a name to a note, different options appear: setting a reminder, adding a label / list or attaching a files (including multimedia). Notes can be combined with each other.

Omni Notes allows you to:

  • archive its content;
  • save backups;
  • add shortcuts and widgets;
  • save text notes made via Google Now;
  • group its content by tags and categories.

Filters by different criteria are also available:

  • title;
  • the date of creation/modification;
  • the date of a set reminder.

In addition to the above mentioned, the notepad app supports co-editing by multiple users.

Download Omni Notes

Evernote is a  cross functional notes and multimedia manager

Evernote is a suitable organizer for students, managers and business representatives. With the feature of shared access employees can work on the same file from different devices. All information is synchronized.

Flexible search can find the specified text not only in electronic notes and PDF-files, but also in pictures. Other search settings: by the date of creation or modification, source and tag.

The key features of Evernote:

  • creating checklists;
  • creating notebooks and large-scale projects with access for chosen ones (business version);
  • grouping by labels;
  • placing shortcuts and widget on a desktop;
  • setting reminders;
  • backing up notes and attachments.

The limitations of Evernote free version:

  • You can use it only on two gadgets,
  • Available traffic is only 60 MB per month,
  • No offline mode.

The types of notes:

  • audio and video files;
  • text with attachments;
  • photos;
  • handwritten memos scanned via the app;
  • web page copies.

Download Evernote

Standard Notes: reliability and simplicity

Standard Notes app has a high level of security in order to protect the content of your notes. Its user can set a password for a memo and enable fingerprint scanning.

Your information is stored on the server in encrypted form. Unencrypted files should be sent by email or archived.

Other Standard Notes capabilities: archiving, syncing, automatic backing up to a cloud (Dropbox, Google Drive or OneDrive).

Available filters:

  • by title;
  • the date of creation;
  • the date of modification.

Standard Notes supports only the text forms without any attachments or lists. There is no feature of co-editing.

Notes are displayed on a screen in the form of a list, it's possible to sort them out by their titles and the dates of creation or modification.

Download Standard Notes


           Job Posting: Lead Cryptography Researcher       Cache   Translate Page      

Job Posting: Lead Cryptography Researcher
Identiq

Identiq is introducing a new paradigm in the Identity verification market, offering strong identity verification, while preserving privacy and meeting strict regulation, such as GDPR. It is set to take over this market, and capture a significant market share in the near future.

The company is developing a unique solution, based on cryptographic protocols and multi-party computation techniques, which allows users to be validated without compromising their privacy.

The company was founded by Itay Levy, a serial entrepreneur with multiple exits in his past, Ido Shilon the general manager of Nielsen Exelate, and Uri Arad PayPal Israel’s Chief Technologist. The company closed its first financing round, with participation by strong Israeli and US investors.

Responsibilities

The job responsibilities include the design and analysis of cryptographic primitives and a full protocol involving multi-party-computation techniques, as well as bringing the protocol from design to implementation. You will be collaborating with our world-renown cryptography advisors and our top-tier technology teams. You will be inventing new encryption schemes, design computationally, and communication efficient protocols, and will be writing proofs of security and privacy under various adversary models.

This is a full-time position, reporting directly to the company’s head of research.

Qualifications

- Strong background in multi-party computation and homomorphic encryption

- Theoretical and applied experience in cryptographic protocols design

- Cryptographic protocol design and analysis

- M.Sc. in mathematics, computer science, or similar field, with specialization in cryptography and security. PhD an advantage

- Programming in C/C++/Java/C#/Go or similar languages

- Experience in protocol simulation and verification tools an advantage

Interested candidates should submit their resumes to jobs (at) identiq.com

Closing date for applications: 31 March 2019


          All That You Need to Know About Man-in-the-Middle Attacks       Cache   Translate Page      

In a man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack, a black hat hacker takes a position between two victims who are communicating with one another. In this spot, the attacker relays all communication, can listen to it, and even modify it.

man-in-the-middle attacks

Imagine that Alice and Barbara talk to one another on the phone in Lojban, which is an obscure language. Nancy is a secret agent who needs to listen in on their conversation but who cannot tap the phone line. Nancy is very clever and talented, so she does the following:

  1. Nancy observes Alice and Barbara for a while. She notices that Alice always calls Barbara, not the other way around.
  2. Nancy recognizes that Alice and Barbara are speaking in Lojban. She learns that language.
  3. Nancy slips a business card into Alice’s purse. The card says “Barbara” but it has Nancy’s phone number.
  4. When Alice calls this number, it is Nancy who receives the call. She answers in Lojban and imitates Barbara’s voice.
  5. Nancy immediately calls Barbara on another phone. She imitates Alice’s voice, saying hello in Lojban.
  6. Nancy continues both conversations switching between them as needed.

Now Alice and Barbara are both certain that they are talking to one another. In reality, they are talking to Nancy who relays communication between them. Nancy knows all the secrets. She may also manipulate the information that Alice and Barbara are sharing with one another.

To pull this off, Nancy uses several tools. For example, she spoofs Barbara’s phone number, she figures out the encryption (Lojban language), and she authenticates by imitating voices. Black hat hackers do very similar things in the IT world.

Are Man-in-the-Middle Attacks Dangerous?

In the world of IT security, black hat hackers usually use man-in-the-middle attacks to eavesdrop on communications between a client and a server. This includes HTTPS connections to websites, other SSL/TLS connections, Wi-Fi connections, and more.

Such hackers have two primary goals: to gain access to sensitive information and/or to manipulate transmitted content. In practice, they can use MITM attacks:

  • To get personal information for identity theft
  • To get login credentials, for example, to gain access to an online bank account
  • To change the target account number to their own when the user is making a bank transfer
  • To get a credit card number when the user is paying at an online shop

You must also remember that websites are not the only target of MITM attacks. A very common target are emails which by default do not use any kind of encryption. If an attacker can get access to an email account, they may intercept and spoof emails.

Real-Life Examples of MITM Attacks

Man-in-the-middle attacks were known a long time before the advent of computers.

In the world of computing, some of the most famous cases linked to MITM attacks were the following:

How Do MITM Attacks Work?

A black hat hacker may attack a connection that is secure (encrypted) or not. In both cases, the first goal is to intercept the connection – like Nancy first has to slip a business card into Alice’s purse. There are many ways to do this including ARP spoofing, IP spoofing, and DNS spoofing. The attacker may also use other attack vectors to take control of the victim’s machine or the server and eavesdrop from there.

ARP Spoofing (ARP Cache Poisoning)

ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) translates between the physical address of an Internet device (MAC address – media access control) and the IP address assigned to it on the local area network. An attacker who uses ARP spoofing tries to inject false information onto the local area network to redirect connections to their device.

For example, your router has the IP address 192.168.0.1. To connect to the internet, your laptop needs to send IP (Internet Protocol) packets to this address. First, it must know which physical device has this address. The router has the following MAC address: 00-00-00-00-00-01.

man-in-the-middle

Let’s say that Nancy is no longer working with phones but she is a black hat hacker:

  1. Nancy injects false ARP packets into the network.
  2. These ARP packets say that the address 192.168.0.1 belongs to Nancy’s device with the following MAC address: 00-00-00-00-00-2A.
  3. The ARP cache stores false information associating IP 192.168.0.1 with MAC 00-00-00-00-00-2A.
  4. The next time your laptop is trying to connect to the internet, it connects to Nancy’s machine.
  5. Nancy’s machine connects to the router (00-00-00-00-00-01) and connects you to the internet, so you don’t even know that Nancy is there.

IP Spoofing (IP Address Spoofing)

IP spoofing means that a computer is pretending to have a different IP address – usually the same address as another machine. On its own, IP spoofing is not enough for a MITM attack. However, an attacker may combine it with TCP sequence prediction.

Most internet connections are established using TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol). When two devices on the network connect to one another using TCP/IP, they need to establish a session. They do it using a three-way handshake. During this process, they exchange information called sequence numbers. The sequence numbers are needed for the recipient to recognize further packets. Thanks to sequence numbers, the devices know the order in which they should put the received packets together.

In this situation, the attacker first sniffs the connection (listens in). This is very easy on a local network because all IP packets go into the network and may be read by any other device. The attacker learns the sequence numbers, predicts the next one, and sends a packet pretending to be the original sender. If that packet reaches the destination first, the attacker intercepts the connection.

A schematic of an ARP spoofing attack used in man-in-the-middle attacks

Let’s go back to Nancy who wants to try IP spoofing with TCP sequence prediction this time:

  1. Nancy joins your local network as 10.0.0.42 with her laptop and runs a sniffer. The sniffer software lets her see all the IP packets that go through the network.
  2. Nancy wants to intercept your connection to the gateway (10.0.0.1). She looks for packets between you (10.0.0.102) and the gateway and then predicts the sequence number.
  3. At the right moment, Nancy sends a packet from her laptop. The packet has the source address of the gateway (10.0.0.1) and the correct sequence number, so your laptop is fooled.
  4. At the same time, Nancy floods the real gateway with a DoS attack. The gateway works slower or stops working for a moment. Nancy’s packet reaches you before the packet from the gateway does.
  5. Nancy convinced your laptop that her laptop is the gateway. Now she convinces the gateway that her laptop is 10.0.0.102 (you), and the MITM attack is complete.

DNS Spoofing (DNS Cache Poisoning)

ARP spoofing and IP spoofing need the attacker to connect to the local network segment that you use. An attacker using DNS spoofing can be anywhere. It’s more difficult because your DNS cache must be vulnerable. However, if successful, it can affect a large number of victims.

DNS (Domain Name System) is the system used to translate between IP addresses and symbolic names like www.example.com. This system has two primary elements: nameservers (DNS servers) and resolvers (DNS caches). The nameserver is the source of authoritative information. Usually, there are two or three systems that keep that information for every domain. For example, the IP number for www.example.com is stored on two nameservers: sns.dns.icann.org and noc.dns.icann.org. You can check this using the Google DNS lookup tool.

If every client that wants to connect to www.example.com connected to these two servers every time, they would be overloaded. That is why every client uses its local resolver to cache information. If the cache does not have information on www.example.com, it contacts sns.dns.icann.org and noc.dns.icann.org to get 93.184.216.34. Then, it stores the IP address locally for some time. All the clients that use this resolver get the address from the cache.

A DNS spoofing attack is performed by injecting a fake entry into the local cache. If a black hat hacker does that, all clients connected to this cache get the wrong IP address and connect to the attacker instead. This lets the attacker become a man-in-the-middle.

A schematic of a DNS spoofing (DNS cache poisoning) attack

This time, Nancy cannot connect to your network so she tries DNS spoofing:

  1. Nancy knows, that you use 203.0.113.255 as your resolver (DNS cache).
  2. Nancy also knows that this resolver is vulnerable to poisoning (uses BIND 4 software).
  3. Nancy poisons BIND 4 at 203.0.113.255 and stores information that www.example.com is 198.51.100.123.
  4. When you type www.example.com in your browser, the site that you see is Nancy’s site.
  5. Nancy connects to the original site to complete the attack.

Other Methods Used to Intercept Connections

Black hat hackers may use many more methods to place themselves between the client and the server. These methods usually belong to one of the following three categories:

  • Server compromise: An attacker may use another technique to gain control over the server that you connect to. They can then place their own software on that server to intercept connections with you. For example, they may start with SQL Injection and escalate to full system compromise, then place MITM software on the compromised web server. They might also abuse a code injection vulnerability to place a shell on the server.
  • Client compromise: An attacker may place a rogue application such as a trojan on your machine (for example, man-in-the-browser). The application can listen in on all your connections and allow for MITM attacks. To do this, the attacker may get you to click a malicious link or may use another technique to have you download malware. They might, for example, perform a Cross-site Scripting attack on your favorite web application and place malicious JavaScript.
  • Communications compromise: An attacker may take over a machine that routes information between the client and the server. For example, a network router with vulnerable software or a public Wi-Fi hotspot. Black hat hackers may also place their own malicious Wi-Fi access point in your vicinity so that you connect to it. If your Wi-Fi network connection uses a vulnerable encryption protocol like WEP, you may be a target of Wi-Fi eavesdropping.

How Do Attackers Listen In?

If the victim uses a secure connection, being in the middle is not enough. Nancy must understand the language that Alice and Barbara are using (Lojban). She must also be able to speak it fluently and imitate Alice’s and Barbara’s voices. This is needed so that Alice and Barbara are still sure that they are talking to one another. Some of the techniques used for this in the IT world are HTTPS spoofing, SSL hijacking, and SSL stripping.

HTTPS Spoofing (IDN Homograph Attacks)

International domain names (IDNs) can contain Unicode characters. Some Unicode characters look similar to ASCII characters. Black hat hackers use this to fool victims. A victim visits a fake website controlled by the attacker who intercepts information and relays it to the real website.

An explanation of an HTTPS spoofing (IDN homograph) attack

For example, Nancy wants you to visit a fake Acunetix website аcunetix.com (the Cyrillic а looks exactly like the ASCII a):

  1. Nancy uses Punycode to register the domain аcunetix.com: xn--cunetix-1fg.com (you can try to create your own using Punycoder).
  2. Nancy buys a legitimate SSL/TLS certificate for аcunetix.com.
  3. Nancy sends you a malicious link to visit the fake Acunetix site.
  4. When you visit the site, you can see https and a lock symbol in the address bar so you are not alarmed.
  5. In the background, Nancy relays all the information sent by you to the real Acunetix site.

Current browsers (Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Internet Explorer, Edge, Safari) have protection against homograph attacks. For example, they display Punycode in the address bar instead of national characters. However, websites and emails may still contain links in Unicode that look exactly like originals.

SSL Hijacking

Anyone can generate an SSL/TLS certificate for any domain. An attacker who intercepts a connection can generate certificates for all domains that the victim visits. They can present these certificates to the victim, establish a connection with the original server, and relay the traffic. This is called SSL hijacking.

However, your browser trusts only certificates that are signed by a trusted Certificate Authority (CA). If the certificate is not signed by a trusted CA, browsers display clear warnings or even refuse to open a page. Therefore, an attacker needs a way to make your browser believe that the certificate can be trusted. To do it, they must add their CA to the trusted certificate store on your computer. This can be done using other attack vectors.

A schematic of an SSL hijacking attack

If Nancy wants to listen in on your SSL/TLS connections using SSL hijacking, this is what she does:

  1. Nancy gets you to download and install her CA certificate using some other type of attack.
  2. Every time you visit a secure site, for example, acunetix.com, Nancy intercepts the connection.
  3. Nancy generates a certificate for acunetix.com, signs it with her CA private key, and serves it back to you.
  4. Your browser trusts the certificate because Nancy’s CA public key is in your trusted store.
  5. Nancy establishes a connection with acunetix.com and relays all the SSL traffic through her system.

SSL hijacking is very often used for legitimate purposes. For example, malware protection software installed on your computer probably uses SSL hijacking. If not, the software would not be able to protect you when you try to download malware using a secure connection. Some companies use SSL hijacking to control traffic in their internal networks, for example, to check what content their employees are accessing. Parental control software also uses SSL hijacking.

SSL Stripping

When you type an address in your browser, your browser first connects to an insecure site (HTTP). Then, it is usually quickly redirected to the secure site (HTTPS). If the website is available without encryption, the attacker can intercept your packets and force an HTTP connection. If you don’t notice that your connection is unencrypted, you may expose secrets to the attacker. This technique is called SSL stripping.

A schematic of an SSL stripping attack

If Nancy wants to use SSL stripping to get your secrets:

  1. Nancy listens in on your connections to secure websites and intercepts them.
  2. Nancy modifies your initial web requests (they are sent using plain text). The server thinks that your browser is requesting to be served via HTTP.
  3. If the website is configured to serve content via HTTP, your data is sent in plain text and Nancy can read it.

Today, many websites use HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) which means that the server refuses to provide content using an insecure connection. Such websites cannot be attacked using this method.

Other Methods Used for Eavesdropping

There are more methods used to compromise secure connections, including:

  • SSL/TSL vulnerabilities: Older versions of SSL/TLS protocols are vulnerable to attacks that let black hat hackers decrypt the data. For example, CRIME or BEAST attacks.
  • Session hijacking: If parts of the site are available via HTTP and other parts via HTTPS, an attacker may easily get the session cookie and impersonate the user. Session cookies may also be stolen if the website is vulnerable to Cross-site Scripting.

How To Detect and Prevent a Man-in-the-Middle Attack

There are many types of man-in-the-middle attacks and some of them very difficult to detect. The key to preventing them is to have as little trust as possible.

It is more difficult to prevent interception. If the attacker is able to access your network directly, if they compromise the destination server, or if they control network equipment that is used for your connection, there is not much that you can do. What you can do in such cases is choose a different communication route or make sure that encryption is unbreakable.

Here are some basic tips that may help you:

  • Patch your system and use renowned anti-malware software.
  • Don’t use public networks and/or hotspots for any sensitive activities.
  • When connecting to your Wi-Fi, check if you are not connecting to a network with a similar name.
  • Don’t forget to check the browser address bar and make sure you are using a secure connection.
  • Click the lock symbol next to the address bar to get more information about the certificate.
  • Install add-ons that help you detect SSL hijacking, for example, CheckMyHTTPS.
  • Never send any sensitive information via email and do not trust any emails with sensitive information.
  • Set up two-factor authentication wherever you can. Even if an attacker intercepts your data, they will have a hard time getting control of your Android or iPhone as well.

Does SSL Protect Against Man-in-the-Middle Attacks?

Some sources may say that SSL/TLS is enough to protect against MITM attacks. This is not true for the following reasons:

  • The weakest link in a MITM attack is often the human. For example, if you don’t monitor the lock symbol on your browser address bar, you will easily fall for an HTTP stripping attack.
  • Older versions of SSL/TLS may be vulnerable to MITM attacks. If the client or the server uses an older version of SSL/TLS, the attacker may be able to break the encryption.
  • If the attacker compromises your computer or the server, they may tap the communication before it is encrypted or after it is decrypted.
  • In the case of email, connections to servers may be encrypted but it is not as common as in the case of web connections. Also, email is stored on the server and often sent between servers in plain text.

How to Prevent MITM Attacks Against My Website?

Man-in-the-middle attacks are often facilitated by websites, even if your client and connection are safe. If you own a website, make sure that you regularly scan it for vulnerabilities, for example, using the Acunetix web vulnerability scanner (click here for a demo version). If you don’t, some vulnerabilities such as SQL Injection or code injection may let someone install malicious software on your web server. In addition, the Acunetix scanner also checks for SSL/TLS vulnerabilities that might let the attacker eavesdrop on connections to your web server, for example, CRIME, BREACH, and POODLE.

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Tomasz NideckiTomasz Andrzej Nidecki Technical Content Writer
LinkedIn: https://mt.linkedin.com/in/tonid

Tomasz Andrzej Nidecki (also known as tonid) is a Technical Content Writer working for Acunetix. A journalist, translator, and technical writer with 25 years of IT experience, Tomasz has been the Managing Editor of the hakin9 IT Security magazine in its early years and used to run a major technical blog dedicated to email security.


          Mozilla launches ‘Firefox Send’ to help you with secure transfers of larger files      Cache   Translate Page      
Mozilla has officially launched Firefox Send to the public after it was revealed to be one of the company’s “test pilots”. The product is intended to be a large file-transfer service between browsers via a secured environment. End-to-end encryption is designed into the service and allow users to transfer files securely. Added security measures were […]
          E-mail Encryption Market - Analysis Showcases Growth Trends and Opportunity Forecasted Until 2025      Cache   Translate Page      
(EMAILWIRE.COM, March 13, 2019 ) E-mail encryption is a data security solution that protects the data against unauthorized users. Huge number of organizations have deployed encryption for abiding by the data privacy and safety compliance regulations. Further, multiple legislations for data privacy...
          GlitchPOS: New PoS malware for sale      Cache   Translate Page      


Warren Mercer and Paul Rascagneres authored this post with contributions from Ben Baker.

Executive summary


Point-of-sale malware is popular among attackers, as it usually leads to them obtaining credit card numbers and immediately use that information for financial gain. This type of malware is generally deployed on retailers' websites and retail point-of-sale locations with the goal of tracking customers' payment information. If they successfully obtain credit card details, they can use either the proceeds from the sale of that information or use the credit card data directly to obtain additional exploits and resources for other malware. Point-of-sale terminals are often forgotten about in terms of segregation and can represent a soft target for attackers. Cisco Talos recently discovered a new PoS malware that the attackers are selling on a crimeware forum. Our researchers also discovered the associated payloads with the malware, its infrastructure and control panel. We assess with high confidence that this is not the first malware developed by this actor. A few years ago, they were also pushing the DiamondFox L!NK botnet. Known as "GlitchPOS," this malware is also being distributed on alternative websites at a higher price than the original.

The actor behind this malware created a video, which we embedded below, showing how easy it is to use it. This is a case where the average user could purchase all the tools necessary to set up their own credit card-skimming botnet.



GlitchPOS


Packer overview


A packer developed in VisualBasic protects this malware. It's, on the surface, a fake game. The user interface of the main form (which is not displayed at the execution) contains various pictures of cats:

The purpose of the packer is to decode a library that's the real payload encoded with the UPX packer. Once decoded, we gain access to GlitchPOS, a memory grabber developed in VisualBasic.

Payload analysis


The payload is small and contains only a few functions. It can connect to a command and control (C2) server to:

  • Register the infected systems
  • Receive tasks (command execution in memory or on disk)
  • Exfiltrate credit card numbers from the memory of the infected system
  • Update the exclusion list of scanned processes
  • Update the "encryption" key
  • Update the User Agent
  • Clean itself


Tasks mechanism


The malware receives tasks from the C2 server. Here is the task pane:

The commands are executed via a shellcode directly sent by the C2 server. Here is an example in Wireshark:

The shellcode is encoded with base64. In our screenshot, the shellcode is a RunPE:

"Encryption" key


The "encryption" key of the communication can be updated in the panel. The communication is not encrypted but simply XORed:

Credit card grabber


The main purpose of this malware is to steal credit card numbers (Track1 and Track2) from the memory of the infected system. GlitchPOS uses a regular expression to perform this task:

  • (%B)\d{0,19}\^[\w\s\/]{2,26}\^\d{7}\w*\?
    The purpose of this regular expression is to detect Track 1 format B
    Here is an example of Track 1:
    Cardholder : M. TALOS
    Card number*: 1234 5678 9012 3445
    Expiration: 01/99
    %B1234567890123445^TALOS/M.

  • ;\d{13,19}=\d{7}\w*\?
    The purpose of this regular expression is to detect Track 2
    Here is an example of Track 2 based on the previous example:
    ;1234567890123445=99011200XXXX00000000?*


If a match is identified in memory, the result is sent to the C2 server. The malware maintains an exclusion list provided by the server. Here is the default list: chrome, firefox, iexplore, svchost, smss, csrss, wininit, steam, devenv, thunderbird, skype, pidgin, services, dwn, dllhost, jusched, jucheck, lsass, winlogon, alg, wscntfy, taskmgr, taskhost, spoolsv, qml, akw.

Panel


Here are some additional screenshots of the GlitchPOS panel. These screenshots were provided by the seller to promote the malware.

The "Dashboard:"

The "Clients" list:

The "Cards Date:"

Linked with DiamondFox L!NK botnet


Author: Edbitss


The first mention of GlitchPOS was on Feb. 2, 2019 on a malware forum:

Edbitss is allegedly the developer of the DiamondFox L!NK botnet in 2015/2016 and 2017 as explained in a report by CheckPoint.

The developer created this video to promote GlitchPOS, as well. In this video, you can see the author set up the malware and capture the data from a swiped card. We apologize for the quality, shakiness, music, and generally anything else with this video, again, it's not ours.


The built malware is sold for $250, the builder $600 and finally, the gate address change is charged at $80.

Panel similarities


In addition to the malware language (VisualBasic), we identified similarities between the DiamondFox panel and the GlitchPOS panel. In this section, the DiamondPOS screenshots come from the CheckPoint report mentioned previously.

Both dashboards' world map are similar (image, code and color):

The author used the same terminology such ask "Clients" or "Tasks" on the left menu:

The icons are the same too in both panels, as well as the infected machine list (starting with the HWID). The PHP file naming convention is similar to DiamondFox, too.

The author clearly reused code from DiamondFox panel on the GlitchPOS panel.

Comparison of GlitchPOS and the DiamondFox POS module


In 2017, the DiamondFox malware included a POS plugin. We decided to check if this module was the same as GlitchPOS, but it is not. For DiamondFox, the author decided to use the leaked code of BlackPOS to build the credit card grabber. On GlitchPOS, the author developed its own code to perform this task and did not use the previously leaked code.

Bad guys are everywhere


It's interesting to see that someone else attempted to push the same malware 25 days after edbitss on an alternative forum:

This attacker even tried to cash in by increasing some prices.

Some members even attempted to call out the unscrupulous behaviour:

With the different information we have, we think that Chameleon101 has taken the previous malware created by Edbitss to sell it on an alternative forum and with a higher price.

Conclusion


This investigation shows us that POS malware is still attractive and some people are still working on the development of this family of malware. We can see that edbitss developed malware years even after being publicly mentioned by cybersecurity companies. He left DiamondFox to switch on a new project targeting point-of-sale. The sale opened a few weeks ago, so we don't know yet how many people bought it or use it. We also see that bad guys steal the work of each other and try to sell malware developed by other developers at a higher price. The final word will be a quote from Edbitss on a DiamondFox screenshot published by himself "In the future, even bank robbers will be replaced."

Coverage


Additional ways our customers can detect and block this threat are listed below.

Advanced Malware Protection (AMP) is ideally suited to prevent the execution of the malware used by these threat actors. Below is a screenshot showing how AMP can protect customers from this threat. Try AMP for free here.

Cisco Cloud Web Security (CWS) or Web Security Appliance (WSA) web scanning prevents access to malicious websites and detects malware used in these attacks.

Email Security can block malicious emails sent by threat actors as part of their campaign.

Network Security appliances such as Next-Generation Firewall (NGFW), Next-Generation Intrusion Prevention System (NGIPS), and Meraki MX can detect malicious activity associated with this threat.

AMP Threat Grid helps identify malicious binaries and build protection into all Cisco Security products.

Umbrella, our secure internet gateway (SIG), blocks users from connecting to malicious domains, IPs, and URLs, whether users are on or off the corporate network.

Open Source SNORTⓇ Subscriber Rule Set customers can stay up to date by downloading the latest rule pack available for purchase on Snort.org.

Indicators of Compromise (IOCs)


The following IOCs are associated to this campaign:

GlitchPOS samples

ed043ff67cc28e67ba36566c340090a19e5bf87c6092d418ff0fd3759fb661ab (SHA256)
abfadb6686459f69a92ede367a2713fc2a1289ebe0c8596964682e4334cee553 (SHA256)

C2 server

coupondemo[.]dynamicinnovation[.]net

URLs

hxxp://coupondemo[.]dynamicinnovation[.]net/cgl-bin/gate.php
hxxp://coupondemo[.]dynamicinnovation[.]net/admin/gate.php
hxxp://coupondemo[.]dynamicinnovation[.]net/glitch/gate.php


          Role of Cell Surface Lipids and Thiol-Disulphide Exchange Pathways in Regulating the Encryption and Decryption of Tissue Factor.      Cache   Translate Page      
Related Articles

Role of Cell Surface Lipids and Thiol-Disulphide Exchange Pathways in Regulating the Encryption and Decryption of Tissue Factor.

Thromb Haemost. 2019 Mar 12;:

Authors: Ansari SA, Pendurthi UR, Rao LVM

Abstract
Tissue factor (TF), a transmembrane glycoprotein, is the cellular receptor of the coagulation factors VII (FVII) and VIIa (FVIIa). The formation of TF-FVIIa complex triggers the initiation of the blood coagulation pathway. TF plays an essential role in haemostasis, but an aberrant expression of TF activity contributes to thrombotic disorders. In health, TF pro-coagulant activity on cells is controlled tightly to allow sufficient coagulant activity to achieve haemostasis but not to cause thrombosis. It is achieved largely by selective localization of TF in the body and encryption of TF at the cell surface. A vast majority of TF on resting cells exists in an encrypted state with minimal pro-coagulant activity but becomes pro-thrombotic following cell injury or activation. At present, the mechanisms that are responsible for TF encryption and activation (decryption) are not entirely clear, but recent studies provide important mechanistic insights into these processes. To date, externalization of phosphatidylserine to the outer leaflet and thiol-disulphide exchange pathways that either turn on and off the allosteric disulphide bond in TF are shown to play a major role in regulating TF pro-coagulant activity on cell surfaces. Recent studies showed that sphingomyelin, a major phospholipid in the outer leaflet of plasma membrane, plays a critical role in the encryption of TF in resting cells. The present review provides an overview of recent literature on the above-described mechanisms of TF encryption and decryption with a particular emphasis on our recent findings.

PMID: 30861549 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


          SMTP Authentication Support: Error since Mail Provider turned off TLS 1.0 support.      Cache   Translate Page      

This module was working beautifully until Friday when our email provider turned off TLS 1.0 support and now no email will send on any port with SSL or TLS. It was working on port 587 with TLS encryption. I can't see any other settings I can change, but the settings are the same as my email, so I am presuming it's the underlying code that is still trying to use TLS 1.0, rather than 1.1 or 1.2

Can this be checked and actioned if needed ASAP please? If I have got the wrong end of the stick, please forgive me.


          Mozilla Firefox Send lets you share encrypted files privately and for free      Cache   Translate Page      

Mozilla is one of the champions for internet freedom and privacy – which is part of why I love the company and its work – so it's no surprise that it "graduated" one of its experiments to a full-fledged product. Meet Firefox Send, a free, encrypted file-transfer service.

Not only has Mozilla improved upload speeds, but it's expanded on how much control you have over the the file(s) you send. You dictate when the link expires, who can view it, how many times it can be downloaded, and if it will have a password for even more security on top of the end-to-end encryption.

Read More

Mozilla Firefox Send lets you share encrypted files privately and for free was written by the awesome team at Android Police.


          Gold Dominant - New Best Paying Investment 2019 - Gold-dominant.com      Cache   Translate Page      
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QUOTE
SSL Encryption
DDos Protection
Licensed Script
Registrar NAMECHEAP INC
Created on 2019-02-18
Expires on 2020-02-18
Updated on 2019-02-18
NS DNS1.REGISTRAR-SERVERS.COM DNS2.REGISTRAR-SERVERS.COM
DNS1.REGISTRAR-SERVERS.COM DNS2.REGISTRAR-SERVERS.COM


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My deposit:
QUOTE
The amount of 100 USD has been withdrawn from your account.
Accounts: U4603107->U12180097. Memo: Shopping Cart Payment.
Deposit to gold-dominant.com User hyiptank..
Date: 13:46 13.03.19. Batch: 250606329.

          Kryptel 8.1      Cache   Translate Page      
Drag-and-drop file and folder encryption using strong crypto.
          WD’s wonderfully compact 512GB portable SSD is $60 off today      Cache   Translate Page      

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          Remove Wi-Fi dead zones with three Asus Lyra Trio devices on sale for $199      Cache   Translate Page      
No more disconnects. The Asus Lyra Trio home Wi-Fi system 3-pack is down to $199 at B&H when you clip the on-page coupon. You can also find this deal on Amazon and Newegg. The system is $300 without the coupon and regularly sells for around $250 at most retailers. This is a great mesh networking system that basically gives you a way to make sure there are no Wi-Fi dead zones anywhere in your home. It has dual-band Wi-Fi with up to 1750 MB/s data throughput. There are three antennas and two Gigabit Ethernet ports along with MU-MIMO tech to ensure all the devices in your household can get fast speeds. You'll also be able to use advanced parental controls, personal wireless encryption, and a free app that helps with setup and network management. It's also compatible with Amazon Alexa for voice control....
          جلوی فعالیت واتس‌اپ‌های قلابی گرفته می‌شود      Cache   Translate Page      
واتس اپ به تازگی خطاب به کاربرانی که از اپلیکیشن‌های غیر رسمی با اسامی مشابه به واتس اپ استفاده می‌کنند، اعلام کرده که از فعالیت آنها به زودی جلوگیری به عمل خواهد آورد.
 
واتس‌اپ که یکی از محبوب‌ترین و پرطرفدارترین اپلیکیشن‌های پیام رسان در جهان به شمار می‌رود، حالا با انتشار بیانیه و پیامی اعلام کرده است که کاربرانی که از اپلیکیشن‌های غیر رسمی و مشابه با نام‌های واتس اپ پلاس (WhatsApp Plus) و واتس اپ جی‌بی (GB WhatsApp) استفاده می‌کنند، هر چه زودتر تمامی اطلاعات موجود و ذخیره شده خود را از آن خارج کرده تا در صورتی که شرکت واتس اپ تصمیم گرفت اقدام به حذف این اپلیکیشن‌ها کند، اطلاعات و پیام‌های رد و بدل شده آنها تحت تأثیر قرار نگیرد و به طور کلی حذف نشود.
 
بر اساس گزارش وب سایت livemint، واتس‌اپ که یکی از بزرگترین زیرمجموعه‌های فیس بوک به شمار می‌رود، به تازگی اعلام کرده است که جلوی فعالیت اپلیکیشن‌های واتس‌اپ تقلبی و قلابی را خواهد گرفت چرا که به امنیت سایبری آنها اعتقادی نداشته و بر این باور است که آنها هیچ تعهدی در قبال حفاظت از حریم خصوصی کاربران ندارند.
 
اپلیکیشن پیام‌رسان واتس‌اپ نیز از قابلیت Encryption End- to End یا رمزنگاری پیشرفته پشتیبانی می‌کند و از پروتکل‌های پیشرفته‌ای برای حفظ حریم شخصی کاربرانش برخوردار است. این اپلیکیشن که برای تمامی سیستم‌های عامل اندروید، iOS و ویندوز قابل استفاده است، در سال ۲۰۱۶ میلادی لقب پرکاربردترین پیام رسان جهان را گرفت. واتس اپ از آن جهت ضریب امنیت سایبری بالایی دارد که مکالمات و اطلاعات مبادله شده میان کاربران و مخاطبان به صورت کامل محافظت شده بوده و مکالمات، اطلاعات شخصی و خصوصی آن‌ها از سوی نهادهای دیگر قابل رصد و ردگیری نخواهد بود.
 
شرکت فیس‌بوک با در اختیار گرفتن و تصاحب شرکت واتس‌اپ در سال ۲۰۱۴، ۱۹ میلیارد دلار کسب کرد و از آن زمان تاکنون نیز با معرفی و افزودن قابلیت‌های جدید بدنبال جذب و حفظ طرفداران این پیام‌رسان بوده است. طبق آخرین آمارهای منتشر شده در سال ۲۰۱۸، پیام‌رسان واتس اپ هم اکنون میزبان بالغ بر ۱ میلیارد و ۳۰۰ میلیون کاربر فعال در ماه است.
 
برای مقایسه باید گفت بر اساس آمار، واتس‌اپ بالغ بر یک میلیارد کاربر فعال در جهان دارد این در حالیست که تلگرام ۲۰۰ میلیون کاربر فعال در ماه داشته است.
 

          Remove Wi-Fi dead zones with three Asus Lyra Trio devices on sale for $199      Cache   Translate Page      
No more disconnects. The Asus Lyra Trio home Wi-Fi system 3-pack is down to $199 at B&H when you clip the on-page coupon. You can also find this deal on Amazon and Newegg. The system is $300 without the coupon and regularly sells for around $250 at most retailers. This is a great mesh networking system that basically gives you a way to make sure there are no Wi-Fi dead zones anywhere in your home. It has dual-band Wi-Fi with up to 1750 MB/s data throughput. There are three antennas and two Gigabit Ethernet ports along with MU-MIMO tech to ensure all the devices in your household can get fast speeds. You'll also be able to use advanced parental controls, personal wireless encryption, and a free app that helps with setup and network management. It's also compatible with Amazon Alexa for voice control. See at B&H...
          Remove Wi-Fi dead zones with three Asus Lyra Trio devices on sale for $199      Cache   Translate Page      
No more disconnects. The Asus Lyra Trio home Wi-Fi system 3-pack is down to $199 at B&H when you clip the on-page coupon. You can also find this deal on Amazon and Newegg. The system is $300 without the coupon and regularly sells for around $250 at most retailers. This is a great mesh networking system that basically gives you a way to make sure there are no Wi-Fi dead zones anywhere in your home. It has dual-band Wi-Fi with up to 1750 MB/s data throughput. There are three antennas and two Gigabit Ethernet ports along with MU-MIMO tech to ensure all the devices in your household can get fast speeds. You'll also be able to use advanced parental controls, personal wireless encryption, and a free app that helps with setup and network management. It's also compatible with Amazon Alexa for voice control....
          Mozilla Firefox Send lets you share encrypted files privately and for free      Cache   Translate Page      

Mozilla is one of the champions for internet freedom and privacy – which is part of why I love the company and its work – so it's no surprise that it "graduated" one of its experiments to a full-fledged product. Meet Firefox Send, a free, encrypted file-transfer service.

Not only has Mozilla improved upload speeds, but it's expanded on how much control you have over the the file(s) you send. You dictate when the link expires, who can view it, how many times it can be downloaded, and if it will have a password for even more security on top of the end-to-end encryption.

Read More

Mozilla Firefox Send lets you share encrypted files privately and for free was written by the awesome team at Android Police.


          Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Meet the newest walled garden      Cache   Translate Page      

Recently, Mark Zuckerberg posted a lengthy note outlining Facebook’s vision to integrate its three messaging services – WhatsApp, Messenger, and Instagram (through its Direct messaging functionality) – into one privacy and security oriented platform. The post positioned Facebook’s future around individual and small group conversations, rather than the “public forum” style communications through Facebook’s newsfeed platform. Initial coverage of the move, largely critical, has focused on the privacy and security aspects of this integrated platform, the history of broken promises on privacy and the changes that would be needed for Facebook’s business model to realize the goal. However, there’s a yet darker side to the proposal, one mostly lost in the post and coverage so far: Facebook is taking one step further to make its family of services into the newest walled garden, at the expense of openness and the broader digital economy.

Here’s the part of the post that highlights the evolution in progress:


Sounds good on its face, right? Except, what Facebook is proposing isn’t interoperability as most use that term. It’s more like intraoperability – making sure the various messaging services in Facebook’s own walled garden all can communicate with each other, not with other businesses and services. In the context of this post, it seems clear that Facebook will intentionally box out other companies, apps, and networks in the course of this consolidation. Rather than creating the next digital platform to take the entire internet economy forward, encouraging downstream innovation, investment, and growth, Facebook is closing out its competitors and citing privacy and security considerations as its rationale.

This is not an isolated incident – it’s a trend. For example, on August 1, 2018, Facebook shut off the “publish_actions” feature in one of its core APIs. This change gutted the practical ability of independent companies and developers to interoperate with Facebook’s services. Some services were forced to disconnect Facebook profiles or stop interconnecting with Facebook entirely. Facebook subsequently changed a long-standing platform policy that had prohibited the use of their APIs to compete, but the damage was done, and the company’s restrictive practices continue.

We can see further evidence of the intent to create a silo under the guise of security in Zuckerberg’s note where he says: “Finally, it would create safety and spam vulnerabilities in an encrypted system to let people send messages from unknown apps where our safety and security systems couldn’t see the patterns of activity.” Security and spam are real problems, but interoperability doesn’t need to mean opening a system up to every incoming message from any service. APIs can be secured by tokens and protected by policies and legal systems.

Without doubt, Facebook needs to prioritize the privacy of its users. Shutting down overly permissive APIs, even at the cost of some amount of competition and interoperability, can be necessary for that purpose – as with the Cambridge Analytica incident. But there’s a difference between protecting users and building silos. And designing APIs that offer effective interoperability with strong privacy and security guarantees is a solvable problem.

The long-term challenge we need to be focused on with Facebook isn’t just whether we can trust the company with our privacy and security – it’s also whether they’re using privacy and security simply as a cover to get away with anticompetitive behavior.

How does this square with the very active conversations around competition and centralization in tech we’re witnessing around the world today? The German competition authority just issued a decision forcing Facebook to stop sharing data amongst its services. This feels like quite the discordant note for Facebook to be casting, even as the company is (presumably) thinking about how to comply with the German decision. Meanwhile, the Federal Trade Commission is actively pursuing an investigation into Facebook’s data practices. And regulators in the U.S., the European Union, India, Israel, and Australia are actively reviewing their antitrust and competition laws to ensure they can respond to the challenges posed by technology and data.

It’s hard to say whether integrating its messaging services will further entrench Facebook’s position, or make it harder to pursue the kinds of remedies directed by the Bundeskartellamt and being considered by politicians around the world. But it seems like Facebook is on a collision course towards finding out.

If Facebook believes that messaging as a platform offers incredible future innovation, the company has a choice. It could either seek to develop that potential within a silo, the way AT&T fostered innovation in telephones in the 1950s – or it could try the way the internet was built to work: offering real interoperability on reasonable terms so that others can innovate downstream.

The post Meet the newest walled garden appeared first on Open Policy & Advocacy.


          Re: Can anyone post an example/sample of the file: pluginsvr_config.xml for 8.1 or 8.1.0.2?      Cache   Translate Page      

For what it's worth, (assuming you didn't mean the Atrium Core (shared) or Normalization Engine  pluginsvr_config.xml...

here's ours from a DEV system. I noticed just now that there is a MIX of references to Drive C: and Drive D: (our installed Remedy, Atrium  & ITSM components are on D:; some of these may very well have been on C: originally and reinstalled. We haven't noticed any issues because of the C: references, although I would be surprised if those folders/files actually still exist there... (just checked, they do).

 

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

<!--

(lengthy comment section deleted)

-->

<pluginsvr_config>

  <port>9999</port>

  <regPortMapper>false</regPortMapper>

  <encryptionPolicy>2</encryptionPolicy>

  <publicKeyAlg>4</publicKeyAlg>

  <publicKeyExpiry>86400</publicKeyExpiry>

  <dataEncryptionAlg>1</dataEncryptionAlg>

  <dataKeyExpiry>2700</dataKeyExpiry>

  <numCoreThreads>5</numCoreThreads>

  <numSelectorThreads>2</numSelectorThreads>

  <workQueueMonitorLogInterval>0</workQueueMonitorLogInterval>

  <workQueueTaskThreshold>5</workQueueTaskThreshold>

  <plugins>

   <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARF.WEBSERVICE</name>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/websvcjava81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.ws.plugin.WSPlugin</classname>

      <userDefined>

        <policyConfigDir>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr</policyConfigDir>

        <!-- This configuration allows you to set the time-out for

         webservices plugin. The value of timeout depends on following rules:-

            * the timeout value finally considered would be minimum of the

            filter-api-timeout and timeout set here.

          * timeout value for plugin would always be less than

            filter-api-timeout value (as configured in ar.cfg).

          * filter-api-timeout value can max be of 300 secs. -->

        <timeout>40</timeout>

      </userDefined>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ALRT.WEBSERVICE</name>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/websvcalrtjava81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.ws.alert.ARAlertPlugin</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/websvcjava81_build001.jar</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARF.REGISTRY</name>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/arregistryplugin81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.registry.ARRegistryPlugin</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/WSRegistryAPI8.0.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/activation.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/tibco-uddi-client3.0.jar</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARDBC.REGISTRY</name>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/arregistryquery81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.registry.ARDBCRegistryQuery</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/WSRegistryAPI8.0.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/activation.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/tibco-uddi-client3.0.jar</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <pluginset>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/arreport81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/arreportingapi81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <plugin>

        <name>ARSYS.ARDBC.ARREPORTENGINE</name>

        <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.report.ReportForms</classname>

        <userDefined>

          <birtinstallpath>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/birtruntime</birtinstallpath>

        </userDefined>

      </plugin>

      <plugin>

        <name>ARSYS.ARF.QUERYPARSER</name>

        <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.report.QueryParserPlugin</classname>

      </plugin>

      <plugin>

        <name>ARSYS.ARF.PARSEPARAMETERS</name>

        <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.report.ParseParameters</classname>

        <userDefined>

          <birtinstallpath>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/birtruntime</birtinstallpath>

        </userDefined>

      </plugin>

      <plugin>

        <name>ARSYS.ARF.PUBLISHREPORT</name>

        <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.report.PublishReport</classname>

        <userDefined>

          <birtinstallpath>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/birtruntime</birtinstallpath>

        </userDefined>

      </plugin>

      <plugin>

        <name>ARSYS.ARF.REPORTSCHEDULER</name>

        <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.report.schedule.ReportSchedulerPlugin</classname>

      </plugin>

    </pluginset>

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARF.RSAKEYPAIRGENERATOR</name>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.rsa.RSAKeyPairGenerator</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/arrsakeypairgen81_build001.jar</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <!-- Atrium SSO AREA Plug-in -->

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.AREA.ATRIUMSSO</name>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.sso.AtriumSSOPlugin</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/arssoplugin81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/atsso-sdk.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/atsso-common.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/bcprov-jdk15-145.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/stax-1.2.0.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/stax-api-1.0.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/json.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/simple-xml-2.5.3.jar</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <!-- Atrium SSO Filterapi confirm password plugin -->

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARF.ATSSOCONFIRMPWD</name>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.sso.AtriumSSOConfirmPassword</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/arssoplugin81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/atsso-sdk.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/atsso-common.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/bcprov-jdk15-145.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/stax-1.2.0.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/stax-api-1.0.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/json.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/simple-xml-2.5.3.jar</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <!-- Config Checker filter APi plugin -->

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.FILTERAPI.CONFIGCHECK</name>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/configchecker81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.configchecker.ConfigCheckerFilterPlugin</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/ftsconfigplugin81_build001.jar</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <!-- Pentaho ARDBC Plug-in -->

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARDBC.PENTAHO</name>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.pdi.ardbc.ARPentahoPlugin</classname>

      <userDefined>

        <pdiDirPath>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration</pdiDirPath>

        <kettleHome>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver</kettleHome>

      </userDefined>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/ardbc-plugin/pentahoardbc81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/ardbc-plugin/arcmnapp81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/lib/kettle-core.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/lib/kettle-db.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/lib/kettle-engine.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/cmdbapi81.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/arpdi-utils81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/arpdirepository81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/LucidDbClient-minimal.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/asjava.zip</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/db2jcc.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/db2jcc_license_cu.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/derby.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/derbyclient.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/h2.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/hive-jdbc-0.5.0-pentaho-1.0.0.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/hsqldb.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/ifxjdbc.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/iijdbc.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/infobright-core-3.3.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/interclient.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/jaybird-full-2.1.0.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/jt400.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/jtds-1.2.5.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/kingbasejdbc.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/monetdb-1.7-jdbc.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/mysql-connector-java-3.1.14-bin.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/ojdbc14.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/orai18n.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/postgresql-8.3-603.jdbc3.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/rdbthin.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/sapdbc.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/sqlitejdbc-v037-nested.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/unijdbc.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/vertica_3.5_jdk_5.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/JDBC/xdbjdbc.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/commons/commons-beanutils-1.7.0.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/commons/commons-codec-1.3.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/commons/commons-collections-3.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/commons/commons-dbcp-1.2.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/commons/commons-digester-1.8.jar</pathelement>

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      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/commons/commons-net-1.4.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/commons/commons-pool-1.3.jar</pathelement>

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      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/feeds/jdom.jar</pathelement>

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      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/feeds/xml-apis.jar</pathelement>

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      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/jfree/jfreechart-1.0.1.jar</pathelement>

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      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/mondrian/commons-math-1.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/mondrian/eigenbase-properties-1.1.0.10924.jar</pathelement>

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      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/mondrian/eigenbase-xom-1.3.0.13768.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/mondrian/javacup-10k.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/mondrian/mondrian-3.2.1.13885.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/mondrian/saxon8-xom.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/hadoop-core-0.20.2.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/jets3t-0.7.4.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/kettle-vfs-20100924.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/libbase-1.2.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/libformula-1.2.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/olap4j-0.9.8.340.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/pentaho-database-4.0.5.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/pentaho-formula-editor-0.0.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/pentaho-hdfs-vfs-1.0.0.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/pentaho-s3-vfs-1.0.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/pentaho-vfs-browser-2.0.2.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/pentaho-xul-core-3.2.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/pentaho-xul-swt-3.2.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/sqleonardo-swt-wrapper.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/pentaho/sqleonardo.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/rules/antlr-runtime-3.1.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/rules/core-3.4.2.v_883_R34x.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/rules/drools-api-5.0.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/rules/drools-compiler-5.0.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/rules/drools-core-5.0.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/rules/mvel2-2.0.10.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/salesforce/axis.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/salesforce/commons-discovery-0.2.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/salesforce/jaxrpc.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/salesforce/saaj.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/salesforce/salesforce20.0.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/spring/spring-beans-2.5.6.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/spring/spring-context-2.5.6.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/spring/spring-context-support-2.5.6.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/spring/spring-core-2.5.6.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/web/activation.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/web/jetty-6.1.21.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/web/jetty-plus-6.1.21.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/web/jetty-util-6.1.21.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/web/servlet-api-2.5-6.1.9.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/web/simple-jndi-0.11.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/webservices/jsr173_api.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/webservices/qname.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/webservices/wsdl4j.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/webservices/wstx-asl-3.2.9.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/webservices/xalan-2.4.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/SNMP4J.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/ascsapjco3wrp.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/dom4j-1.6.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/edtftpj2.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/ftp4che-0.7.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/ini4j-0.5.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/jackcess-1.2.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/jakarta-oro-2.0.8.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/janino.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/javadbf.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/javassist.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/jaxen-1.1.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/jcifs-1.3.3.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/js.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/jsch-0.1.42.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/json_simple-1.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/jsonpath.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/jug-lgpl-2.0.0.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/junit-4.7.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/jxl.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/ldapjdk.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/livetribe-jsr223-2.0.6.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/log4j-1.2.14.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/mail.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/odfdom.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/ognl-2.6.9.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/palo-core.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/poi-3.6-20091214.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/poi-ooxml-3.6-20091214.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/poi-ooxml-schemas-3.6-20091214.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/saxon8.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/scannotation-1.0.2.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/secondstring.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/slf4j-api-1.5.8.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/slf4j-jcl-1.5.8.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/snakeyaml-1.7.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/syslog4j-0.9.34.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/trilead-ssh2-build213.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/xbean.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/diserver/data-integration/libext/xercesImpl-2.9.1.jar</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ALRT.TWITTER</name>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/aralerttwitter81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.alert.twitter.TwitterAlertDeliveryPlugin</classname>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARF.TWITTER</name>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/aralerttwitter81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.alert.twitter.TwitterAlertDeliveryPlugin</classname>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARDBC.SNMP</name>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.snmp.SNMPPlugin</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/snmpplugin81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <userDefined>

        <arconfPath>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy</arconfPath>

        <armonitorPath>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/conf</armonitorPath>

      </userDefined>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/log4j-1.2.14.jar</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARDBC.FTSCONFIG</name>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.ftsconfig.FTSConfigPlugin</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/ftsconfigplugin81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <userDefined>

        <arconfPath>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy</arconfPath>

        <armonitorPath>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/conf</armonitorPath>

        <ftsFolder>D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/fts</ftsFolder>

        <ftsJavaPath>D:/Java64/JRE/bin/java</ftsJavaPath>

      </userDefined>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.AREA.AREALDAP</name>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/arealdapplugin81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.arealdap.AREALdapPlugin</classname>

    </plugin>

   

    <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARDBC.LDAP</name>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/pluginsvr/ardbcldapplugin81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.plugins.ardbcldap.ARDBCLDAPPlugin</classname>

    </plugin>

   

     <plugin>

      <name>ARSYS.ARDBC.PREVIEW</name>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/approval/bin/arasj81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <classname>com.bmc.arsys.approval.main.ApprovalPlugin</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/arserver/api/lib/arcmnapp81_build001.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:/Program Files/BMC Remedy/arserver/api/lib/arutil81_build001.jar</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>RMDY.ITSM.RKM.UPDATEKAMMAPPINGS</name>

      <type>FilterAPI</type>

      <code>JAVA</code>

      <filename>C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\rkm-operations.jar</filename>

      <classname>com.bmc.itsm.rkm.filterapi.operations.UpdateKAMMappings</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">D:\Program Files\BMC Remedy\pluginsvr\foundation_shared\ITSMCommonUtils.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="path">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>RMDY.ITSM.RKM.REGISTRATION</name>

      <type>FilterAPI</type>

      <code>JAVA</code>

      <filename>C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\rkm-registration.jar</filename>

      <classname>com.bmc.itsm.rkm.filterapi.registration.RegistrationController</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\3rd_party\commons-io-1.4.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\3rd_party\poi-3.5-FINAL-20090928.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\3rd_party\iText-2.1.5.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\3rd_party\dom4j-1.6.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\3rd_party\poi-ooxml-3.5-FINAL-20090928.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\rkm-common.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:\Program Files\BMC Remedy\pluginsvr\foundation_shared\ITSMCommonUtils.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="path">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins</pathelement>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>RMDY.ITSM.RKM.FILESYSTEM</name>

      <type>ARDBC</type>

      <code>JAVA</code>

      <filename>C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\file-system.jar</filename>

      <classname>com.bmc.itsm.rkm.ardbc.filesystem.RkmFileSystemPlugin</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\3rd_party\commons-io-1.4.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\3rd_party\poi-3.5-FINAL-20090928.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\3rd_party\iText-2.1.5.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\3rd_party\dom4j-1.6.1.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\3rd_party\poi-ooxml-3.5-FINAL-20090928.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\rkm-common.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:\Program Files\BMC Remedy\pluginsvr\foundation_shared\ITSMCommonUtils.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="path">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins</pathelement>

      <userDefined>

        <entry_id_length>500</entry_id_length>

      </userDefined>

    </plugin>

    <plugin>

      <name>RMDY.ITSM.RKM.FORMPERMISSIONS</name>

      <type>FilterAPI</type>

      <code>JAVA</code>

      <filename>C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\rkm-form-permissions.jar</filename>

      <classname>com.bmc.itsm.rkm.filterapi.formpermissions.Permissions</classname>

      <pathelement type="location">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins\rkm-form-permissions.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="location">D:\Program Files\BMC Remedy\pluginsvr\foundation_shared\ITSMCommonUtils.jar</pathelement>

      <pathelement type="path">C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BMCRemedyITSMSuite\Shared_Components\plugins</pathelement>

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          Remove Wi-Fi dead zones with three Asus Lyra Trio devices on sale for $199      Cache   Translate Page      
No more disconnects. The Asus Lyra Trio home Wi-Fi system 3-pack is down to $199 at B&H when you clip the on-page coupon. You can also find this deal on Amazon and Newegg. The system is $300 without the coupon and regularly sells for around $250 at most retailers. This is a great mesh networking system that basically gives you a way to make sure there are no Wi-Fi dead zones anywhere in your home. It has dual-band Wi-Fi with up to 1750 MB/s data throughput. There are three antennas and two Gigabit Ethernet ports along with MU-MIMO tech to ensure all the devices in your household can get fast speeds. You'll also be able to use advanced parental controls, personal wireless encryption, and a free app that helps with setup and network management. It's also compatible with Amazon Alexa for voice control. See at B&H...
          Mozilla launches Firefox Send (free encrypted file transfer)      Cache   Translate Page      

I'm a day late to the news, but am just learning about Firefox Send, a free encrypted file transfer service launched by Mozilla.

Here is their Press Release with some more information. Here are the major features, as described in their release:

  • Free
  • End-to-End Encryption
  • Security controls (download limits and expiration)
  • Send files up to 2.5GB

It's open-source on GitHub under the Mozilla Public License 2.0.

There's also already a CLI tool to allow you to upload and get a link directly from the command line.

What do people think?


          Review: Sophos Intercept X Stops Threats at the Gate      Cache   Translate Page      
Review: Sophos Intercept X Stops Threats at the Gate eli.zimmerman_9856 Tue, 03/12/2019 - 11:59

Traditional anti-malware products scan both memory and disk for particular threat signatures, which are updated daily (or even more often). But if a new threat appears before the pattern files are updated, these solutions won’t be able to detect or prevent the attack. 

In an effort to keep ahead of hackers, SophosLabs analyzes more than 400,000 new malware samples every day. The challenge is that the vast majority of malware is unique to individual organizations, so updating a pattern file is an inefficient, ineffective block for these attacks.

To fix that, Sophos Intercept X sits on top of traditional security software solutions to augment protection. The software prevents malware before it can be executed and stops threats, such as ransomware, from running. When ransomware does get into the network, the tool provides a root cause analysis to help users understand the forensic details.

MORE FROM EDTECH: Here are four ways universities can improve their endpoint protection.

Defeat Ransomware with Automatic Monitoring and File Rollbacks

Intercept X uses deep learning to detect new (and previously unseen) malware and unwanted applications. Deep learning is modeled after the human brain, using advanced neural networks that continuously learn as they accumulate more data.

It’s the same kind of machine learning that powers facial recognition, natural language processing and even self-driving cars, all inside an anti-malware program.

Sheen

Ransomware has grown at a fast clip since the success of the WannaCry malware infection in May 2016. Ransomware installs itself on a computer and then encrypts important files, making them inaccessible to their owner. The owner then receives a message from the attackers that, in an exchange for currency, they will decrypt the files

Sophos Intercept X blocks these attacks by monitoring the file system, detecting any rapid encryption of files and terminating the process. It even rolls back the changes to the files, leaving them as if they had never been touched — and denying the cybercriminals a payoff.

Integrated Protections Give Admins Better Visibility

The software offers several additional protections. WipeGuard uses the same deep learning features to protect a computer’s Master Boot Record. (Ransomware attacks on the MBR prevent the computer from restarting — even restores from backups are impossible until the cybercriminals get their money.)

Safe Browsing includes policies to monitor a web browser’s encryption, presentation and network interfaces to detect “man in the browser” attacks that are common in many banking Trojan viruses.

Sophos Root Cause Analysis contains a list of infection types that have occurred in the past 90 days. There’s even a Visualize tab that connects devices, browsers and websites to track where the infection occurred and how it spread. 

This doesn’t mean users must take action immediately, but it could help them investigate the chain of events surrounding a malware infection and highlight any necessary security improvements.

One caveat: If users haven’t patched their software (especially Java and Adobe applications), Intercept X may detect false positives. Be sure to update all software to the most current versions — always a best practice — to avoid these accidental alerts.

Cybersecurity-report_EasyTarget.jpg

Make Management Easier Through Sophos Central Dashboard

Endpoint protection is wonderful, but managing all those endpoints can be a chore. In addition to the usual laptops and desktops, security managers must pay attention to servers, mobile devices, email and web browsing. The potential threat surface can be overwhelming.

Sophos Central streamlines endpoint management, especially when deployed alongside other Sophos products. From the console, admins can manage Intercept X and endpoint protection either globally or by device. Web protection provides enterprise-grade browsing defense against malicious pop-ups, ads and risky file downloads. The mobile dashboard also shows device compliance, self-service portal registrations, platform versions and management status. 

Server security protects both virtual and physical servers. The Server Lockdown feature reduces the possibility of attack by ensuring that a server can configure and run only known, trusted executables.

Sophos wireless, encryption and email products also tie in to the console, and Sophos Wi-Fi access points can work alongside endpoint and mobile protection clients to provide integrated threat protection. 

That lets admins see what’s happening on wireless networks, APs and connecting clients to get insight into the inappropriate use of resources, including rogue APs. 

The Sophos Encryption dashboard provides centrally managed full-disk encryption using Windows BitLocker or Mac FileVault. Key management becomes a snap with the SafeGuard Management Center, which lets users recover damaged systems. 

Sophos email protection provides a safeguard against spam, phishing attempts and other malicious attacks through the most common user interface of all: email.

Sophos Central isn’t just for admins. Self-service is an important feature today, with user demands and IT budgets in constant conflict. 

Users can log in to the Sophos self-service portal to customize their security status, recover passwords and get notifications. In most IT departments, password recovery is the No. 1 help desk request, and eliminating those calls means technicians can spend more time on complex tasks.

Sophos Intercept X

OS: Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10, 32-bit and 64-bit; macOSz
Speed: Extracts millions of file features in 20 millisecondsm
Storage Requirement: 20MB on the endpoint
Server Requirement: Sophos Central supported on Windows 2008R2 and above

Dr. Jeffrey Sheen currently works as the supervisor of enterprise architecture services for Grange Mutual Casualty Group of Columbus, Ohio.


          Mongo DBA      Cache   Translate Page      
IL-Northbrook, US Citizen and Green Card holders please apply- we are not able to sponsor for this position at present time- Database engineer to lead the design and implementation of encryption, both at rest and over the wire for our MongoDB deployments. Join a company of individuals with hopes, plans and passions, all using and developing our talents for good, at work and in life. Responsibilities The successf
          Remove Wi-Fi dead zones with three Asus Lyra Trio devices on sale for $199      Cache   Translate Page      
No more disconnects. The Asus Lyra Trio home Wi-Fi system 3-pack is down to $199 at B&H when you clip the on-page coupon. You can also find this deal on Amazon and Newegg. The system is $300 without the coupon and regularly sells for around $250 at most retailers. This is a great mesh networking system that basically gives you a way to make sure there are no Wi-Fi dead zones anywhere in your home. It has dual-band Wi-Fi with up to 1750 MB/s data throughput. There are three antennas and two Gigabit Ethernet ports along with MU-MIMO tech to ensure all the devices in your household can get fast speeds. You'll also be able to use advanced parental controls, personal wireless encryption, and a free app that helps with setup and network management. It's also compatible with Amazon Alexa for voice control....
          matlab task RSA      Cache   Translate Page      
Be written in MATLAB code for encrypting text (random number of characters) by using the RSA encryption algorithm. Also be achieved the decryption format. To assume that the characters that can be used... (Budget: €8 - €30 EUR, Jobs: 3D Modelling, 3D Rendering, Engineering, Graphic Design, Matlab and Mathematica)
          Introducing Android Q Beta      Cache   Translate Page      

Posted by Dave Burke, VP of Engineering

In 2019, mobile innovation is stronger than ever, with new technologies from 5G to edge to edge displays and even foldable screens. Android is right at the center of this innovation cycle, and thanks to the broad ecosystem of partners across billions of devices, Android's helping push the boundaries of hardware and software bringing new experiences and capabilities to users.

As the mobile ecosystem evolves, Android is focused on helping users take advantage of the latest innovations, while making sure users' security and privacy are always a top priority. Building on top of efforts like Google Play Protect and runtime permissions, Android Q brings a number of additional privacy and security features for users, as well as enhancements for foldables, new APIs for connectivity, new media codecs and camera capabilities, NNAPI extensions, Vulkan 1.1 support, faster app startup, and more.

Today we're releasing Beta 1 of Android Q for early adopters and a preview SDK for developers. You can get started with Beta 1 today by enrolling any Pixel device (including the original Pixel and Pixel XL, which we've extended support for by popular demand!) Please let us know what you think! Read on for a taste of what's in Android Q, and we'll see you at Google I/O in May when we'll have even more to share.

Building on top of privacy protections in Android

Android was designed with security and privacy at the center. As Android has matured, we've added a wide range of features to protect users, like file-based encryption, OS controls requiring apps to request permission before accessing sensitive resources, locking down camera/mic background access, lockdown mode, encrypted backups, Google Play Protect (which scans over 50 billion apps a day to identify potentially harmful apps and remove them), and much more. In Android Q, we've made even more enhancements to protect our users. Many of these enhancements are part of our work in Project Strobe.

Giving users more control over location

With Android Q, the OS helps users have more control over when apps can get location. As in prior versions of the OS, apps can only get location once the app has asked you for permission, and you have granted it.

One thing that's particularly sensitive is apps' access to location while the app is not in use (in the background). Android Q enables users to give apps permission to see their location never, only when the app is in use (running), or all the time (when in the background).

For example, an app asking for a user's location for food delivery makes sense and the user may want to grant it the ability to do that. But since the app may not need location outside of when it's currently in use, the user may not want to grant that access. Android Q now offers this greater level of control. Read the developer guide for details on how to adapt your app for this new control. Look for more user-centric improvements to come in upcoming Betas. At the same time, our goal is to be very sensitive to always give developers as much notice and support as possible with these changes.

More privacy protections in Android Q

Beyond changes to location, we're making further updates to ensure transparency, give users control, and secure personal data.

In Android Q, the OS gives users even more control over apps, controlling access to shared files. Users will be able to control apps' access to the Photos and Videos or the Audio collections via new runtime permissions. For Downloads, apps must use the system file picker, which allows the user to decide which Download files the app can access. For developers, there are changes to how your apps can use shared areas on external storage. Make sure to read the Scoped Storage changes for details.

We've also seen that users (and developers!) get upset when an app unexpectedly jumps into the foreground and takes over focus. To reduce these interruptions, Android Q will prevent apps from launching an Activity while in the background. If your app is in the background and needs to get the user's attention quickly -- such as for incoming calls or alarms -- you can use a high-priority notification and provide a full-screen intent. See the documentation for more information.

We're limiting access to non-resettable device identifiers, including device IMEI, serial number, and similar identifiers. Read the best practices to help you choose the right identifiers for your use case, and see the details here. We're also randomizing the device's MAC address when connected to different Wi-Fi networks by default -- a setting that was optional in Android 9 Pie.

We are bringing these changes to you early, so you can have as much time as possible to prepare. We've also worked hard to provide developers detailed information up front, we recommend reviewing the detailed docs on the privacy changes and getting started with testing right away.

New ways to engage users

In Android Q, we're enabling new ways to bring users into your apps and streamlining the experience as they transition from other apps.

Foldables and innovative new screens

Foldable devices have opened up some innovative experiences and use-cases. To help your apps to take advantage of these and other large-screen devices, we've made a number of improvements in Android Q, including changes to onResume and onPause to support multi-resume and notify your app when it has focus. We've also changed how the resizeableActivity manifest attribute works, to help you manage how your app is displayed on foldable and large screens. To you get started building and testing on these new devices, we've been hard at work updating the Android Emulator to support multiple-display type switching -- more details coming soon!

Sharing shortcuts

When a user wants to share content like a photo with someone in another app, the process should be fast. In Android Q we're making this quicker and easier with Sharing Shortcuts, which let users jump directly into another app to share content. Developers can publish share targets that launch a specific activity in their apps with content attached, and these are shown to users in the share UI. Because they're published in advance, the share UI can load instantly when launched.

The Sharing Shortcuts mechanism is similar to how App Shortcuts works, so we've expanded the ShortcutInfo API to make the integration of both features easier. This new API is also supported in the new ShareTarget AndroidX library. This allows apps to use the new functionality, while allowing pre-Q devices to work using Direct Share. You can find an early sample app with source code here.

Settings Panels

You can now also show key system settings directly in the context of your app, through a new Settings Panel API, which takes advantage of the Slices feature that we introduced in Android 9 Pie.

A settings panel is a floating UI that you invoke from your app to show system settings that users might need, such as internet connectivity, NFC, and audio volume. For example, a browser could display a panel with connectivity settings like Airplane Mode, Wi-Fi (including nearby networks), and Mobile Data. There's no need to leave the app; users can manage settings as needed from the panel. To display a settings panel, just fire an intent with one of the new Settings.Panel actions.

Connectivity

In Android Q, we've extended what your apps can do with Android's connectivity stack and added new connectivity APIs.

Connectivity permissions, privacy, and security

Most of our APIs for scanning networks already require COARSE location permission, but in Android Q, for Bluetooth, Cellular and Wi-Fi, we're increasing the protection around those APIs by requiring the FINE location permission instead. If your app only needs to make peer-to-peer connections or suggest networks, check out the improved Wi-Fi APIs below -- they simplify connections and do not require location permission.

In addition to the randomized MAC addresses that Android Q provides when connected to different Wi-Fi networks, we're adding new Wi-Fi standard support, WP3 and OWE, to improve security for home and work networks as well as open/public networks.

Improved peer-to-peer and internet connectivity

In Android Q we refactored the Wi-Fi stack to improve privacy and performance, but also to improve common use-cases like managing IoT devices and suggesting internet connections -- without requiring the location permission.

The network connection APIs make it easier to manage IoT devices over local Wi-Fi, for peer-to-peer functions like configuring, downloading, or printing. Apps initiate connection requests indirectly by specifying preferred SSIDs & BSSIDs as WiFiNetworkSpecifiers. The platform handles the Wi-Fi scanning itself and displays matching networks in a Wi-Fi Picker. When the user chooses, the platform sets up the connection automatically.

The network suggestion APIs let apps surface preferred Wi-Fi networks to the user for internet connectivity. Apps initiate connections indirectly by providing a ranked list of networks and credentials as WifiNetworkSuggestions. The platform will seamlessly connect based on past performance when in range of those networks.

Wi-Fi performance mode

You can now request adaptive Wi-Fi in Android Q by enabling high performance and low latency modes. These will be of great benefit where low latency is important to the user experience, such as real-time gaming, active voice calls, and similar use-cases.

To use the new performance modes, call WifiManager.WifiLock.createWifiLock() with WIFI_MODE_FULL_LOW_LATENCY or WIFI_MODE_FULL_HIGH_PERF. In these modes, the platform works with the device firmware to meet the requirement with lowest power consumption.

Camera, media, graphics

Dynamic depth format for photos

Many cameras on mobile devices can simulate narrow depth of field by blurring the foreground or background relative to the subject. They capture depth metadata for various points in the image and apply a static blur to the image, after which they discard the depth metadata.

Starting in Android Q, apps can request a Dynamic Depth image which consists of a JPEG, XMP metadata related to depth related elements, and a depth and confidence map embedded in the same file on devices that advertise support.

Requesting a JPEG + Dynamic Depth image makes it possible for you to offer specialized blurs and bokeh options in your app. You can even use the data to create 3D images or support AR photography use-cases in the future. We're making Dynamic Depth an open format for the ecosystem, and we're working with our device-maker partners to make it available across devices running Android Q and later.

With Dynamic Depth image you can offer specialized blurs and bokeh options in your app.

New audio and video codecs

Android Q introduces support for the open source video codec AV1. This allows media providers to stream high quality video content to Android devices using less bandwidth. In addition, Android Q supports audio encoding using Opus - a codec optimized for speech and music streaming, and HDR10+ for high dynamic range video on devices that support it.

The MediaCodecInfo API introduces an easier way to determine the video rendering capabilities of an Android device. For any given codec, you can obtain a list of supported sizes and frame rates using VideoCodecCapabilities.getSupportedPerformancePoints(). This allows you to pick the best quality video content to render on any given device.

Native MIDI API

For apps that perform their audio processing in C++, Android Q introduces a native MIDI API to communicate with MIDI devices through the NDK. This API allows MIDI data to be retrieved inside an audio callback using a non-blocking read, enabling low latency processing of MIDI messages. Give it a try with the sample app and source code here.

ANGLE on Vulkan

To enable more consistency for game and graphics developers, we are working towards a standard, updateable OpenGL driver for all devices built on Vulkan. In Android Q we're adding experimental support for ANGLE on top of Vulkan on Android devices. ANGLE is a graphics abstraction layer designed for high-performance OpenGL compatibility across implementations. Through ANGLE, the many apps and games using OpenGL ES can take advantage of the performance and stability of Vulkan and benefit from a consistent, vendor-independent implementation of ES on Android devices. In Android Q, we're planning to support OpenGL ES 2.0, with ES 3.0 next on our roadmap.

We'll expand the implementation with more OpenGL functionality, bug fixes, and performance optimizations. See the docs for details on the current ANGLE support in Android, how to use it, and our plans moving forward. You can start testing with our initial support by opting-in through developer options in Settings. Give it a try today!

Vulkan everywhere

We're continuing to expand the impact of Vulkan on Android, our implementation of the low-overhead, cross-platform API for high-performance 3D graphics. Our goal is to make Vulkan on Android a broadly supported and consistent developer API for graphics. We're working together with our device manufacturer partners to make Vulkan 1.1 a requirement on all 64-bit devices running Android Q and higher, and a recommendation for all 32-bit devices. Going forward, this will help provide a uniform high-performance graphics API for apps and games to use.

Neural Networks API 1.2

Since introducing the Neural Networks API (NNAPI) in 2017, we've continued to expand the number of operations supported and improve existing functionality. In Android Q, we've added 60 new ops including ARGMAX, ARGMIN, quantized LSTM, alongside a range of performance optimisations. This lays the foundation for accelerating a much greater range of models -- such as those for object detection and image segmentation. We are working with hardware vendors and popular machine learning frameworks such as TensorFlow to optimize and roll out support for NNAPI 1.2.

Strengthening Android's Foundations

ART performance

Android Q introduces several new improvements to the ART runtime which help apps start faster and consume less memory, without requiring any work from developers.

Since Android Nougat, ART has offered Profile Guided Optimization (PGO), which speeds app startup over time by identifying and precompiling frequently executed parts of your code. To help with initial app startup, Google Play is now delivering cloud-based profiles along with APKs. These are anonymized, aggregate ART profiles that let ART pre-compile parts of your app even before it's run, giving a significant jump-start to the overall optimization process. Cloud-based profiles benefit all apps and they're already available to devices running Android P and higher.

We're also continuing to make improvements in ART itself. For example, in Android Q we've optimized the Zygote process by starting your app's process earlier and moving it to a security container, so it's ready to launch immediately. We're storing more information in the app's heap image, such as classes, and using threading to load the image faster. We're also adding Generational Garbage Collection to ART's Concurrent Copying (CC) Garbage Collector. Generational CC is more efficient as it collects young-generation objects separately, incurring much lower cost as compared to full-heap GC, while still reclaiming a good amount of space. This makes garbage collection overall more efficient in terms of time and CPU, reducing jank and helping apps run better on lower-end devices.

Security for apps

BiometricPrompt is our unified authentication framework to support biometrics at a system level. In Android Q we're extending support for passive authentication methods such as face, and adding implicit and explicit authentication flows. In the explicit flow, the user must explicitly confirm the transaction in the TEE during the authentication. The implicit flow is designed for a lighter-weight alternative for transactions with passive authentication. We've also improved the fallback for device credentials when needed.

Android Q adds support for TLS 1.3, a major revision to the TLS standard that includes performance benefits and enhanced security. Our benchmarks indicate that secure connections can be established as much as 40% faster with TLS 1.3 compared to TLS 1.2. TLS 1.3 is enabled by default for all TLS connections. See the docs for details.

Compatibility through public APIs

Another thing we all care about is ensuring that apps run smoothly as the OS changes and evolves. Apps using non-SDK APIs risk crashes for users and emergency rollouts for developers. In Android Q we're continuing our long-term effort begun in Android P to move apps toward only using public APIs. We know that moving your app away from non-SDK APIs will take time, so we're giving you advance notice.

In Android Q we're restricting access to more non-SDK interfaces and asking you to use the public equivalents instead. To help you make the transition and prevent your apps from breaking, we're enabling the restrictions only when your app is targeting Android Q. We'll continue adding public alternative APIs based on your requests; in cases where there is no public API that meets your use case, please let us know.

It's important to test your apps for uses of non-SDK interfaces. We recommend using the StrictMode method detectNonSdkApiUsage() to warn when your app accesses non-SDK APIs via reflection or JNI. Even if the APIs are exempted (grey-listed) at this time, it's best to plan for the future and eliminate their use to reduce compatibility issues. For more details on the restrictions in Android Q, see the developer guide.

Modern Android

We're expanding our efforts to have all apps take full advantage of the security and performance features in the latest version of Android. Later this year, Google Play will require you to set your app's targetSdkVersion to 28 (Android 9 Pie) in new apps and updates. In line with these changes, Android Q will warn users with a dialog when they first run an app that targets a platform earlier than API level 23 (Android Marshmallow). Here's a checklist of resources to help you migrate your app.

We're also moving the ecosystem toward readiness for 64-bit devices. Later this year, Google Play will require 64-bit support in all apps. If your app uses native SDKs or libraries, keep in mind that you'll need to provide 64-bit compliant versions of those SDKs or libraries. See the developer guide for details on how to get ready.

Get started with Android Q Beta

With important privacy features that are likely to affect your apps, we recommend getting started with testing right away. In particular, you'll want to enable and test with Android Q storage changes, new location permission states, restrictions on background app launch, and restrictions on device identifiers. See the privacy documentation for details.

To get started, just install your current app from Google Play onto a device or Android Virtual Device running Android Q Beta and work through the user flows. The app should run and look great, and handle the Android Q behavior changes for all apps properly. If you find issues, we recommend fixing them in the current app, without changing your targeting level. Take a look at the migration guide for steps and a recommended timeline.

Next, update your app's targetSdkVersion to 'Q' as soon as possible. This lets you test your app with all of the privacy and security features in Android Q, as well as any other behavior changes for apps targeting Q.

Explore the new features and APIs

When you're ready, dive into Android Q and learn about the new features and APIs you can use in your apps. Take a look at the API diff report, the Android Q Beta API reference, and developer guides as a starting point. Also, on the Android Q Beta developer site, you'll find release notes and support resources for reporting issues.

To build with Android Q, download the Android Q Beta SDK and tools into Android Studio 3.3 or higher, and follow these instructions to configure your environment. If you want the latest fixes for Android Q related changes, we recommend you use Android Studio 3.5 or higher.

How do I get Android Q Beta?

It's easy - you can enroll here to get Android Q Beta updates over-the-air, on any Pixel device (and this year we're supporting all three generations of Pixel -- Pixel 3, Pixel 2, and even the original Pixel!). Downloadable system images for those devices are also available. If you don't have a Pixel device, you can use the Android Emulator, and download the latest emulator system images via the SDK Manager in Android Studio.

We plan to update the preview system images and SDK regularly throughout the preview. We'll have more features to share as the Beta program moves forward.

As always, your feedback is critical, so please let us know what you think — the sooner we hear from you, the more of your feedback we can integrate. When you find issues, please report them here. We have separate hotlists for filing platform issues, app compatibility issues, and third-party SDK issues.




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