Next Page: 10000

          Un ataque ddos a microsoft afecta a usuarios del grupo másmóvil y vodafone      Cache   Translate Page      
https://www.redeszone.net/app/uploads/2018/03/nuevo-record-ddos.jpg?x=634&y=309



Durante esta mañana algunos miembros de RedesZone hemos experimentado problemas a la hora de acceder a WordPress y algunas páginas. Pero han sido muchos más los usuarios que han tenido problemas al utilizar algunos servicios en la red. No afectaba a usuarios de todas las compañías, sino en algunos casos como MásMóvil. El problema ha sido



Este ataque masivo a Microsoft ha tenido lugar en ESpanix. Botnets de clientes de las propias compañías que han provocado la saturación de muchos servicios. Plataformas como Skype se han visto afectadas por este problema. También Azure y otros muchos servicios de Microsoft.



Por redes sociales se han sucedido las quejas y preguntas de muchos usuarios. Operadores como Yoigo, Pepephone o el propio MásMóvil se han visto afectados. Como mencionamos, se trata de un problema ajeno a estas compañías pero que afecta a los usuarios en ciertos servicios.





ESpanix es una organización que actúa como un punto neutro de intercambio. Su función principal es facilitar la interconexión de operadores poder establecer Peering entre ellos. Es por ello que ese ataque DDoS masivo contra Microsoft únicamente ha afectado a aquellas compañías que hacen Peering con ESpanix.



Básicamente Peering es la conexión entre dos redes para intercambiar información entre los usuarios de cada parte. En un artículo anterior explicábamos más a fondo qué es el Peering y cómo funciona.



https://www.redeszone.net/app/uploads/2018/09/acceso-aplicaciones-microsoft-634x308.jpg



Plataformas como Comvive han recibido muchos mensajes de usuarios que tenían problemas para acceder a ciertos servicios. Ellos mismos, a través de su cuenta oficial de Twitter, han confirmado que se trata de un ataque DDoS masivo a Microsoft en ESpanix y de ahí el problema que ha afectado a usuarios de algunas operadoras como MásMóvil, Pepephone o Yoigo.


Actualizamos : Es un ataque DDOS masivo a @Microsoft en #Espanix que está afectando a varios operadores, el origen son botnets de clientes finales de @masmovil @vodafone_es u otros operadores con #peering en #espanix que saturan sus puertos y hace que no lleguen a otros miembros.



— Comvive (@comvive) March 12, 2019


Cómo funciona este tipo de ataques DDoS



Los ataques DDoS han estado muy presentes en los últimos tiempos. De hecho, si recordáis hace unos meses vivimos dos récords relacionados con este tipo de ataques en cuestión de días.



A través de este tipo de ataques logran denegar conexiones. Puede provocar que sea imposible acceder a ciertos servicios. Para ello utilizan botnets conectadas a una red. En este caso eran botnets de usuarios de estas compañías que hemos mencionado. Lo que hacen es saturar las conexiones y provocar que el acceso a ciertos servicios y plataformas sea imposible o muy limitado en algunos casos.







Como hemos mencionado, ha afectado a servicios de Microsoft, pero también otras páginas y plataformas alojadas en sitios que se han visto afectados. Muchos usuarios han reportado problemas al utilizar Skype, por ejemplo, a través de estas redes.



En definitiva, si has sufrido algún problema al entrar en algunas páginas o utilizar servicios de Microsoft durante esta mañana, el problema se debe a un ataque DDoS masivo a Microsoft en ESpanix.





Ver información original al respecto men Fuente>
          GlitchPOS: New PoS malware for sale      Cache   Translate Page      


Warren Mercer and Paul Rascagneres authored this post with contributions from Ben Baker.

Executive summary


Point-of-sale malware is popular among attackers, as it usually leads to them obtaining credit card numbers and immediately use that information for financial gain. This type of malware is generally deployed on retailers' websites and retail point-of-sale locations with the goal of tracking customers' payment information. If they successfully obtain credit card details, they can use either the proceeds from the sale of that information or use the credit card data directly to obtain additional exploits and resources for other malware. Point-of-sale terminals are often forgotten about in terms of segregation and can represent a soft target for attackers. Cisco Talos recently discovered a new PoS malware that the attackers are selling on a crimeware forum. Our researchers also discovered the associated payloads with the malware, its infrastructure and control panel. We assess with high confidence that this is not the first malware developed by this actor. A few years ago, they were also pushing the DiamondFox L!NK botnet. Known as "GlitchPOS," this malware is also being distributed on alternative websites at a higher price than the original.

The actor behind this malware created a video, which we embedded below, showing how easy it is to use it. This is a case where the average user could purchase all the tools necessary to set up their own credit card-skimming botnet.



GlitchPOS


Packer overview


A packer developed in VisualBasic protects this malware. It's, on the surface, a fake game. The user interface of the main form (which is not displayed at the execution) contains various pictures of cats:

The purpose of the packer is to decode a library that's the real payload encoded with the UPX packer. Once decoded, we gain access to GlitchPOS, a memory grabber developed in VisualBasic.

Payload analysis


The payload is small and contains only a few functions. It can connect to a command and control (C2) server to:

  • Register the infected systems
  • Receive tasks (command execution in memory or on disk)
  • Exfiltrate credit card numbers from the memory of the infected system
  • Update the exclusion list of scanned processes
  • Update the "encryption" key
  • Update the User Agent
  • Clean itself


Tasks mechanism


The malware receives tasks from the C2 server. Here is the task pane:

The commands are executed via a shellcode directly sent by the C2 server. Here is an example in Wireshark:

The shellcode is encoded with base64. In our screenshot, the shellcode is a RunPE:

"Encryption" key


The "encryption" key of the communication can be updated in the panel. The communication is not encrypted but simply XORed:

Credit card grabber


The main purpose of this malware is to steal credit card numbers (Track1 and Track2) from the memory of the infected system. GlitchPOS uses a regular expression to perform this task:

  • (%B)\d{0,19}\^[\w\s\/]{2,26}\^\d{7}\w*\?
    The purpose of this regular expression is to detect Track 1 format B
    Here is an example of Track 1:
    Cardholder : M. TALOS
    Card number*: 1234 5678 9012 3445
    Expiration: 01/99
    %B1234567890123445^TALOS/M.

  • ;\d{13,19}=\d{7}\w*\?
    The purpose of this regular expression is to detect Track 2
    Here is an example of Track 2 based on the previous example:
    ;1234567890123445=99011200XXXX00000000?*


If a match is identified in memory, the result is sent to the C2 server. The malware maintains an exclusion list provided by the server. Here is the default list: chrome, firefox, iexplore, svchost, smss, csrss, wininit, steam, devenv, thunderbird, skype, pidgin, services, dwn, dllhost, jusched, jucheck, lsass, winlogon, alg, wscntfy, taskmgr, taskhost, spoolsv, qml, akw.

Panel


Here are some additional screenshots of the GlitchPOS panel. These screenshots were provided by the seller to promote the malware.

The "Dashboard:"

The "Clients" list:

The "Cards Date:"

Linked with DiamondFox L!NK botnet


Author: Edbitss


The first mention of GlitchPOS was on Feb. 2, 2019 on a malware forum:

Edbitss is allegedly the developer of the DiamondFox L!NK botnet in 2015/2016 and 2017 as explained in a report by CheckPoint.

The developer created this video to promote GlitchPOS, as well. In this video, you can see the author set up the malware and capture the data from a swiped card. We apologize for the quality, shakiness, music, and generally anything else with this video, again, it's not ours.


The built malware is sold for $250, the builder $600 and finally, the gate address change is charged at $80.

Panel similarities


In addition to the malware language (VisualBasic), we identified similarities between the DiamondFox panel and the GlitchPOS panel. In this section, the DiamondPOS screenshots come from the CheckPoint report mentioned previously.

Both dashboards' world map are similar (image, code and color):

The author used the same terminology such ask "Clients" or "Tasks" on the left menu:

The icons are the same too in both panels, as well as the infected machine list (starting with the HWID). The PHP file naming convention is similar to DiamondFox, too.

The author clearly reused code from DiamondFox panel on the GlitchPOS panel.

Comparison of GlitchPOS and the DiamondFox POS module


In 2017, the DiamondFox malware included a POS plugin. We decided to check if this module was the same as GlitchPOS, but it is not. For DiamondFox, the author decided to use the leaked code of BlackPOS to build the credit card grabber. On GlitchPOS, the author developed its own code to perform this task and did not use the previously leaked code.

Bad guys are everywhere


It's interesting to see that someone else attempted to push the same malware 25 days after edbitss on an alternative forum:

This attacker even tried to cash in by increasing some prices.

Some members even attempted to call out the unscrupulous behaviour:

With the different information we have, we think that Chameleon101 has taken the previous malware created by Edbitss to sell it on an alternative forum and with a higher price.

Conclusion


This investigation shows us that POS malware is still attractive and some people are still working on the development of this family of malware. We can see that edbitss developed malware years even after being publicly mentioned by cybersecurity companies. He left DiamondFox to switch on a new project targeting point-of-sale. The sale opened a few weeks ago, so we don't know yet how many people bought it or use it. We also see that bad guys steal the work of each other and try to sell malware developed by other developers at a higher price. The final word will be a quote from Edbitss on a DiamondFox screenshot published by himself "In the future, even bank robbers will be replaced."

Coverage


Additional ways our customers can detect and block this threat are listed below.

Advanced Malware Protection (AMP) is ideally suited to prevent the execution of the malware used by these threat actors. Below is a screenshot showing how AMP can protect customers from this threat. Try AMP for free here.

Cisco Cloud Web Security (CWS) or Web Security Appliance (WSA) web scanning prevents access to malicious websites and detects malware used in these attacks.

Email Security can block malicious emails sent by threat actors as part of their campaign.

Network Security appliances such as Next-Generation Firewall (NGFW), Next-Generation Intrusion Prevention System (NGIPS), and Meraki MX can detect malicious activity associated with this threat.

AMP Threat Grid helps identify malicious binaries and build protection into all Cisco Security products.

Umbrella, our secure internet gateway (SIG), blocks users from connecting to malicious domains, IPs, and URLs, whether users are on or off the corporate network.

Open Source SNORTⓇ Subscriber Rule Set customers can stay up to date by downloading the latest rule pack available for purchase on Snort.org.

Indicators of Compromise (IOCs)


The following IOCs are associated to this campaign:

GlitchPOS samples

ed043ff67cc28e67ba36566c340090a19e5bf87c6092d418ff0fd3759fb661ab (SHA256)
abfadb6686459f69a92ede367a2713fc2a1289ebe0c8596964682e4334cee553 (SHA256)

C2 server

coupondemo[.]dynamicinnovation[.]net

URLs

hxxp://coupondemo[.]dynamicinnovation[.]net/cgl-bin/gate.php
hxxp://coupondemo[.]dynamicinnovation[.]net/admin/gate.php
hxxp://coupondemo[.]dynamicinnovation[.]net/glitch/gate.php


          Tecnología de seguridad para crear una «internet del cuerpo» que sea imposible de «crackear»      Cache   Translate Page      

Igual que existe la llamada internet de las cosas que adolece de unos cuantos problemas de seguridad, unos investigadores de la Universidad de Purdue están proponiendo preparar la seguridad para la «internet del cuerpo» antes de que se produzcan. En este vídeo el profesor Shreyas Sen cuenta cómo lo están haciendo.

Lo que plantean es utilizar el propio cuerpo humano como red local. Sería lo que denominan Red de Área Corpórea (frente a la tradicional WAN o Red de Área Inalámbrica). Las señales funcionarían mediante conductividad eléctrica, en lo que denominan una «distancia electro-cuasiestática» (una especie de «capa» con alcance a tan solo unos 15cm de la piel) frente a los 5 metros o más que alcanzan redes Bluetooth o Wi-Fi. La red corpórea no irradia las señales más allá de lo necesario para funcionar.

Tecnología de seguridad para crear una «internet del cuerpo» que sea imposible de «crackear» / Universidad de Purdue
Red de Área Corpórea vs. Red de Área Inalámbrica / Imagen: Universidad de Purdue

Gracias a esta red que abarcaría todo el cuerpo podrían conectarse dispositivos no sólo desde la cabeza a los dedos de los pies; también hasta el interior del cuerpo. Por ejemplo se podrían enviar señales desde un reloj de tipo smartwatch a (potencialmente) un marcapasos, algo extremadamente delicado como es lógico y que nadie querría que fuera crackeado indebidamente (como ya se ha demostrado que se puede hacer). Pero también podría servir para los sistemas de entrenamiento que cuentan pasos y miden otras constantes vitales (privadas); para las píldoras-cámara, los nanorrobots y cosas así.

Una tecnología interesante para proteger mediante criptografía fuerte sistemas que son extremadamente delicados y que sólo los médicos deberían poder «reprogramar», estando cerca del paciente, no algo que cualquiera que pase cerca al alcance del Bluetooth o tenga acceso al wifi porque alguien usó contraseñas débiles en plan 1234 pudiera crackear indebidamente.

# Enlace Permanente


          Mas mails amenazantes personalmente por supuesta actividad porno ...      Cache   Translate Page      
Ayer ya subimos 4 muestras de estos mails que exigen pago en BitCoins como contraprestación a la no publicidad de las imagenes capturadas en el ordenador del afectado.



Hoy siguen viniendo, de los cuales este es una muestra:





______________________





Asunto: Your life can be destroyed: (ngk) from socks5 num (#6793)

De: Julie Kallman <hr@moi-igry.com>

Fecha: Mie, 13 de Marzo de 2019, 10:32 am

Para: destinatario





Camera ready,Notification: 13/03/2019 11:29:44

Status: Waiting for Reply 37xuOaRy6A8f53wVnEmKkW3IrD4Gy11Nu6_Priority: Normal



=-=--=-=-=--=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=--=-=-=--=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=--=-=-=--=-=-=-=



Hi



I do not want to joke about you... Read our message carefully. My squad will not

ruin your life if you go to a deal with us.



You can find a lot of varied rules about security on the internet- using virtual

private network , install the latest firewall settings; stick web cameras with the

adhesive tape... But you deem that it is not obligatorily.

There are something about



1100 soft marks that emplaced the malicious software...

I implemented it in fake site of adobe player. Users installed everything and didnt

surmise something bad, because this plug-in is necessary for all computers to play

video files...

You are infected too and only you can help yourself.

With the help of a parser reacted to calls to porn-sites in your connections.

Immediately after the play button was pushed my virus turned on the web-cam to catch

you caressing your body. Right after that my malware copied the video which you were

watching on the screen. With the help of form-grabber demolished history and

collected all details from your accounts which were visited from previous Monday. I

copied your contacts with your friends, collegues and relatives.

Let's put it all together. I got video with you masturbating, contacts with your

friends, collegues and relatives; vid which you watched on your screen.

You can help yourself you must pay us 420 united states dollars with bitcoins.



MyBITCOIN - bc1qn8xpg4ae87l4hu5vgran2k240snj3wl25turpu



Think better: be a star among friends or pay this little sum to safe your social

status.

You can complain cops, but they can not find us. We use botnet, and of course I do

not live in your country. You cant find my ip in a header of this message.

If you have some problems write me back.





Dont be fullish.




__________





Despues de todo lo dicho hasta ahora, ya no vale la pena hablar de mas de lo mismo, verdad ?





pero conviene saberlo para evitar el posible infarto ...







saludos



ms, 13-3-2019
          Un ataque ddos a microsoft afecta a usuarios del grupo másmóvil y vodafone      Cache   Translate Page      
https://www.redeszone.net/app/uploads/2018/03/nuevo-record-ddos.jpg?x=634&y=309



Durante esta mañana algunos miembros de RedesZone hemos experimentado problemas a la hora de acceder a WordPress y algunas páginas. Pero han sido muchos más los usuarios que han tenido problemas al utilizar algunos servicios en la red. No afectaba a usuarios de todas las compañías, sino en algunos casos como MásMóvil. El problema ha sido



Este ataque masivo a Microsoft ha tenido lugar en ESpanix. Botnets de clientes de las propias compañías que han provocado la saturación de muchos servicios. Plataformas como Skype se han visto afectadas por este problema. También Azure y otros muchos servicios de Microsoft.



Por redes sociales se han sucedido las quejas y preguntas de muchos usuarios. Operadores como Yoigo, Pepephone o el propio MásMóvil se han visto afectados. Como mencionamos, se trata de un problema ajeno a estas compañías pero que afecta a los usuarios en ciertos servicios.





ESpanix es una organización que actúa como un punto neutro de intercambio. Su función principal es facilitar la interconexión de operadores poder establecer Peering entre ellos. Es por ello que ese ataque DDoS masivo contra Microsoft únicamente ha afectado a aquellas compañías que hacen Peering con ESpanix.



Básicamente Peering es la conexión entre dos redes para intercambiar información entre los usuarios de cada parte. En un artículo anterior explicábamos más a fondo qué es el Peering y cómo funciona.



https://www.redeszone.net/app/uploads/2018/09/acceso-aplicaciones-microsoft-634x308.jpg



Plataformas como Comvive han recibido muchos mensajes de usuarios que tenían problemas para acceder a ciertos servicios. Ellos mismos, a través de su cuenta oficial de Twitter, han confirmado que se trata de un ataque DDoS masivo a Microsoft en ESpanix y de ahí el problema que ha afectado a usuarios de algunas operadoras como MásMóvil, Pepephone o Yoigo.


Actualizamos : Es un ataque DDOS masivo a @Microsoft en #Espanix que está afectando a varios operadores, el origen son botnets de clientes finales de @masmovil @vodafone_es u otros operadores con #peering en #espanix que saturan sus puertos y hace que no lleguen a otros miembros.



— Comvive (@comvive) March 12, 2019


Cómo funciona este tipo de ataques DDoS



Los ataques DDoS han estado muy presentes en los últimos tiempos. De hecho, si recordáis hace unos meses vivimos dos récords relacionados con este tipo de ataques en cuestión de días.



A través de este tipo de ataques logran denegar conexiones. Puede provocar que sea imposible acceder a ciertos servicios. Para ello utilizan botnets conectadas a una red. En este caso eran botnets de usuarios de estas compañías que hemos mencionado. Lo que hacen es saturar las conexiones y provocar que el acceso a ciertos servicios y plataformas sea imposible o muy limitado en algunos casos.







Como hemos mencionado, ha afectado a servicios de Microsoft, pero también otras páginas y plataformas alojadas en sitios que se han visto afectados. Muchos usuarios han reportado problemas al utilizar Skype, por ejemplo, a través de estas redes.



En definitiva, si has sufrido algún problema al entrar en algunas páginas o utilizar servicios de Microsoft durante esta mañana, el problema se debe a un ataque DDoS masivo a Microsoft en ESpanix.





Ver información original al respecto men Fuente>
          Information Security Analyst - SITA - Montréal, QC      Cache   Translate Page      
Up to date knowledge of existing and emerging threats, with a deep technical understanding of common attack vectors, such as malware behavior, botnet pattern,...
From SITA - Wed, 20 Feb 2019 17:58:40 GMT - View all Montréal, QC jobs


Next Page: 10000

Site Map 2018_01_14
Site Map 2018_01_15
Site Map 2018_01_16
Site Map 2018_01_17
Site Map 2018_01_18
Site Map 2018_01_19
Site Map 2018_01_20
Site Map 2018_01_21
Site Map 2018_01_22
Site Map 2018_01_23
Site Map 2018_01_24
Site Map 2018_01_25
Site Map 2018_01_26
Site Map 2018_01_27
Site Map 2018_01_28
Site Map 2018_01_29
Site Map 2018_01_30
Site Map 2018_01_31
Site Map 2018_02_01
Site Map 2018_02_02
Site Map 2018_02_03
Site Map 2018_02_04
Site Map 2018_02_05
Site Map 2018_02_06
Site Map 2018_02_07
Site Map 2018_02_08
Site Map 2018_02_09
Site Map 2018_02_10
Site Map 2018_02_11
Site Map 2018_02_12
Site Map 2018_02_13
Site Map 2018_02_14
Site Map 2018_02_15
Site Map 2018_02_15
Site Map 2018_02_16
Site Map 2018_02_17
Site Map 2018_02_18
Site Map 2018_02_19
Site Map 2018_02_20
Site Map 2018_02_21
Site Map 2018_02_22
Site Map 2018_02_23
Site Map 2018_02_24
Site Map 2018_02_25
Site Map 2018_02_26
Site Map 2018_02_27
Site Map 2018_02_28
Site Map 2018_03_01
Site Map 2018_03_02
Site Map 2018_03_03
Site Map 2018_03_04
Site Map 2018_03_05
Site Map 2018_03_06
Site Map 2018_03_07
Site Map 2018_03_08
Site Map 2018_03_09
Site Map 2018_03_10
Site Map 2018_03_11
Site Map 2018_03_12
Site Map 2018_03_13
Site Map 2018_03_14
Site Map 2018_03_15
Site Map 2018_03_16
Site Map 2018_03_17
Site Map 2018_03_18
Site Map 2018_03_19
Site Map 2018_03_20
Site Map 2018_03_21
Site Map 2018_03_22
Site Map 2018_03_23
Site Map 2018_03_24
Site Map 2018_03_25
Site Map 2018_03_26
Site Map 2018_03_27
Site Map 2018_03_28
Site Map 2018_03_29
Site Map 2018_03_30
Site Map 2018_03_31
Site Map 2018_04_01
Site Map 2018_04_02
Site Map 2018_04_03
Site Map 2018_04_04
Site Map 2018_04_05
Site Map 2018_04_06
Site Map 2018_04_07
Site Map 2018_04_08
Site Map 2018_04_09
Site Map 2018_04_10
Site Map 2018_04_11
Site Map 2018_04_12
Site Map 2018_04_13
Site Map 2018_04_14
Site Map 2018_04_15
Site Map 2018_04_16
Site Map 2018_04_17
Site Map 2018_04_18
Site Map 2018_04_19
Site Map 2018_04_20
Site Map 2018_04_21
Site Map 2018_04_22
Site Map 2018_04_23
Site Map 2018_04_24
Site Map 2018_04_25
Site Map 2018_04_26
Site Map 2018_04_27
Site Map 2018_04_28
Site Map 2018_04_29
Site Map 2018_04_30
Site Map 2018_05_01
Site Map 2018_05_02
Site Map 2018_05_03
Site Map 2018_05_04
Site Map 2018_05_05
Site Map 2018_05_06
Site Map 2018_05_07
Site Map 2018_05_08
Site Map 2018_05_09
Site Map 2018_05_15
Site Map 2018_05_16
Site Map 2018_05_17
Site Map 2018_05_18
Site Map 2018_05_19
Site Map 2018_05_20
Site Map 2018_05_21
Site Map 2018_05_22
Site Map 2018_05_23
Site Map 2018_05_24
Site Map 2018_05_25
Site Map 2018_05_26
Site Map 2018_05_27
Site Map 2018_05_28
Site Map 2018_05_29
Site Map 2018_05_30
Site Map 2018_05_31
Site Map 2018_06_01
Site Map 2018_06_02
Site Map 2018_06_03
Site Map 2018_06_04
Site Map 2018_06_05
Site Map 2018_06_06
Site Map 2018_06_07
Site Map 2018_06_08
Site Map 2018_06_09
Site Map 2018_06_10
Site Map 2018_06_11
Site Map 2018_06_12
Site Map 2018_06_13
Site Map 2018_06_14
Site Map 2018_06_15
Site Map 2018_06_16
Site Map 2018_06_17
Site Map 2018_06_18
Site Map 2018_06_19
Site Map 2018_06_20
Site Map 2018_06_21
Site Map 2018_06_22
Site Map 2018_06_23
Site Map 2018_06_24
Site Map 2018_06_25
Site Map 2018_06_26
Site Map 2018_06_27
Site Map 2018_06_28
Site Map 2018_06_29
Site Map 2018_06_30
Site Map 2018_07_01
Site Map 2018_07_02
Site Map 2018_07_03
Site Map 2018_07_04
Site Map 2018_07_05
Site Map 2018_07_06
Site Map 2018_07_07
Site Map 2018_07_08
Site Map 2018_07_09
Site Map 2018_07_10
Site Map 2018_07_11
Site Map 2018_07_12
Site Map 2018_07_13
Site Map 2018_07_14
Site Map 2018_07_15
Site Map 2018_07_16
Site Map 2018_07_17
Site Map 2018_07_18
Site Map 2018_07_19
Site Map 2018_07_20
Site Map 2018_07_21
Site Map 2018_07_22
Site Map 2018_07_23
Site Map 2018_07_24
Site Map 2018_07_25
Site Map 2018_07_26
Site Map 2018_07_27
Site Map 2018_07_28
Site Map 2018_07_29
Site Map 2018_07_30
Site Map 2018_07_31
Site Map 2018_08_01
Site Map 2018_08_02
Site Map 2018_08_03
Site Map 2018_08_04
Site Map 2018_08_05
Site Map 2018_08_06
Site Map 2018_08_07
Site Map 2018_08_08
Site Map 2018_08_09
Site Map 2018_08_10
Site Map 2018_08_11
Site Map 2018_08_12
Site Map 2018_08_13
Site Map 2018_08_15
Site Map 2018_08_16
Site Map 2018_08_17
Site Map 2018_08_18
Site Map 2018_08_19
Site Map 2018_08_20
Site Map 2018_08_21
Site Map 2018_08_22
Site Map 2018_08_23
Site Map 2018_08_24
Site Map 2018_08_25
Site Map 2018_08_26
Site Map 2018_08_27
Site Map 2018_08_28
Site Map 2018_08_29
Site Map 2018_08_30
Site Map 2018_08_31
Site Map 2018_09_01
Site Map 2018_09_02
Site Map 2018_09_03
Site Map 2018_09_04
Site Map 2018_09_05
Site Map 2018_09_06
Site Map 2018_09_07
Site Map 2018_09_08
Site Map 2018_09_09
Site Map 2018_09_10
Site Map 2018_09_11
Site Map 2018_09_12
Site Map 2018_09_13
Site Map 2018_09_14
Site Map 2018_09_15
Site Map 2018_09_16
Site Map 2018_09_17
Site Map 2018_09_18
Site Map 2018_09_19
Site Map 2018_09_20
Site Map 2018_09_21
Site Map 2018_09_23
Site Map 2018_09_24
Site Map 2018_09_25
Site Map 2018_09_26
Site Map 2018_09_27
Site Map 2018_09_28
Site Map 2018_09_29
Site Map 2018_09_30
Site Map 2018_10_01
Site Map 2018_10_02
Site Map 2018_10_03
Site Map 2018_10_04
Site Map 2018_10_05
Site Map 2018_10_06
Site Map 2018_10_07
Site Map 2018_10_08
Site Map 2018_10_09
Site Map 2018_10_10
Site Map 2018_10_11
Site Map 2018_10_12
Site Map 2018_10_13
Site Map 2018_10_14
Site Map 2018_10_15
Site Map 2018_10_16
Site Map 2018_10_17
Site Map 2018_10_18
Site Map 2018_10_19
Site Map 2018_10_20
Site Map 2018_10_21
Site Map 2018_10_22
Site Map 2018_10_23
Site Map 2018_10_24
Site Map 2018_10_25
Site Map 2018_10_26
Site Map 2018_10_27
Site Map 2018_10_28
Site Map 2018_10_29
Site Map 2018_10_30
Site Map 2018_10_31
Site Map 2018_11_01
Site Map 2018_11_02
Site Map 2018_11_03
Site Map 2018_11_04
Site Map 2018_11_05
Site Map 2018_11_06
Site Map 2018_11_07
Site Map 2018_11_08
Site Map 2018_11_09
Site Map 2018_11_10
Site Map 2018_11_11
Site Map 2018_11_12
Site Map 2018_11_13
Site Map 2018_11_14
Site Map 2018_11_15
Site Map 2018_11_16
Site Map 2018_11_17
Site Map 2018_11_18
Site Map 2018_11_19
Site Map 2018_11_20
Site Map 2018_11_21
Site Map 2018_11_22
Site Map 2018_11_23
Site Map 2018_11_24
Site Map 2018_11_25
Site Map 2018_11_26
Site Map 2018_11_27
Site Map 2018_11_28
Site Map 2018_11_29
Site Map 2018_11_30
Site Map 2018_12_01
Site Map 2018_12_02
Site Map 2018_12_03
Site Map 2018_12_04
Site Map 2018_12_05
Site Map 2018_12_06
Site Map 2018_12_07
Site Map 2018_12_08
Site Map 2018_12_09
Site Map 2018_12_10
Site Map 2018_12_11
Site Map 2018_12_12
Site Map 2018_12_13
Site Map 2018_12_14
Site Map 2018_12_15
Site Map 2018_12_16
Site Map 2018_12_17
Site Map 2018_12_18
Site Map 2018_12_19
Site Map 2018_12_20
Site Map 2018_12_21
Site Map 2018_12_22
Site Map 2018_12_23
Site Map 2018_12_24
Site Map 2018_12_25
Site Map 2018_12_26
Site Map 2018_12_27
Site Map 2018_12_28
Site Map 2018_12_29
Site Map 2018_12_30
Site Map 2018_12_31
Site Map 2019_01_01
Site Map 2019_01_02
Site Map 2019_01_03
Site Map 2019_01_04
Site Map 2019_01_06
Site Map 2019_01_07
Site Map 2019_01_08
Site Map 2019_01_09
Site Map 2019_01_11
Site Map 2019_01_12
Site Map 2019_01_13
Site Map 2019_01_14
Site Map 2019_01_15
Site Map 2019_01_16
Site Map 2019_01_17
Site Map 2019_01_18
Site Map 2019_01_19
Site Map 2019_01_20
Site Map 2019_01_21
Site Map 2019_01_22
Site Map 2019_01_23
Site Map 2019_01_24
Site Map 2019_01_25
Site Map 2019_01_26
Site Map 2019_01_27
Site Map 2019_01_28
Site Map 2019_01_29
Site Map 2019_01_30
Site Map 2019_01_31
Site Map 2019_02_01
Site Map 2019_02_02
Site Map 2019_02_03
Site Map 2019_02_04
Site Map 2019_02_05
Site Map 2019_02_06
Site Map 2019_02_07
Site Map 2019_02_08
Site Map 2019_02_09
Site Map 2019_02_10
Site Map 2019_02_11
Site Map 2019_02_12
Site Map 2019_02_13
Site Map 2019_02_14
Site Map 2019_02_15
Site Map 2019_02_16
Site Map 2019_02_17
Site Map 2019_02_18
Site Map 2019_02_19
Site Map 2019_02_20
Site Map 2019_02_21
Site Map 2019_02_22
Site Map 2019_02_23
Site Map 2019_02_24
Site Map 2019_02_25
Site Map 2019_02_26
Site Map 2019_02_27
Site Map 2019_02_28
Site Map 2019_03_01
Site Map 2019_03_02
Site Map 2019_03_03
Site Map 2019_03_04
Site Map 2019_03_05
Site Map 2019_03_06
Site Map 2019_03_07
Site Map 2019_03_08
Site Map 2019_03_09
Site Map 2019_03_10
Site Map 2019_03_11
Site Map 2019_03_12
Site Map 2019_03_13