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          QA/Analyst/Tech, Packer/Production Worker & other positions.      Cache   Translate Page      
HI-Honolulu, TARO BRAND Competitive starting wages and excellent full-time benefits. We are looking for the following positions: -QA Analyst/Tech -Packer / Production Workers -Poi Processor -CDC Day Receiver / Hauler -PPC Supervisor -Plant Mechanic Qualified candidates please email resume to jobs@hpcfoods.com Our company is a drug free work environment and an Equal Opportunity employer.
          Server - Kona Grill Restaurants - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
Kona Grill Offers:. People are the Heart of Kona Grill, so it’s important for us to find passionate individuals to join our family....
From Kona Grill Restaurants - Fri, 01 Mar 2019 10:58:41 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          Product Demonstrator - Hawaiian Isles Kona Coffee - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
SUMMARY: Full-time position for a Coffee Demonstrator. Primary responsibilities includes interacting with customers, offers facts and information pertaining...
From Indeed - Thu, 28 Feb 2019 17:52:58 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          Import Customer Service Agent - Commodity Forwarders Inc - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
With offices in Anchorage, Los Angeles, Miami, Orlando, Chicago, San Francisco, Seattle New York, Honolulu, Maui, Kona, Hilo, Kauai, we are well positioned to... $15 - $17 an hour
From Indeed - Tue, 22 Jan 2019 23:40:05 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          Domestic Customer Service Agent - Commodity Forwarders Inc - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
With offices in Anchorage, Los Angeles, Miami, Orlando, Chicago, San Francisco, Seattle New York, Honolulu, Maui, Kona, Hilo, Kauai, we are well positioned to... $15 - $17 an hour
From Indeed - Tue, 22 Jan 2019 23:35:50 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          Help Wanted - Honolulu Coffee Company - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
Now hiring at 1001 Bishop Street,...
From Job Spotter - Tue, 19 Feb 2019 01:52:12 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          Host - Craft Brew Alliance - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
Kona Brewing Co. Kona Brewing Co., part of Craft Brew Alliance, has an immediate opening for a Host in Honolulu, HI....
From Craft Brew Alliance - Sat, 23 Feb 2019 04:54:50 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          Line Cook - Craft Brew Alliance - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
Kona Brewing Co. Kona Brewing Co., part of Craft Brew Alliance, has an immediate opening for a Line Cook in Honolulu, HI. Specific job duties include:....
From Craft Brew Alliance - Fri, 22 Feb 2019 04:54:29 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          [Upwork] Full stack developer for government project      Cache   Translate Page      
From Upwork // We are seeking a full stack developer located in Honolulu HI for a potential government website project.

The developer must be local and available to occasionally meet with client at their location in Kaimuki.  

We are seeking someone with full stack dev experience ranging from HTML/CSS, PHP, MySQL.

No remote developers will be considered.


Posted On: March 13, 2019 00:02 UTC
Category: Web, Mobile & Software Dev > Web Development
Skills: API Development, CSS, CSS3, HTML, HTML5, jQuery, MySQL Administration, MySQL Programming, PHP, Website Development
Location Requirement: Only freelancers located in the United States may apply.
Country: United States
click to apply
          DIS Unplugged Podcast – 03/11/19 – Disneyland Show      Cache   Translate Page      
In this episode, the panel discusses Southwest now flying to Honolulu, the opening date for Jessie’s Critter Carousel, the DCA Food & Wine Festival, plus the best days of the week to visit Disneyland! Want to get in touch? Check out our contact page. Podcasts #759 – Disneyland Discussion + Best Day to Go to Disneyland: [...]
          Kumu Kahua Theatre Presents THE WATCHER OF WAIPUNA by Gary Pak      Cache   Translate Page      

Kumu Kahua Theatre proudly presents The Watcher of Waipuna by Gary Pak, directed by Harry Wong III, running March 21 - April 20, 2019.


Gilbert Sanchez is the Watcher of Waipuna, defending his tiny corner of paradise against evil commercial expansion and greedy family members. Based on Gary Pak's short story, this local fairy tale-like parable includes a chorus of housewives and supernatural elements, and cleverly examines the powerful connection between humans and the environment'loyalty to our land, connections to place, corporate development, and local displacement.

This production contains adult language and themes.


This play runs: Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: March 21, 22, 23, 28, 29, 30; April 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 2019 Sundays 2pm: March 24, 31; April 7, *14, 2019 (No show Sunday, April 21 - Easter)

*American Sign Language Interpretation available upon request.


Following the performance on Friday, March 29th there will be a free talk story. These talk stories are offered on the 2nd Friday of each production run and offer an opportunity to gain behind-the-scenes insight from the director, cast and playwright (when available).


Hometowns of the cast of The Watcher of Waipuna by Gary Pak:
Samantha Fukushima, Kunia, HI - Eddy Gudoy, Honolulu, HI - Brandon Hagio, Mililani, HI - Kahana Ho, Honolulu,HI - Lelea'e "Buffy" Kahalepuna-Wong, Honolulu, HI - Kirk A. Lapilio Jr., Waianae, HI - P?'ai Lincoln, Waimea, HI - Darryl Soriano, Benguet, PHL - Nicole Tessier, Ewa Beach, HI.

Tickets for performances can be purchased with a credit card by calling 536-4441, or by visiting the box office at 46 Merchant Street (corner of Bethel and Merchant Streets, downtown) between 11am and 3pm Monday through Friday. Tickets can also be purchased at KumuKahua.org. Ticket prices are $5-$25


          C’e ‘un barlume di speranza Il Capitano 郭川 di aiutarci a salvare la sua Famiglia 郭川-www.74eee.com      Cache   Translate Page      
Il Capitano 郭川 ancora qualcosa di aiutarci a salvare La Famiglia: Guo Chuan Chi PuO ‘aiutarci a salvare Guo Chuan?Ieri è venuto da Honolulu Dalla Guardia Costiera degli Stati Uniti di sospendere le operazioni di ricerca e Soccorso Guo Chuan Guo 川岸 La Notizia che la Squadra e la sua Famiglia e disperazione.Guo Chuan Cade […]
          Security Officer - Hawaii Protective Association, LLC - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
*Hawaii Protective Association, LLC. has been providing premiere Security and Investigative Services throughout the State of Hawai’i for over 50 years!...
From Indeed - Tue, 22 Jan 2019 22:27:39 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          Chassis and Reefer Mechanic - The Pasha Group - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
Chassis and Reefer Mechanic Job Duties: Inspect, maintain and repair all chassis, refrigerated units, power packs, gensets, transformers and other company...
From The Pasha Group - Tue, 05 Mar 2019 01:07:05 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          5-foot-long boa constrictor found in Kunia – Honolulu, Hawaii news, sports & weather – KITV Honolulu      Cache   Translate Page      
5-foot-long boa constrictor found in Kunia – Honolulu, Hawaii news, sports & weather KITV Honolulu Snakes pose a serious threat to Hawaii’s environment, as they have no natural predators. …read more Source:: Honolulu News By...
          In shadow of Ghosn, Nissan, Renault and Mitsubishi meet to hash out future – KITV Honolulu      Cache   Translate Page      
In shadow of Ghosn, Nissan, Renault and Mitsubishi meet to hash out future KITV Honolulu When the three leaders of the world’s top car-making alliance gather in Japan on Tuesday, they will be looking to...
          UPDATE: Maui Community Correctional staff bring disturbance unde – Honolulu, Hawaii news, sports & weather – KITV Honolulu      Cache   Translate Page      
UPDATE: Maui Community Correctional staff bring disturbance unde – Honolulu, Hawaii news, sports & weather KITV Honolulu The Hawaii Department of Public Safety confirms that inmates have created a disturbance in a module at Maui...
          Leland Miyano Wins Honolulu Biennal’s Inaugural Golden Hibiscus Award – – ARTnews      Cache   Translate Page      
Leland Miyano Wins Honolulu Biennal’s Inaugural Golden Hibiscus Award – ARTnews The Honolulu Biennial Foundation has named Leland Miyano the first recipient of its Golden Hibiscus Award, a $10,000 unrestricted cash prize that is given...
          News & new releases!      Cache   Translate Page      
The Rolling Stones – Honolulu 1973 1st Night (no label) is a single disc recorded at Honolulu International Center, Honolulu, Hawaii on January 21st, 1973. It appears that a missing portion of “Jumping Jack Flash” has been filled using a tape from the following night. Pink Floyd – Definitive Millard (Sigma 228) is a triple ...
          Pour la première fois dans l’Est ! Le NOUVEAU SPECTACLE « le bal de Shirley et Dino »      Cache   Translate Page      

shirley dino spectacle bruyère

Après la 3è édition de la ballade gourmande et du Gala avec Claude Vanony, le comité de jumelage Bruyères-Honolulu réitère cette fois avec le nouveau spectacle du couple d’humoristes Chirley et Dino dont la réputation n’est plus à faire. Il s’agit pour l’association de collecter des fonds afin de mener à bien les missions fixées […]

Cet article Pour la première fois dans l’Est ! Le NOUVEAU SPECTACLE « le bal de Shirley et Dino » est apparu en premier sur Gerardmer info.


          Planner - Network Planning - Hawaiian Telcom Communications, Inc. - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
Summary The Planner in Network Planning will plan and prepare implementation designs and drawings for construction of new, removal and rearrangement of...
From Hawaiian Telcom Communications, Inc. - Tue, 12 Mar 2019 08:29:42 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          Medical Marijuana? Say Goodbye to Your Gun Rights      Cache   Translate Page      

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on our website December 12, 2017. We are republishing it now that Ohio media have finally caught on. (see here and here and here and here.

House Bill 523, passed on September 8, 2016, legalized medical marijuana in Ohio. The Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program will allow residents of the state with certain qualifying conditions, and a recommendation from a physician, to register with the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy for a patient ID card.

State agencies are still working on how to administer the program, but medical marijuana patient ID cards will be available no later than September 2018.

The question is, how does this affect gun rights in Ohio? The answer seems to be, if you use marijuana, you lose your gun rights regardless of state law.

Here's the problem: while the state has made medical marijuana legal in Ohio, federal law continues to list marijuana as a Schedule I controlled substance. That means marijuana users can't have guns legally.

In 2011, BATFE sent a letter to U.S. gun dealers that took a firm stance on the issue:

U.S. Department of Justice

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives

Washington DC 20226

September 21, 2011
www.atf.gov

OPEN LETTER TO ALL FEDERAL FIREARMS LICENSEES

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) has received a number of inquiries regarding the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes1 and its applicability to Federal firearms laws. The purpose of this open letter is to provide guidance on the issue and to assist you, a Federal firearms licensee, in complying with Federal firearms laws and regulations.

A number of States have passed legislation allowing under State law the use or possession of marijuana for medicinal purposes, and some of these States issue a card authorizing the holder to use or possess marijuana under State law. During a firearms transaction, a potential transferee may advise you that he or she is a user of medical marijuana, or present a medical marijuana card as identification or proof of residency.

As you know, Federal law, 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(3), prohibits any person who is an "unlawful user of or addicted to any controlled substance (as defined in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802)" from shipping, transporting, receiving or possessing firearms or ammunition. Marijuana is listed in the Controlled Substances Act as a Schedule I controlled substance, and there are no exceptions in Federal law for marijuana purportedly used for medicinal purposes, even if such use is sanctioned by State law. Further, Federal law, 18 U.S.C. § 922(d)(3), makes it unlawful for any person to sell or otherwise dispose of any firearm or ammunition to any person knowing or having reasonable cause to believe that such person is an unlawful user of or addicted to a controlled substance. As provided by 27 C.F.R. § 478.11, "an inference of current use may be drawn from evidence of a recent use or possession of a controlled substance or a pattern of use or possession that reasonably covers the present time."

Therefore, any person who uses or is addicted to marijuana, regardless of whether his or her State has passed legislation authorizing marijuana use for medicinal purposes, is an unlawful user of or addicted to a controlled substance, and is prohibited by Federal law from possessing firearms or ammunition. Such persons should answer "yes" to question 11.e. on ATF Form 4473 (August 2008), Firearms Transaction Record, and you may not transfer firearms or ammunition to them. Further, if you are aware that the potential transferee is in possession of a card authorizing the possession and use of marijuana under State law, then you have "reasonable cause to believe" that the person is an unlawful user of a controlled substance. As such, you may not transfer firearms or ammunition to the person, even if the person answered "no" to question 11.e. on ATF Form 4473.

ATF is committed to assisting you in complying with Federal firearms laws. If you have any questions, please contact ATF's Firearms Industry Programs Branch at (202) 648-7190.

Arthur Herbert
Assistant Director
Enforcement Programs and Services

1The Federal government does not recognize marijuana as a medicine. The FDA has determined that marijuana has a high potential for abuse, has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and lacks an accepted level of safety for use under medical supervision. See 66 Fed. Reg. 20052 (2001). This Open Letter will use the terms "medical use" or "for medical purposes" with the understanding that such use is not sanctioned by the federal agency charged with determining what substances are safe and effective as medicines.

So according to the BATFE, if you use marijuana, you can't legally ship, transport, receive or possess firearms or ammunition. Period. State law doesn't matter.

While this seems clear to those who pay close attention to such legal technicalities, it probably won't be clear to many casual gun owners. Most will only know that marijuana is legal in Ohio, and it will never occur to them that they are violating federal law if they choose to participate in the medical marijuana program.

For example, the letter above mentions question 11.e. on ATF Form 4473. This is the form you fill out when you purchase a firearm and it is used to conduct a background check. It asks:

Are you an unlawful user of, or addicted to, marijuana or any depressant, stimulant, narcotic drug, or any other controlled substance?

You may think that since Ohio has made marijuana legal, you can answer "no." And if you're like me, and you fill out this form frequently, you may just quickly check "no" on all the legal questions without reading them. Which means you'll probably miss the warning that was added to this question earlier this year:

Warning: The use or possession of marijuana remains unlawful under Federal law regardless of whether it has been legalized or decriminalized for medicinal or recreational purposes in the state where you reside.

From long experience, I know that people don't read carefully, and a certain number of gun owners are going to provide false information on this form and unknowingly become felons. This exposes you to felony charges under federal law, punishable with prison time and/or a hefty fine.

It's difficult to predict how the medical marijuana vs. guns issue will play out. In some states, such as Hawaii, enforcement may be strict. According to the Miami Herald, The Honolulu Police Department has been sending letters to legal users of medicinal weed, telling them to surrender their guns within 30 days. However, other states, such as Ohio, may take a softer approach. According to Ohio Board of Pharmacy spokesman Cameron McNamee, only qualified doctors will have access to the Ohio medical marijuana patient registry. Dayton Daily News is reporting that the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) won’t include this data.

Regardless, with 29 states and the District of Columbia legalizing medical marijuana, there is bound to be confusion over the issue. And no matter how you may feel about it, the fact remains that Ohio law and federal law conflict. At this time, guns and pot are like oil and water. Legally, they don't mix.

Dean Rieck is Executive Director of Buckeye Firearms Association, a former competitive shooter, NRA Patron Member, #1 NRA Recruiter for 2013, business owner and partner with Second Call Defense.


          Medical Marijuana? Say Goodbye to Your Gun Rights      Cache   Translate Page      

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on our website December 12, 2017. We are republishing it now that Ohio media have finally caught on. (see here and here and here and here.

House Bill 523, passed on September 8, 2016, legalized medical marijuana in Ohio. The Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program will allow residents of the state with certain qualifying conditions, and a recommendation from a physician, to register with the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy for a patient ID card.

State agencies are still working on how to administer the program, but medical marijuana patient ID cards will be available no later than September 2018.

The question is, how does this affect gun rights in Ohio? The answer seems to be, if you use marijuana, you lose your gun rights regardless of state law.

Here's the problem: while the state has made medical marijuana legal in Ohio, federal law continues to list marijuana as a Schedule I controlled substance. That means marijuana users can't have guns legally.

In 2011, BATFE sent a letter to U.S. gun dealers that took a firm stance on the issue:

U.S. Department of Justice

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives

Washington DC 20226

September 21, 2011
www.atf.gov

OPEN LETTER TO ALL FEDERAL FIREARMS LICENSEES

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) has received a number of inquiries regarding the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes1 and its applicability to Federal firearms laws. The purpose of this open letter is to provide guidance on the issue and to assist you, a Federal firearms licensee, in complying with Federal firearms laws and regulations.

A number of States have passed legislation allowing under State law the use or possession of marijuana for medicinal purposes, and some of these States issue a card authorizing the holder to use or possess marijuana under State law. During a firearms transaction, a potential transferee may advise you that he or she is a user of medical marijuana, or present a medical marijuana card as identification or proof of residency.

As you know, Federal law, 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(3), prohibits any person who is an "unlawful user of or addicted to any controlled substance (as defined in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802)" from shipping, transporting, receiving or possessing firearms or ammunition. Marijuana is listed in the Controlled Substances Act as a Schedule I controlled substance, and there are no exceptions in Federal law for marijuana purportedly used for medicinal purposes, even if such use is sanctioned by State law. Further, Federal law, 18 U.S.C. § 922(d)(3), makes it unlawful for any person to sell or otherwise dispose of any firearm or ammunition to any person knowing or having reasonable cause to believe that such person is an unlawful user of or addicted to a controlled substance. As provided by 27 C.F.R. § 478.11, "an inference of current use may be drawn from evidence of a recent use or possession of a controlled substance or a pattern of use or possession that reasonably covers the present time."

Therefore, any person who uses or is addicted to marijuana, regardless of whether his or her State has passed legislation authorizing marijuana use for medicinal purposes, is an unlawful user of or addicted to a controlled substance, and is prohibited by Federal law from possessing firearms or ammunition. Such persons should answer "yes" to question 11.e. on ATF Form 4473 (August 2008), Firearms Transaction Record, and you may not transfer firearms or ammunition to them. Further, if you are aware that the potential transferee is in possession of a card authorizing the possession and use of marijuana under State law, then you have "reasonable cause to believe" that the person is an unlawful user of a controlled substance. As such, you may not transfer firearms or ammunition to the person, even if the person answered "no" to question 11.e. on ATF Form 4473.

ATF is committed to assisting you in complying with Federal firearms laws. If you have any questions, please contact ATF's Firearms Industry Programs Branch at (202) 648-7190.

Arthur Herbert
Assistant Director
Enforcement Programs and Services

1The Federal government does not recognize marijuana as a medicine. The FDA has determined that marijuana has a high potential for abuse, has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and lacks an accepted level of safety for use under medical supervision. See 66 Fed. Reg. 20052 (2001). This Open Letter will use the terms "medical use" or "for medical purposes" with the understanding that such use is not sanctioned by the federal agency charged with determining what substances are safe and effective as medicines.

So according to the BATFE, if you use marijuana, you can't legally ship, transport, receive or possess firearms or ammunition. Period. State law doesn't matter.

While this seems clear to those who pay close attention to such legal technicalities, it probably won't be clear to many casual gun owners. Most will only know that marijuana is legal in Ohio, and it will never occur to them that they are violating federal law if they choose to participate in the medical marijuana program.

For example, the letter above mentions question 11.e. on ATF Form 4473. This is the form you fill out when you purchase a firearm and it is used to conduct a background check. It asks:

Are you an unlawful user of, or addicted to, marijuana or any depressant, stimulant, narcotic drug, or any other controlled substance?

You may think that since Ohio has made marijuana legal, you can answer "no." And if you're like me, and you fill out this form frequently, you may just quickly check "no" on all the legal questions without reading them. Which means you'll probably miss the warning that was added to this question earlier this year:

Warning: The use or possession of marijuana remains unlawful under Federal law regardless of whether it has been legalized or decriminalized for medicinal or recreational purposes in the state where you reside.

From long experience, I know that people don't read carefully, and a certain number of gun owners are going to provide false information on this form and unknowingly become felons. This exposes you to felony charges under federal law, punishable with prison time and/or a hefty fine.

It's difficult to predict how the medical marijuana vs. guns issue will play out. In some states, such as Hawaii, enforcement may be strict. According to the Miami Herald, The Honolulu Police Department has been sending letters to legal users of medicinal weed, telling them to surrender their guns within 30 days. However, other states, such as Ohio, may take a softer approach. According to Ohio Board of Pharmacy spokesman Cameron McNamee, only qualified doctors will have access to the Ohio medical marijuana patient registry. Dayton Daily News is reporting that the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) won’t include this data.

Regardless, with 29 states and the District of Columbia legalizing medical marijuana, there is bound to be confusion over the issue. And no matter how you may feel about it, the fact remains that Ohio law and federal law conflict. At this time, guns and pot are like oil and water. Legally, they don't mix.

Dean Rieck is Executive Director of Buckeye Firearms Association, a former competitive shooter, NRA Patron Member, #1 NRA Recruiter for 2013, business owner and partner with Second Call Defense.


          Dreams of an Egyptian Boy      Cache   Translate Page      

Honolulu Community College journalism student Xina-Ann Garett is in Egypt this semester visiting relatives. As part of the school’s Egyptian Day celebration, here’s her report on one of the people she met during her stay there: CAIRO, Egypt — There... Continue Reading →


          PHOTO: Hopper Dredger Essayons in Sand Islands, Hawaii      Cache   Translate Page      
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ hopper dredger Essayons is currently undergoing annual maintenance in Sand Island, also known as Kush Island, a small island within the city of Honolulu, Hawaii....

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          Waterfront & Tamura Catering Kitchen      Cache   Translate Page      
HI-Honolulu, Tamura's Enterprises Inc. is a fourth-generation family-owned company in Hawaii. We ARE ACTIVELY SEEKING TO HIRE FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS AT THE Waterfront Fine Wine and Poke STORE and Tamura Catering Kitchen: FULL-TIME – PM LINE COOK PART-TIME – POKE CLERK Must be available to work flexible shifts and weekends *We are now accepting applications for our NEW soon to open Market store in Wailuku*
          Corrections      Cache   Translate Page      

The Honolulu Star-Advertiser strives to make its news report fair and accurate. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, call Marsha McFadden, managing editor/news, at 529-4759 or email city editors at cityeditors@staradvertiser.com.


          Letter: Not every house needs weekly trash bin pickup      Cache   Translate Page      

A fee of $60 per annum is too high for trash pickup (“$2.8B Honolulu budget proposes trash-pickup fee and higher taxes for hotels, investment properties,” Star-Advertiser, March 2).


          Letter: Don’t make public pay Kealoha’s legal fees      Cache   Translate Page      

The Honolulu Police Commission should not add more insult to injury for taxpayers by honoring Louis Kealoha’s request to continue to foot the bill for his defense (“Kealoha lawyer seeks city funding for fees,” Star-Advertiser, March 7). The arrogance and entitlement displayed by this so-called former “power couple” is disgusting and insulting to all residents.


          Stopping Hawaii’s Millennial Brain Drain Is Complicated      Cache   Translate Page      

Jackson Grubbe of the conservative think tank Grassroot Institute of Hawaii recently suggested that increasing suburban sprawl via real estate development into Hawaii’s finite agricultural lands could keep millennials from leaving Hawaii (“Building More Suburbs Could Help Millennials Stay In Hawaii”). I strongly disagree. Keeping the millennials of multi-generationally rooted local households in Hawaii is […]

The post Stopping Hawaii’s Millennial Brain Drain Is Complicated appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.


          Revenue Council Predicts Slowdown In State Economic Growth      Cache   Translate Page      

Hawaii’s economy is slowing down after a couple of turbocharged years, and that’s going to affect how much the state government has to spend. The state Council on Revenues, a panel of tax professionals, business leaders and economists that advises the state on budget-planning, said that while the economy is still growing, increases in tax […]

The post Revenue Council Predicts Slowdown In State Economic Growth appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.


          Trisha Kehaulani Watson: The Beauty of Being Satisfied With ‘Enough’      Cache   Translate Page      

A friend and I were having dinner last week and talking about our businesses. We’re both female small business owners here in Hawaii – not the easiest feat on Earth, but challenging and rewarding. We dove into a discussion on scale and growth, and both found ourselves admitting that neither was particularly interested in endlessly […]

The post Trisha Kehaulani Watson: The Beauty of Being Satisfied With ‘Enough’ appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.


          Chad Blair: Why Is Keith Kaneshiro Still Getting A Paycheck?      Cache   Translate Page      

If it’s Wednesday, that means Keith Kaneshiro just pocketed another $467.70. That’s what his $170,712 annual salary and benefits works out to per day. Not bad for a guy who’s not actually working for the City and County of Honolulu — not since he went on administrative leave last week in the wake of his […]

The post Chad Blair: Why Is Keith Kaneshiro Still Getting A Paycheck? appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.


          School Chief Chooses Some Of The People Helping To Evaluate Her      Cache   Translate Page      

Business leaders, principals and the Honolulu police chief are among the people the Hawaii school superintendent has asked for input on the public education system’s successes and challenges as part of her year-end evaluation process. The names of 20 people asked to provide feedback were approved by the Board of Education on March 7. Their […]

The post School Chief Chooses Some Of The People Helping To Evaluate Her appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.


          As Deadline Looms, HART May Not Fully Comply With Federal Subpoena      Cache   Translate Page      

A month has passed since the Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation received its first grand jury subpoena, but the board overseeing the rail project has yet to discuss the criminal probe with its attorneys. That’s not a big concern for the first two federal orders and the tens of thousands of pages that HART has […]

The post As Deadline Looms, HART May Not Fully Comply With Federal Subpoena appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.


          Immigrant Sanctuary Bill Dies In Hawaii Legislature      Cache   Translate Page      

(AP) — A bill that would have made Hawaii the third so-called sanctuary state for immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally has died at the state Legislature. The state Senate passed the bill and sent it to the House. But Rep. Gregg Takayama, the chairman of the House Public Safety Committee, said Tuesday he […]

The post Immigrant Sanctuary Bill Dies In Hawaii Legislature appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.


          Late Night Theatre Company Presents CORPUS INTERRUPTUS      Cache   Translate Page      

Late Night Theatre Company, UH M?noa's student theatre organization, presents Corpus Interruptus, a devised theatrical experience with no script, no fiction, and no rules, exploring our bodies and identities in 2019. It will play in the Earle Ernst Lab Theatre on April 6, 12, and 13 at 10:00pm and April 7 at 7:30pm. Tickets range from $5-10 and are sold at the Kennedy Theatre Box Office one hour before curtain.

Corpus Interruptus is based on the personal experiences and artistic interpretations of its cast, made up entirely of female, trans, genderfluid and nonbinary performers, as they navigate life in Hawai?i and America in 2019. Through movement, song, dance, scripted drama, and much more, Corpus Interruptus asks such questions as, "Who are we?" "Do you belong if you don't look like your family?" "How are systems of power imprinted on bodies?" and, "Will we ever feel safe?"

For the past forty years, devised theatre has sidestepped the potentially oversimplified conventions of traditional dramatic theatre by conveying a theatre of presence. Addressing political issues of the day with fragments offered meant to provoke and engage, rather than metaphor intended to transport audiences to a realm of fiction, this form of theatre offers a unique approach to today's most pressing issues.

Corpus Interruptus is an entirely original work by eight female, trans, genderfluid and nonbinary performers, facilitated and directed by Katherine Altman, a Directing MFA student at UH, and recent winner of KCACTF's regional directing award, with eight years of experience as a theatre instructor. Perplexed by the lack of scripts that explore the realities of gender in today's America, Altman sought to create a piece of theatre formed directly from the voices that aren't being heard right now. Controversial, provocative, introspective and contemporary, you're sure to laugh, think and rethink contemporary ideas about identity through the individual lenses of the experiences of their performers.

Late Night Theatre is an entirely student-run theatre company, part of the Theatre and Dance Association student organization at UHM. Late Night's mission is to provide students opportunities in directing, designing, playwriting, choreographing, performing, and theatre management. Late Night seeks to explore, to entertain, and to excite; to produce challenging theatre that is not

otherwise available to Honolulu audiences; and to pursue innovation with the aim of creating excellent student-driven performance.

Tickets for Corpus Interruptus are available at the door beginning one hour before the curtain opens on performance nights.


          Accounts Receivable Clerk      Cache   Translate Page      
HI-HONOLULU, Salary: $14.25 to $16.50 per hour Are you a self-starting and detail-oriented Accounts Receivable (A/R) Clerk? This is a long-term temporary Accounts Receivable Clerk position and is based in the Honolulu, Hawaii area. Accountemps is partnering with a growing Non-Profit company who is seeking an Accounts Receivable (A/R) Clerk to join the accounting team. As part of their duties, the Accounts Rece
          Financial Aid Analyst/Specialist      Cache   Translate Page      
HI-HONOLULU, Salary: $14.25 to $16.50 per hour Accountemps is currently looking for a Financial Aid Analyst for an Educational Institution. As the Financial Aid Analyst, you will be assisting students and families with financial aid options. You will also assist with processing federal, state and institutional financial aid applications in accordance with all federal, state and college regulations. Duties Resp
          Sr. Financial Analyst      Cache   Translate Page      
HI-HONOLULU, Salary: $15.84 to $18.34 per hour Accountemps is seeking a Senior Analyst with Banking Experience to assist with forecast revenues and expenditures and assist with future budgeting. Duties Responsibilities: - Review and analyze potential suspicious activity; determine whether to file a Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) and document the SAR decision by completing the SAR or documenting the non-SAR.
          Accounting Clerk      Cache   Translate Page      
HI-HONOLULU, Salary: $14.25 to $16.50 per hour An Accounting Clerk position is available through Accountemps, whose duties will be matching invoices to purchase orders/ vouchers, data entry, and assisting with Accounts Payable (A/P) and Accounts Receivable (A/R). This is a short-term temporary position based in the Honolulu, Hawaii area. This job is ideal for candidates seeking an energetic, team-oriented envi
          Accounting Clerk      Cache   Translate Page      
HI-HONOLULU, Salary: $12.35 to $14.30 per hour Accountemps is looking for an Accounting Clerk to join their staff. The primary responsibilities of the Accounting Clerk will be assisting in the process of Accounts Payable (A/P) and Accounts Receivable (A/R), matching invoices to purchase orders and/or vouchers, and general forms of data entry. If you are innovative and motivated, get your career moving in the r
          Accounting Clerk      Cache   Translate Page      
HI-HONOLULU, Salary: $14.25 to $16.50 per hour If you desire to start a career as an Accounting Clerk, Accountemps is currently trying to fill the position for a prominent company in the insurance - casualty industry. The main tasks of the Accounting Clerk will be assisting in the process of Accounts Payable (A/P) and Accounts Receivable (A/R), matching invoices to purchase orders and/or vouchers, and general
          📱 Advertising Sales / Professionals B2B Sales      Cache   Translate Page      
HI-Honolulu, 📱Text Message Marketing is Exploding! START GETTING PAID COMMISSIONS WITHIN A WEEK OF APPLYING! Free Online Mobile Marketing Certification Training, Social community support along with Manager/Mentor For Success Contact Ronald Estes, National Sales Manager with Sentext Solutions, at 937-286-1073 to learn more. There are currently over 290 Million mobile phone users in the United States alone. Wit
          General Dentist- Private practice, comprehensive care, leading compensation, $250,000+, Partnership      Cache   Translate Page      
HI-Honolulu, Private practice now hiring a full-time Associate Dentist. Modern, state of the art facility. Practice is one of the most productive in Hawaii, and in the top 10% off practices across the U.S. 4 days per week Earn over $250,000/year PPO, cash Experienced staff and supportive owner Mentorship available for young dentist Compensation and Benefits including 30% production Additional $500 per Weekend
          Roman Reigns irá estrelar em nova comédia do Netflix      Cache   Translate Page      
A atriz Candace Smith revelou no Instagram esta semana que recentemente filmou uma comédia da Netflix junto de Roman Reigns em Honolulu, no Havaí. Isso foi na época em que Reigns estava no Havaí filmando o filme "Hobbs & Shaw" com The Rock alguns meses atrás.

A comédia em questão, é intitulada de "The Wrong Missy". A comédia será estrelada por David Spade e produzido pela Happy Madison Productions, de Adam Sandler. A trama segue Tim Morris (Spade), que conhece a mulher dos seus sonhos (Sims) e a convida para o retiro da sua empresa. No entanto, uma antiga pretendente do protagonista aparece e Tim percebe que mandou uma mensagem para a garota errada (Lapkus).

Não há nenhuma informação sobre quando o filme será lançado ou qual será o papel de Reigns.
          Hospital Aide - (Honolulu, Hawaii, United States)      Cache   Translate Page      
Under indirect supervision of Unit Supervisor, and under direction of licensed staff, performs variety of non-professional patient care duties in inpatient hospital setting; is responsible and accountable for assigned tasks. Essential Functions: - Assists with ongoing data collection; identifies changes in patient status and reports changes to RN/LPN; implements care plan under direction of licensed staff. - Assists with admissions, discharges, and transfers. - Demonstrates technical competence in basic nursing skills and use of simple equipment. - Demonstrates basic competencies to work on specialty unit. - Records data and nursing care activities in medical record following Department/Unit/JCAHO standards. - Utilizes Department and Unit forms per procedures. - Functions with awareness of and applies safety principles and standards, including patient, environment and employee issues. - Utilizes correct body mechanics. - Reports incidents, work related injuries, unsafe equipment or environment to supervisor or other appropriate person. - Functions with awareness of and applies infection control principles and standards, including patient, environment and employee issues. - Functions within parameters of job description. - Maintains confidentiality of patient/hospital information. - Reports off when leaving Unit. - Reports pertinent patient data and problem to licensed staff, charge nurse or supervisor. - Remains calm in emergency patient care/Unit situations; follows established protocols. - Assists as directed during Code 500 (Chest compression and runner to lab). - Practices within Hospital, Department and Unit standards/policies/procedures. - Locates and uses Facility and Hospital manuals, and other reference manuals/books when necessary. - Completes mandatory JCAHO inservices annually. - Completes CPR recertification of 24 months - Level C. - Attends at least three Unit Staff Meetings. - Reads/signs minutes of Staff Meetings not attended. - Seeks guidance, direction or supervision when unsure of procedures/actions needed. - Participates in peer evaluation when requested by supervisor. - Demonstrates sufficient knowledge, skills, and abilities in area of specialization. - Demonstrates knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to provide care and/or service appropriate to age groups served. - Demonstrates knowledge skills, and abilities necessary to provide culturally sensitive care and/or service. - Performs other duties and accepts responsibility as assigned.
          Speech & Language Pathologist-Rehabilitation Services - (Honolulu, Hawaii, United States)      Cache   Translate Page      
Under indirect supervision and according to guidelines of American Speech/Language/Hearing Association, provides and ensures high quality and cost effective speech-language pathology, evaluation, and treatment services. Collaborates with physicians, hospital, SNF, clinic, outreach, home care, other agency staffs, and families to facilitate appropriate communication of health management. Participates in case management activities that promote appropriate admission and discharge to/from hospital, SNF, clinic, home care, and other agencies. Specializes in identifying and assessing patients in need of cognitive, communication, and swallowing therapy. Counsels patients and caregivers, teaching skills to families and staff. Provides case management of caseload and discharge planning. Coordinates services with other staff, caregivers, and community resources (e.g., public and private agencies). Acts as patient advocate and coordinator. Functions as liaison between communicatively impaired individuals and care-giving system. Essential Functions: - Provides evaluation, diagnosis and care plan development related to cognitive, communication, and swallowing disorders - Provides direct or indirect communication and swallowing therapeutic and counseling intervention in hospital, SNF, clinic; coordinates appropriate referrals for speech-language pathology follow-up with contract and community services - Provides backup coverage during other speech-language pathology staff absence - Provides continuing formal and informal education for professional staff - Coordinates, develops, and facilitates group treatment, education and related materials for clients and caregivers - Develops and maintains reports and data with outcome results pertaining to caseload management, quality assurance and peer review issues - Collaborates with other personnel to identify goals and objectives for discharge planning needs - Participates in stroke rounds, SNF patient care Rounds and other patient care meetings where caseload is involved - Participates in peer review and QA studies and meetings as delegated by supervisor - Participates in development of materials and programs under direction of immediate supervisor - Obtains review and co-signature of supervisor on written reports and documentation as requested by ASHA for CFY certification - Maintains own continuing education to keep abreast of clinical evolution - Develops and teaches in-service programs for professionals in cognitive, communication, and swallowing disorders and health promotion as delegated by immediate supervisor - Additional essential functions as listed in the complete job description
          OR Services Coordination Clerk - (Honolulu, Hawaii, United States)      Cache   Translate Page      
Under indirect supervision, performs office duties & minor administrative duties. Supports & maintains automated OR management system. Enters data pertaining to scheduling, inventory, patient data, charging & statistical reporting. Provides training & orientation to staff regarding use of system. Acts as resource person. Produces hard copy reports, policies, & procedures, correspondence, & special reports. Supports compliance & Principles of Responsibility. Maintains confidentiality. Protects organizational assets. Exhibits ethics & integrity. Adheres to applicable federal & state laws & regulations, accreditation & licensing requirements, policies & procedures. Reports &/or resolves issues of non-compliance. Essential Functions: - Verifies & inputs data in Management System to meet scheduling, case log, implant records & patient billing functions - Assists in data collection. Enters data to ensure accurate report generation (e.g., staff, block utilization, specialty statistics) - Acts as liaison between other departments requiring information from system. Assists in coordination of resource information with other departments to ensure needed supplies &/or resources available on timely basis for surgical procedures - Controls & monitors OR inventory. Orders & receives stock, non-stock & special orders - Provides training, orientation & overall education regarding system & other departmental routines to assigned staff members - Monitors others use of system to ensure accuracy of data input & patient & report confidentiality. Limits access of system by others as directed - Assists in implementation & coordination of yearly physical & perpetual inventory requirements. Uses inventory control system to ensure accuracy of inventory information & pricing - Produces hard copy reports, correspondence & special reports. Documents policies & procedures - Assists supervisor in preparation of special projects or presentations. Performs research as required. Assembles presentation materials as needed - Establishes & maintains OR library, filing & reference manuals, catalogs & other related literature - Performs all associated clerical & scheduling duties as required &/or assigned. Posts schedules. Distributes to appropriate departments - Operates standard office equipment - Maintains staff records, schedules, & credentialing information. Maintains confidentiality of staff information system & associated reports. Posts & updates staff schedules as required - Develops & creates user-defined reports to demonstrate utilization statistics concerning OR time, block utilization, physician usage, case & procedural information - Demonstrates knowledge, skills, & abilities necessary to provide care &/or service appropriate to age groups served - Demonstrates knowledge, skills, & abilities necessary to provide culturally sensitive care &/or service - On regular, sustained basis, cooperates with other staff members both within & outside department in accomplishment of own job duties as well as assisting others in accomplishing theirs. Serves as team player & role model for other employees in organization, always exhibiting traits of courtesy, caring, helpfulness & respect. Conducts self in service-oriented manner that is attentive, pleasant, cooperative, sensitive, respectful & kind when dealing with members, visitors, public & all employees - Performs other duties & accepts responsibility as assigned - Additional essential functions as listed in the complete job description
          Management Assistant - (Honolulu, Hawaii, United States)      Cache   Translate Page      
Provides moderately complex administrative and operational clerical support to department managers and/or staff. Serves as resource person to staff, members, and outside vendors. Responsibilities may include answering phones and relaying messages/information to both departmental staff and callers; scheduling/calendaring meetings and conferences; maintaining filing systems; ordering/stocking office supplies; opening/sorting mail. Types/ proofreads/composes correspondence; creates graphs and presentations; researches issues as needed. Essential Functions: - Answers phones, takes messages, and greets KP visitors or outside vendors. - Maintains calendars and schedules conference rooms. - Drafts, edits, proofreads and prepares correspondence; creates reports, graphs, and presentations. - Inputs data and maintains established databases; gathers and researches information. - Researches files and documents. - Collects data for maintenance of required records. - Exchanges information with functional employees, external vendors and representatives in support of ongoing business services. - Provides additional moderately complex administrative support as needed to other staff members. - Administers programs, projects, and/or processes specific to operating unit served. - May serve as administrative liaison for others within and outside organization regarding administrative issues relating to purchasing, personnel, facilities, and operations. - May conduct department-specific training. - May develop department administrative policies and procedures.
          2/9/18 MAKING KUCHING TRULY THE CITY OF BORNEO .....exploring on New GOM-GOS working framework.      Cache   Translate Page      
Worldwide, especially with the hungry Chinese and not wanting to be left India (later Brazil), in the next 5-10 years the world economic development will be very interesting to observe. The West due to their Capitalism Hunger is rampaging the oil rich Middle East and North Africa. Despite so, UAE with Dubai as its pillar is pulling away from the traditional Arabs norms and now is among the most busiest and prosperous trading place on earth. Accordingly, Istanbul due to the American hegemony actions may do better with the help of Russia and Iran (and possible China) and thus may reshape the future role and position of the America and the West. Nonetheless right here at home, due to prolong greed in our governing system, Malaysia as a whole and Sarawak in particular, is in great financial distress that warrant us to be much strategic and bold in our action. Herewith, I'm proposing something that we can look at as potential means to take us out of such distress and as well as to position ourselves better in this 21st century regional economic regatta. How could Sarawak; Kuching in particular can help to raise the whole Borneo, to the extend by 2050, Borneo collectively will turn to be the next World Economic Power. Let start with a vision of making Kuching the City of Borneo.

(2) The key economic issue facing Sarawak that I foresee now is that our economy may be moving to diminishing if not stagnation or digressing.  Sarawak all these while had been resources-based economic driven. Unfortunately the global demand over our resources is either moving to stagnation or down dwindling. Timber, oil palm, rubber, pepper and petroleum production, demand and pricing are no more to our advantage. Worst, Sarawak had not work hard enough to restructure her economic base to the form that keep her to a fore running position. We had not been smart and daring enough to push our economy in the forefront of others. Since 1960s to this end, we are still keeping to the traditional harvesting the natural economic endowment. We had not graduated beyond nature based economy. In this article, I'm focusing onto making Kuching urban setting to be internationalized as a meant to nurture healthy living of her population and Sarawak economic growth vis-a-vis all other regional development proposals that I had earlier written which among them are:  (1) http://abchek.blogspot.com/2009/06/5609-sarawak-economic-development-model.html?m=1 (2) http://abchek.blogspot.com/2016/09/1916-let-work-on-basin-based-devt-thats.html?m=1 (3) http://abchek.blogspot.com/2010/05/8510-model-ekonomi-desa-med.html?m=1 (4) http://abchek.blogspot.com/2017/09/2917-sarawak-digital-economy.html?m=1

(3) If the Bible (not clearly said in the case of the  Al Quran) narrative of the descendant of Eve and Adam was correct, one would wonder why did Allah sent Eve to Becca while Adam to India. Adam to India be it in Ceylon or Himalaya, such places were with better endowment as compared to Becca of the Arabia. I'll skip my speculation over the reason for the place(s) of descending of Adam, but let have a look at Becca the place of landing for Eve. Definitely, there are many perspectives for such choice by Allah. But in the case of Becca, let me try to lead readers to just one aspect of probably the numerous perspectives that we could explore. We can't exactly say, when did Adam and Eve descent to earth. Probably hundreds of thousands if not millions of years before. Even 1,400 years ago, there was nothing in Becca as compared to today Human Civilization Standard. Becca even 1,400 years ago was just barren desert with pockets of oasis. Eve, upon her landing, she might had been placed among those cavity-hills with the oasis for her basic survival needs. My such presumption is based on  an inferring to the lives of Hajar and Ismael upon their seclusion in Mecca by Abraham. Saie, which being said was the wandering of Hajar between Mt Marwan and Saffa,  I would believe must be the nature that happened to Eve at time of her isolation. She must had been made to wander just as Saie of Hajar before the coming of Adam. As Allah saying "Nothing that He did is without reason" thus my strongest predicament of the Hajar-Ismael fate in Abraham family squabble is an inference for His mahluk of all times. Thus for the case of Eve, then followed by Hajar-Ismael, why did Allah chosen Becca as their place of "exile"? Why did Adam and thus Abraham had a better place of "stay" as compared to their spouses?

(4) Eve and Hajar were the great mothers' of the mankind. Why indeed, the "harsh" treatment were imposed upon them, as compared to their men? Why not in the first place, Adam and Eve be landing together at the same place, say in the comfortable Mediterranean. Accordingly, why did Abraham need to send Hajar and Ismael to Mecca (Becca), a faraway place from Palestine where he and Sarah-Jacob were residing. Can't he just kept them in the nearby neighborhood? What indeed Allah signaling over all these for the good of mankind?

(5) In particular, what do all these have to do with Kuching and more important to transform Kuching into the Truly City of Borneo (CoB)? Firstly, I want to suggest the solution on how to make our economy to be better through urban development. Urbanize development is a must to take ourselves to a better state of being. Urbanize development has always been the better economic of scale for agglomeration of most of the human needs. If one cares, one could follow such wisdom of Allah through His creation of the olden days civilization be it in Nile, Euphrates, Ganges and Yang Tze. Old days Civilization started from the rivers (water). The original Sarawak and later Kuching, it started with the Sarawak river. For such reasons, for Sarawak, I'm focusing to Kuching as the potential for a conceptual better urban development. As per today, our economy is in distress. There seem to be some form of stagnation is happening. Structurally, we are coming to the Zero Sum Game of the economy. We seem to be meeting our economic plateau point by reason there are sectors that is cancelling the positive effect of the others. Definitely growth is there, but not really a healthy prospering growth to all. Unemployment among our graduates is high and even if they are employed, their salary doesn't commensurate with their academic qualification. The same applies to the rest of the population. People are unable to cope with the ever rising cost of living due to faster rising of cost of living as compared to net income growth.  Even if we look into the whole of Borneo, the third largest island in the world after Greenland and Papua New Guinea, with huge natural resources, we are still in the state of the Lower Third World hierarchy. Thus as I had said many times, we must take serious note or lesson from how Allah manage things as a clue to resolve our problem and improve ourselves. So much so, the best city development progression and purposes should emulate from His design and rationales.  Thus, I'm looking at Kuching vis-a-vis Mecca in my city development model thinking process. As Muslim, it is very ignorance if one can't see the beauty of Allah "wisdom's" in all of His creations. He placed Kaaba in Mecca and definitely by virtue of Mecca landscapes, He must be having great "wisdom" on how Mecca will evolve into a prosperous and harmonious city place that people could emulate all over despite its barren and isolated nature.

(6) Kuching comparatively to the early Mecca, there is nothing much there. Mecca was barren desert, and Kuching was peat and mangrove mudflat. Naturally both were barren places. One was with the least water endowment, while the later having too much. Secondly, both were least populated. Third, both were well isolated. Nonetheless Allah designed for these places was beyond human comprehension. Indeed there were so many the none feasible factors for Mecca and Kuching to be developed as a city far more to say a Centripetal City Place. Therefore, taking all these into a basket, there is no hope that Kuching should grow into the City of Borneo (CoB). But my belief is otherwise, for as I said, and as repeated in the Al Quran many times: "Nothing is created by Allah without its merit", thus there is nothing that Kuching couldn't emulate Mecca of the past to Mecca of today. With Mecca, indeed Allah wisdom is, there is nothing impossible if  one is determine and having passion and patience. Mecca was built from the ruble of the Kaaba by both Abraham and Ismael. From barren ruble, Mecca turns to be the World Largest Multi-Islamic Cultural Holly City, and In Shaa Allah it will forever expanding and evolving. Thus, Kuching can be developed into the City of Borneo, a City of Truly Borneo despite of all its handicaps just as the early Mecca.

(7) To me, from the way Mecca had evolved, from desert to thematic Multi-national Islamic Cultural City, Kuching could as well emulate such strategic wisdom ie to be developed along a strategic international theme. For such, based on its nature therefore my best presumption, Kuching could and must be developed into the City of Borneo.

(8) At time of Eve, Mecca was a one-person-city place. Today, Mecca has a permanent population of 1.53 millions but with at least 30-35 million visitors annually and it is growing probably at the rate of 3-5 percents a year. As an overall, Saudi Arabia is having 28.61 million population (2018), which means even deriving from the Pilgrimages, Saudi indeed should never having any economic or income issues in making the kingdom a prosperous and harmonious place to stay and visit. Indeed today Mecca should be a Multi-National Islamic Cultural City. There is no other city world-wide having such an aura, not even the Vatican City of Rome. No any other religion is now embraced by almost all of the world ethnics population, except Islam. Mecca initially was a focal City for almost all of the Arabs, Persian, African  and even Turks ethnicity and cultures. Today, indeed Mecca (and Madinah) is a City of Islamic Multi-Cultural setting, if politic is discounted from the making of the Saudi Arabia in general and Mecca-Madinah specifically. BaitulMuqaddis was the City that once having the aura of today Mecca, but Allah had made the Muslims to turn away from BaitulMuqaddis. In today City Planning sense, indeed as the doa by Abraham, the man whom revived Mecca (Kaaba) from ruble, "Oo Allah make this City a place of prosperity and harmony for all humankind", and so should it be to this days. Unfortunately the Saud had not made Mecca into Multi-National Islamic Cultural and Spiritual City. Indeed apart from its Islamic theological Central, Mecca for its original isolation is indeed a strength that Allah want us to uncover.  I presume, Allah may want us to see how Muslims should realise His saying "In diversity, you should celebrate for in its you will get to know each others" which to me, He wants us to see how the celebration of diversity could lead to unity, prosperity and harmony through justice.

(9) Now I will address the notion of the City of Borneo. Why Kuching? Why not Kota Kinabalu, Pontianak, Palangkaria, Banjar Masin, Balik Papan, Bandar Sri Bangawan (BSB), etc? Well surely, I admit it is all about vision. We must have a vision to place ourselves above others without making others worst off. Better off if our vision is meant for the good of all. I believe Sarawak ie Kuching can do it, so let get moving. While we are on our path to prosperity and harmony, so the rest must also be granted as such. Justice must be honored. Indeed my view, by making Kuching as the City of Borneo, such will be giving the phenomena of high tide raise all boats. I believe, KalBar, KalSel, and KalTeng will benefit from the making of Kuching CoB. Even Brunei, Sabah and KalTim would have the trickling effect at the later stage.

(10) City of Borneo, to my definition is a City that having the multi-cultural Borneo taste. Kuching should be made a place where the Bornean and the world could celebrate the multi-cultural and creativity of Borneo. It is a City of Borneo convergence. People, cultures, products and many others of Borneo should be there in Kuching for the world to celebrate. This is a City that is built over passing religious, racial, political, cultural and values differences. This is a City that resembles and appreciate the celebration of Allah created Tropical diversity. The tropical is green and important to the world for its content and celebration of diversity. Kuching must go along the same path of development.

(11) Definitely a vision must be grounded with all the strong backup rationales. What indeed are the solid advantages of Kuching over the others? Firstly let have a look at all the Borneo major cities. Bandar Sri Bangawan is well secluded due to its enclave by Malaysia. Its inland bound is very limited. Kota Kinabalu is far to the North. Again its inland connectivity to the rest of Borneo is limiting, though its international access is equally as good if not better than Kuching. Pontianak, Banjar Masin, and Balik Papan are southern bound coastal cities of Kalimantan. Their international access is limited through Jakarta. They are having international distance connectivity disadvantages. Thus from the spatial perspective, Kuching has the better international frontage either by land, sea and even air. Indeed Kuching has greater access to Indochina and Far East for the hinterland people and products of Borneo. Kuching is having greater hinterland networks and thus is having greater access to all the rich Borneo hinterland endowment. In 5-10 years time, Kuching is commanding the Central Place for Borneo. Building on this advantage, In Shaa Allah will amke Kuching sustainably in the fore front of the others.

(12) I'm postulating. Kuching is just about 40 miles from the Equatorial Line. The Equatorial Line crosses right through Pontianak, such makes it the Borneo Equator City. Kuching is just 40 miles North of the Equatorial Line plus its location toward the South China Sea, thus sunlight, humidity cloud cover, and wind nature of Kuching I would say is much challenging as compared to any other cities of Borneo. I believe Kuching is facing much challenging climatic regimes as compare to the others. In the electromagnetic sense, such is much tougher to address say as compared to lesser climatic problematic areas. These natural climatic challenges, if properly over come, I would predict, Kuching will give Borneo the best solution over Digital Communication environment. I presume, locational advantages and over coming climatic "challenges" is the best advantage for Kuching to be Borneo Digital Hub. Such advantage, gives Kuching the best digital communique positioning among others. Kuching can be made the Digital Gateway for the whole of Borneo.

(13) Borneo is a multi-cultural and religious region. The diverse culture and resources of Borneo given rise to multi-talents and creativity. All these could be celebrated at one place entity for ease of marketing and achieving the economic of scale. Kuching could take central role for such purposes.

(14) Accordingly, over the past 50-60 years, Kuching apart from BSB has the most socio-political stability as compared to the rest of Borneo cities. The multi-ethnicity of Sarawak had molded Kuching into a peaceful and harmony Administrative and Industrial City. The social balanced had kept Kuching to its peaceful and harmonious charisma. Such socio-political harmony of Kuching gives her the best asset to traject higher and faster from the rest of Borneo.

(15) With Kuching present locality advantages as centre for resources, cultural agglomeration and ICT Gateway potentials couple by its peaceful and harmonious sphere, thus I have a strong belief that Kuching can organise itself to be, first the Entre Port of Borneo, second Health, Educational, Arts and Cultural City, thirdly Industrial City, and fourthly Information Gateway of Borneo. Thus my scope of City of Borneo for Kuching covers the areas of International Trade, Tourism, Manufacturing and ICT Hub.

(16) Definitely, my spatial definition of Kuching CoB is stretching beyond the present Kuching. Indeed I'm looking at the space from Tg Dato in Lundu to as far as Tg Manis in Sarikei. No doubt, the present Kuching will be the core for Kuching CoB. Sematan, Lundu, Bau, Serian, Simunjan, Pusa and Tg Manis, I'm postulating as the metropolitan of Kuching CoB. Sematan, Pusa and Tg Manis need to be part and parcel of Kuching CoB for they are having the strengths to enhance the Natural Tourism facets, Bulking Port facilities and Industrial specialization. Sematan in Lundu and Sambas of KalBar are having great tourism potentials that could be developed so as to provide the synergy and economic of scale. Sematan-Bako Coastline and Serikin-Bau Limestone Hinterland offer great tourism opportunities development to the eastern of Kuching. Particularly the Tg Pok-Sematan Bay; the sandy and mangrove nature mixed of the coastline, is unique tourism feature of its own virtue. Accordingly, the rich fishing ground of Singkawang to Sematan sea area is a best gift by Allah for seafood loving population of the East. Nature and food-based tourism could be well place for the advancement of this region. The limestone hinterland of Lundu-Bau would provide the added Nature and Adventure type of tourism experiences.

(17) With the emergence of China as a rich State so much so, almost all Indochinese states vis Thailand, Chambodia, and Vietnam and even the Philippines are crazy in capturing their tourism demand. The Chinese-tourism is now dominated by the emergence of the effluent communities, so much so their liking is more toward built-up and high dense tourism activities. I have a strong believe, over time all these will fade away and people will be going back to healthy-nature-based tourism. Indeed Sarawak should now wisely capitalize the turning away of other parts of tourism-liking from the traditional Indochinese. We could build tourism heaven away from the Chinese craziness and thus capturing our own niche market.

(18) Pusa and Tg Manis, if well connected to Nanga Badau and Tebedu, they could play the great Bulking Export Points and Processing for KalBar, KalTeng and KalSel produces. Both Pusa and Tg Manis could be turned into Food and Food-based Industrial Centers with raw material be drawn form Kalimantan and as well as from the locals. A Bulking facilities could be explored in Pusa, Betong. I can foresee, Pusa can be developed into the Oleo-Chemical Industrial Hub to cater for Sarawak Southern Region, KalBar and KalTeng palm oil production. Accordingly, through proper strategic international arrangement trade between Malaysia and Indonesia, I can foresee, similar treatment for the KalBar and KalTeng forest and bulk mining produces. Pusa and Tg Manis can be the Industrial Centers for KalBar, KalTeng and KalSel produces. With such bulks export facilities be placed out of Kuching, not only will ease heavy vehicles from entering Kuching but most important, expansion for the down stream effects of such business will be better facilitated. Cheaper land for various other related development would be easily available. For long term urban sustainable development and as well as to position ourselves better into the regional food and food-based industrial development, I strongly suggest both Pusa and Tg Manis plus all the potential new growth center be well developed along the concept of green tropical cities.

(19) I'm thinking that we should be brave enough to look a the Tebedu-Pusa-Lubok Antu-Tg Manis as new growth coridor. The land in this corridor should be fully developed into multi-mixed agro-industrial source of raw material. Accordingly, infrastructural development and enhancement in the area would turn the area into strong economic hinterland for Kuching CoB. The Illustration provide to the left is my initial visualization of infrastructural development network for the region plus all the potential new growth areas that will spur from such initiatives. All these is needed to build a strong economic hinterland economies for the sustainable growth of Kuching. Most important, all these new growth centers would regulate the effect of immigration to Kuching. Kuching then could be well developed into Healthy Borneo Cultural City Center for it will be relieved of all unnecessary urban over crowding pressures.

(20) Indeed both Tebedu and Lubok Antu could be a great gateway for KalBar and KalTeng population and bulk produces. Inland Port facilities could be developed in these two places. What needed is for Sarawak to aggressively facilitate for such to happen. In this sense, Sarawak (and GOM) must have the courage to look at the bigger economic and mutual international gains from such facilitation. Infrastructure especially better road and probably bulk train access could be workout for the purposes. Indeed, the Tebedu-Pusa-Lubok Antu-Tg Manis corridor is having high potential for the advance oil palm and oleo-chemical industrial development if couple with those of KalBar. Accordingly, I can see Pontianak-Putu Sibau is best for the Kapuas International Ghost Ride Fiesta, from Vampire City (Pontianak) to Ghost Town (Lubok Antu) if we could take such seriously and creatively. Indeed good road network between Tebedu and Lubok Antu to Kuching will definitely facilitate for all the KalBar, KalTeng and KalSel arts and creativity inflow into Kuching, and thus making Kuchin a much prosperous and harmonious City of Borneo Cultural Celebration.

(21) Kuala Lumpur and Kuching should work on a best Spatial and Investment Plan on such an idea. Thereon GOM and GOS should work to the best arrangement on how to use our present earning from O&G and thus to really building a much higher growth and prosperity beyond O&G. As we know, O&G resources of the Nation is not going to be forever there. But an honest and smart synergy of GOM and GOS to work on the best return over our O&G resources would be the best for the State and as well as the Nation. I have a strong belief, BSB would love to place their interest to build greater wealth from  their present potential "diminishing" wealth. Both GOM and GOS could takeon BSB to their long term wealth interest creation. We can also work with Singapore.

(22) Sarawak indeed can offer almost all the required development impetus needed by KalBar, KalTeng and KalSel through the good working spirit of Sosek Malindo and BIMP EAGA. Our much advance utilities development could be exported to Kalimantan states. Both GOM and GOS should be having a very strong working arrangement to really building Sarawak to her best along the notion of enriching the neighbor ie the Kalimantan. I have a very strong belief that Brunei, Singapore, ADB and IDB would be more happy to chip in. Let make Borneo as our best foundation in transforming the Nusantara Economic Caucus as we had envisioned sometimes ago. Regatta, Top Spinning, Kite Flying and even Silat are our forefathers left culture and arts that we should seriously read in between the lines as our great strengths to be together and be strong.

(23) As per Kuching per se, to turn Kuching into CoB, GOS need to relook at reshaping Kuching Urban Fabrics to such Kuching should move to a modern green city touch. Numerous urban renewal and or infill need to be done. To name a few, Simpang Tiga Complex, Baddarudin Complex, the RTM-Telkom Complex, Brooke Dockyard, and former BinaMara should be revamped and turn all those into the modern setting for both local and visitors places of interest. In order to facilitate such urban renewal process Kuching should then be having a proper Integrated Modern Administrative Center (IMAC) to place all these public institutions to their most cost-effective public services delivery positioning. The present state of public institutions in Simpang Tiga, Badaruddin, RTM etc I would say is a shame of the State and Nation as we are moving into a Developed Nation. Each of these Complexes, if properly planned and developed on thematic approach, definitely would make Kuching a healthy working, living and a must visit CoB. As key component of CoB, facilities such as the international accord High Learning and Skill Development facilities should be well conceived to carter for Human Resource Development within the Borneo and Indochina. Accordingly, the present Kuching Historical City Zones should be enhanced to provide not only a lovely visiting place, but most important is to turn all those into the true multi-cultural setting of Sarawak in particular and Borneo in general. By virtue of our diverse ethnicity similarity with the rest of Borneo, by so doing, Kuching definitely will be capturing the whole of Borneo Cultural components, and thus giving the perspective of Truly Borneo images. Most important, the present Kuching had been known for its advantage in marketing the Borneo Creative Crafts. This aspect of the Borneo's Creativity could be well capitalise not only as key attraction to Kuching as CoB, but most important as a means to foster stronger Borneo Cultural Bonding. Accordingly, for stronger international marketing advantages, our City Landscapes should keep to the need to uphold our diverse tropical setting. We need to secure the West, Middle East and Far East Market by offering the best Green Tropical City Setting of Kuching. Borneo is tropical, keeping Kuching Sustainable Tropical Setting will add spice to our Kuching CoB vision. The present Kuching International Rain Forest Musical and Tatoo Festival is something that we must expand and sustain.

(24) In the advancement of today 21st century industrial revolution particularly wrt the 4.0 Industrial Generation, Borneo in particular is having great disadvantages. Our key setback is wrt to our infrastructural development gaps. Despite so, Kuching in particular is well located within the high potential major international trading route. So much so, if we dare to take a much strategic positioning, Kuching indeed can evolve into the Borneo ICT Hub. Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, Hong Kong, Honolulu and even Sydney can be well connected to Kuching and the rest of Borneo if we could quickly harness the ICT framework to our advantages. For Sarawak to realize its Digital Economic Vision, to start with, we can first begin with the tourism related marketing, E-Education, E-Arts and Cultural Innovation, and as well as E-Medical. Thus, GOS need to move fast to integrate our present infrastucture development with the ICT Infostructure buildup.

(25) As the Kuching CoB build up going steady, we then should move as the Borneo Financial House of which ICT will then be well capitalized. For Kuching to be as such, we need to be smart and far sighted enough to work with Brunei, Singapore, Hong Kong and Tokyo for the purposes. We need to work hard and smart with Kuala Lumpur to make Kuching as Borneo Financial Center. Sarawak, Sabah, Brunei and all the Kalimantan should join force to turn Borneo into the 2050 High Potential World Economic Power. I believe, Jakarta is ever ready to work with us so as to help them to ease Java from all the distress that they are now facing. Making Kuching CoB is helping Borneo to be the World Economic Power and thus easing Jakarta from the headache of Java's problems. Accordingly, definitely Sarawak as a whole will gain better footing. In Shaa Allah.

(26) Who would be the enabler for all these? If in the 1960s, there exist MNC to spear the economic development in the colonized states, such was 60 years ago. With today free flows of capital and expertise definitely with proper smart arrangement, all these could be packaged nicely to a win-win investments. Our key State GLCs plus many others in Kuala Lumpur, we can consolidate our experiences and strengths to be the movers and enablers together with all those private sectors that are now most eager to expand. What indeed immediately needed is for GOS to have a Comprehensive Public-Private Sector Economic Development and Investment Plan for everybody to work on.  Accordingly we must quickly established high competent and good governance system. Our present governing system must be revamped to the best cost-efficient. We need to have very proactive and high integrity Civil Service and Political System. And since Sarawak is quite an autonomous State within Malaysia, we should take such position into a much higher level, and thus working within the Federation Framework to move ourselves, the Nation and region into a more prosperous and harmonious footing.  In Shaa Allah.

Kuching, Sarawak
27 Sept., 2018

          Pour la première fois dans l’Est ! Le NOUVEAU SPECTACLE « le bal de Shirley et Dino »      Cache   Translate Page      

shirley-Dino-2

Après la 3è édition de la ballade gourmande et du Gala avec Claude Vanony, le comité de jumelage Bruyères-Honolulu réitère cette fois avec le nouveau spectacle du couple d’humoristes Chirley et Dino dont la réputation n’est plus à faire. Il s’agit pour l’association de collecter des fonds afin de mener à bien les missions fixées […]

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          Security Officer - Hawaii Protective Association, LLC - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
*Hawaii Protective Association, LLC. has been providing premiere Security and Investigative Services throughout the State of Hawai’i for over 50 years!...
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          Chassis and Reefer Mechanic - The Pasha Group - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
Chassis and Reefer Mechanic Job Duties: Inspect, maintain and repair all chassis, refrigerated units, power packs, gensets, transformers and other company...
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          Sponsors and Supporters      Cache   Translate Page      
We would like to thank the following organizations for their support of the Third International Mokuhanga Conference 2017, Hawaii Awagami Factory, Japan Australian Consulate-General Honolulu City & County of Honolulu Constellation Studios, Lincoln, Nebaska Consulate General of Japan Honolulu Consulate General of Finland Honolulu Donkey Mill Art Center, Hawaii Hawaii Japanese Center Hawai‘i State Foundation …

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          Press Releases: Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary W. Patrick Murphy Travels to Thailand, Indonesia, and Hawaii      Cache   Translate Page      
Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
March 13, 2019


Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary (PDAS) for East Asian and Pacific Affairs W. Patrick Murphy travels to Thailand, Indonesia, and Hawaii March 18-22.

PDAS Murphy will visit Bangkok, Thailand March 18-19 to meet with Royal Thai government interlocutors and other stakeholders to discuss Thailand’s 2019 ASEAN Chairmanship and the U.S.-Thailand alliance.

He will visit Jakarta March 20 to lead the U.S. delegation at Indonesia’s high-level dialogue on Indo-Pacific cooperation. He will hold bilateral consultations to discuss U.S. and partner nation priorities in the region. PDAS Murphy will also meet with Indonesian officials to discuss issues of mutual interest and efforts to strengthen the U.S.-Indonesia Strategic Partnership in this 70th year of diplomatic ties.

In Honolulu, Hawaii, March 21-22, PDAS Murphy will meet with senior officials at the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command and locally-based entities and experts focused on the Indo-Pacific region.


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          (USA-HI-Honolulu) Program Manager      Cache   Translate Page      
Oceanit is seeking qualified candidates for the position of **Program Manager** with a successful track record requiring hands-on program management and technical leadership skills to support and coordinate ongoing & new programs. **THE VALUE YOU DELIVER:** * Provides strategic direction and leadership to ensure that corporate goals and strategies are achieved. * Mentors and builds teams to develop staff and create synergistic cross-functional teams. * Manages programs and projects – defines program/project objectives, plans, develops, directs, coordinates and exercises control over resources and personnel (technical and administrative staff) for assigned projects, ensuring that adequate and appropriate resources are assigned and remain within budget allocations. * Ensures progress is being accomplished toward specific project and modifies or changes methodology as required to redirect and attain or exceed objectives. Regularly reports to management on program/project status and, when necessary, take corrective actions to meet program/project goals. * Supports existing programs and coordinate with technical business program managers. * Monitor and evaluate operational effectiveness. Designs and implements standardized project management processes and procedures, which are consistent with corporate processes and procedures. * Determines the economic value of initiatives and garners commitment of affected parties to achieve financial, strategic and objective goals. * Acts as key customer interface to build business relationships as well as ensure customer quality control on program deliverables. **THE EXPERTISE WE'RE LOOKING FOR:** * Education: Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering, Physics, or Business Management, required. Master’s Degree or Ph.D. preferred. * 5+ years of management experience required; 10+ years of management experience preferred. * 5+ years of progressive engineering experience preferred. * Strong program and/or project management experience with superior organizational skills required. * Demonstrated ability to provide well-developed, strategic thinking and direction in a fast-paced, diverse, high-growth environment. * Technically astute, business-oriented engineering manager with proven abilities. * Able to thrive in chaos and to success within an informal 'start-up' environment. Flexibility to adjust in a continually changing environment. * Superior leadership, interpersonal and communication skills required. *Department:* Science and Technology *Location:* Honolulu, HI (Oahu)
          4 Most Expensive Cities for Retirees      Cache   Translate Page      
4 Most Expensive Cities for Retirees kcarsella Wed, 03/13/2019 - 08:41
The average U.S. household over 65 years of age spends a little more than $49,000 per year, but in four cities, annual cost of living is closer to $100,000. 

The average U.S. household over 65 years of age spends a little more than $49,000 per year, but in four cities, annual cost of living is closer to $100,000. 

Using BLS data, GoBankingRates.com analyzed likely average spending for retirees in 100 U.S. cities. The findings show that in San Francisco and San Jose, Calif., New York City, Seattle, and Honolulu, retirees' average annual cost of living expenses are between $99,579 (Honolulu) and $151,103 in San Francisco, Realtor.com reports. In only two U.S. cities do retirees spend less than an average $40,000 per year, both in Ohio: Cleveland ($38,147), and Toledo ($38,643).

The biggest reason the Bay Area takes three of the top 10 spots on this list? Housing costs, explains GoBankingRates’s Lead Researcher and Data Analyst Andrew DePietro: “Housing is the biggest component of overall cost of living, and with median home prices just above and below $1 million — San Fran. is over $1 million, San Jose in the $900,000s — the cost is incredibly heavy.” He adds that non-housing costs like health care are also “markedly more expensive” in the Bay Area than in lower cost areas.

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          $1.3M cash for home of Honolulu couple in corruption probe      Cache   Translate Page      
A U.S. judge has approved the sale of a home belonging to a retired Honolulu police chief and his former prosecutor wife mired in a corruption investigation. A buyer is...
          Heidi Swedberg Net Worth      Cache   Translate Page      

Heidi Swedberg was born on the 3rd March 1966, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA and is an actress and a musician, possibly most famous for her appearance in NBC’s hit sitcom “Seinfeld”, in which she portrayed Susan Ross, the fiancée of Jerry Seinfeld‘s best friend, George Costanza. She is also the founder of her own Heidi …

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          Hiroshi Aruga      Cache   Translate Page      
95, of Hilo died on January 17, 2019 in Honolulu. Private services held. Family requests no monetary offering. Arrangements Provided By: Hawaiian Memorial Park Mortuary
          Chauncey Wesley Kam      Cache   Translate Page      
63, of Kaneohe, Hawai'i died on Friday, February 15, 2019 in Lihue, Kaua'i. Chauncey was born in Honolulu to Thomas & Annabelle Kam on February 10, 1956. He graduated from St. Louis High School in 1974. He worked for Kam's Express Trucking for ov...
          Garrett Kazuhiro Serikawa      Cache   Translate Page      
86, of Kailua, died in Honolulu on February 22, 2019. He was born in Honolulu. Visitation: 2pm; Services: 3:30pm on Sunday, March 17, 2019 at Nuuanu Memorial Park & Mortuary.
          Anna Leigh Alisna      Cache   Translate Page      
61, of Las Vegas, Nevada, died on November 13, 2018 in Las Vegas. She was born on December 13, 1956 in Honolulu, Hawaii. Celebration of Life: 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at Kualoa Beach Park.
          Oran G Watson      Cache   Translate Page      
50, of Waimanalo, died in Honolulu on February 24, 2019. He was born in Honolulu. Visitation: 4:30 PM; Services: 5:30 PM on Wednesday, March 20, 2019 at Hawaiian Memorial Park. Scattering of ashes.
          Masao Uyehara      Cache   Translate Page      
99, of Honolulu, died in Honolulu on February 27, 2019. He was born in Kaneohe. Private servicers were held.
          Masaichi Miyashiro      Cache   Translate Page      
91, of Honolulu, died in Honolulu on February 27, 2019. He was born in So. Hilo. Visitation: 10 a.m.; Services: 11 a.m. on Thursday, March 21, 2019 at St. Theresa Catholic Church. Inurnment: 10 a.m. on Friday, March 22 at Valley of...
          Abraham K. Kaluna      Cache   Translate Page      
60, of Honolulu, died in Ewa Beach on January 10, 2019. He was born in Honolulu. Visitation: 9:30 am on Friday, March 22, 2019 at Auwaiolimu Congregational Church. Inurnment: 1:00 pm at National Cemetery of the Pacific. ...
          Gerald H.S. “Jerry” Chun      Cache   Translate Page      
79, of Honolulu, died in Kailua, Hawaii on February 21, 2019. He was born in Honolulu, Hawaii. Celebration of Life: 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 17, 2019 at St. Peter's Episcopal Church. Visitation will follow services. ...
          Simi Siaumau Mapu      Cache   Translate Page      
65, of Laie, died in Honolulu on March 8, 2019. He was born in Honolulu. Visitation: 9:00AM; Services: 11:30AM Bishop's Service on Friday, March 15 at LDS Laie North Stake Center (Front Chapel). Burial: 1:00PM at Laie Cemetery. ...
          Blake, Heidegger, Buddhism, and Deep Ecology: A Fourfold Perspective on Humanity's Relationship to Nature      Cache   Translate Page      
February 2007

Romanticism and Buddhism

Blake, Heidegger, Buddhism, and Deep Ecology: A Fourfold Perspective on Humanity's Relationship to Nature

Louise Economides, University of Montana

This study examines the controversy surrounding Deep Ecology and argues that this branch of ecological theory usefully interrogates anthropocentric humanism. Parallels between Deep Ecology and Buddhist thought are explored as a means of countering the charge that Deep Ecology is narrowly 'romantic,' while its endebtedness to Romanticism, particularly that evident in William Blake and Martin Heidegger's phenomenology, is also acknowledged. This essay appears in _Romanticism and Buddhism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

  1. Deep ecology, that branch of environmental philosophy that most radically challenges the assumptions of anthropocentric humanism, has recently become something of a bête-noir within mainstream ecological thought. Following Luc Ferry's influential linking of deep ecology with fascism in The New Ecological Order, many environmental thinkers have published work criticizing the movement's anti-modernism and potentially totalitarian holism. For example, in "Ecofascism: An Enduring Temptation," Michael Zimmerman identifies instances of such holism in the politics of noted European environmentalist Dr. Walter Schoenichen and in American environmentalist J. Baird Collicott's early approval of deep ecology's "biocentric" philosophy. Citing Aldus Leopold's collectivist land ethic as a major influence upon American biocentrists, Zimmerman sums up the threat of organic holism at work in certain branches of deep ecological thought:

    According to Leopold, 'the land' refers to the internally related complex of organic and inorganic elements . . . that constitute a particular biome or bioregion. Leopold sometimes described these elements as being analogous to the organs of an organism. To survive, an organism's organs must cooperatively limit their behavior in ways that serve the higher good of the whole organism. Individual organisms lack ethical importance, for they are temporary instantiations of enduring species whose interlocking relationships constitute 'the land.' (400)

    If taken as a biological foundation for political policy, it is not difficult to see how Leopold's land ethic can lead to a form of holistic totalitarianism wherein the rights of individuals are automatically subordinated to the collective good. Similarly, in Imagining Nature: Blake'sEnvironmental Poetics, literary critic Kevin Hutchings analyzes the Polypus in Blake's Jerusalem as a "travesty or parody of the holistic relationality which is a definitive yet ultimately irreducible or undefinable trait of Blakean 'Life'" (194). Hutchings analyzes the Polypus as a figure whereby Blake explores the horrific implications of a human society that has been "overwhelmed by the 'Outside' or objective universe" (196) to such an extent that it behaves like an assimilating "organism" in which "the individual human loses all autonomous identity." He goes on to link such a totalitarian vision with Arne Naess's philosophy:

    One of the founders of the 'deep ecology' movement, Naess advocates an ethic of human 'identification' with all life, a mode of relationship entailing [according to critic Ralph Pite] 'an extension of sympathy that reaches so far and becomes so constant that the self loses any desire to differentiate between itself and the world.' (quoted in Hutchings 197)

    Far from offering a desirable alternative to modernity's dualistic alienation of human beings from nature as a domain to be dominated in the name of civilization, Hutchings's deep ecological Polypus embodies an inverse, pathological form of identification which "entails a holistic totalitarianism that actually forecloses ethical possibilities" (197).

  2. Such critiques are important insofar as they identify regressive elements within the deep ecology movement that, in the name of holism, seek to efface différance and to deny political contingency via recourse to specious biological determinism. The historical consequences of such ideology in Nazi "blood and soil" totalitarianism should serve as a powerful reminder of the risks entailed in reactionary dismissals of modernity and of humanism's ethical legacy for our species. However, as Cary Wolfe and other scholars have pointed out, traditional liberal humanism is—in and of itself—theoretically "impoverished" when it comes to providing non-anthropocentric models for how to conceive the rights of non-human species. Indeed, changes currently underway in global ecology and in technology indicate that non-human nature is rapidly being altered by human culture to such an extent that any distinguishable difference between what is "natural" and what is artificial may soon be rendered meaningless. Although the cultural dimension of nature's meaning has always been a product of human artifice, the scope of physical changes underway in today's global weather systems, increasingly ubiquitous genetically modified organisms, and in continually shrinking habitat for endangered species all suggest that nature's material "différance" is being effaced by humanity on an unprecedented scale.  Indeed, it is the latter erasure that has led contemporary ecologists such as Bill McKibben to conclude that our era marks the "end of nature" and philosophers such as Michel Serres to argue that global culture has itself become a force of nature, the human equivalent of plate tectonics (16). In other words, if we continue to apply powerful technology under the influence of a traditionally humanist mindset that remains blind to the pitfalls of anthropocentrism, nature as an "outside" will cease to function as a useful counterbalance to human activity or as a domain which provides a window onto other modes of being. In essence, the risk of humanity being reduced to a subset of biological nature feared by opponents of totalitarian holism seems far less likely today than an opposite (equally problematic) monism wherein nature is completely subsumed by the category of the human.

  3. Insofar as it attempts to inaugurate a means of thinking alternatives to the latter dilemma, deep ecology remains a significant facet of environmental philosophy. Of all the major schools of ecological thinking currently available, deep ecology addresses most directly the problem of anthropocentrism and the need to re-consider the status of non-human entities as co-inhabitants of planet earth. It does so primarily via the Deep Ecology Platform (DEP)'s recognition of "intrinsic value" in all life forms and its assertion that human beings have no essential "right" to reduce the richness of biodiversity "except to satisfy vital needs" (Naess and Sessions quoted in Deep Ecology 70). Although the concepts of "inherent worth" and humanity's "vital needs" are subject to deconstruction, the platform nonetheless raises the question of why non-human life has traditionally been excluded from "subject" status in western thought, and (therefore) from inclusion within the sphere of "intrinsic value" and/or unalienable rights. Indeed, the notion of intrinsic value, I will argue, necessarily compliments the principle of "wide identification" that also underwrites deep ecological thought as an "ultimate premise" (Glasser 219). As is illustrated in Zimmerman's and Hutchings's analysis, the charge that deep ecology promotes totalitarian holism hinges largely upon exclusive attention to the "identification" principle without an acknowledgement of the tension that is produced by deep ecology's concurrent inclusion of the "intrinsic value" principle. At a fundamental level, the latter represents an attempt to acknowledge the value of both "human and nonhuman" diversity, as reflected in the platform's second basic principle: "richness and diversity of life forms contribute to the realization of [intrinsic] values" (Naess and Sessions quoted in Deep Ecology  70). It is difficult to see how a commitment to human diversity as a "value in [itself]" gels with the charge of totalitarian holism leveled by critics of deep ecology. Moreover, diverse traditions have informed the philosophical premises of the DEP (including Spinozan Christianity, feminism, pre-industrial or "primal" cultures, ecological science, contemporary physics and—particularly significant for the present study—Romanticism and Eastern religion).

  4. The humanist tradition in Western thought enables us to contemplate human life's "intrinsic value," arguably one of the most important ethical achievements of this philosophy. Although subject to the charge of logical fallacy (it might be argued that nothing has inherent value but that all value derives from human attribution), the principle nonetheless possesses a certain wisdom insofar as it guards against the reduction of value to utility. This is why Kant's "categorical imperative" asserts that it is wrong to see a human being as a "means" to some end rather than as an "end in his/herself"—i.e. to see subjects in terms of their functional utility rather than as entities with a value that transcends all notions of use. Following in this tradition, Naess attempts to extend the concept of what constitutes an "end in itself" to non-human entities. Thus, following Tom Regan, he defines "intrinsic value" as "the presence of inherent value in a natural object . . . independent of any awareness, interest, or appreciation of it by any conscious being" (Regan quoted in Naess  197). The humanist tradition, however, maintains that differences in kind which exist between humans and animals (language use, rationality, capacity for ethical behavior) justifies their exclusion from the domain of "intrinsic rights." For example, Kant maintained that because animals lacked consciousness, they could not be ends in themselves but were mere means to human ends. Given recent discoveries regarding animal consciousness in the field of cognitive ethology and regarding humanity's close genetic kinship with other animals, many of the discriminatory markers invoked by earlier humanist thinkers have proven to be problematic and/or not nearly as clearly defined as was once believed. Deep ecology challenges us to reconsider why we continue to deny that non-human life can also be perceived as possessing inherent worth and why, for purposes of expediency, human beings should automatically have the right to determine a natural entity's value, or, conversely, to deny it. In order to consider the possibility that non-human life forms might possess intrinsic value, deep ecologists have had to seek philosophical models beyond those afforded in humanism, insights derived from non-dominant traditions within Western thought and in Eastern traditions such as Buddhism.   

  5. Humanity's ability to identify with certain non-human life forms may at first seem to be a sufficient basis for attributing intrinsic value to an entity, yet in actuality identification alone in no way ensures that an organism's right to life will be acknowledged. For example, human beings might identify with a tiger's strength and beauty or a wolf's intelligence, yet this very identification contributes to the slaughter of tigers for aphrodisiac products in the Far East and has contributed to our competitive drive to exterminate the wolf in the West. Likewise, the popularity of bird feathers and furs as objects of aesthetic admiration (human identification with the beauty of these things) has contributed to extinction and/or drastic reduction in the populations of other animals. This is why "wide identification" alone is an insufficient principle upon which to ground an ecological philosophy that goes beyond the limitations of traditional humanism. Conversely, if we cannot identify with non-human life at all (seeing human interests as being entirely distinct from the interests of other organisms and denying the latter a capacity for thought or feeling) then we also run the risk of objectifying and exploiting natural entities as wholly alien "others." In an effort to avoid either scenario, deep ecology attempts to counterbalance "wide identification" with an acknowledgement of all life's "intrinsic value." The great risk of this strategy is that, from a conventionally rational perspective, it may appear to be incoherent. Operating from within such a perspective, one might critique the logic of asking human beings to identify with natural entities while simultaneously asserting that life's value is ultimately "independent" of any human "awareness, interest, or appreciation" of it. From such a standpoint, a philosophy must choose whether it bases its ethical claims upon principles of sameness (identification) or différance (attribution of value to things because they resist the homogenizing effects of identification).              

  6. This paper will make a case for the necessity of deep ecology's inclusion of these apparently contradictory (but actually complementary) principles within its philosophical framework. Three key sources of deep ecological thought—Romanticism, Martin Heidegger's philosophy, and Buddhism— collectively illustrate the importance of combining both "wide identification" and "intrinsic value" in one's environmental ethos. William Blake's monistic art demonstrates the vital importance of human identification with nature; Martin Heidegger's late philosophy outlines the limitations of identification and the need to acknowledge "intrinsic value" in non-human entities; and Buddhist thought parallels both approaches, providing a means for recognizing their complementarity. Conceptually, this essay will revolve around the insight suggested in Zen master Ch'ing-Yüan's famous sermon on mountains and waters (Sheng-yu Lai  358-359). Ch'ing-Yüan states that when he first began to study Zen, mountains were mountains and waters were waters, when he thought he understood Zen, mountains were not mountains and waters were not waters, and when he actually experienced Zen awakening mountains were again mountains and waters were again waters. One way to interpret this sermon is to note that we in the West are inheritors of a dominant mode of dualistic thinking wherein mountains and waters appear to be objects existing "outside" the human subject, which could be likened to the first phases of understanding in Ch'ing-Yüan's sermon. However, we also inherit a less dominant tradition (Romanticism) that seeks to foster a mode of consciousness that transforms mountains and waters into phenomena the subject identifies with on a deeper level. In this second phase of awareness, mountains no longer appear to be the objects they once were, but take on an altered phenomenological status within the mind of the perceiver. Yet, such identification must go a step further in order for the human subject to achieve a truly enlightened relationship with mountains and waters. A third phase must be achieved wherein mountains and waters again are acknowledged as being separable from humanity, although this insight is now accompanied by a greater sense of compassion than was available at the outset. Inspired by Ch'ing-Yüan's sermon, this paper will consider whether deep identification is a necessary prerequisite to "letting things be," by acknowledging that such identification does not require a one way projection of human identity onto nature, nor an insistence that nature be absolutely revealed to us. True identification humbly acknowledges the limits of human understanding and values the mystery of nature's "suchness"—its irreducible otherness—by creating a space for acknowledging its "intrinsic value."

  7. In "Blake's Deep Ecology, or the Ethos of Otherness," critic Mark Lussier usefully revises the traditional characterization of Blake as an archetypal champion of art and reviler of nature as something hostile to the imagination. As he convincingly illustrates, what Blake objected to was the Cartesian construct of nature as an object domain separable from human consciousness, a world of dead matter that could be exploited ad infinitum to benefit humanity's estate. In such a view, nature's unpredictability is effaced within a mechanistic framework that characterizes it as a machine-like system composed of discreet parts, whose power can be harnessed by human beings. Nature remains a material other, but one that can be controlled by humanity. Blake's texts—perhaps more than those of any other Romantic poet—consistently subvert this construction of nature and the anthropocentric subjectivity that underwrites it. This is because of his conviction (expressed in a 1799 letter to Rev. Dr. Trusler) that "to the Eyes of the Man of Imagination Nature is Imagination itself" (Complete Poetry  702). For Blake, nature and humanity are in fact one, originally unified in Albion, the Eternal Man. Albion's fragmentation gave rise to the dualistic illusion that humanity is separate from nature, but Imaginative perception—particularly that enacted in poetic reflection—reveals the true interconnection of all things. In order to experience what a deep ecologist might term "wide identification" with nature, however, Blake asserted that we must revise our atomistic understanding of subjectivity in order to comprehend all existence as reflecting the Human Form Divine. Within this monistic schema, all entities share humanity's capacity for intellect, feeling, and "speech" because, on a deep level, they are synonymous with the human mind or imagination.  

  8. Blake realized that human identification with nature requires an acknowledgment of how non-human entities "signify" even though they don't literally possess human language. This is why, in poems such as "The Book of Thel" natural entities "speak" to Thel in the sense that they are capable of educating her if she is receptive to their lessons. As Lussier points out, this poem anticipates what we would today describe as an ecological awareness that "every thing that lives, / Lives not alone, nor for itself" (II: 26-27)—that although lilies, clouds, worms and human beings are (as individuals) impermanent, they sustain wider networks of life that do not pass away. This is why the Lilly (Blake's spelling) of the field explains she doesn't lament death because her life nourishes other animals like the lamb and the bee. Likewise, a little cloud explains that when it appears to vanish, it in fact remains part of the water cycle that gives "tenfold life" (II: 11) to other beings. Thel's existential dilemma (a uniquely human dilemma) is that she cannot accept either her mortality or her integration within the web of life. This is why Thel fears that she "live[s] only to be at death the food of worms," to which the cloud replies "Then if thou art the food of worms. O virgin of the skies, / How great thy use, how great thy blessing" (II: 23-26).  Here, the text playfully subverts Thel's speciesist revulsion at the prospect of becoming worm food by reversing the anthropocentric assumption that human beings use nature (but not vice versa) to celebrate Thel's inescapable "purposiveness" within ongoing natural cycles. Yet, due to a dualistic philosophy that locates subjectivity exclusively in the individual's disembodied mind, Thel is incapable of consciously accepting her own impermanence, an understanding that would provide insight into what Lussier terms "the splendors of a complementary, undifferentiated existence" (55). As many commentators have pointed out, an acceptance of impermanence as an existential condition common to all things is also a major facet of Buddhist thought, one that implies a need for the individual ego to free itself from a grasping mentality that would seek to escape or avoid such a realization. D. T. Suzuki sums up this stance succinctly: "we are all finite, we cannot live out of time and space . . . salvation must be sought in the finite itself . . . if you seek the transcendental, that will cut you off from this world of relativity, which is the same thing as annihilation of yourself" (14).

  9. Blake consistently presents "self-annihilation" an ethical imperative that permits a fundamental re-visioning of nature.  However, as Kevin Hutchings points out, such "annihilation" is not synonymous with the human subject's complete loss of identity due to its absorption into nature as an "outside," as may be erroneously inferred from Lussier's notion of "undifferentiated existence." On the contrary, in Blake's schema, the atomistic Cartesian subject is "annihilated" not by being absorbed into nature, but instead is transformed via a radical expansion outward so that it comes to be perceived as encompassing both humanity and nature within a higher "Human" identity. I would argue that what could be termed Blake's monistic "higher humanism" is something that distinguishes his art from both Zen Buddhist thought and from deep ecology. However, Blake's emphasis on phenomenological experience as a gateway to realizing this higher state of unity is something that also connects his thought with these approaches, as scholars such as John G. Rudy have noted. In poems such as Milton, self-annihilation is not merely arrived at via abstract contemplation, but is experienced as an ecstatic, embodied expansion of the self outward in moments of intense inspiration. What critic Michel Haar says of Rilke's attempt to explore the "'unheard of center' or 'pure space' of the heart of the world that is no longer subject or object" (130) seems equally descriptive of Blake's project. Haar asserts that when Rilke says "The birds fly through us" he "does not mean our consciousness represents the flight of the birds; not only do we experience their very flight in our body, but it happens through our body in a sense that is not simply a matter of perception but a fit of passion, of an ecstatic outburst , of 'sympathy,' of a fluttering of wings that quivers through and beyond us in a space that gathers and envelops us" (Haar 126).  Such ecstatic "sympathy" enables Blake to experience (via his imagination) the being of other animals and to assert that they have the ability to "signify" through and beyond the scope of language. A vivid instance of this occurs in Milton's famous lark song passage:

    The Lark sitting upon his earthly bed: just as the morn
    Appears; listens silent; then springing from the waving Corn-field! loud
    He leads the Choir of Day! trill, trill, trill, trill,
    Mounting upon the wings of light into the Great Expanse:
    Reechoing against the lovely blue & shining heavenly Shell.
    His little throat labours with inspiration; everyfeather
    On throat & breast & wings vibrates with the effluence Divine
    All Nature listens silent to him & the awful Sun
    Stands still upon the Mountain looking on this little Bird
    With eyes of soft humility, & wonder love & awe (II, 31:29-38)

    Inspired, the lark's song moves its whole being, makes it quake with "Divine effluence"; its whole body "vibrates" with inspiration, just as the poem resonates with a sound but half its own. The poet, like the bird, "labours" to give voice to this "ecstatic outburst" whereby the reader may experience something of the bird's vibrant trace: "the bird flies through us" when our bodies resonate with the text, or when we experience the lark's song first hand. The lark signifies as an emergent phenomenon at the juncture of bird, text, song and consciousness, so that its voice becomes indistinguishable from the poet's. Such identification, whereby the bird is no longer just a bird, nor the text just a vehicle for representation, would be quite impossible from a dualistic perspective. Similarly, Rudy interprets the lines "How do you know but ev'ry Bird that cuts the airy way,/ Is an immense world of delight, clos'd by your senses five" in Blake's "Marriage of Heaven and Hell" as "draw[ing] the reader meditatively into the prior oneness of text and bird, of text and world, as the emergent base of all reading" (102). Rudy notes that the question "How do you arrive at the knowledge of immensity suggested in the phrase 'immense world of delight'" meditatively leads the reader towards the insight that "the bird is not simply a representation of delight. It is the realm of delight itself, requiring not simply knowledge about but knowledge as that which is under the pen" (104). What we see in Blake's poetics that is common to both Zen and deep ecology is, therefore, an emphasis on action as a form of knowledge that compliments discourse, "a shift from saying to doing" (100).

  10. And yet, is Blake's romantic identification enough to provide us with a blueprint for subjectivity that moves beyond anthropocentrism to cultivate an ethos of alterity?  Given Blake's monistic position, his belief that all things are part of a higher Human (with a capital H) identity, one might question in what sense his poetry permits the thinking nature's alterity as true "otherness." It seems to me that Blake's thought is incompatible with deep ecology's desire to recognize nature's "inherent value" if by this we mean the ability to acknowledge nature's worth beyond any human "awareness, interest or appreciation" of it. Indeed, Blake's thinking does not break with humanism's tendency to see in man "the measure of all things"—why else would his figure of ultimate unification (Albion) bear a human form?  From an ecological perspective, Blake's monistic equation of nature with Human imagination poses potential difficulties. For example, what about the need to protect species or landscapes with which we humans have difficulty identifying (perhaps why there aren't more "save the leech or swamp" campaigns)?  Likewise, as aforementioned, too much human identification with a species can also lead to destructive ecological practices. Still more problematic is the potential to justify continuing radical alteration of the environment based on the principle of identity. In The Machine in the Garden, Leo Marx explores how the pastoral ideal guiding western cultivation of so-called "barren" wilderness is underwritten by the notion that all human arts (including technology) are a product of nature, that nature evolved our tool wielding species to permit its own transformation. In the humanities, the equivalent of this thinking is reflected in assertions that without art, nature would not signify—in Heideggerian terms, that nature requires the "clearings" of human language so that the "truth" of its being may shine forth. The common theme here is, to quote Blake, "where man is not, nature is barren." Yet deep ecology seeks to balance "wide identification" with an ability to recognize that nature (even without humans) constitutes a richly diverse panorama of life, much of which evolved long before humans arrived on the scene. Is there a way to balance identification with an acknowledgment that this domain has inherent value, a right to exist apart from us?           

  11. In order to create room for thinking the truth of inherent value, deep ecology draws upon both post-Romantic Western thought and insights from Eastern philosophy, most notably from the late work of philosopher Martin Heidegger and from Zen Buddhism. As Bill Devall and George Sessions note in Deep Ecology: Living as if Nature Mattered, Heidegger "made three contributions to the deep, long-range ecology literature," namely: his critique of Western philosophy's development after Plato (which "paved the way for the technocratic mentality that espouses domination over Nature"), his characterization of Thinking as something "closer to the Taoist process of contemplation than to Western analytical thinking," and finally, an ethos that urges modern culture to develop ways of "dwell[ing] authentically on this Earth" via increased alertness to one's bioregion and to natural processes (98). Despite these potentially useful ideas, however, it must be acknowledged that Heidegger not only remains a controversial figure due to his allegiances with Nazi politics, but also a problematic thinker even from an ecological perspective. For example, in Of Spirit: Heidegger and the Question, Jacques Derrida notes that Heidegger's characterization of animals as "world poor" in comparison to human beings constitutes a "discourse on privation [that] cannot avoid a certain anthropocentric or even humanist teleology" (55). In "Eating Well," Derrida even claims that Heidegger's theory of animal privation belies a "sacrificial structure" (113) that underwrites western culture's putting to death (in a non-criminal manner) of not only animals but also groups of de-humanized people. While I do not endorse Derrida's conclusion that Heidegger's desire to deny humanity's kinship with animals implies that human beings do not "have a responsibility to the living in general" (112), it is important to acknowledge potentially destructive components in Heidegger's thinking which tend to essentialize both human and animal identity alike. Philosophers sympathetic to deep ecology would do well to interrogate such flaws in Heidegger's critique of humanism, as Michael Zimmerman has in recent years.

  12. Nevertheless, in spite of the many shortcomings in Heidegger's work (and life), his thought does inaugurate, in a unique manner, a way towards thinking the underlying complimentarity of "wide identification" and "inherent value" which is critical to the deep ecological platform. For the sake of brevity, I will focus on the evolving relationship of "poiesis" to physis in Heidegger's work as an indication that nature's "presence" or truth may not ultimately require human artifice to be revealed.  I will focus on "The Origin of the Work of Art" (1935) and "The Thing" (1950) as texts that reflect, in Zimmerman's words, a turning away from an earlier anthropocentrism in Heidegger's thought when the philosopher concluded that "he could no longer conceive of being in terms of human understanding, but instead had to conceive of human understanding as an aspect of being itself" ("Heidegger" 247). That is, Heidegger's late philosophy regarding the mutually "appropriating mirror-play" ("The Thing" 179) of the fourfold (earth, sky, mortals and the divine) suggests that the "physis" (self-revealing event) of natural entities constitutes a form of value ("intrinsic value") that cannot be reduced to the clearings afforded by western poiesis (human facilitated modes of revealing), such as art and technology. Heidegger's eventual turn away from formal philosophy is sometimes attributed to his interest in poets writing in the Romantic tradition, such as Hölderlin and Rilke. Certainly in essays like "As When On a Holiday…" (1939) we can see the influence of romantic identification with nature at work. Here, Heidegger develops his hermeneutics of resonance, whereby the poet responds to the "call" of nature by creating linguistic "clearings" through which the truth of its "holy chaos" (82) can be simultaneously revealed and concealed, or perhaps more to the point, revealed in its concealment. But beyond the identification that permits the poet to respond to nature's sublimity, there is also a play in this essay between nature's presence and absence, a revealing and concealing flux that is not evident (or possible) in Blake's monistic ethos. Is there another tradition that Heidegger brings into play that enables insight into an irreducible nothingness that is ever at work in nature's revealing?  Many scholars have pointed to the influence of Eastern thought—and particularly Buddhism and Taoism—on the development of Heidegger's late work. The philosopher was already referencing Eastern thought in his lectures during the 1930's, worked with a Chinese scholar to translate Lao-tzu in 1946, and, upon reading D.T. Suzuki's Zen Buddhism in the 1950's, remarked "[i]f I understand this man correctly, this is what I have been trying to say in all my writings" (quoted in Suzuki  xi). As Zimmerman asserts in "Heidegger, Buddhism and deep ecology," there is much to suggest that Zen thinking enabled Heidegger's late philosophy of dwelling to go beyond anthropocentric identification in order to explore how all things (man-made and natural entities) are at once absent and present, gathering the world into presence by virtue of their emptiness.

  13. This shift is perhaps most evident in the different treatment of the relationship between art and nature in "The Origin of the Work of Art"(1935) and in "The Thing"(1950). In the "Origin" essay, Heidegger discusses the way a Greek temple "accomplishes" (175) the strife between earth and world necessary for the revealing of truth, and in doing so "acquire[s] the shape of destiny for human being" (167). That is, the temple both embodies occidental culture's pitting of human history (world) against an earth that is conceived of as being "ahistorical," and brings these domains into an antagonistic "belonging to one another"(174). Natural entities require the temple's work for their "truth" to come into presence, and historical world requires the earth as a foundation that grounds its unfolding destiny. Through a series of violent cuts, the temple's différance permits an otherwise invisible earth to become visible:

    Standing there, the building holds its ground against the storm raging
    above it and so first makes the storm itself manifest in its violence . . .
    The temple's firm towering makes visible the invisible space of air . . .
    Tree, grass, eagle and bull, snake and cricket first enter into their
    distinctive shapes and thus appear as what they are. The Greeks early called
    this emerging and rising in itself and in all things physis. (167-68)

    What is curious about the description of the temple's poiesis—its bringing into presence of nature—is the way in which the temple's "world" has usurped the original meaning of physis, which is an "emerging and rising in itself" [my emphasis]. That is, natural phenomena only become "visible" via the temple's enframing; by implication, earthly things cannot manifest themselves as what they truly are without the presence of human poiesis (which originally included both art and technology as forms of technē). The earth's reliance upon human enframing for its truth to appear is even more pronounced in the world of modern (as opposed to ancient) art. In his famous discussion of Van Gogh's painting of peasant shoes, Heidegger analyzes the way in which the painting reveals the truth of the shoes as equipment, which in turn reflects the truth of the peasant's "world" and, only indirectly, the earth's truth as part of the peasant's world. Indeed, the earth's status in the world revealed through this relatively modern, representational work of art is arguably even more removed than what we see in the Greek temple. This is because "earth" in the painting is subject to many layers of mediation: its traces are only indirectly apparent by considering signs of wear upon the shoes, the earth's significance for the (hypothetical) peasant woman who owns the shoes, the artist Van Gogh's interpretation of the peasant's world, the viewer's interpretation of Van Gogh's interpretations. On the one hand, Heidegger tells us that "in the shoes vibrates the silent call of the earth, its quiet gift of the ripening grain and its unexplained self-refusal in the fallow desolation of the wintry field" (159). On the other hand, we are told that the shoes are a completely de-contextualized aesthetic object: "there is nothing surrounding this pair of peasant shoes in or to which they might belong—only an undefined space.  There are not even clods of soil from the field or the field-path sticking to them, which would at least hint at their use." The question therefore arises as to how the earth can be at once present and absent in modern representational art; a paradox that can only be resolved by seeing the earth's "presence" as being entirely contingent upon the viewer's apprehension of its role in the peasant's experience of world: "on the leather lie the dampness and richness of the soil. Under the soles stretches the loneliness of the field-path as evening falls." The earth's physis as a mode of self-revealing is, therefore, particularly inaccessible within the alethias (clearings) afforded by Van Gogh's painting. Although a trace of the earth's materiality is evident in the ancient temple's marble and in the natural environment which surrounds it, nature's physis is completely subsumed in the painting by the shoes' utility, the peasant woman's world, and the decontextualized nature of the art object itself.

  14. By 1954, however, physis makes a remarkable comeback in "The Question Concerning Technology." There, Heidegger claims that not only art, but physis itself is a form of poiesis ("bringing forth"): "physis is indeed poiēsis in the highest sense," as evident in the "bursting of a blossom into bloom, in itself"(10). Rather than pitting technology's poiesis against earth's physis in an effort to alter the latter, Heidegger suggests that technology should ideally allow the earth's own presence to "be" instead of transforming nature into a gigantic "standing reserve"(17) of energy. What can account for the dramatic shift in physis's status in this late work? I believe a careful study of "The Thing," a text written four years before "The Question Concerning Technology," suggests that concepts derived from Eastern traditions may well have influenced this change in Heidegger's thought. In this text, there is an attempt to re-think the value of physis, of learning to respect what is inherent in nature—what Zen philosophy might refer to as nature's "suchness." Such thinking would see humanity's identification with nature as a first (not final) step towards granting natural entities the right to "just be" (inherent value). Paradoxically, deep identification entails granting non-human things a certain distance from humanity's modes of being, while also acknowledging that all things are "appropriated" within the fourfold "thinging" of earth, sky, mortals, and the divine. The former creates a space for thinking how the physis of natural entities constitutes a mode of poiesis, while the latter (in a suggestive parallel with Buddhist thought) implies that all things have "presence" by virtue of an underlying absence (emptiness).

  15. As in "The Question Concerning Technology" essay, "The Thing" begins with a discussion of the many ways in which contemporary technology appears to have virtually eliminated "distances in time and space" (165). That is, circa 1950, air travel, telecommunications, film, and other technologies seem to have "abolish[ed] every possibility" of temporal or spatial "remoteness" as great distances can be overcome with a speed that is historically unprecedented (an abolition that is even more pronounced in the 21st Century internet era). Yet, Heidegger argues that in spite of this "conquest of distances" there is a "terrifying" sense in which we remain remote from the nature of things: "the nearness of things remains absent" (166). In the course of the essay, it becomes clear that "things" include both man-made and natural entities, the phenomena that constitute "being" as a whole. Heidegger suggests that the "thingness of things" (167) remains remote from us as long as we conceive of things as objects:  "the thingly character of the thing does not consist in its being a represented object, nor can it be defined in any way in terms of objectness, the over-againstness, of the object." That is, the essence of thing-ness does not appear in "objective" scientific accounts of an entity's physical composition, or in modes of enframing which equate things merely with their utility as man-made products. Nor do we gain insight into the nature of things by dividing the world between "objects" represented within the subject's consciousness versus things-in-themselves (Kant's account): "'Thing-in-itself,' thought in a rigorously Kantian way, means an object that is no object for us, because it is supposed to stand, stay put, without a possible before: for the human representational act that encounters it" (177). Instead of seeing things as static objects that are "represented" within human consciousness, Heidegger proposes that we contemplate all things as instances of "gathering"—as clearings that enable a bringing together of four modes of being—earth, sky, mortals (human beings), and the divine—that mutually appropriate (179) each other. A thing's thing-ness therefore consists in its "bringing near" (178) the fourfold in a way that "sets each of the four free into its own, [yet] binds these free ones into the simplicity of their essential being toward one another" (179). For example, a jug "things" insofar as it holds the "gift" of wine, and thereby gathers the sky's water, the earth's grape, humanity's production of wine, and the presence of gods when wine is used in religious ceremonies (libation). Such gatherings constitute the thingness of things, something not only true of the products of human poiesis, but also of the physis of natural entities:

    Inconspicuously compliant is the thing: the jug and the bench, the footbridge and the plow. But tree and pond, too, brook and hill, are things, each in its own way. Things, each thinging from time to time in its own way, are heron and roe, deer horse and bull. Things, each thinging and each staying in its own way, are mirror and clasp, book and picture, crown and cross. (182)

    Two things are striking regarding this penultimate passage in "The Thing." First, there is an acknowledgement here that poiesis is not the only means whereby things come into "presence"; rather, all things do this insofar as they gather the fourfold, "each in [their] own way." A tree, for example, can also be said to "gather" the fourfold insofar as it is nourished by the earth's soil, and the sky's light can be affected by human care and perceived as a symbol of divine creation. Unlike what we see in the "Origin of Art" essay, Heidegger insists here that things do not appear as things "by meansof human making," but neither, he insists, do they appear "without the vigilance of mortals" (181). From a human perspective, things do not appear in their thing-ness unless we reconsider what it means to "dwell" more responsively in a world where we are always already part of a larger "dance of appropria[tion]" (180) over which we cannot exert ultimate control.  In acknowledging that all things gather the world, "each in [their] own way," Heidegger's thought inaugurates a way towards understanding natural entities' "inherent value" and challenges human beings to find ways to honor this value in their own poiesis (technological or artistic clearings).

  16. How did Heidegger arrive at such a different perspective on the relationship between physis and poeisis in his later work?  Scholars such as Reinhard May and Michael Zimmerman have suggested that Heidegger's encounters with Eastern thought—particularly his interest in Buddhism and Taoism—may well have influenced this shift. A crucial step toward acknowledging humanity's appropriation within the fourfold lies in recognizing a deeper relationship between emptiness and form than has traditionally been available in post-Platonic Western philosophy—a relationship convincingly elaborated within Eastern traditions. As Zimmerman argues, both Heidegger and Mahayana Buddhism acknowledge "humans can learn to 'let things be' only by gaining insight into the nothingness that pervades all things" ("Heidegger" 240). In Mahayana Buddhism, nothingness connotes the "emptiness" and impermanence of all things, yet is not synonymous with formless, chaotic negativity. Rather, the Sanksrit word for nothingness, "sunyata," is derived from a term meaning "to swell" (quoted in "Heidegger"  252), suggesting that emptiness can be conceived of  as a "clearing" or openness that constitutes a generative space in which things appear. It is no accident that Heidegger chooses a jug as the focus of his discussion in "The Thing." A jug is an ideal focus for critiquing of our understanding of things as solid, discreet objects, rather than "clearings" which gather the world.  The jug's "thing-ness" is not to be understood as synonymous with its material composition, but is instead suggested by its "holding" (or gathering) nature:

    When we fill the jug, the pouring that fills it flows into the empty jug. The emptiness, the void, is what does the vessel's holding. The empty space, this nothing of the jug, is what the jug is as the holding vessel . . . [t]he vessel's thingness does not lie at all in the material of which it consists, but in the void that holds. (169)

    In contrast to the Greek temple in the "Origin" essay, whose columns make the air visible, it is the emptiness of the jug, not its form, that constitutes its thingness. In Taoist fashion, the jug is a clearing through which the fourfold comes to presence, as it gathers together the earth's soil and the sky's rain in wine that mortals pour in libation to the gods. Indeed, as Reinhard May illustrates in Heidegger's Hidden Sources, "The Thing's" discussion of the jug remarkably parallels Chapt. 11 of Lao Tzu's exploration of how "[t]he work of pitchers consists in their nothingness" (30). Similarly, Zimmerman discusses suggestive parallels between Heidegger's characterization of the fourfold's mutually appropriating "mirror-play" and insight regarding the universe's luminosity in Mahayana Buddhism. In the most famous expression of this insight, the universe is conceived as the jewel net of the god Indra.  All things are analogous to "perfect gems" within this net (or network), and their reflective light is simultaneously produced by all the gems collectively, "no one of which stands in a 'superior' or 'causal' relation to the others" ("Heidegger" 253). Zimmerman argues that "Heidegger's account of the dance of earth and sky, gods and mortals, the dance in which things manifest themselves in the event of mutual appropriation, bears remarkable similarities to the Buddhist account of the moment-by-moment coproduction of self-luminous phenomena" (257).  

  17. Critics steeped within a Western tradition that posits the human individual's dignity and "inherent value" might find the suggestion that all things (human and otherwise) are "empty" has troubling implications if applied to political subjectivity, fearing that an emptying of selves is often a prerequisite of totalitarian political regimes or can lead to too intense an identification with the "objective" domain. For example, Brian Victoria's Zen War Stories makes a compelling case for a link between the Zen concept of "selflessness" and Japanese militarism during World War II, and Karla Poewe's New Religions and the Nazis similarly links the German Faith movement, militarism and Indo-Aryan religious doctrine, particularly Jakob Hauer's interpretation of Hindu texts such as the Bhagavad Gita.  Poewe claims that Hauer's efforts to forge a new Indo-Aryan religion with a fatalistic warrior code "anticipated justification of the deeds committed by the Nazi regime" (79). Such work, as with critiques of radical elements within the deep ecology movement, usefully analyzes potential effects of state-sanctioned religious ideology, instead of maintaining that religious discourse necessarily "transcends" politics. As convincing as such studies are as explorations of how Eastern thought has been appropriated by totalitarian regimes, it is problematic to conclude that Buddhist and/or Hindu thought is essentially nationalistic and/or totalitarian. To draw such a conclusion is to not only distort what Hirata Seikō describes as "the absolute rejection of war in ancient Indian Buddhism" (4), but also to deny that any set of ideas is subject to variable interpretation or, more rigorously, (re-) construction over time.  As is well known, when Chinese scholars translated Indian Hinayanan and Mahayanan texts, they interpreted Buddhism within the framework of existing Taoist thought, resulting in "Cha'an" Buddhism; likewise, Japanese monks reinterpreted these texts to form Zen Buddhism. Any western interpreter of Buddhism brings to the table certain cultural and/or ideological lenses through which he or she constructs interpretations of this thought. Concepts such as "emptiness" are therefore not only subject to ideological appropriation (in both a positive and negative sense), but also to unintended distortion. As John Rudy and other interpreters of Zen Buddhism have pointed out, a western, dualistic tradition that divides the world between subjects and objects can contribute to misinterpretation of the concept of emptiness. In Romanticism and Zen Buddhism, Rudy points out that:

    For Zen Buddhists, engaging [a] spiritual ground [inclusive yet prior to subject-object dualities] follows patterns of meditative emptying by which individuals relinquish the compulsion either to assert independence through radical emphases on difference or to establish unity through variant modes of bridged togetherness. The result is neither subjective nor objective. It is, rather, an opening process that reveals how each thing in nature is both an autonomous unit of codependent activity and a holistic manifestation of ultimate reality. (xiii)

    Rather than underwriting identification with "objective" or state-sanctioned structures (totalitarian or otherwise), emptiness as Rudy interprets it suggests an alternative to both subjective individualism and objective obedience to collectives. Indeed, it is such alternatives to dualistic accounts of human subjectivity vis-à-vis the rest of the living world that appealed not only to Heidegger in the later stages of his philosophy, but also continues to appeal to deep ecologists. As "The Thing" makes clear, insight into the self's "appropriation" within the world's mirror play does not entail a collapsing of any one dimension of the fourfold into the others.  Human beings still retain a unique manner of "gathering" the world in relation to other beings: "men alone, as mortals, by dwelling attain to the world as world" (182)—that is, human beings alone can self-consciously choose the mode of their dwelling and experience the world as one of many possible worlds. Nonetheless, other non-human beings also participate in the fourfold, "each in its own way," and this diversity implies the inherent value of each unique mode of gathering. The metaphor of "mirror-play" enables Heidegger to suggest a deep identification between human and non-human actors in the "dance" of creation, yet this mirroring never stabilizes into a form of monistic holism. I would suggest that this is because, unlike his Romantic predecessors such as William Blake, Heidegger ultimately resists equating "nature" with a higher Human identity, such as the Imagination. Instead, the philosopher, like deep ecologists influenced by his thought, challenges us to think of identification and inherent worth as a productive "coincidence of opposites" (in Dennis McCort's parlance), the kind of paradoxical truth embraced by Buddhist and Toaist traditions. If we re-conceive the identity of all things as at once unique (having inherent value) and empty (inescapably appropriated by other beings), a truly non-anthropocentric understanding of nature becomes possible. Paradoxically, only by learning to "identify" with the emptiness of all things while retaining a sense of our distinctive perspective may we eventually find it in ourselves to allow mountains to be mountains and waters to be waters.

 

Works Cited

Blake, William. The Complete Poetry & Prose of William Blake. Ed. David V. Erdman. New York: Doubleday, 1988.

Derrida, Jacques. "'Eating Well,' or the Calculation of the Subject: An Interview with Jacques Derrida." Trans. Peter Connor and Avital Ronell. WhoComes After the Subject? Ed. Eduardo Cadava et al. New York: Routledge, 1991.

---. Of Spirit: Heidegger and the Question. Trans. Geoffrey Bennington and Rachel Bowlby. Chicago: U of Chicago Press,  1989.

Devall, Bill and George Sessions. Deep Ecology: Living as if Nature Mattered. Salt Lake City: Gibbs M. Smith, 1985.

Ferry, Luc. The New Ecological Order. Trans. Carol Volk. Chicago: U of Chicago Press, 1995.

Glasser, Harold. "Demystifying the Critiques of Deep Ecology." EnvironmentalPhilosophy:  From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology. 2nd Ed. New Jersey:  Prentice Hall, 1998. 212-226.

Haar, Michel. The Song of the Earth: Heidegger and the Grounds of the Historyof Being. Trans. Reginald Lilly. Bloomington: IU Press, 1993.

Heidegger, Martin. "As When On a Holiday. . . ." Elucidations of Hölderlin's Poetry. Trans. Keith Hoeller. New York: Humanity Books,  2000.  

---. "The Origin of the Work of Art." Basic Writings. Ed. David Farell Krell. San Francisco: Harper, 1993. 139-212. 67-99.

---. "The Question Concerning Technology." The Question Concerning Technology andOther Essays. Trans. William Lovitt. New York: Harper & Row, 1977. 3-35.

---. "The Thing." Poetry, Language, Thought. Trans. Albert Hofstadter. New York: Harper, 1971. 165-186.

Hutchings, Kevin. Imagining Nature: Blake's Environmental Poetics. Montreal: McGill-Queen's UP, 2002.

Lussier, Mark. "Blake's Deep Ecology, or the Ethos of Otherness." Romantic Dynamics: ThePoetics of Physicality. New York: St. Martin's, 2000. 47-63.

Marx, Leo. The Machine in the Garden: Technology and the Pastoral Ideal inAmerica. New York: Oxford UP, 1964.

May, Reinhard. Heidegger's Hidden Sources: East Asian influences on his work. Trans. Graham Parkes. New York: Routledge,  1996.

McCort, Dennis. Going beyond the Pairs: The Coincidence of Opposites in GermanRomanticism, Zen and Deconstruction. Albany: SUNY Press,  2001.

McKibben, Bill. The End of Nature. New York: Doubleday, 1999.

Naess, Arne. "The Deep Ecological Movement: Some Philosophical Aspects." Environmental Philosophy. 2nd Ed. 193-211.

Poewe, Karla. New Religions and the Nazis. London: Routledge, 2006.

Rudy, John G. Romanticism and Zen Buddhism. New York: Edwin Mellen Press, 2004.

Seikō, Hirata. "Zen Buddhist Attitudes to War." Trans. Thomas Kirchner. Rude Awakenings:Zen, the Kyoto School, & the Question of Nationalism. Eds. James W. Heisig and John C. Maraldo. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1994.

Serres, Michel. The Natural Contract. Trans. Elizabeth MacArthur and William Paulson. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan Press, 1998.

Sheng-yu Lai, Robert. "Blake and Zen Buddhism: A Study of the Uses of Orthodox Religion." Tamkang Review 18.4 (1987): 351-369.

Suzuki, D.T. Zen Buddhism: Selected Writings of D. T. Suzuki. Ed. William Barrett. New York: Doubleday, 1996.

Victoria, Brian Daizen. Zen War Stories. New York: Routledge Curzon, 2003.

Wolfe, Cary. "Old Orders for New: Ecology, Animal Rights and the Poverty of Humanism." Animal Rites: American Culture, the Discourse of Species, and Posthumanist Theory. Chicago: U of Chicago Press, 2003. 21-43.

Zimmerman, Michael.  "Ecofascism: An Enduring Temptation." Environmental Philosophy:From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology. 4th ed. New Jersey:  Prentice Hall,  1998. 390-408.

---. "Heidegger, Buddhism and Deep Ecology." The Cambridge Companion toHeidegger. Ed. Charles Guignon. New York: Cambridge UP, 1993. 240-269.

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