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          Mother's Family Tree Necklace Personalized Mom Gift • Mother's Day Gift Idea from Daughter or Son • Unique Gift for Mom • Initial Necklace by burnish      Cache   Translate Page      

45.00 USD

A hand-stamped custom keepsake necklace to be worn often and treasured. Lovely lightweight leaves flutter on your neck. Choose your own initial, the initial of someone you love, or your children's initials. Each necklace is individually crafted just for you, ensuring you receive special, one-of-a-kind jewelry. Handmade in Alaska from solid sterling silver.

► DETAILS

• 100% sterling silver
• Hand stamped initial
• Hand cast leaf is 0.5 x 0.3 inches
• Cable chain & mini lobster clasp
• Choose from 16, 18, 20, or 22 inch chain

► THE STORY BEHIND THE DESIGN

Wearing your loved ones' initials daily is such a special thing, that I decided to make another hand stamped design with delicate, soothing leaves. I created the leaf design using a real leaf, so you can carry the beauty of nature with you. After each leaf is cast, I hand stamp it with your initial, then add a patina and polish. I pair all of my necklace designs with my favorite sturdy, but dainty cable chain, which I solder on the ends to close with a mini lobster clasp. So much thought and love go into each necklace! Enjoy!

► WHY ORDER FROM BURNISH?

• Jewelry with meaning. Intentionally created to reflect your unique self.
• Long lasting pieces, crafted from the highest quality materials.
• Timeless designs that you can love forever.
• More than 24,000 sales with 5 star rating.
• Happiness Guarantee: Free 30 day returns/exchanges in the USA.
• All items come thoughtfully gift packaged.
• Handcrafted with care in Anchorage, Alaska.

► GIFTS

All jewelry comes individually packaged in a signature gift box. If you would like, additional gift wrapping if available at checkout. If you'd like to include a gift message, you may do so at checkout. It will be printed on a gift tag.

► PRODUCTION TIME

All items are made to order in 3 BUSINESS days. This does not include weekends, so your order may take up to 5 days to ship, depending on the day it’s ordered. If you need it sooner, select Priority Express shipping is available, but order production time still applies. Please message me with any questions or requests.

► SEE WHAT’S NEW & EXCITING

Instagram: instagram.com/burnishjewelry (@burnishjewelry)
Facebook: facebook.com/burnishjewelry

► ABOUT BURNISH

Everything is made by me, Rebekah Hemmer, in a happy little studio in the woods in Anchorage, Alaska. Since it’s kitchen table origins in 2011, my jewelry line, Burnish, was created with the intent to offer meaningful jewelry as an alternative to mass-produced fashion.

I am thoroughly invested in ensuring that my customers receive beautiful jewelry they can enjoy for years to come.

Please don't hesitate to contact me with any questions or comments. xoxo, Rebekah


          Teardrop Birthstone Earrings in Sterling Silver • Woodland Branch Silver Earrings Handmade • Personalized Custom Jewelry Women Gift for Her by burnish      Cache   Translate Page      

46.00 USD

A teardrop shaped branch pendant makes an eye-catching focal point for these organic earrings. Pair it with your (or their) birthstone, or just select your favorite stone! Each pair of earrings is individually crafted just for you, ensuring you receive special, one-of-a-kind jewelry. Handmade in Alaska from solid sterling silver and natural gemstones.

► DETAILS

• All solid sterling silver.
• Choose your birthstone.
• Gemstones are 4mm in diameter.
• Overall earring length is 1 3/8 inch.
• Comes with clear earring stoppers.
• Arrives beautifully packaged, with additional wrapping available in cart.
• Made to order in 3 business days.

► WHY ORDER FROM BURNISH?

• Long lasting pieces, crafted from the highest quality materials.
• Happiness Guarantee: Free 30 day returns in the USA.
• Since 2011, more than 20,000 sales with a 5 star review rating.
• Timeless designs that you can love forever.
• All items come thoughtfully packaged.
• Handcrafted with care in Anchorage, Alaska.

► GIFTS

All orders come packaged in a signature jewelry box. Additional gift wrapping and ribbon is available at checkout by selecting "this order is a gift" and checking the box for "gift wrap".

To include a message with the order check the box for "this order is a gift" and then you will be given the option to "add gift message for free". It will come printed onto a gift tag.

If you are ordering multiple items, and need them packaged in individual boxes, please leave me a note at checkout.

► PRODUCTION TIME

All items are made to order in 3 BUSINESS days. This does not include weekends, so your order may take up to 5 days before it ships, depending on the day it’s ordered. Please message me with any questions or requests.

► MORE BY BURNISH

https://www.etsy.com/shop/burnish

► MORE BIRTHSTONE JEWELRY

https://www.etsy.com/shop/burnish?&search_query=birthstone

► SEE WHAT’S NEW & EXCITING

Instagram: instagram.com/burnishjewelry (@burnishjewelry)
Facebook: facebook.com/burnishjewelry

► ABOUT BURNISH

Everything is made by me, Rebekah Hemmer, in a happy little studio in the woods in Anchorage, Alaska. Since it’s kitchen table origins in 2011, my jewelry line, Burnish, was created with the intent to offer meaningful jewelry as an alternative to mass-produced fashion.

I am thoroughly invested in ensuring that my customers receive beautiful jewelry they can enjoy for years to come.

Please don't hesitate to contact me with any questions or comments. xoxo, Rebekah


          This Provocative United Way Campaign Reads Between the Lines of Why Kids Drop Out      Cache   Translate Page      
If you assume a teenager who habitually skips school is a "lost cause" or a "bad kid," you wouldn't be alone. But you could be completely wrong. The United Way in Anchorage, Alaska, via agency Spawn Ideas, uses common misperceptions as a way to draw attention to the backstories of young dropouts whose reasons for...
          Clinical Psychologist (Care Manager)      Cache   Translate Page      
<h3>Position Description</h3> <p>The successful Optum Alaska <b>Clinical Psychologist</b> candidate will be a licensed Psychologist who has working knowledge and experience with serving children, adolescents, and adult Waiver target populations, and who is capable of reviewing authorization, utilization services, and psychological testing requests.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The primary responsibility of the Clinical Psychologist is to ensure the delivery of cost effective quality care that incorporates recovery, resiliency and person-centered services.&nbsp; They are also responsible for Level of Care guidelines, utilization management protocols, oversight and management with the Medical Director and Clinical Program Director as well as all utilization review, management and care coordination activities.&nbsp; In addition, they will provide clinical oversight to the clinical staff, and keep current regarding prevalent treatment protocols and philosophies; including those that address consumer cultural preferences and for ensuring that the usage of psycho-social rehabilitation services and psychological testing requests are aligned with clinical necessity. The Clinical Psychologist will also be responsible for maintaining the clinical integrity of the program; providing oversight to utilization management and quality staff; including consultation to community based clinicians.&nbsp; This includes providing timely services for the Optum operation and communication regarding necessity review and recommendations, service denial reviews, grievance issues, and clinical best practices guideline development.</p> <p>&nbsp; <b>Primary Responsibilities:</b></p> <ul> <li>Responsible for achieving appropriate utilization by performing reviews, denials, peer reviews and appeals; consulting with care management staff; using data to identify opportunities for improvement and implementing strong action plans for Medicaid enrollees</li> <li>Responsible for implementing a recovery philosophy working closely with the Recovery &amp; Resiliency staff by maintaining a knowledge base in rehabilitation and recovery principles and innovations; modeling principles of engagement, empowerment and learning with colleagues and employees, and training all staff in the practical implications of these principles with a particular emphasis on care management, alternative levels of care and network sufficiency</li> <li>Provide periodic supervision/in-service training to both Optum clinical staff and other staff as needed focusing on medical necessity, reason(s) for continued services, state requirements, appropriate practice and engagement, empowerment, recovery and rehabilitation</li> <li>Ensure receipt of mental health services</li> <li>Ensure systematic screening for behavioral health related disorders by using standardized and/or evidence-based approaches</li> <li>Promote preventive behavioral health strategies</li> <li>Provide peer to peer reviews and consultations</li> <li>Act as a liaison with Optum service area facilities, providers, and agencies as requested</li> <li>Provide all necessary reports on UM activities</li> <li>Complete all medical necessity reviews when Care Managers are unable to authorize rehabilitation continued stay</li> <li>Provide sufficient electronic documentation in the consumer record when a denial is made for either adult or child/adolescent</li> <li>Establish criteria and procedures for the Clinical Director review of clinical cases</li> <li>Provide consultation to Optum management and staff regarding such issues as clinical standards, policies, procedures, recovery and resiliency and best practices</li> <li>Conduct clinical reviews of contracted provider clinical records as requested</li> <li>Participate in Quality Assurance activities and audits</li> <li>Ability to be a successful Care Management advocate for local Alaskans</li> </ul> <p><b>Required Qualifications:</b></p> <ul> <li>Experience with multiple disciplines addressing broad range of diagnostic issues</li> <li>Demonstrated understanding of the clinical application of the principles of engagement, empowerment, rehabilitation and recovery</li> <li>PC proficiency, familiarity with computerized clinical data systems, data analysis and strong organizational skills necessary</li> <li>Knowledge of post-acute care planning such as home care, discharge planning, case management, and disease management</li> <li>Excellent communication, negotiation and customer service skills</li> <li>Experience in developing creative, innovative solution-based programs and initiatives</li> <li>Minimal local travel in Anchorage, AK</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>One year experience in managed care conducting utilization</li> <li>Care Management Experience</li> <li>Demonstrated commitment to assisting people to maintain in the community with maximum independence and self-sufficiency and understanding of the appropriate use of wraparound, in home stabilization services and natural community supports to maximize community tenure</li> <li>Ability to perform a highly diverse level of tasks and deliver quality outcomes in alignment with Optum mission</li> <li>Experience working with community based programs and resources designed to aid the Medicaid population</li> <li>Experience with Waiver target populations</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>OptumHealth is part of the family of companies that make UnitedHealth Group one of the leaders across most major segments of the US health care system.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>OptumHealth helps nearly 60 million Americans live their lives to the fullest by educating them about their symptoms, conditions and treatments; helping them to navigate the system, finance their health care needs and stay on track with their health goals. No other business touches so many lives in such a positive way. And we do it all with every action focused on our shared values of Integrity, Compassion, Relationships, Innovation &amp; Performance.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>At OptumHealth, you will perform within an innovative culture that's focused on transformational change in the health care system. You will leverage your skills across a diverse and multi-faceted business. And you will make contributions that will have an impact that's greater than you've ever imagined.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><i>Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V</i></p> <p><i>UnitedHealth Group is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment. In addition, employees in certain positions are subject to random drug testing.</i></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>Job FamilyMedical and Clinical Operations</li> <li>Business SegmentOptum Consumer Solutions Group</li> </ul> <p>Job Location Information</p> <ul> <li>affordable and quality health care should be available to everyone.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp; The fraudulent emails, which do not originate from any of UnitedHealth Group’s email domains, or those of any of its operating divisions, supposedly ask recipients to contact the sender to start the company’s hiring process by downloading software and/or requesting a fee. &nbsp; UnitedHealth Group will never request you download software or pay a fee of any sort to explore employment opportunities with our company.</p> <p>If you wish to verify the legitimacy of any email purporting to have been sent by or on behalf of UnitedHealth Group recruiters,&nbsp; please call 1-800-561-0861 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. CT, Monday - Friday, for assistance. You also may inquire via email to lifesbestwork@uhg.com.</p> <p>© 2019 Optum Global Solutions (Ireland) Limited. All rights reserved.</p> <p>UnitedHealth Group is committed to working with and providing reasonable accommodations to individuals with physical and mental disabilities. If you need special assistance or accommodation for any part of the application process, or you encounter technical difficulties, please call 1-800-561-0861 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. CT, Monday - Friday, for assistance.</p> <p>UnitedHealth Group is a registered service mark of UnitedHealth Group, Inc. The UnitedHealth Group name with the dimensional logo, as well as the dimensional logo alone, are both service marks for the UnitedHealth Group, Inc.</p> <p>Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, protected veteran status, disability status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, genetic information, or any other characteristic protected by law.</p> <p>UnitedHealth Group is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment.</p>
           Comment on Iditarod 2019 – Day 11 by JuanitaM       Cache   Translate Page      
Oh my god, I can't believe Petit scratched! I would have thought he and the dogs could have had a good long rest and still been able to finish in the upper middle group. Oh well, I'm sure he had good reasons. Obviously, I wasn't there! :-) The News Miner and Anchorage Daily News have blocked me now. Apparently, I have seen my quota of stories at this point on both my computer and phone. lol. I'm cheap, I don't pay for anything. I notice that the Berington twins are once again traveling in tandem as is their usual routine. Teaming up apparently works for them. They almost always finish in the upper half. I keep saying this, but every year, I'm always amazed at how far these dogs run in the Quest and the Iditarod. It boggles the mind, or at least it does mine! It would be like me running my dogs from Virginia to Texas. Or someone sledding from upstate New York to Ft. Lauderdale. My dogs might make it to the North Carolina border, maybe. There's a British guy on YouTube that is living in the US right now, and he talks about the size of the American states, and how many are larger than a standard country. He was shocked when he took a look at the area of Alaska (he was comparing states to the UK). I just don't think most people really understand that.
          Iditarod front runner drops out of race after dogs disagree over bathroom break      Cache   Translate Page      

A favorite to win the Iditarod sled dog race, a nearly 1,000 mile arctic haul across Alaska from Nome to Anchorage, dropped out of the event Monday less than 200 miles from the finish line because his dogs refused to continue.

Nicolas Petit of Girdwood, Alaska, and his 10 dogs were just off the...


          This Provocative United Way Campaign Reads Between the Lines of Why Kids Drop Out      Cache   Translate Page      
If you assume a teenager who habitually skips school is a "lost cause" or a "bad kid," you wouldn't be alone. But you could be completely wrong. The United Way in Anchorage, Alaska, via agency Spawn Ideas, uses common misperceptions as a way to draw attention to the backstories of young dropouts whose reasons for...

          Import Customer Service Agent - Commodity Forwarders Inc - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
With offices in Anchorage, Los Angeles, Miami, Orlando, Chicago, San Francisco, Seattle New York, Honolulu, Maui, Kona, Hilo, Kauai, we are well positioned to... $15 - $17 an hour
From Indeed - Tue, 22 Jan 2019 23:40:05 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          Domestic Customer Service Agent - Commodity Forwarders Inc - Honolulu, HI      Cache   Translate Page      
With offices in Anchorage, Los Angeles, Miami, Orlando, Chicago, San Francisco, Seattle New York, Honolulu, Maui, Kona, Hilo, Kauai, we are well positioned to... $15 - $17 an hour
From Indeed - Tue, 22 Jan 2019 23:35:50 GMT - View all Honolulu, HI jobs
          3/13/2019: NEWS: 50 States      Cache   Translate Page      
ALABAMA Beauregard: The Poarch Band of Creek Indians has donated $184,000 to cover funeral costs for all 23 victims of the May 3 tornado. ALASKA Anchorage: Pet licenses in the city can now come with digital codes aimed at more rapidly reuniting lost...
          Search continues for pilot missing northwest of Anchorage      Cache   Translate Page      

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Army National Guard says it’s continuing to search for a pilot missing since last week. The pilot’s hunting partner reported March 6 that the pilot and his Cessna 172 were overdue northwest of Anchorage. Inclement weather including turbulent wind and low clouds has hampered the search, which Tuesday focused on […]
          Higher freight costs take the shine of export log prices. Domestic supply is abundant, China demand stable, India prices under pressure      Cache   Translate Page      

At Wharf Gate (AWG) prices for logs delivered to ports around New Zealand decreased on average -NZ$5 per JASm3 in March from the highest February prices. This decrease in AWG prices is due to increased ocean freight costs for export log cargo.

Most CFR log prices in China were flat to a modest increase of +US$1 per JASm3. ‘A’ grade export now sells for up to US$143 per JASmin China and US$155 per JASmin India.

The domestic market for logs has continued the very stable start to 2019. There has been some capacity taken out of the pruned market with the closure of the Waverley sawmill, but other mills producing clear sawn timber are already at capacity.

Due to the drop in the AWG sale prices for export sawlogs the PF Olsen Log Price Index decreased -$3 in March to $134. The index is currently $6 above the two-year average, $9 above the three-year average, and $17 higher than the five-year average.

Domestic Log Market

Log Supply and Pricing

Prices for domestic log sales in March are mostly unchanged from February as most supply is locked in for the quarter. The settled weather around the country has caused log supply to increase with some mills and in particular those buying pruned logs, reporting an abundance of log supply.

Sawn Timber Domestic Demand

Most mills continue to report that 2019 sales levels are above 2018 levels. The continued fine settled weather in New Zealand is the likely cause of this solid demand. There was also a reduction in demand in 2018 as business was unsettled after the outcome of the New Zealand general election. But as usually happens, business realises there isn’t actually much change and gets on with their activities.

Sawn Timber Export Demand

The Australian market remains slow with reduced housing starts, and the Asian demand is increasing after the aforementioned Chinese holiday.  

The European clearwood market remains strong with some New Zealand supply about to be reduced after the closure of the Waverley sawmill.

The stable markets led to a less interesting market report, but the stability is good for the New Zealand forest industry.  

Export Log Markets

China

Total softwood log stocks increased across China during the Lunar New Year holiday period to just over 4.1 million m3. Daily uplift from the ports has steadily increased since this holiday period with current estimates between 60-70,000 mper day. The rate of offtake over the next month will likely determine the market direction for the next three to six months. Over 2018 the total softwood log market remained balanced with the number of days inventory supply in the 40-50 range. Log exporters expect a similar balanced position to be sustained through 2019.

The China log market is currently sitting at a sensitive point. Based on current CFR log prices and the China retail prices the log buyers cannot make a profit from New Zealand radiata logs. This does make Chinese log buyers quite discerning in log quality to ensure they are getting the quality of the grade they purchase.

It is unlikely alternative supply can increase dramatically in the short term, so the New Zealand log exporters expect further modest CFR price increases over the short term. Any pressure from competition will likely come initially in the lower grades as this volume can easily be replaced in construction markets with Uruguayan or other lower-cost logs.

While the US has delayed indefinitely an increase in tariffs on China goods, there is still a lot of negotiation to occur before a deal is concluded and tariffs lifted by either side. Once a deal is agreed, it is expected an easing of tariffs will be stepped rather than a complete removal. This means the sentiment about log supply from the US hasn’t changed.

Due to favourable pricing relative to New Zealand logs, Southern Yellow Pine (SYP) volumes have recovered overall slightly since Q4 2018. The current volume is approximately 50,000 JAS m3 per month which is still less than half of the Q1 2018 monthly volume. There was a recent reduction in supply due to snowstorm events. The current returns are supressed due to trade tariffs, but log volumes close to port and low-cost freight due to an imbalance in the container trade are keeping this business viable. Should the New Zealand radiata price hold, or slightly increase, the SYP price may improve slightly, underwriting some volume growth.

Log Supply to China from Uruguay was adversely affected in 2018 by increases in ocean freight costs. Uruguay is now able to provide some positive market return for forest owners as the freight market dropped around 10 USD per JAS mfor Q1 2019. Due to the increasing price for NZ radiata, logs from Uruguay can now sell for a slightly higher CFR price, improving the viability of exports and increasing available volume. South American exporters now have a much-improved understanding and management of quality control after earlier significant issues. They have also improved stowage for ship loading. South America led by Uruguay, currently export about seven vessels per month with the potential to increase more if New Zealand radiata logs maintain the current price level. Brazil is also starting to export in bulk with several vessels shipped in 2018 and a regular program expected in 2019. It will be interesting to see how these markets cope with expected ocean freight increases.

Courtesy: Pacific Forest Products (PFP)

India

Movement of log stocks off Kandla Port has increased and the older stock has now been sold. The CFR price for New Zealand ‘A’ grade pine logs are in the US$155 per JASm3 range and forecast to increase marginally.

The lumber prices remain around Rs491 per CFT but the strengthening of Indian Rupee to 70-71 range with the USD has provided some bottom-line respite to sawmillers.

There is currently a strong demand for the cheaper 3m short length logs to reduce the average basket price.

The much-welcomed decision of the Indian government to reduce the GST to 2% on finished apartments and houses is likely to give a boost to the construction sector. Log sellers expect the effect on demand to occur shortly after the general elections in May 2019. Over this election period the market for NZ pine logs will not be significantly affected, however, the hardwood log trade is expected to slow down.

The recent removal of several Indian banks (Corporation Bank, Dena Bank, Allahabad) from the regulator watch list, the Prompt Corrective Action (PCA), should marginally improve funding and LC issues for sawmillers and log importers.

There is a market move by the Kandla Timber Association (Pine Cell) to make a concerted effort to increase the NZ pine sawn timber to Rs501 per CFT.

New Zealand pine continues to face competition from the following global trade aggressively targeting the Indian market.

  • Southern Yellow Pine CFR 120 USD for 10” (25cm) small end diameter (SED) and above. (NZ A grade logs have a 30cm SED).

  • South Africa Pine CFR 125 USD per metric tonne for pruned logs with a 30cm SED.

  • Kiln dried (KD) pine sawn timber from the Ukraine and Eastern Europe at 220 USD per m3.

  • There have been some arrivals of taeda and ellioti pine sawn timber from Brazil recently.

Due to the Kandla prices remaining low (around Rs491 per CFT) they are able to sufficiently service the Bangalore and Hyderabad markets (Rs 511/- per CFT) covering the cartage costs. Sawmills importing logs via Tuticorin Port have reduced production by approximately 30% while they wait for prices to increase. The demand for New Zealand logs and vessel shipments from New Zealand to Tuticorin are likely to remain subdued for the next few months.

Exchange rates

Over the last month the NZD has continued to trade within the 0.672 and 0.690 range against the USD. This means there has been little effect on AWG prices offered by log exporters.

NZD:USD

The Chinese Yuan (CNY) appreciated slightly against the USD through February.

CNY:USD

Ocean Freight

Exporters have different freights costs relative to last month as there were some cheaper spot vessels available last month. Freight costs seem to have bottomed out and there has been steady increases over the last month. Freight demand is expected to increase with the usual increased activity after the Chinese Lunar New Year which will increase vessel daily charge rates.

Ocean Freight from NZ to Kandla is in range of 34 to 37 USD per JASm3.

Vessel congestion at the North Island load ports remains an issue particularly in Gisborne and Tauranga, where there is regularly two to three vessels parked at anchorage waiting for a berth. This congestion is due to a number of factors – increased log volumes requiring more vessels, port labour shortages, and in Tauranga fumigating logs for vessels can at times tie up a berth.

Singapore Bunker Price (IFO380) (red line) versus Brent Oil Price (grey line)

Source: Ship & Bunker

The Baltic Dry Index (BDI) is a composite of three sub-indices, each covering a different carrier size: Capesize (40%), Panamax (30%), and Supramax (30%). It displays an index of the daily USD hire rates across 20 ocean shipping routes. Whilst most of the NZ log trade is shipped in handy size vessels, this segment is strongly influenced by the BDI.

The graph of the BDI over the last year below shows the recent bottoming-out then increase in the BDI.

Source: TradingEconomics.com

PF Olsen Log Price Index - March 2019

Due to the drop in the AWG sale prices for export sawlogs the PF Olsen Log Price Index decreased -$3 in March to $134. The index is currently $6 above the two-year average, $9 above the three-year average, and $17 higher than the five-year average.

Basis of Index: This Index is based on prices in the table below weighted in proportions that represent a broad average of log grades produced from a typical pruned forest with an approximate mix of 40% domestic and 60% export supply.

Indicative Average Current Log Prices – March 2019

Log Grade $/tonne at mill $/JAS m3 at wharf
  Mar-19 Feb-19 Dec-18 Nov-18 Mar-10 Feb-19 Dec-18 Nov-18
                 
Pruned (P40) 175-195 175-195 175-195 170-195 185-190 185-192 178-186 186-192
Structural (S30) 130 130 130 130        
Structural (S20) 115 115 115 115        
Export A         151 156 142 147
Export K         143 148 135 139
Export KI         136 141 127 132
Export KIS         129 134 122 124
Pulp 50 50 50 50        

Note: Actual prices will vary according to regional supply/demand balances, varying cost structures and grade variation. These prices should be used as a guide only..

A longer series of these prices is available here.

Log Prices

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This article is reproduced from PF Olsen's Wood Matters, with permission.


          Worksession re (AO 2018-115) Reapportionment to Establish Eleven Single Member Districts; (AO 2018-114) Rotation of Single Member District; and Related Topics - Mar 08, 2019      Cache   Translate Page      

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          Southcentral Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Council to meet in Anchorage      Cache   Translate Page      

The Southcentral Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Council will meet March 26-27, 2019 at the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association, 1131 E. International Airport Road, in Anchorage. The meeting will begin at 11:00 a.m. on March 26 and at 9:00 a.m. on March 27.


          (USA-AK-Anchorage) Call Center Specialist - Food and Nutrition      Cache   Translate Page      
**Description:** **Providence is calling a Call Center Specialist - Dietary Services (Food and Nutrition, Variable** **Shift, 1.0 FTE) to Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage, Alaska.** **We are a community of caregivers delivering every day on our Mission to provide compassionate care that is accessible for all - especially those who are poor and vulnerable.** **This is a full time position in our Food and Nutrition department. There are two variable shifts that caregivers work: 5 am - 1:30 pm and 12 pm - 8:30 pm.** **In this position you will:** + Provide direct patient interaction while assisting with meal selections, nutritional supplements and snacks over the phone or in person. + Provide professional communication with all clinical areas of the facility while ensuring patients and customer needs are being processed and completed in a highly efficient manner. + Ensure correct food types and diets are served to the right patients in a timely manner and patient requests are being met. + Monitor food handling according to HACCP guidelines ensuring food quality and safety is being met. + Follow proper procedures for sanitation, infection control and safety in accordance with municipal, state and federal regulations. **Qualifications:** **Required qualifications for this position include:** + High school diploma or equivalent + Basic knowledge of therapeutic diets + Familiarity with the fundamental operation of a hospital kitchen + Ability to communicate effectively **Preferred qualifications for this position include:** + Associate's degree in food service science and nutrition or related field + 1 year experience in a health care facility food service operation **About Providence Alaska Medical Center** Providence Health & Services Alaska is among nation’s best employers for healthy lifestyles! The National Business Group on Health, a non-profit association of large U.S. employers, has honored Providence Alaska for its commitment and dedication to promoting a healthy workplace and encouraging our caregivers (employees) and families to support and maintain healthy lifestyles. Mountain-Pacific Quality Health has awarded Providence Alaska Medical Center with its Quality Achievement Award for high-quality care in the areas of heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia and surgical infection prevention. This is the highest honor awarded by Mountain-Pacific. As the state’s largest hospital, Providence Alaska Medical Center provides full-service, comprehensive care to all Alaskans, a role unmatched by any other in the state. Within our community, you will find top notch ski resorts, kayaking, and wildlife. Enjoying the outdoors is just one of many reasons to live in and explore Alaska! **We offer a full comprehensive range of benefits - see our website for details** http://www.providenceiscalling.jobs/rewards-benefits/ **Our Mission** As expressions of God’s healing love, witnessed through the ministry of Jesus, we are steadfast in serving all, especially those who are poor and vulnerable. **About Us** Providence Health & Services is a not-for-profit Catholic network of hospitals, care centers, health plans, physicians, clinics, home health care and services guided by a Mission of caring the Sisters of Providence began over 160 years ago. Providence is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. Providence does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, disability, veteran, military status, religion, age, creed, national origin, sexual identity or expression, sexual orientation, marital status, genetic information, or any other basis prohibited by local, state, or federal law. **Schedule:** Full-time **Shift:** Variable **Job Category:** Customer Service **Location:** Alaska-Anchorage **Req ID:** 218754
          (USA-AK-Anchorage) Transport & Logistics Center Technician      Cache   Translate Page      
**Description:** **Providence is calling a Transport and Logistics Technician (Transport and Logistics, Variable** **Shift, 1.0 FTE) to Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage, Alaska.** **We are a community of caregivers delivering every day on our Mission to provide compassionate care that is accessible for all - especially those who are poor and vulnerable.** **In this position you will:** + Be responsible for independently transporting inpatients via wheelchair, stretcher, bed to and from clinical, ancillary and support departments throughout PAMC. + Be responsible for assisting with complex lifts defined as total body transfers. + Provide mentoring and support on Safe Patient Handling & Mobility equipment and practices. + Ensure patient safety during transport and lifts by using proper equipment and safety techniques. + Respond to emergent situations in a timely manner to assist as needed. + Manage workflow and respond to unit requests for services utilizing automated dispatching system TeleTracking. + Comply with isolation standards and equipment disinfecting techniques and guidelines. + Maintain hospital wide moveable patient care equipment inventory and delivery. + Report equipment malfunction and facility issues appropriately. **Qualifications:** **Required qualifications for this position include:** + High School Diploma or equivalent + 1 year in a customer service position/field + Ability to exert continuous physical effort including lifting, carrying, pushing or moving of patients, and patient care equipment + Competency in computers and electronic communication devices **Preferred qualifications for this position include:** + Basic Life Support (BLS) certification within 6 months of hire + 6 months experience working in health care with patient contact **About Providence Alaska Medical Center** Providence Health & Services Alaska is among nation’s best employers for healthy lifestyles! The National Business Group on Health, a non-profit association of large U.S. employers, has honored Providence Alaska for its commitment and dedication to promoting a healthy workplace and encouraging our caregivers (employees) and families to support and maintain healthy lifestyles. Mountain-Pacific Quality Health has awarded Providence Alaska Medical Center with its Quality Achievement Award for high-quality care in the areas of heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia and surgical infection prevention. This is the highest honor awarded by Mountain-Pacific. As the state’s largest hospital, Providence Alaska Medical Center provides full-service, comprehensive care to all Alaskans, a role unmatched by any other in the state. Within our community, you will find top notch ski resorts, kayaking, and wildlife. Enjoying the outdoors is just one of many reasons to live in and explore Alaska! **We offer a full comprehensive range of benefits - see our website for details** http://www.providenceiscalling.jobs/rewards-benefits/ **Our Mission** As expressions of God’s healing love, witnessed through the ministry of Jesus, we are steadfast in serving all, especially those who are poor and vulnerable. **About Us** Providence Health & Services is a not-for-profit Catholic network of hospitals, care centers, health plans, physicians, clinics, home health care and services guided by a Mission of caring the Sisters of Providence began over 160 years ago. Providence is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. Providence does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, disability, veteran, military status, religion, age, creed, national origin, sexual identity or expression, sexual orientation, marital status, genetic information, or any other basis prohibited by local, state, or federal law. **Schedule:** Full-time **Shift:** Variable **Job Category:** Patient Transporter **Location:** Alaska-Anchorage **Req ID:** 218762
           After Upheaval, Alaska Names Acting CIO, Permanent CISO       Cache   Translate Page      
Alaska's state capitol building

John Boucher is the third person to hold the title of chief information officer in Alaska — whether in an acting or permanent capacity — since December 2018, but he may hold the title for some time.

After months of apparent upheaval in the Alaska Office of Information Technology, Boucher confirmed for Government Technology last week that he has been acting CIO since Feb. 14, and the state has also named a new chief information security officer.

Boucher said he was not aware of any search for a permanent replacement for his position.

“I’m here as long as Commissioner (Kelly) Tshibaka would like me to serve in this capacity,” he said, referring to the head of the Alaska Department of Administration that supervises OIT. “If the path that she chooses to take is to openly compete it, I will put my hat in the ring.”

Boucher was also Alaska’s acting CIO for about three months toward the end of 2018, after Bill Vajda resigned in August.

A career economist with a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Notre Dame, Boucher has had roles in several Alaska state departments over the course of nearly 36 years in public service. According to his LinkedIn profile, he started with more than 17 years as an economic analyst for labor market statistics for the Alaska Department of Labor. For five years he was the project manager of an agency-wide information systems replacement and integration project, Online Resource for the Children of Alaska, for the state’s Office of Children’s Services; for nine years he was a senior analyst/legislative liaison for the state Office of Management and Budget; and for two years he was the deputy commissioner of the state Department of Administration. Boucher returned to the Office of Management and Budget in 2017, where he spent 18 months as a senior policy analyst, then moved to OIT in September 2018 as the state’s acting CIO in Vajda’s stead.

That’s where the recent shakeups started. In December 2018, without a formal announcement, newly elected Gov. Michael Dunleavy appointed a new CIO — Peter Zuyus, whose resume reflects a career at telecommunications companies around the country and ownership of a political consulting firm in Alaska, but who declined to answer calls and emails from the press. The office of the governor also declined to return calls requesting comment on Zuyus’ hire.

By mid-February, also without announcement or explanation, Zuyus was out. His contact information on the state website was temporarily replaced by that of Paula Vrana as acting CIO, who did not respond to a request for comment at the time.

Zuyus’ departure followed a series of leadership changes in the Department of Administration. The department’s head commissioner, Jonathan Quick, resigned Jan. 24 amid reports that he had lied on his resume. Vrana replaced Quick as acting commissioner for a week until Jan. 31, when Dunleavy chose a full-time replacement in Kelly Tshibaka, a former chief data officer for the U.S. Postal Service Office of the Inspector General and former counsel for the U.S. Department of Justice. Vrana then took over for Zuyus as acting CIO until Feb. 14, when Boucher stepped in.

Boucher declined to comment on Zuyus’ hire, departure or press shyness. A political blog, The Alaska Landmine, connected Zuyus’ departure in mid-February to missed payments on an $11.6 million contract for cybersecurity services awarded by the state in fall 2018 to California-based Evotek. Boucher would not comment on the Evotek contract, which The Alaska Landmine said has been terminated, or what the state is doing to meet cybersecurity needs for which state officials assigned more than $11 million last year.

“We’re trying to increase and harden our security profile within the resource constraints that we have,” he said. “Security is a priority for us, so we’re definitely trying to move forward to the best of our ability.”

Boucher also confirmed that Alaska has had a new chief information security officer, Mark Breunig, since January. According to his LinkedIn profile, Breunig has also been a project manager at Accenture, a senior manager of IT security at NANA Development Corporation, an IT manager for the municipality of Anchorage and the owner of his own IT security consulting business.

As someone who has had a hand in many state departments over three-plus decades, Boucher felt comfortable saying IT in Alaska, in general, is in a “challenged state.” More specifically he pointed to Administrative Order 284, an order from then-Gov. Bill Walker in April 2017 consolidating Alaska's IT assets to a standalone agency under the leadership of a state CIO. He said the state is working toward IT services and infrastructure being shared between all its departments, and that process is still ongoing.

“We’re attempting to execute a consolidation to a shared services model where it works and is appropriate, which many of the other states are going through some iteration of the same exercise,” he said. “Since the beginning of (AO 284), we’ve moved 140-some positions into the central IT organization from the agencies, the individual departments … We’ve used the phrase ‘commodity services,’ such as the delivery of endpoint support, data centers, that kind of stuff. Those are the first moves that we are making in terms of consolidation.”

Despite AO 284 and recent turnover in OIT, Boucher said he sees no significant difference between the structure of the department now and in 2018.

Talking to GT last week, he said he would be speaking to the state House finance subcommittee this week on IT projects or initiatives underway, but he declined to elaborate.

Alaska’s CIO under Walker’s administration, Bill Vajda, started a new job on March 4 as CIO of the U.S. Department of the Interior.


          9th Annual York County Regional Job Fair      Cache   Translate Page      
**Job seekers!**

The 9th Annual York County Regional Job Fair will certainly be one of Maine's largest and most successful recruiting events of 2019 and over 100 Maine and Southern New Hampshire businesses are expected to attend.

In 2018 a hundred employers recruited at this regional job fair. This is a tremendous no cost opportunity for job seekers to meet face to face with recruiters! Research the companies you are interested in ahead of time to learn more about the available opportunities, bring plenty of resumes, and dress to impress!

**Job Fair Recruiters**

- ADUSA Distribution LLC - Anchorage By the Sea - Arundel Machine - Atlantic Broadband - Avita of Wells - Barrette Outdoor Living - Biddeford School Department - Bonney Staffing - Bread and Roses Bakery - Career Tree Healthcare - Casco Bay Molding - CEO Camp Pro - Charter Communications - Cianbro - City of Sanford - Continuum Health Services - Cornerstone Artisanal Pizza and Craft Beer - Cornerstone VNA - Corning - CoWorx Staffing - Creative Work Systems - Destination Hotels dba: Cliff House Maine - Dunes on the Waterfront - Ethos Vet - Evonik Cyro - Expert Staffing - Fiber Materials Inc. - Getchell Bros., Inc. - George Roberts Co. and The Step Guys - Goodwill Northern New England - Gordon Food Service - Hannaford: Sanford, Waterboro, N. Berwick - Hannaford: York, Wells, Kennebunk - Helical Solutions - Home Instead Senior Care - Homecare for Maine - Hussey Seating - Kelly Services - Kennebunkport Resort Collection - Ledgemere Transportation - Lucas Tree - Maine Air National Guard - Maine Army National Guard - Maine Dept of Health and Human Services - MaineHealth - Maine Office of Child and Family Services - Manpower - Masis Staffing - Military Talent Source - Norseman Resort & Lafayette Oceanfront Resort - North Shore Behavioral Health - Northeast Credit Union - Nouria Energy Corporation - Paradigm Windows - Pathways of Maine - People's United Bank - PeopleReady - Pratt and Whitney - Renewal by Andersen of Maine - Renys - RGIS - Safran Aerospace Composites - Securitas - SequelCare of Maine LLC - Spurwink - Stonewall Kitchen - Sweetser - TC Hafford Basement Systems - The Goldenrod - The Home Depot - The Nonamtum Resort - U.S. Air Force - U.S. Army - U.S. Navy - VELUX America LLC - Volk Packaging - Waban Projects - WGME CBS 13 and WPFO Fox 23 - Wire Pro Inc. - York County Community Action Corp. - York County Government - York Hospital

**Job Fair Exhibitor Contact**

Employers, contact Ben Neveux at bernard.a.neveux@maine.gov or 207-324-5460 by Friday, March 22, 2019 to learn more. A registration fee of $75 will be required and includes table rental and lunch for two recruiters.

Registration and payment will ONLY be accepted electronically. To register your business and to submit your registration fee, please go to http://sanfordchamber.org/event-3202429?CalendarViewType=1&SelectedDate=4/7/2019
          Planning and Zoning Commission - 3/11/2019 - Mar 11, 2019      Cache   Translate Page      

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          Joint Assembly and Anchorage School Board Meeting - Mar 08, 2019      Cache   Translate Page      

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          Budget Advisory Commission Meeting - Mar 07, 2019      Cache   Translate Page      

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          Assembly - Regular - 3/5/2019 - Mar 05, 2019      Cache   Translate Page      

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          Search continues for pilot missing northwest of Anchorage - CityNews Calgary      Cache   Translate Page      
Search continues for pilot missing northwest of Anchorage  CityNews Calgary

Eighteen Canadians died in the Ethiopian Airlines plane crash on Sunday that crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all 157 aboard. Several of the Canadians on ...


          Bill seeks to require jail time in cases similar to infamous Anchorage assault      Cache   Translate Page      
Soldotna Republican Sen. Peter Micciche, the bill sponsor, says the measure would prevent a case like that of Justin Schneider from happening again.
          Psychiatry locums needed near Anchorage, AK      Cache   Translate Page      
Posted on: 2019-03-12

Position: Psychiatry Physician
Location: near Anchorage, AK

 

MPLT Healthcare is are currently looking for physician who Understand the Urgency, Never Give Up, and Have the Courage to Excel in the forever changing medical industry! We have numerous opportunities for an experienced Psychiatry Physician with highly competitive pay rates in Alaska.

Position Details:

  • BC or BE
  • Will consider PERM
  • Can fast track privileges

The benefits of working with MPLT Healthcare include:

  • Flexibility – work when, where and how often you’d like to work
  • Paid malpractice insurance
  • Pre-paid travel and housing expenses
  • Competitive compensation paid on a weekly basis
  • One-on-one attention and 24-hour access to your personal MedPartners consultant
  • Dedicated medical staff services that assist with credentialing and facility paperwork

 

About MPLT Healthcare

 

MPLT Healthcare specializes in placing well-qualified physicians and advanced practice clinicians in locum, locum-to-perm and direct hire staff and leadership positions while making this process as seamless as possible for our clinicians and client facilities.

 

Don’t delay, apply today!


          ‘Ugly Dogs’ group helps Alaska students raise trip money      Cache   Translate Page      

NIKOLAI, Alaska (AP) — Social media fans of a rookie Iditarod musher have used their #UglyDogs group to raise money for students at a rural Alaska school. KTVA in Anchorage reported Tuesday that Twitter followers of musher Blair Braverman helped raise field-trip funds for students at Top of the Kuskokwim School in the race checkpoint […]
          Search continues for pilot missing northwest of Anchorage      Cache   Translate Page      

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Army National Guard says it’s continuing to search for a pilot missing since last week. The pilot’s hunting partner reported March 6 that the pilot and his Cessna 172 were overdue northwest of Anchorage. Inclement weather including turbulent wind and low clouds has hampered the search, which Tuesday focused on […]
          Alaskan Native Pete Kaiser wins Iditarod sled dog race      Cache   Translate Page      

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Pete Kaiser won the Iditarod early Wednesday, throwing his arms over his head and pumping his fists as he became the latest Alaska Native to claim victory in the iconic sled dog race. Kaiser, 31, crossed the finish line in Nome after beating back a challenge from the defending champion, Norwegian […]
          Alaskan claims victory in gruelling 1,000-mile sled dog race      Cache   Translate Page      
The 1,000-mile race began on March 3 north of Anchorage.
          1 Bedroom Studio Flat      Cache   Translate Page      
95000
NO FORWARD CHAIN: INVESTMENT OR FIRST TIME BUYER PROPERTY. Ground floor studio flat located in the popular area of Anchorage Park with easy access to local transport links. The property comprises entrance hall, lounge/bedroom, kitchen, shower...
1 room parking
Mon, 11 Mar 2019 17:23:38 +0100
          Osborn Court, 30 Corby Crescent, Portsmouth PO3      Cache   Translate Page      
95000
NO FORWARD CHAIN: INVESTMENT OR FIRST TIME BUYER PROPERTY. Ground floor studio flat located in the popular area of Anchorage Park with easy access to local transport links. The property comprises entrance hall, lounge/bedroom, kitchen, shower...
1 room 1 bathroom parking
Mon, 11 Mar 2019 15:45:37 +0100
          3 Bedroom Detached House      Cache   Translate Page      
340000
MANN Countrywide are delighted to present to market this well presented three/four bedroom detached house in the popular location of Anchorage Park. The property boasts a garage and off road parking, upon entering the property you will find open...
3 rooms parking fitted kitchen
Sun, 10 Mar 2019 17:00:34 +0100
          Alaskan claims victory in gruelling 1,000-mile sled dog race      Cache   Translate Page      
The 1,000-mile race began on March 3 north of Anchorage.
          Alaskan claims victory in gruelling 1,000-mile sled dog race      Cache   Translate Page      
The 1,000-mile race began on March 3 north of Anchorage.
          Alaskan musher wins close Iditarod dog-sled race      Cache   Translate Page      

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (Reuters) – The 1,000-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race ended in a predawn sprint through the snow-covered streets of Nome on Wednesday, with Alaskan Pete Kaiser and his dogs barely holding off defending champion Joar Leifseth Ulsom of Norway. Kaiser, 31, reached the finish line just 12 minutes ahead of Leifseth Ulsom, 32, […]

The post Alaskan musher wins close Iditarod dog-sled race appeared first on Japan Times of News.


          Alaskan Native Pete Kaiser Wins Iditarod Dog Sled Race      Cache   Translate Page      
Pete Kaiser has become the latest Alaska Native to win the Iditarod dog sled race. Kaiser won the race for the first time early Wednesday, crossing the finish line in Nome after beating back a challenge from the defending champion, Norwegian musher Joar Ulsom.   Crowds cheered and clapped as Kaiser came off the Bering Sea ice and mushed down Nome's main street to the famed burled arch finish line.   The 1,000-mile (1,600-kilometer) race began March 3 north of Anchorage.   Kaiser, who is Yupik, is from the southwest Alaska community of Bethel.   Four other Alaska Native mushers have won the race, including John Baker, an Inupiaq from Kotzebue, in 2011.   Kaiser will receive $50,000 and a new pickup truck for the victory.  
          Alaskan Native Pete Kaiser Wins Iditarod Dog Sled Race      Cache   Translate Page      
Pete Kaiser has become the latest Alaska Native to win the Iditarod dog sled race. Kaiser won the race for the first time early Wednesday, crossing the finish line in Nome after beating back a challenge from the defending champion, Norwegian musher Joar Ulsom. Crowds cheered and clapped as Kaiser came off the Bering Sea ice and mushed down Nome's main street to the famed burled arch finish line. The 1,000-mile (1,600-kilometer) race began March 3 north of Anchorage.   Kaiser, who is Yupik, is from the southwest Alaska community of Bethel. Four other Alaska Native mushers have won the race, including John Baker, an Inupiaq from Kotzebue, in 2011.   Kaiser will receive $50,000 and a new pickup truck for the victory.    
          1 Bedroom Studio Flat      Cache   Translate Page      
95000
NO FORWARD CHAIN: INVESTMENT OR FIRST TIME BUYER PROPERTY. Ground floor studio flat located in the popular area of Anchorage Park with easy access to local transport links. The property comprises entrance hall, lounge/bedroom, kitchen, shower...
1 room parking
Mon, 11 Mar 2019 17:23:38 +0100
          Osborn Court, 30 Corby Crescent, Portsmouth PO3      Cache   Translate Page      
95000
NO FORWARD CHAIN: INVESTMENT OR FIRST TIME BUYER PROPERTY. Ground floor studio flat located in the popular area of Anchorage Park with easy access to local transport links. The property comprises entrance hall, lounge/bedroom, kitchen, shower...
1 room 1 bathroom parking
Mon, 11 Mar 2019 15:45:37 +0100
          3 Bedroom Detached House      Cache   Translate Page      
340000
MANN Countrywide are delighted to present to market this well presented three/four bedroom detached house in the popular location of Anchorage Park. The property boasts a garage and off road parking, upon entering the property you will find open...
3 rooms parking fitted kitchen
Sun, 10 Mar 2019 17:00:34 +0100
          Commenti su TAV, AL VIA LE PROCEDURE PER IL TUNNEL DI BASE: LAVORI DA 2,3 MILIARDI DI EURO di Bruno      Cache   Translate Page      
..... Dublino, Reykjavik, Montreal, Ottawa, Anchorage, Vladivostok, Ulan Bator, Mosca e Pietroburgo..... sempre in treno.
          Alaskan claims victory in gruelling 1,000-mile sled dog race      Cache   Translate Page      
The 1,000-mile race began on March 3 north of Anchorage.
          Global Microcarriers Market Emerging Trends and Company Profiles to Watch- GE Healthcare, Merck KGaA, Danaher, Lonza, Becton, HiMedia in 2018-2026      Cache   Translate Page      

Albany, NY -- (SBWIRE) -- 03/13/2019 -- Microcarriers are small bead like materials that support the matrix which facilitate the growth of adherent cells. Cell culture techniques are now used extensively to study animal cell function, structure, and differentiation and to manufacture several significant biological materials, such as vaccines, hormones, enzymes, antibodies, interferons, and nucleic acids. For the survival and replication majority of cells in cell culture require attachment to a surface and are anchorage-dependent. Thus, these microcarriers support the growth of anchorage-dependent cells. Microcarriers are widely used in the large-scale commercial production of cell-based vaccines and biologics (proteins). Thus, rise in demand for biologics and cell-based vaccines drives the microcarriers market. Increase in cell-based research, rise in public and private funding, and technological advancement propel the global market. However, high cost of cell-based research is likely to hinder the global microcarriers market during forecast period.

Get Sample Copy Of This Report @ https://www.marketresearchreports.biz/sample/sample/7074

The global microcarriers market can be segmented based on product, application, end-user, and region. In terms of product, the global market can be bifurcated into equipment and consumables. The equipment segment can be divided into culture vessels, bioreactors, filtration devices, cell counters, and accessories. The consumables segment can be sub-segmented into microcarrier beads, media, and reagents. The consumables segment is anticipated to expand at considerable CAGR during forecast period owing to continuous use of various reagents and media for various cell culture processes and applications. Based on application, the market can be segregated into vaccine manufacturing, cell therapy, and other applications. Vaccine manufacturing is expected to hold a significant share of the market due to the surge in demand for cell-based vaccines. In terms of end-user, the microcarriers market can be categorized into pharmaceutical & biotechnology companies, contract research & manufacturing organizations, and research & development institutes. The pharmaceutical & biotechnology segment is expected to hold a dominant share of the market due to the surge in demand for cell-based vaccines, increase in pharmaceutical research & development expenditure, and expansion in application areas of microcarriers. 

Based on region, the global microcarriers market can be segmented into North America, Europe, Latin America, Asia Pacific, and Middle East & Africa. North America and Europe constituted for a large share of the global microcarriers market due to the rise in demand for cell-based vaccines and biologics, developed health care infrastructure, presence of key players, and increase in research & development activities. Technological advancement in cell-based research and rise in the number of venture capital investments further drive the global microcarriers market in North America and Europe. The market in Asia Pacific is anticipated to expand at a significant CAGR during the forecast period. Rise in investments by various key players in the region, increase in awareness, developments in health care infrastructure, and favorable regulatory reforms propel the microcarriers market in Asia Pacific. The market in Latin America and Middle East & Africa is projected to expand at considerable pace during the forecast period owing to the increase in investments from market players in these regions.

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Key players operating in the global microcarriers market include Thermo Fisher Scientific, GE Healthcare, Merck KGaA, Danaher Corporation, Lonza, Eppendorf AG, Becton, Dickinson and Company, HiMedia Laboratories, Corning Incorporated, and Sartorius AG.

MRR.BIZ has been compiled in-depth market research data in the report after exhaustive primary and secondary research. Our team of able, experienced in-house analysts has collated the information through personal interviews and study of industry databases, journals, and reputable paid sources.

The report provides the following information:

- Tailwinds and headwinds molding the market's trajectory
- Market segments based on products, technology, and applications
- Prospects of each segment
- Overall current and possible future size of the market
- Growth pace of the market
- Competitive landscape and key players' strategies

The main aim of the report is to:

- Enable key stakeholder's in the market bet right on it
- Understand the opportunities and pitfalls awaiting them
- Assess the overall growth scope in the near term
- Strategize effectively with respect to production and distribution

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MRR.BIZ is a leading provider of strategic market research. Our vast repository consists research reports, data books, company profiles, and regional market data sheets. We regularly update the data and analysis of a wide-ranging products and services around the world. As readers, you will have access to the latest information on almost 300 industries and their sub-segments. Both large Fortune 500 companies and SMEs have found those useful. This is because we customize our offerings keeping in mind the specific requirements of our clients.

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          COASTAL HIGHWAY SOUTH BETHANY AT ANCHORAGE AVE WILL HAVE SHOULDER CLOSURES SOUTH BOUND FOR CONSTRUCTION UNTIL 5PM      Cache   Translate Page      
none
          Alaskan claims victory in gruelling 1,000-mile sled dog race      Cache   Translate Page      
The 1,000-mile race began on March 3 north of Anchorage.
                Cache   Translate Page      
"I'm sailing rough seas in a strong boat and the big waves just make the story more interesting."   ~ Bartrand J. A. Hubbard 
 
Well, the captain untied the lines and cast off from Hampton Public Marina in downtown Hampton, VA all by himself today.   It was 6:30 AM, dark, and 46 degrees.  The first mate, though awake, hunched deeper into the covers, and their little dog, feeling a whole lot perkier, rolled over onto her back in her little dog bed with a big doggy yawn.

Around 8:30 AM we were hobby-horsing along in strong winds and the seas were 3-4 feet.  I believe we were, at that time, crossing the Potomac River which is uncomfortable on a good day.   I stayed below and monitored the slipping and sliding stuff, cushioned the tv with a pillow, and stowed any extraneous gear.  My headquarters were in the aft cabin.  Then my frolicksome pup decided she might like to join me on the bed so I got an old quilt and brought her up with me.

Things finally began to calm down in the early afternoon, but the winds were still sharp and blowing 25 mph when we cut off to go into Solomon's Marina to top off our fuel tanks.  At 2:00 PM we anchored in Mill Creek -- yes, another Mill Creek -- in Solomons, MD.  It's a pretty little anchorage tucked in from the wind and it's peaceful here.  

I'm sure there were many photo ops today, but I didn't take advantage of them.  Attached are the three photos I took today:

 
Entering Solomons, MD

Solomons, MD

Tonight;s back yard.  Sharing Mill Creek anchorage with Moran tugs

 


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 HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY!!
Today we left Hampton Public Marina at 6:35 AM in the rain.  We spent a mostly harrowing 9-1/2 hours hobby-horsing north on the Chesapeake Bay with wind and opposing tide.  I took some photos of historic Fort Monroe from the water as we left Hampton.  This beautiful fort still has the original moat and it still has water in it.  Through the portal across the moat to the inside you will find the original homes built there, some of which are still occupied.  I've added Fort Monroe to my list of "must sees" on our way south in the fall.

Striper was not very perky this morning, but we were able to get her to eat and as the day went on, she seemed more like herself.  We have still not re-started the antibiotic because she just is not quite herself yet.
We arrived at Mill Creek, an anchorage off the Wicomico River at 4:00 PM to blue skies and sunshine.  It's very peaceful here and we are looking forward to a good night's rest. 
Attached are a few of today's photos:

Leaving Hampton, VA early this AM in the rain

Hampton Public Marina



Leaving Hampton, VA

Ft. Monroe


Ft. Monroe

Buckroe Beach, VA

The most stable spot in the boat -- aft cabin bed

Tonight's back yard, Mill Creek off the Wicomico River

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We weighed anchor at 6:00 AM to catch the unscheduled bridge openings as well as the current.  We traveled 91 miles through the ICW on the Neuse River.  We passed by Swansboro, Morehad City and Beaufort (pronounced Bow-fort here in North Carolina.)  The weather was sunny and beautiful. 

Striper was improved today and eating and drinking a little better than yesterday and no difficulties with bodily functions we are happy to report.  She spent the majority of the day on the fly bridge with the Captain.  Thank you all for your kind emails and even telephone calls of concerns about her.  How very thoughtful. :)

We arrived at Campbell Creek anchorage in Aurora, NC  off the Neuse River at 5:50 PM -- a long day.  Here are a few photos:
Leaving Camp Lejeune -- this sign warns of live ammunition when the sign is flashing -- it wasn't

Lovely homes on the ICW

Swansboro, NC

I thought this tug pushing a barge of rocks was rather unique

Morehead City, NC

This little pontoon as a tractor for cargo

Probably taking that tractor home to this house

The beautiful Neuse River

Striper spent the day topsides with the captain.  Still droopy, but better.

We passed this tug today, the Beaufort Belle

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The captain departed Southport City Dock at 7:00 AM and mid-morning the first mate awoke to take him coffee and a snack on the fly bridge.  I was happy to sleep late today.  It was a tad overcast but before long the sun came out and it was a beautiful day with exceptionally beautiful cloud formations.
 
We got held up an hour at the Wrightsville Bridge which opens only on the hour.  Ralph called on the radio and asked if the bridgetender would hold the opening for him and was told "If you can be here in one minute, I'll hold" -- that was do-able, but immediately after the transmission, the bridgetender started closing the bridge so we floated around for an hour.  By that time several other boats had accumulated, including our friends, Gary and Christelle on Time and Tide. We ended up going through most of the bridges together, which reminded us of locking through all those Canadian locks.  They were able to scoot through a bridge or two, though, since they do not have the same height restriction we do.
 
Striper is not doing very well today.  She didn't eat her dog food at all, and only a few nibbles of food we were eating.  I gave her another dose of the antibiotic this morning and within a couple hours she looked catatonic and the pads of her paws were cold, as was her body.  We called the vet in Southport who said that she also had the topical dose of Parastar for ticks/fleas yesterday and it may not have settled well with her.  So until she perks up, we are to discontinue the medicine.  We aren't used to seeing her like this.  She's drinking a lot of water which is good and she is asleep now.
 
We are anchored in Jacksonville, NC -- actually beside Camp Lejeune Marine Base.  Aerial maneuvers are going on overhead so it's quite noisy.  Also going on overhead with the lack of ambient light -- there are a plethora of stars out tonight.  The sky is beautiful.
 
We traveled 64 miles today.  Our goal is to be in Annapolis, MD by the 15th -- which is a bit ambitious so we are hoping for no more weather delays.  Here are a few of today's photos:
 
Leaving the Cape Fear, NC area

Beautiful homes on the NC portion of the ICW

Striper was a little droopy today

Waiting for the Wrightsville Beach Bridge to open

Christelle and Gary on Time and Tide

Time and Tide has no height restriction here so off they go!

A particularly beautiful day for cloud watching

Two clammers along our route

A hard aground sailboat along our route, too

This is for Fred -- a tug like his "Tug 44"

This was really pretty, although a bit over the top

Beautiful homes and condos along the water

Some commercial work going on here, too

Entering the Camp Lejeune anchorage

Tonight's back yard
 

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Thursday, May 2, 2013

Today was blustery with winds 15-25 mph all day.  The sun poked out a time or two, but for the most part it was gray, gloomy and damp.  We traveled  through areas called Brickyard Creek, another Hell Gate (we've gone through several Hell Gates on this leg of our journey), and the narow shoaling Ashepoo-Coosaw Cut where the wind gusted to 39 mph and the seagulls following us were flying sideways. 

Striper and I spent most of the day down below.  I've been working on my book and Striper enjoys  snoozing in her little pet bed.  The only thing that wakens her is opening a cupboard or the refrigerator.  Ralph spoke to John Henry on the phone this morning. We're going to catch up with him and Edna in a few days at their new home in Surfside Beach, SC.  Can't wait to see them -- it's been at least five years.  They've graciously consented to accept our mail.  This will be our first mail pick-up since we've left home.

We traveled 64 miles today and reached Edgewater Park, SC about 5 miles South of Charleston, at 4:30 PM and anchored.  This is a somewhat protected anchorage but be cautioned about crab pots in some areas.  Here are a few of today's photos:
This beautiful home is nestled in the woods

Leaving Beaufort, SC


This is a restricted area -- a military operations zone perhaps having to do with Parris Island Marine Training Camp

Calm water for a while

Starboard side of Ashepoo-Coosaw Cut

Port side of Ashepoo-Coosaw Cut

Seagulls flying sideways in 39 mph wind

Tonight's back yard



          Alaskan claims victory in gruelling 1,000-mile sled dog race      Cache   Translate Page      
The 1,000-mile race began on March 3 north of Anchorage.
          Anchorage police investigate child’s death at overlook      Cache   Translate Page      

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Anchorage police are investigating the death of a child at a city scenic overlook. Airport police shortly after 6:30 a.m. Wednesday called in city officers after finding a dead child and a woman with injuries in a car at the Point Woronzof (WORH-on-zawf) parking lot in west Anchorage. The child had […]
          Alaskan Native Pete Kaiser wins Iditarod sled-dog race      Cache   Translate Page      

ANCHORAGE — Pete Kaiser won the Iditarod early Wednesday, throwing his arms over his head and pumping his fists as he became the latest Alaska Native to claim victory in the iconic sled dog race. Kaiser, 31, crossed the finish line in Nome after beating back a challenge from the defending champion, Norwegian musher Joar […]
          Assistant General Manager      Cache   Translate Page      
AK-Anchorage, Assistant General Manager (AGM) Exempt Job Summary: The Assistant General Manager assists the General Manager in overseeing all facets of a branch operation. Reports to the General Manager. Essential Functions: - Assist the GM with the oversight of all facets of the day-to day branch operation. - Ensure that customer service and quality standards are met. - Assist with Staff supervision. - Develop
          ANCHORAGEWEDDINGS.COM      Cache   Translate Page      
Auction Type: Bid, Auction End Time: 03/19/2019 11:00 AM (PDT), Price: $89, Number of Bids: 0, Domain Age: 0, Description: , Traffic: 0, Valuation: $0, IsAdult: false
          Homestay in Salford near Anchorage Metrolink Station      Cache   Translate Page      
none
          Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, March 12, 2019      Cache   Translate Page      

Murkowski's public lands bill becomes law; Memos detail gaps in ANWR science; Interior says they’ll guide future work; Cash-strapped state of Alaska takes aim at North Slope government's oil money; Kaiser eyes Nome from White Mountain, with a hungry Ulsom on his tail; House and Senate both look at what budget cuts to make amid Dunleavy proposal; Bill seeks to require jail time in cases similar to 2018 Justin Schneider assault; Search continues for pilot missing northwest of Anchorage; Fairbanks City Council fails to overturn mayor's veto of anti-discrimination ordinance; State plans to sell Sheldon Jackson Museum in cost-cutting efforts

The post Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 appeared first on Alaska Public Media.


          Contract Spec/Administrator/Negotiator, Procurement Analyst (Supvy/Non/Lead) - US General Services Administration - Anchorage, AK      Cache   Translate Page      
Duties Summary THIS IS A PUBLIC NOTICE: Please review further information below regarding how this posting will be used. As a contracting professional, you... $61,218 - $164,200 a year
From usajobs.gov - Tue, 27 Nov 2018 22:17:53 GMT - View all Anchorage, AK jobs
          (USA-AK-Anchorage) Driver Job Fair      Cache   Translate Page      
## Job Description **OPEN HOUSE JOB FAIR****HIRING SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS** **We Offer:** * PAID CDL Training! * Drug Free Workplace! * Benefits Package (after the qualification period)! * Great Pay!! Attendance bonus program! * Routes immediately available upon completion of training & licensing **Talent Requirements:** * Must be at least 21 years of age * Must be able to obtain a CDL permit with S & P endorsements * Ability to navigate the service area **ON SITE HIRING EVENT****Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - Friday March 15, 2019 from 8:30 am to 4 pm****Location:**10560 Old Seward Hwy, Anchorage, AK 99515**Questions??**Please call (907) 336-3568**Walk In:** Don't want to wait?? Walk Ins are welcome - Monday through Friday until 4 pm Reliant Transportation is committed to as policy of Equal Employment Opportunity and will not discriminate against an applicant or employee on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, sex, physical or mental disability, veteran or military status, genetic information or any other legally recognized protected basis under federal, state or local laws, regulations or ordinances. The information collected by this application is solely to determine suitability for employment, verify identity and maintain employment statistics on applicants. Where permissible under applicable state and local law, applicants may be subject to a pre-employment drug test and background check after receiving a conditional offer of employment. *Employee Type:* Full-Time *Location:* Anchorage, AK *Job Type:* Customer ServiceOtherTransportation *Experience:* Not Specified *Date Posted:* 12/3/2019
          Alaskan claims victory in gruelling 1,000-mile sled dog race      Cache   Translate Page      
The 1,000-mile race began on March 3 north of Anchorage.
          Home for Sale (Oodle) $510,000      Cache   Translate Page      
5BR/3BA/2CG - Home for Sale!!! - 2212 Vanderbilt Cir. Absolutely beautiful home features ELEVATOR, new paint, carpet, hot water heater, updated bathrms, new vinyl, &much more! Home has 5 bedrms, 3 Bathrms, 2 Car Garage, family rm, office, bonus rm could be used for crafts or second office &an elevator. Centrally located near UAA, APU, hospitals, schools &shopping. Could be used as an assisted living home. Seller offering 5K toward closing cost/carpet

          Give the Cruising Dream! Last minute, no-shipping gift ideas      Cache   Translate Page      
Need a little something at the last minute? Here are a few ideas to help inspire the hopeful cruiser in your life… or, put a smile on that cruiser across the anchorage from you! My favorite elves above, three years ago, on our mad road trip across South Africa to catch up with family in […]
          Historic Forts - Fort de la Rade - ile d Aix,Nouvelle Aquitaine,France      Cache   Translate Page      
source island of Aix:
At the southern tip of the island called St. Catherine, was built in 1703. It controlled access to the harbor of Aix, anchorage of the squadron of Rochefort. In 1757 he was completely shaved by an English attack. In 1778, in the face of a new threat from the Royal Navy, the Marquis de Montalembert urgently built a new fortification. Under the First Empire, the fort is fully recovered, then regularly modernized. Today, the site houses a hotel residence, a campsite and a sailing school.
The fort is open access.


source ile d Aix :
A la pointe sud de l’île dite de Sainte Catherine, a été construit en 1703. Il contrôlait l’accès à la rade d’Aix, lieu de mouillage de l’escadre de Rochefort. En 1757, il est entièrement rasé par une attaque anglaise. En 1778, devant une nouvelle menace de la Royal Navy, le Marquis de Montalembert construit dans l’urgence une nouvelle fortification. Sous le Premier Empire, le fort est entièrement repris, puis régulièrement modernisé. Aujourd’hui, le site abrite une résidence hôtelière, un camping et une école de voile.
Le fort est en accès libre.



          New Digs for the Blog      Cache   Translate Page      
It’s been almost nine years to the day since Deb Vanasse posted the very first post on this blog. 49 Writers was not yet a nonprofit organization back then, we had not started offering classes and events, and the blog still had its original name—49 Writers, No Moose. Deb’s first sentence in that first postreads “Amazing writers live in Alaska.” That is still—perhaps even increasingly—true today as it was then.

The blog started as a collaborative effort between Deb and co-founder Andromeda Romano-Lax. They hadn’t even met face to face yet, and probably didn’t know that almost a decade later we’d be looking back at years of activity while looking ahead into a promising offing.

Almost a year after the beginning, Andromeda wrote “This blog, I hope, will be an experiment in fostering another little piece of community, with an Alaskan flavor.” I think it’s safe to say that her hope was realized. It has built community, one that maintains a focus on quality writing. Like many of you, I’ve seen how the blog, and the community and programing that burgeoned from it over the years, bolsters a craft-driven creativity among writers at all stages of development. I’ve also seen how it connects readers with writers, and Alaskans with non-Alaskans. I’ve seen how it connects people and sparks friendships, writing groups, inspiration, ideas, and understanding.   

This post is our 2,252nd blog post to date. As of mid-morning today, our all-time pageview history numbered 1,081,184, with 19,080 hits and counting just last month alone. People not only in Alaska but across Canada, the U.S., and the globe read this  blog.

Perhaps you’ve seen our new 49 Writers website. I’m pleased to report that we’re migrating this blog from its original Blogspot habitat over to the new website. Instead of having two different URLs—one for our blog and one for our website—they’ll live together under the singular 49Writers.org roof.

All 2,252 of the posts made on the original platform have been imported into the new site, so our entire archive remains searchable, linkable, and loveable as ever. It was impossible to avoid some formatting fracases during the transfer of existing posts, so I apologize in advance for any untidiness on that front. I trust that we’ll have smooth and aesthetically pleasing sailing from here forward.  

Also, we were able to re-subscribe most of you who subscribed to the old blog, but you’ll need to confirm it via email. If you’re not subscribed automatically and would like to receive new postings by email, please head over to the new blog and enter your email address in the “Blog Subscription” field in the sidebar. You can always unsubscribe anytime.

Your old links to the original blog should still function, pointing toward the same post on the new platform. In the meantime, consider updating your blog bookmarks to point at the new URL, which is http://49writers.org/blog. While you’re at it, get in there and dig around a bit. Use the “search” function to unearth some of the gems in that deep pile of posts. Reminisce or catch up. And if you find yourself eager to write, or hungry to connect with other writerly folks, go ahead and click on that “Register for Classes” link in the top left of the page, and sign yourself up for this term’s online workshop or one of the face to face classes in Anchorage.

So that’s the update! Time, now, to celebrate our first many years, our first 2,252 blog posts, our first million+ pageviews, and all those yet to come.

Thanks,
Jeremy  




          Roundup for Literary Alaska      Cache   Translate Page      
Have news, events, or opportunities you'd like to see listed here? Email details to info (at) 49writers.org. Spread the word. Your message must be received by close of business the Wednesday before the roundup is scheduled to run at the latest. Unless your event falls in the "Opportunities and Awards" category, it should occur no more than 30 days from when we receive your email. Thanks! 

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

Registration is underway now for 49 Writers classes and workshops, both in Anchorage and online. Learn more and register here

Congrats to Eowyn Ivey, whose new novel, To the Bright Edge of the World, was nominated for the Carnegie Medal in fiction.  

Playwright Edward Albee died on Friday, September 16, 2016. 

Alaska Humanities Forum reminds us: take part in the Library of Congress National Book Festival from the comfort of your own home! Check out the live stream of interviews with authors and other festival sessions this Saturday, September 24 from 8AM - 2PM Alaska time. #NatBookFest | more info 

Best American Poetry 2016 features Olena Kalytiak Davis's poem "On the Certainty of Bryan", previously published in Alaska  Quarterly Review. Also, Best American Short Stories 2016 features Daniel O'Malley's story "Bridge" and Raul Palma's story "Eminent Domain" is cited as a Distinguished Story of the year. Best American Essays 2016 features an essay by Ela Helen Harrison. 

SOUTHCENTRAL
ANCHORAGE | Eowyn Ivey will be signing To the Bright Edge of the World at Costco on Dimond from noon until 2 PM. 

ANCHORAGE | Publication Consultants, in association with Alaska Book Week, is hosting the Great Alaska Book Fair sponsored in part by The Mall at Sears and Anchorage Public Library. They suggest that anyone interested in participating in The Great Alaska Book Fair respond before all tables are reserved. Concurrent event will include: a Farmer's Market, a Sidewalk Sale and the Better Business Bureau's Shred Day, and a Financial Fitness Fair; it's the same day that The Mall at Sears features an annual sidewalk sale to coincide with the release of Permanent Fund Dividends. If you're interested you can sign up for a table hereBook fair hours are 10 AM to 6 PM on Saturday, October 8, 2016. Tables will be allocated on a first come, first serve basis. Authors are responsible for their own sales—and pocket all the money. There will not be a central check out register. There is a charge of $50 per table. Authors may share tables if they'd like. 


BUILDING FIRES IN THE SNOW (BFITS) SOUTHCENTRAL ALASKA BOOK TOUR
BFITS READING & BOOK SIGNING
Saturday, September 24, 2016, 6-7:30 PM
Homer Public Library, 500 Hazel Avenue, Homer, AK
Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking book, the first to anthologize stories and poems from this perspective. The collection explores the deep connection between LGBTQ Alaskans, the urban context and the wilderness that surrounds them both. Editor Martha Amore, along with contributors Teresa Sundmark, Dawnell Smith and Teeka Ballas, will give a short reading.
A Question and Answer session and book signing will follow. FREE | Presented with Friends of the Homer Library.

BFITS BOOK SIGNING
Thursday, September 29, 2016, 5-7 PM
Barnes & Noble, 200 East Northern Lights Boulevard, Anchorage, AK, 99503
Anthology contributors will sign books and answer questions about the collection.
Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking book featuring work from some of Alaska’s finest writers. While collecting for the first time Alaska-themed LGBTQ short fiction and poetry, for the most part the work relates to concerns all Alaskans share. FREE

49 Writers presents Crosscurrents 
Tales of the City: Writing from Alaska’s Urban Hubs
ANCHORAGE | October 13, 2016 
5-6:45 pm – Building Fires in the Snow celebratory meet-and-greet at MUSE
7-8:30 pm – Crosscurrents event in the Anchorage Museum auditorium



As part of an author exchange facilitated by Susan McBeth at Adventures by the Book in partnership with 49 Writers, Inc., four authors will present programs of interest to writers in Anchorage Sept. 24 - 28: 
Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 9:50 -10:50 am
Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Best Practices to Present Your Book
Presenter: Kathi Diamant
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman (AWG), Jeremy Pataky (49W)
Description: How do you present your book to an audience so that they will buy it? This workshop will offer specific techniques to craft talking points about your book, and adapt those messages to various audiences, covering the spectrum from the inhabitants of an elevator, to book club groups, classrooms, speaking engagements, and print, web, radio and television interviews. Topics covered include creating a 30-second "elevator speech" and how to prepare for a live broadcast interview or speaking engagement.   


Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 11 am - noon
Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Strategic Event Planning – How to Market Your Book, Building an Author Foundation
Presenter: Susan McBeth
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman (AWG), Jeremy Pataky (49W)
Description: You wouldn’t dream of building your house without a foundation, yet counterintuitively, that’s precisely what most authors do. It’s not until after they create their book that they typically start to think about a marketing foundation to launch it successfully. In this session, Susan will share tips on how you can start building your foundation, no matter where you are at in the publishing process. Learn about some innovative ways to host your book events, whether you are setting up your very first book signing, or you are a seasoned author looking to inject new life into your book signings.


Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 11 am - noon
Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Native Tongues: Blending the Other into Dialogue
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman, Jeremy Pataky
Description: In an increasingly diverse world community, writers face the challenge of replicating a myriad of voices into their stories. In this session, writers will learn to create memorable, authentic characters by capturing the cadence of English as it is spoken by non-English speakers and weaving other languages into their dialogues, including strategies for replicating the nuanced speech patterns of characters from varied cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. Participants will examine excerpts from stories by Jhumpa Lahiri, Edwidge Danticat, and Soliven's own work. Following this discussion, writers will draft passages of dialogue inspired by writing prompts. Those comfortable with sharing their work will be encouraged to read their scenes aloud for feedback.


Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016 2:10 – 3:10 pm Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Cooking Up Memoirs: How to Record History
Presenter: Kitty Morse
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman, Jeremy Pataky
Description: Have you ever daydreamed, while standing at the stove, of handing down family recipes to the next generation? Better yet, of recording your family’s history in the process? Don’t wait to tell your story. This sense of urgency motivated Kitty to write her award-winning memoir, Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories. During this hour-long seminar, find out how she gathered family recipes and stories, tested the dishes, organized text and photographs, and mastered the publishing and marketing processes.

Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 6 PM
Event: An Evening at the Kasbah
Location: Turkey Red Restaurant, 550 South Alaska St.
Presenter: Kitty Morse
Cost: $35 | tickets 
Host: Fireside Books
Contact: David Cheezem; Barbara Hecker barbara@goodbooksbadcoffee.com
Estimated attendance: venue seats 50
Book sales: by Fireside Books
Description: Savor the authentic flavors of Morocco with Casablanca-born Kitty Morse, author of Cooking at the Kasbah: Recipes from my Moroccan Kitchen, now in its tenth printing from Chronicle Books. Chef Alex will prepare a menu featuring recipes from Kitty’s book using local Alaskan products. Have dinner while Kitty entertains guests with tales of Moroccan culture and cuisine from Dar Zitoun, her family home south of Casablanca. Books will be available for sale courtesy of Fireside Books.
Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, 9 – 10:15 am (40 minute talk)
Event: 9 AM service Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship: “Uniting Writers and Readers for Social Justice”
Location: 2824 E. 18th Ave, Anchorage
Presenters: Susan McBeth, Marivi Soliven
Cost: none
Host: Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship
Contact: Gary Holthaus
Estimated attendance: 50 - 60
Description: Susan McBeth, founder of Adventures by the Book, and Marivi Soliven, author of The Mango Bride, will discuss how they collaborated on “Saving Beverly,” a literary event that raised awareness and funds to assist immigrant victims of domestic violence, as well as the broader challenge of enabling meaningful interactions between writers and readers.
  

Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm (40 minute talk)
Event: 11 AM service Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship: “Saving Beverly”
Location: 2824 E. 18th Ave., Anchorage
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
Cost: none
Host: Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship
Contact: Gary Holthaus
Estimated attendance: 80 – 90
Book sales: following service
Description: Inspired by her work as an interpreter for immigrant survivors of domestic violence, San Diego author Marivi Soliven wrote The Mango Bride. Within the context of the novel, Beverly, an immigrant wife whose dreams of a better life vanish when her marriage turns violent, is a composite of the anonymous women for whom Soliven translates.
Domestic violence cuts through all socio-economic classes. Despite their widely differing backgrounds, immigrant wives are especially vulnerable when their legal status is controlled by an abusive spouse. During the 11 am service, Soliven will discuss the expanded protections of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), the Filipino diaspora, and the Saving Beverly movement, which raises funds for community organizations that support immigrant survivors of domestic violence.

Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, 5:00 - 7:00pm
Event: Salon Meet and Greet; includes informal panel (20 – 30 minutes) “Novel Ways to Get Noticed” featuring all visiting authors
Location: Home of Martha Amore, address forthcoming to RSVPers
Presenters: Susan McBeth, Kathi Diamant, Marivi Soliven, Kitty Morse
More Info: http://49writers.org/special-events-and-salons
Cost: Potluck; BYOB
Open to: 49 Writers, Alaska Writers Guild, and Alaska SCBWI current members only 
Host: 49 Writers
Contact: Jeremy Pataky
Estimated attendance: 25 - 35
Description: An informal meet-and-greet potluck event, by invitation to members of 49 Writers, Alaska SCBWI, and the Alaska Writers Guild. Visiting authors will speak as an informal panel on their success with novel ways of connecting readers with their books.


Monday, Sept. 26, 5 – 7 pm
Event: Kafka’s Last Love—Dora Diamant
Location: University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) Bookstore, 2901 Spirit Way, Anchorage
Presenter: Kathi Diamant
More info: https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/bookstore/events/special-events-calendar.cfm
Cost: free
Open to: public
Host: UAA Philosophy Dept/Honors College/UAA Bookstore
Contact: John Mouracade, Rachel Epstein
Description: In her book Kafka’s Last Love: The Mystery of Dora Diamant, author Kathi Diamant explores the relationship between Franz Kafka and his companion and confidante Dora Diamant (1898-1952). It details their life in Berlin and, after his death in 1924, her passionate commitment to keep Kafka’s literary flame alive while caught in the maelstroms of fascism, communism, and the Holocaust.

Kathi Diamant is Director of the Kafka Project at San Diego State University which is an ongoing international search for Kafka's missing literary treasure: 35 letters and 20 notebooks written by Kafka in the last year of his life, and confiscated from Dora by the Gestapo in Berlin 1933. Just returning from investigations in Berlin, Kathi will also share her latest findings and her extraordinary adventures through archives and history.


Tuesday, Sept. 27, 1 – 2:30 pm
Event: “The Mango Bride: A Frank Talk about Domestic Violence in Immigrant Communities and the Filipino Diaspora”
Location: University of Alaska (UAA) Bookstore, 2901 Spirit Way, Anchorage
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
More info: https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/bookstore/events/special-events-calendar.cfm
Cost: free
Host: UAA Public Health, UAA Bookstore
Contact: Gabe Garcia, Rachel Epstein
Description: Marivi Soliven reads from her award-winning debut novel, The Mango Bride, inspired by her work as an interpreter for immigrant survivors of domestic violence.  Discussion will include the expanded protections of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), the Filipino diaspora, and the Saving Beverly movement, which raises funds for community organizations that support immigrant survivors of domestic violence.


Tuesday, Sept. 27, 5:30 – 7 pm
Event: Ten Things You Should Know about Kafka (Before You Waste the Rest of Your Life) 
Mountain View Branch Library, 120 Bragaw, Anchorage
Presenter: Kathi Diamant
Cost: free
Open to: public
Host: Mountain View Library
Contact: Virginia McLure
Estimated attendance: unknown
Book sales: by author
Description: Who was Franz Kafka? Why is he so important? And what does Kafkaesque really mean, anyway?

One of the most influential and misunderstood writers of our age, Franz Kafka was a lawyer who wrote in his spare time as "a form of prayer." After his death at the age of forty in 1924, his three unfinished novels were published, and barely sold a few copies. Yet, 100 years after the publication of his most famous short story, The Metamorphosis, he has become an icon of modern literature. His name is invoked more than 75 times a day on the internet, and a new book has been published on Kafka somewhere in the world every 10 days for the past 15 years. Yet, many people have never heard of him.

In this fun and informative talk, Kathi Diamant, author of Kafka's Last Love, and director of the SDSU Kafka Project, outlines ten things you should know to help you understand and appreciate Franz Kafka, one of the early players in defining--and shaping--our modern world view. You will discover surprising facts to impress your friends and family, and learn how reading Kafka actually can make you smarter.  


Tuesday, Sept. 27, 7 – 8:30 pm
Event: “Saving Beverly” Fundraiser for Abused Women’s Aid in Crisis (AWAIC)
Location: Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship, 2824 E. 18th Ave., Anchorage
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
Cost: $10 suggested donation
Host: Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship; fundraiser for AWAIC
Contact: Gary Holthaus
Estimated attendance: unknown
Book sales: following program
Description: Inspired by her work as an interpreter for immigrant survivors of domestic violence, San Diego author Marivi Soliven wrote The Mango Bride. Within the context of the novel, Beverly, an immigrant wife whose dreams of a better life vanish when her marriage turns violent, is a composite of the anonymous women for whom Soliven translates.

Domestic violence cuts through all socio-economic classes. Despite their widely differing backgrounds, immigrant wives are especially vulnerable when their legal status is controlled by an abusive spouse. After several women shared their own stories of domestic violence, Soliven realized that more could be done –should be done – to spare others from suffering Beverly’s fate.

At the Saving Beverly event in Anchorage, Soliven will discuss the expanded protections of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), the Filipino diaspora, and the Saving Beverly movement, which raises funds for community organizations that support immigrant survivors of domestic violence. $10 suggested donation to support Abused Women Aid in Crisis (AWAIC).


Wednesday, Sept. 28, 6:30 – 8 pm
Event: “Sprinkle Flowers on Your Plate” for the Alaska Botanical Garden Lecture Series
Location: BP Energy Center Birch Room, 900 E. Benson, Anchorage
Presenter: Kitty Morse
Cost: $30 ABG members; $35 non-members
Host: Alaska Botanical Garden (ABG) with 49 Writers
Contact: Stacey Shriner
Description: Let award-winning cookbook author Kitty Morse take you on a fragrant excursion through the world of edible flowers. During her presentation, Kitty will share her knowledge of growing, gathering and cooking with these delectable edibles. A sampling of flowers and treats containing them, recipe handouts, and a signing of Kitty’s latest book, Edible Flowers: A Kitchen Companion with Recipes round out the presentation.

ANCHORAGE | Panel discussion about Censorship, Diversity, and YA Literature at Mountain View Library. October 4, 2016. 7 pm. Each year the American Library Association release’s a list of the most challenged books of the year. Young adult books are more likely to be challenged than any other and, according to Diversity in YA, 20% of the authors that make the list are non-white. About half of the books that make that list include content about non-whites, non-heterosexuals, or disabled people. Panel will discuss exactly why diversity in young adult literature is needed and how we can ensure that diverse literature is available in our community. Panel discussion depend on audience participation – come prepared to ask questions and share your opinion!
Panelists will include:

Jon Ebron – Anchorage Public Library, Teen Librarian

Suzanne Metcalfe – School Librarian, Anchorage School District

Sharon Pinkney – Language Arts Teacher, Anchorage School District

Michael Robinson – UAA/APU Consortium Library and Chair of the Alaska State Library Association’s Committee on Intellectual Freedom

Dr. Jervette R. Ward – Assistant professor at UAA and author of, “In Search of Diversity: Dick and Jane and Their Black Playmates”, as well as the editor of, “Real Sister: Stereotypes, Respectability, and Black Women in Reality TV”.

Suzanne Metcalfe – School Librarian, Anchorage School District

Sharon Pinkney – Language Arts Teacher, Anchorage School District

Michael Robinson – UAA/APU Consortium Library and Chair of the Alaska State 
Library Association’s Committee on Intellectual Freedom

Dr. Jervette R. Ward – Assistant professor at UAA and author of, “In Search of Diversity: Dick and Jane and Their Black Playmates”, as well as the editor of, “Real Sister: Stereotypes, Respectability, and Black Women in Reality TV”.

ANCHORAGE | October 19, 2016, 7 pm at 49th State Brewpub. Find Your Park. Share Your Story. Storytelling Event in the style of Arctic Entries. Tickets are $12 at the door or in advance at the Alaska Geographic Store at 241 North C Street. Facebook event

INTERIOR 
FAIRBANKS | Building Fires in the Snow: Presentation, Reading
Friday, October 7, 2016, 5:30--7:30pm, Gulliver’s Books, 3525 College Rd.

Tales of the City: Writing from Alaska’s Urban Hubs | Modern Alaska life exists in the dichotomy between what some call the Great Land—majestic lands teeming with wildlife—and the goings-on of our mostly urban people. How does this dichotomy affect urban Alaskans and the stories they tell? J
          Spotlight on Alaska Books | Lizbeth Meredith: Pieces of Me      Cache   Translate Page      

Prologue:


AFTERMATH

2016
Sometimes I’m asked if I feel lucky. Usually, it’s after I’ve given a presentation about domestic violence or the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study, and in the context of “Aren’t you glad all the bad stuff happened when your kids were little?” As though prebirth and early childhood experiences are any less impactful.

The truth is, I do feel lucky, but not because my kids were little when their father tried to kill me. I feel lucky because I survived, and so did they. I feel lucky because when he stole them years later and took them to Greece, I was still a young adult, with all the energy and optimism I needed to risk bringing them home. (Pieces of Me: Rescuing My Kidnapped Daughters by Lizbeth Meredith)


In 1994, Lizbeth Meredith said goodbye to her four and six year-old daughters for a visit with their non-custodial father, only to learn days later that they had been kidnapped and taken to their father’s home country of Greece.

Twenty-nine and just off food stamps, Lizbeth now faced a $100,000 problem on a $10 an hour budget. For the next two years—fueled by the memories of her own childhood kidnapping—Lizbeth traded in her small life for a life more public to garner interest in her efforts, travelling to the White House and to Greece. The generous community of Anchorage became Lizbeth’s makeshift family—one that was replicated by a growing number of Greeks and expats overseas who helped Lizbeth navigate the turbulent path leading back to her daughters.


“Lizbeth Meredith writes hauntingly about an all-too-common experience—domestic violence, and it’s ultimate aftermath: kidnapping. In the face of a mother’s nightmare, she summons all her resources to recover her daughters. Pieces of Me is a powerful testimony to one woman’s courage and resilience in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds, and to the unbreakable bounds between a mother and her daughters.”
--Eleanor Vincent, author of Swimming with Maya: A Mother’s Story

“Pieces of Me  is an important, honest, and heartrending story of a brave young mother’s struggle to save her precious daughters—no matter the toll it takes on her—as she through it all carries the double-burden of reliving her own childhood trauma.”
--Lene Fogelberg, author of the Wall Street Journal bestseller Beautiful Affliction.

Lizbeth Meredith is an Anchorage-based writer and 49 Writers member and volunteer with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and a master’s degree in psychology. She has worked as a domestic violence advocate and a child abuse investigator, and with at-risk teens as a juvenile probation supervisor. A contributor to A Girl’s Guide to Travelling Alone by Gemma Thompson and author of When Push Comes to Shove: How to Help When Someone You Love is Being Abused, Lizbeth blogs at www.lameredith.com.

Pieces of Me: Rescuing My Kidnapped Daughters will be available in digital and hard copy





          Kathi Diamant | Dispatch from Berlin: You’ve Got To Be There      Cache   Translate Page      
Kathia Diamant is visiting Anchorage Sept. 24 - 28, 2016 through an author exchange program sponsored by Adventures by the Book. In partnership with the Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers is featuring these visiting authors in workshops at the AWG conference on Saturday, Sept. 24 and also at a members-only salon event on Sunday, Sept. 25 (details here).  

Prenzlauer Berg, Berlin, 20 September 2016  

As long as you keep climbing, there will be steps, they will magically appear under your climbing feet.“  Franz Kafka, The Blue Octavo Notebooks

I hoped to write this blog post from Berlin in advance my upcoming Alaska visit to announce the mystical, magical new developments in my search for a missing literary treasure. And something truly amazing did happen today. It’s the best possible news, outside of finding it.

For almost twenty years, I’ve led the search to recover the lost, last writings of literary giant Franz Kafka. My search actually began two decades earlier, in 1971, in a German language literature class, when my teacher interrupted our translation of “The Metamorphosis” to ask if I were related to Dora Diamant. He told me that Dora and Kafka were very much in love, that Kafka died in her arms, and that she burned his work. A fellow student behind me echoed what I’d been thinking. He whispered: “Not enough of it."

Throughout my lifelong search to solve the mysteries surrounding the remarkable young Polish Jewish woman who gave Kafka the happiest year of his life, I have traveled in her footsteps, becoming her biographer and rewriting her into history. Along the way, I learned to love Kafka. Dora Diamant, with whom I share the coincidence of a last name, was a mysterious and dark figure when I took my first research trip to find her. She haunted me, and finally, I had to know what happened to her after Kafka’s death (of tuberculosis, at age 40 in 1924). On my first mission to find Dora in 1985, I went to Prague where Kafka lived and is buried, then to the small sanatorium outside Vienna where he died, and on to Israel to check out the Diamant genealogy at Hebrew University. Since then, I have travelled to these and many other places in the world, from Poland to Germany, to the Soviet Union, to Israel, France, and England, where she died in 1952, three weeks to the day after I was born.

In the three decades since then, I found the traces of Dora’s remarkable life through the people who knew her, and through the discoveries of her lost letters, diaries, photographs and Gestapo and Comintern files. I was able to find her lost family members and reunite them when we placed a stone on Dora’s unmarked grave. One of the most important discoveries about Dora was that she didn’t burn Kafka’s work, as my teacher said. Instead, Dora kept a secret collection of Kafka’s writings, 35 letters he had written to her and 20 notebooks he kept in the last year of his life. These papers were confiscated from Dora by the Gestapo in 1933. But scholars always hoped they would be found. And indeed, they might.

In 1996, I started the Kafka Project at San Diego State University to conduct and record the official international search to recover this missing literary treasure. In 1998, I spent four months in Berlin, scouring the Nazi and Gestapo archives until I found the proof of the confiscation and the office responsible for receiving it. Since then, incrementally, we’ve made progress, tracing the papers through Germany to Poland to Russia, and then back again to Germany. In 2013, we learned of an uncatalogued archive dating back to the Third Reich, which could contain this material. After a series of meetings with local scholars and experts, we made a plan. In 2014, nothing had moved forward, so I returned to Berlin to continue the search. Two years passed, and nothing happened, and no progress was made.

So I returned this month to Berlin. After two years of writing to him, without an answer, yesterday I received a telephone call from our “deep throat” archivist in the German Federal Archives, who agreed to meet with me and Dr. Hans Koch, the leading Kafka scholar in Germany on Kafka’s letters, with new information. We met today, renewed the approach to the archive, and are moving forward with the help of two German universities who have signed on to take over the research. Now two major academic institutions are taking over the work. They believe it is possible we will find this missing chapter to literary history. If I had stayed home, nothing would still be happening.

All writers are also researchers. Even if you aren’t looking to find the traces of someone who once lived, as a writer, if at all possible, you should go to the place you are writing about. Even if you think you know the place, if it’s burned into your memory, you still have to go back. If you have never been there, and you can physically make the trip, you must go. This is especially true if place is an important part of your story. It’s not just to fully describe it using all of your senses, but to allow magic and coincidences to take place. To let the story, true or fiction, unfold in the place it happened, or is happening, or will happen.

Of course this isn’t always possible. There are many excellent excuses. The place may not exist anymore. Or for myriad reasons travel is impossible. Many say they cannot afford it, which is the poorest excuse of all. But if you can’t go, I hope you’ll find other ways to replicate the experience. Read fully, watch films and videos, listen to the music, do what you can. But for those are able to travel, go. Now. Charge it, do what you must do. But go.

By being in the place where one’s story takes place, miraculous events occur, which wouldn’t happen, sitting comfortably at your desk. I’m living proof. I’m leaving Berlin tomorrow, and will be in Anchorage on Friday. I’ll be presenting on Saturday, Sept 24, at the Alaska Writers Guild Conference, and will be giving two additional talks, on Tuesday Sept 27 at Mountain View Library and on Monday, Sept 26 at the UAA Bookstore, about why you should read Kafka, and the story of my search for his last love. I hope to see you there!


Kathi Diamant is an award-winning author, broadcaster and adjunct professor at San Diego State University, where she teaches writing and critique. Since 1998, Kathi has led the SDSU Kafka Project, the official international search to recover the missing writings of Franz Kafka. Kathi’s literary detective work resulted in Kafka’s Last Love: The Mystery of Dora Diamant, which won the San Diego Book Awards’ “Best Biography” and the Geisel Award for “Best of the Best” in 2003. Much of her life now revolves around books, research travel, writing and teaching. She continues her on-air presence as a fundraising host and interview for PBS pledge programs.

          Bree Kessler | The Perfect Pitch is All in Your Head      Cache   Translate Page      

Last week I ran into a woman who, earlier this year during my very short stint as the editor of the Edible Alaska website, successfully pitched me an article. I shared with this woman, an objectively superior writer and MFA graduate, that her published article was one of my favorite pieces to read and I wondered why she didn’t do more paid freelance work. She replied, “I just don’t know how to sell myself like that.”    

There is some cognitive dissonance necessary with crafting a pitch. The writer must convince herself that she is the authority, the expert, the best possible person to write the proposed story. One might need to be a bit of a social worker of the self – a cognitive behavior therapist – to achieve the notion that you, the freelancer, are the foremost expert on “best hairstyles for cats” or “how to pack for the backcountry entirely with Costco items.” As silly as it seems, you must convince yourself that one does have a PhD in cat hairstyles or Costco shopping in order to “sell” your story to an editor.

The feminist in me truly believes that everyone has valuable and numerous story ideas, but a good pitch is very different than a good story. The pitch succinctly summarizes what you will share with the reader, why the story is not only appropriate, but a must-have, for the given publication, and again, why you are the very best person to tell the story. And when you get better at these key factors, you can add to the list: why you should get paid more than the editor initially offers to write the proposed article.

Like a group of children who construct different looking structures out of the very same pack of Legos, a savvy pitcher can finesse the same story idea for completely unrelated publications. For example, a few years ago I was making the rounds pitching a story about my experience as a reader for the Advance Placement (AP) exam in the subject of psychology. I pitched this story to New York magazine as a series of confessions by AP readers. Good magazine received a pitch that was an exposé style reveal of how schools that send teachers to the AP reading are privy to insider knowledge that benefit their students. I sent McSweeney’sQuarterly a pitch that was a comical account of eating in the cafeteria with the other AP readers. Same general story – three different pitches – none sent simultaneously in order to abide by pitching etiquette.

There can be something a little disheartening about the pitching process. For some, manipulating a story to meet the needs of a publication can feel really soulless. For others, like myself, I just want to get my (or “the”) idea out to the public and I’ll do what it takes to get it there and to get paid. And then there is the waiting game… those moment (or weeks or months) between sending out your pitch to the editor and waiting for your inbox to ping back with a response. It’s like waiting for a college acceptance letter weekly as an adult. But when (and if) a positive response does arrive it’s shear elation. I’ll never forget hearing back from the New York magazine editor. I had to do everything in my power not to instantly respond to his, “We think that idea is hilarious!” email and instead, as one would do after receiving an email from an ex-lover, to wait an hour before writing back to accept his story terms. Note, I’ll save you the time in googling the article: it never got published. Sometimes a good pitch comes at the wrong time in an editorial calendar. But a savvier pitcher than I was in my early career knows these calendars ahead of time and can suggest stories to meet the editor’s needs.

Bree Kessler
A solid pitcher is a true craftsman with a healthy self-esteem and a working knowledge of the business. A good pitch may get you in the door, but good writing gets you invited back.

Bree’s three hour 49 Writers class, Pitch Perfect: Fundamentals of the Freelance Pitch, is Saturday, October 1st, 2-5 pm in Anchorage at the Alaska Humanities Forum. $45 members / $55 nonmembers. Learn more and register here


Bree Kessler is a #SAHM (stay-at-home-mom) of @tiny.park.ranger, laid-off editor, adjunct professor of community engagement, and a trained, but not practicing, social worker. Her newly revised travel guidebook Moon: Big Island of Hawaii hit bookshelves earlier this month. Learn more about her writing at www.breekessler.com.

          49 Writers | Roundup for Literary Alaska      Cache   Translate Page      
Have news, events, or opportunities you'd like to see listed here? Email details to info (at) 49writers.org. Spread the word. Your message must be received by close of business the Wednesday before the roundup is scheduled to run at the latest. Unless your event falls in the "Opportunities and Awards" category, it should occur no more than 30 days from when we receive your email. Thanks! 

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

Congrats to the late Alaska author Eva Saulitis and UAA MFA alum Mary Kudenov for their inclusion in the 2016 Best American Essays anthology edited by Jonathan Franzen!

Our 7th Annual Tutka Bay Writers Retreat wrapped up last weekend, led by the incredible and generous Debra Magpie Earling. Registration is underway now for 49 Writers classes and workshops, both in Anchorage and online. Learn more and register here


SOUTHCENTRAL
HOMER | Saturday, September 17th from noon-3 PM. Happy Birthday Party for the Homer Public Library! Over one million people have visited in its first decade. Celebrate with live music, dessert, and surprises. More

KODIAK | the first Galley Tables storytelling show of the season is coming up. They occur on Friday nights every month from October through May. Sign yourself up (or a friend) to tell a story. Details  

ANCHORAGE | Anchorage essayist and author Bill Sherwonit will teach a 12-week nature and travel writing class beginning September 21st in the Sierra Club office downtown. Participants in this workshop-style class will explore and refine their own writing styles, with an emphasis on the personal essay form. The class will also read and discuss works by some of America’s finest nature and travel writers. $240. To sign up for this Wednesday night class (7 to 9:30 pm), or for more information, contact Sherwonit at 245-0283 or akgriz@hotmail.com.

ANCHORAGE | Publication Consultants, in association with Alaska Book Week, is hosting the Great Alaska Book Fair sponsored in part by The Mall at Sears and Anchorage Public Library. They suggest that anyone interested in participating in The Great Alaska Book Fair respond before all tables are reserved. Concurrent event will include: a Farmer's Market, a Sidewalk Sale and the Better Business Bureau's Shred Day, and a Financial Fitness Fair; it's the same day that The Mall at Sears features an annual sidewalk sale to coincide with the release of Permanent Fund Dividends. If you're interested you can sign up for a table hereBook fair hours are 10 AM to 6 PM on Saturday, October 8, 2016. Tables will be allocated on a first come, first serve basis. Authors are responsible for their own sales—and pocket all the money. There will not be a central check out register. There is a charge of $50 per table. Authors may share tables if they'd like. 

BUILDING FIRES IN THE SNOW (BFITS) ALASKA BOOK TOUR
BFITS READING & BOOK SIGNING
Saturday, September 17, 2016, 4-5 PM
Fireside Books, 720 S Alaska St # B, Palmer, AK
Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking book featuring work from some of Alaska’s finest writers. While collecting for the first time Alaska-themed LGBTQ short fiction and poetry, for the most part the work relates to concerns all Alaskans share. Editors Martha Amore and Lucian Childs, along with contributor Teeka Ballas, will sign books and give a short reading. FREE

BFITS DINNER, PANEL DISCUSSION, READING & BOOK SIGNINGWriting Against Stereotypes: Dinner and Artist Talk
Saturday, September 17, 2016, 6-8:30 PM
Turkey Red Restaurant, 550 S. Alaska St., Suite 100, Palmer, AK
Join editors Martha Amore and Lucian Childs, along with contributor Teeka Ballas, for dinner at Turkey Red. They will share their work and discuss the process of writing a different Alaska. Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking anthology that opens a window onto the diverse lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer Alaskans. From quotidian urban outings to intimate encounters with breathtaking natural beauty, the collection shatters stereotypes to reveal a little seen side of the state. A Question and Answer session and book signing will follow. 
Dinner tickets are $30 per person and only available in advance of the event at Fireside Books. Purchase at the store, by calling 745-2665 or online.

BFITS PRESENTATION, READING & BOOK SIGNINGA Community Tells Its Story
Thursday, September 22, 2016, 5-7 PM
University of Alaska Anchorage Bookstore, 2901 Spirit Way, Anchorage, AK
Join editors Martha Amore and Lucian Childs, along with contributors Susanna Mishler, Mei Mei Evans and others, as they share their work and discuss the process of writing about the Alaska LGBTQ community. Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking book featuring work from some of Alaska’s finest writers. How does the anthology reveal different aspects of the Alaska LGBTQ community? How can collaborative projects such as Building Fires in the Snow or Arctic Entries open windows onto little-seen aspects of our state? Can literature empower a community or does it stand outside political and social movements? A Question and Answer session and book signing will follow. FREE

READING & BOOK SIGNING
Saturday, September 24, 2016, 6-7:30 PM
Homer Public Library, 500 Hazel Avenue, Homer, AK
Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking book, the first to anthologize stories and poems from this perspective. The collection explores the deep connection between LGBTQ Alaskans, the urban context and the wilderness that surrounds them both. Editor Martha Amore, along with contributors Teresa Sundmark, Dawnell Smith and Teeka Ballas, will give a short reading.
A Question and Answer session and book signing will follow. FREE | Presented with Friends of the Homer Library.

BFITS BOOK SIGNING
Thursday, September 29, 2016, 5-7 PM
Barnes & Noble, 200 East Northern Lights Boulevard, Anchorage, AK, 99503
Anthology contributors will sign books and answer questions about the collection.
Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking book featuring work from some of Alaska’s finest writers. While collecting for the first time Alaska-themed LGBTQ short fiction and poetry, for the most part the work relates to concerns all Alaskans share. FREE

49 Writers presents Crosscurrents 
Tales of the City: Writing from Alaska’s Urban Hubs
ANCHORAGE | October 13, 2016 
5-6:45 pm – Building Fires in the Snow celebratory meet-and-greet at MUSE
7-8:30 pm – Crosscurrents event in the Anchorage Museum auditorium



As part of an author exchange facilitated by Susan McBeth at Adventures by the Book in partnership with 49 Writers, Inc., four authors will present programs of interest to writers in Anchorage Sept. 24 - 28: 
Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 9:50 -10:50 am
Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Best Practices to Present Your Book
Presenter: Kathi Diamant
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman (AWG), Jeremy Pataky (49W)
Description: How do you present your book to an audience so that they will buy it? This workshop will offer specific techniques to craft talking points about your book, and adapt those messages to various audiences, covering the spectrum from the inhabitants of an elevator, to book club groups, classrooms, speaking engagements, and print, web, radio and television interviews. Topics covered include creating a 30-second "elevator speech" and how to prepare for a live broadcast interview or speaking engagement.   


Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 11 am - noon
Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Strategic Event Planning – How to Market Your Book, Building an Author Foundation
Presenter: Susan McBeth
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman (AWG), Jeremy Pataky (49W)
Description: You wouldn’t dream of building your house without a foundation, yet counterintuitively, that’s precisely what most authors do. It’s not until after they create their book that they typically start to think about a marketing foundation to launch it successfully. In this session, Susan will share tips on how you can start building your foundation, no matter where you are at in the publishing process. Learn about some innovative ways to host your book events, whether you are setting up your very first book signing, or you are a seasoned author looking to inject new life into your book signings.


Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 11 am - noon
Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Native Tongues: Blending the Other into Dialogue
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman, Jeremy Pataky
Description: In an increasingly diverse world community, writers face the challenge of replicating a myriad of voices into their stories. In this session, writers will learn to create memorable, authentic characters by capturing the cadence of English as it is spoken by non-English speakers and weaving other languages into their dialogues, including strategies for replicating the nuanced speech patterns of characters from varied cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. Participants will examine excerpts from stories by Jhumpa Lahiri, Edwidge Danticat, and Soliven's own work. Following this discussion, writers will draft passages of dialogue inspired by writing prompts. Those comfortable with sharing their work will be encouraged to read their scenes aloud for feedback.


Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016 2:10 – 3:10 pmBreakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Cooking Up Memoirs: How to Record History
Presenter: Kitty Morse
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman, Jeremy Pataky
Description: Have you ever daydreamed, while standing at the stove, of handing down family recipes to the next generation? Better yet, of recording your family’s history in the process? Don’t wait to tell your story. This sense of urgency motivated Kitty to write her award-winning memoir, Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories. During this hour-long seminar, find out how she gathered family recipes and stories, tested the dishes, organized text and photographs, and mastered the publishing and marketing processes.

Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 6 PM
Event: An Evening at the Kasbah
Location: Turkey Red Restaurant, 550 South Alaska St.
Presenter: Kitty Morse
Cost: $35 | tickets 
Host: Fireside Books
Contact: David Cheezem; Barbara Hecker barbara@goodbooksbadcoffee.com
Estimated attendance: venue seats 50
Book sales: by Fireside Books
Description: Savor the authentic flavors of Morocco with Casablanca-born Kitty Morse, author of Cooking at the Kasbah: Recipes from my Moroccan Kitchen, now in its tenth printing from Chronicle Books. Chef Alex will prepare a menu featuring recipes from Kitty’s book using local Alaskan products. Have dinner while Kitty entertains guests with tales of Moroccan culture and cuisine from Dar Zitoun, her family home south of Casablanca. Books will be available for sale courtesy of Fireside Books.
Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, 9 – 10:15 am (40 minute talk)
Event: 9 AM service Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship: “Uniting Writers and Readers for Social Justice”
Location: 2824 E. 18th Ave, Anchorage
Presenters: Susan McBeth, Marivi Soliven
Cost: none
Host: Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship
Contact: Gary Holthaus
Estimated attendance: 50 - 60
Description: Susan McBeth, founder of Adventures by the Book, and Marivi Soliven, author of The Mango Bride, will discuss how they collaborated on “Saving Beverly,” a literary event that raised awareness and funds to assist immigrant victims of domestic violence, as well as the broader challenge of enabling meaningful interactions between writers and readers.
  

Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm (40 minute talk)
Event: 11 AM service Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship: “Saving Beverly”
Location: 2824 E. 18th Ave., Anchorage
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
Cost: none
Host: Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship
Contact: Gary Holthaus
Estimated attendance: 80 – 90
Book sales: following service
Description: Inspired by her work as an interpreter for immigrant survivors of domestic violence, San Diego author Marivi Soliven wrote The Mango Bride. Within the context of the novel, Beverly, an immigrant wife whose dreams of a better life vanish when her marriage turns violent, is a composite of the anonymous women for whom Soliven translates.
Domestic violence cuts through all socio-economic classes. Despite their widely differing backgrounds, immigrant wives are especially vulnerable when their legal status is controlled by an abusive spouse. During the 11 am service, Soliven will discuss the expanded protections of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), the Filipino diaspora, and the Saving Beverly movement, which raises funds for community organizations that support immigrant survivors of domestic violence.

Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, 5:00 - 7:00pm
Event: Salon Meet and Greet; includes informal panel (20 – 30 minutes) “Novel Ways to Get Noticed” featuring all visiting authors
Location: Home of Martha Amore, address forthcoming to RSVPers
Presenters: Susan McBeth, Kathi Diamant, Marivi Soliven, Kitty Morse
More Info: http://49writers.org/special-events-and-salons
Cost: Potluck; BYOB
Open to: 49 Writers, Alaska Writers Guild, and Alaska SCBWI current members only 
Host: 49 Writers
Contact: Jeremy Pataky
Estimated attendance: 25 - 35
Description: An informal meet-and-greet potluck event, by invitation to members of 49 Writers, Alaska SCBWI, and the Alaska Writers Guild. Visiting authors will speak as an informal panel on their success with novel ways of connecting readers with their books.


Monday, Sept. 26, 5 – 7 pm
Event: Kafka’s Last Love—Dora Diamant
Location: University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) Bookstore, 2901 Spirit Way, Anchorage
Presenter: Kathi Diamant
More info: https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/bookstore/events/special-events-calendar.cfm
Cost: free
Open to: public
Host: UAA Philosophy Dept/Honors College/UAA Bookstore
Contact: John Mouracade, Rachel Epstein
Description: In her book Kafka’s Last Love: The Mystery of Dora Diamant, author Kathi Diamant explores the relationship between Franz Kafka and his companion and confidante Dora Diamant (1898-1952). It details their life in Berlin and, after his death in 1924, her passionate commitment to keep Kafka’s literary flame alive while caught in the maelstroms of fascism, communism, and the Holocaust.

Kathi Diamant is Director of the Kafka Project at San Diego State University which is an ongoing international search for Kafka's missing literary treasure: 35 letters and 20 notebooks written by Kafka in the last year of his life, and confiscated from Dora by the Gestapo in Berlin 1933. Just returning from investigations in Berlin, Kathi will also share her latest findings and her extraordinary adventures through archives and history.


Tuesday, Sept. 27, 1 – 2:30 pm
Event: “The Mango Bride: A Frank Talk about Domestic Violence in Immigrant Communities and the Filipino Diaspora”
Location: University of Alaska (UAA) Bookstore, 2901 Spirit Way, Anchorage
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
More info: https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/bookstore/events/special-events-calendar.cfm
Cost: free
Host: UAA Public Health, UAA Bookstore
Contact: Gabe Garcia, Rachel Epstein
Description: Marivi Soliven reads from her award-winning debut novel, The Mango Bride, inspired by her work as an interpreter for immigrant survivors of domestic violence.  Discussion will include the expanded protections of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), the Filipino diaspora, and the Saving Beverly movement, which raises funds for community organizations that support immigrant survivors of domestic violence.


Tuesday, Sept. 27, 5:30 – 7 pm
Event: Ten Things You Should Know about Kafka (Before You Waste the Rest of Your Life) 
Mountain View Branch Library, 120 Bragaw, Anchorage
Presenter: Kathi Diamant
Cost: free
Open to: public
Host: Mountain View Library
Contact: Virginia McLure
Estimated attendance: unknown
Book sales: by author
Description: Who was Franz Kafka? Why is he so important? And what does Kafkaesque really mean, anyway?

One of the most influential and misunderstood writers of our age, Franz Kafka was a lawyer who wrote in his spare time as "a form of prayer." After his death at the age of forty in 1924, his three unfinished novels were published, and barely sold a few copies. Yet, 100 years after the publication of his most famous short story, The Metamorphosis, he has become an icon of modern literature. His name is invoked more than 75 times a day on the internet, and a new book has been published on Kafka somewhere in the world every 10 days for the past 15 years. Yet, many people have never heard of him.

In this fun and informative talk, Kathi Diamant, author of Kafka's Last Love, and director of the SDSU Kafka Project, outlines ten things you should know to help you understand and appreciate Franz Kafka, one of the early players in defining--and shaping--our modern world view. You will discover surprising facts to impress your friends and family, and learn how reading Kafka actually can make you smarter.  


Tuesday, Sept. 27, 7 – 8:30 pm
Event: “Saving Beverly” Fundraiser for Abused Women’s Aid in Crisis (AWAIC)
Location: Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship, 2824 E. 18th Ave., Anchorage
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
Cost: $10 suggested donation
Host: Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship; fundraiser for AWAIC
Contact: Gary Holthaus
Estimated attendance: unknown
Book sales: following program
Description: Inspired by her work as an interpreter for immigrant survivors of domestic violence, San Diego author Marivi Soliven wrote The Mango Bride. Within the context of the novel, Beverly, an immigrant wife whose dreams of a better life vanish when her marriage turns violent, is a composite of the anonymous women for whom Soliven translates.

Domestic violence cuts through all socio-economic classes. Despite their widely differing backgrounds, immigrant wives are especially vulnerable when their legal status is controlled by an abusive spouse. After several women shared their own stories of domestic violence, Soliven realized that more could be done –should be done – to spare others from suffering Beverly’s fate.

At the Saving Beverly event in Anchorage, Soliven will discuss the expanded protections of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), the Filipino diaspora, and the Saving Beverly movement, which raises funds for community organizations that support immigrant survivors of domestic violence. $10 suggested donation to support Abused Women Aid in Crisis (AWAIC).


Wednesday, Sept. 28, 6:30 – 8 pm
Event: “Sprinkle Flowers on Your Plate” for the Alaska Botanical Garden Lecture Series
Location: BP Energy Center Birch Room, 900 E. Benson, Anchorage
Presenter: Kitty Morse
More Info: http://alaskabg.org/programsevents/
Cost: $30 ABG members; $35 non-members
Host: Alaska Botanical Garden (ABG) with 49 Writers
Contact: Stacey Shriner
Estimated attendance: room holds 75
Book sales: following program
Description: Let award-winning cookbook author Kitty Morse take you on a fragrant excursion through the world of edible flowers. During her presentation, Kitty will share her knowledge of growing, gathering and cooking with these delectable edibles. A sampling of flowers and treats containing them, recipe handouts, and a signing of Kitty’s latest book, Edi
          Marivi Soliven ​| Blending the Other into Dialogue       Cache   Translate Page      

Marivi Soliven is visiting Anchorage Sept. 24 - 28 through an author exchange program sponsored by Adventures by the Book. In partnership with the Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers is featuring these visiting authors in workshops at the AWG conference on Saturday, Sept. 24 and also at a members-only salon event on Sunday, Sept. 25.

Candlewick Press recently postponed the release of e. E. Charlton-Trujillo’s young adult novel When We Was Fierce because of what the publisher termed “…the dramatic contrast between pre-publication reviews …[and] …many of the social media and blog responses…” Closer examination of one blogger’s response reveals a stinging critique of the dialogue which Charlton-Trujillo created for the novel’s African American characters.

Although pre-publication reviews praised this novel about an African American gang, author Jennifer Baker described Charlton-Trujillo’s dialogue as “…constructed Ebonics… deeply offensive and extremely hard to read without rereading not for interest but for comprehension.”

This is an extreme example of what happens when a writer gets carried away writing “authentic” dialogue for racially diverse characters. When accents are handled skillfully, dialogue brings a character alive more effectively than any amount of physical description. Done poorly, dialogue turns that character into a caricature.

Stories peopled by characters of many different ethnicities is not merely a publishing trend but a reflection of the multi-cultural communities in which we live. The writer’s challenge lies in composing dialogue which captures the nuances of a non-English speaking character without hitting the reader over the head with it.

Pulitzer-Prize winning author Jhumpa Lahiri does this by adjusting her character’s syntax — the arrangement of words in a sentence — in a scene from her short story, “When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine”[1]:

One day in October Mr. Pirzada asked upon arrival, “What are these large orange vegetables on people’s doorsteps? A type of squash?”

Pumpkins,” my mother replied. “Lilia, remind me to pick one up at the supermarket.”

And the purpose? It indicates what?”

You make a jack-o’-lantern,” I said, grinning ferociously. “Like this, to scare people away.”

I see,” Mr. Pirzada said, grinning back. “Very useful.”

The exchange suggests that Professor Pirzada learned English at school, and thus speaks it with a formality not used by the average American when discussing pumpkins.

Another way to signify otherness is through diction or word choice. In this scene from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s story “On Monday of Last Week, ”[2] her character’s diction demonstrates how a word takes on entirely different connotations in different cultures:

“Maybe you could teach Josh a Nigerian language?… He’s very quiet, very sweet, a great kid, but I’m concerned there aren't any bi-racial kids like him at our school or in our neighborhood.”

Bi-racial?” Kamara asked.

Neil’s cough was delicate. “My wife is African-American and I’m white, Jewish.”

Oh, he’s half-caste.”

There was a pause and Neil’s voice came back, thicker. “Please don’t use that word.”

Earlier in the story, Kamara, the babysitter, had mused about how, in Nigeria, “half-caste” children were blessed with “…light-skinned good looks, trips abroad to visit white grandparents.” Her subsequent conversation with his father highlights the dramatic difference between their interpretations of this word.

I learned much about composing dialogue from both these authors when writing my novel, where class, not race, defines the way characters speak. In this excerpt from The Mango Bride[3], Amparo, a well-born Filipina argues with an unschooled Filipino WWII veteran over medical care:

“You fought in World War II didn’t you? Don’t you get veteran’s benefits?” Amparo was clutching at rhetorical straws now, working off her scant knowledge of American history.
           
HA! Yes, I am a veteran, and yes, I deserve veteran’s benefits.” Manong Del’s voice rose as he waved an angry arm. “But do I GET those benefits? No!” A vein dissecting the old man’s forehead pulsed like a brown root. He sat rigidly erect in bed, more enraged than Amparo had ever seen him. “Why don't I get veteran’s benefits? Why, you ask? Because that gaddamn Harry Truman signed the Rescission Act after the war. That’s why I don’t get no gaddam veteran’s benefits….”

In this case, I used a phonetic misspelling of “Goddamn” to capture the over-determined accent that many older Filipinos put on when speaking English.

If you would like to practice writing dialogue for a multicultural cast of characters, consider attending the Native Tongues: Blending the Other into Dialogue workshop I’m teaching at the Alaska Writers Guild Conference on Saturday, September 24. Please click here for details. 

Marivi Soliven has authored seventeen books and taught creative writing at the University of the Philippines and University of California San Diego. Prior to publication, her debut novel, The Mango Bride (Penguin 2013) won the Grand Prize at the 2011 Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature, the Philippine counterpart of the Pulitzer Prize. The Mango Bride later won Best Contemporary Fiction of 2013 at the San Diego Book Awards. Grupo Planeto released a Spanish edition, Hace Una Eternidad en Manila in 2014 and National Book Store published the Filipino edition in 2015. Learn more at https://marivisoliven.com


[1]Jhumpa Lahiri, “When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine,” in The Interpreter of Maladies (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1999), 34-35.
[2]Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “On Monday of Last Week,” in The Thing Around Your Neck, (London: Fourth Estate, 2009), 76.
[3]Marivi Soliven, The Mango Bride, (New York: NAL Penguin, 2013), 279.

          Kitty Morse | From Casablanca to Anchorage      Cache   Translate Page      
Kitty Morse is visiting Anchorage Sept. 24 - 28, 2016 through an author exchange program sponsored by Adventures by the Book. In partnership with the Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers is featuring these visiting authors in workshops at the AWG conference on Saturday, Sept. 24 and also at a members-only salon event on Sunday, Sept. 25. Kitty will also conduct a special program called "Sprinkle Flowers on Your Plate" as part of the Alaska Botanical Garden Lecture Series, conducted in partnership with 49 Writers (buy tickets here).  

My life as a writer developed by accident. Never in my wildest imagination did I think upon emigrating from Morocco to the US, and obtaining my master’s degree in French, that I would end up three decades later the author of ten cookbooks and a memoir. And now, I’ll visit Anchorage on a book tour!

In the beginning, I freelanced, opting to write about my passions – food and travel. My first byline plastered on the front page of the food section of the San Diego Union-Tribune sealed my fate. I was hooked. I submitted query upon query to every publication I could think of. Most queries were rejected, and I learned rule #1: Never take rejections personally. The next published article would send my spirits (and my ambition) soaring.

A strange thing happened over time. I fell in love with the process of writing. Magazine and newspaper assignments gave me the liberty to satisfy my curiosity about any subject that struck my fancy. I can still remember how excited I was one particular month to have a byline in 6 different national publications simultaneously. I learned rule #2: It takes perseverance, perseverance, and more perseverance, as well as timing and luck.

To this day, I advise beginning writers: “Practice the vow of chastity. NEVER sleep under the same roof as a rejected manuscript.” As a freelancer, a rejected article repackaged in a new envelope and shipped to a new address left my house the next day. Rule #3: DARE to query! You have nothing to lose.

My love of food led me to write cookbooks, and I have written 10 to date. Since I was born in Morocco, I focused on what I knew: Moroccan cuisine. The first book, Come with me to the Kasbah: A Cook’s Tour of Morocco, was hatched at the request of cooking students. I met the challenge, though it took over a dozen years to get it into print.

Closer to home, I frequented my weekly farmer’s market. The California Farm Cookbook eventually took me around the state to interview hundreds of farmers and request their favorite recipes. What a deal! And what a trip!

Tired of writing recipes, I set myself a new challenge in 2002 to write a memoir of Dar Zitoun, the historic Moroccan mansion my father willed me in the medieval town of Azemmour, 90 kilometers south of my native Casablanca. But how to make the switch from cookbook writer to memoirist? I took courses in poetry and creative writing at my local university. Once again, I fell in love with the process.

I think of Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories, as a cookbook with very long headnotes. To get it into print, I sought the help of professional editors and a book designer. Then, off it went to China to be printed. Mint Tea and Minarets turned me into an author/publisher. My new “job” is marketing, and to that end, I publish a monthly enewsletter called The Kasbah Chronicles.

The path I took to become a writer, then an author/publisher, has been arduous at times. But 10 published cookbooks, a memoir (and a very supportive husband and food photographer) allowed me to follow my heart. For that, I thank my lucky stars every day.

Kitty Morse’s writing and cooking career spans more than more than three decades. She is the author of 10 cookbooks and a memoir. She has been a guest on radio and television around the US and abroad, and her articles have appeared in a number of national and international publications. www.kittymorse.com

Kitty hopes to meet up with some of you at one of the following events:

Saturday, September 24: 2:10 to 3:10PM
Alaska Writers Guild annual conference, Anchorage, Alaska, in partnership with 49 Writers
Kitty Morse on How to write and market a cookbook.
2:10 pm to 3 10 pm:
BP Energy Center
900 E. Benson, Anchorage, Alaska 99519-6612
Saturday, September 24: 6PM. Reservations required.
CHAT WITH THE AUTHOR and SAVOR AN AUTHENTIC MOROCCAN DINNER
TURKEY RED RESTAURANT
550 S Alaska, Suite 100, Palmer AK
Email: turkeyredak@gmail.com
Call: 1-907-355-3242
Books for sale provided by David Cheezum, Fireside bookstore, Palmer, AK. fireside@goodbooksbadcoffee.com

Monday, September 26. 6-8PM. Reservations required.
Cooking Class: A Taste of Morocco
Allen and Peterson Home store
3002 Seward Highway, Anchorage AK
907-276-0111

Tuesday, September 27. 6PM. Open to the public.
Presentation on Moroccan cuisine and culture
Anchorage Public Library
Chugiak-Eagle River Branch
907-343-1533 

Wednesday, September 28: 6:30PM to 8PM. Fee charged.
Sprinkle Flowers on your plate!
Alaska Botanical Gardens Lecture Series in partnership with 49 Writers
September 28 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
BP Energy Center
900 E. Benson, Anchorage, AK 99508  

Thursday September 29, 7PM
Presentation on Moroccan cuisine and culture
Anchorage Public Library, Loussac Branch
907-343-1533

Kitty Morse, author

Edible Flowers: a Kitchen Companion with Recipes

Mint Tea and Minarets: A Banquet of Moroccan Memories
Best Book/Arab Cuisine/USA
Gourmand World Cookbook Awards

          49 Writers | Roundup for Literary Alaska       Cache   Translate Page      
Have news, events, or opportunities you'd like to see listed here? Email details to 49roundup (at) gmail.com. Spread the word. Your message must be received by noon on the Thursday before the roundup is scheduled to run at the latest. Unless your event falls in the "Opportunities and Awards" category, it should occur no more than 30 days from when we receive your email.

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

SOUTHCENTRAL

KODIAK | the first Galley Tables storytelling show of the season is coming up. They occur of Friday nights every month from October through May. The September theme is Extra Tough. Sign yourself up (or a friend) to tell a story. Details  

ANCHORAGE | Dr. Liu Zhen presents Political Ideas Conceived in the Zhouyi (The Book of Change) 
Friday, September 9 from 12-1:30 pm
Dr. Liu Zhen presents Political Ideas Conceived in the Zhouyi (The Book of Change). 
Zhen is Associate Professor at China University of Political Science and Law and currently a visiting professor at College of William and Mary Confucius Institute. His talk will focus on the rituals, political advocacy, and virtuous pursuit conceived in the Book of Change (Zhouyi) for government administrators. And it will analyze the value of traditional ideas in the Zhouyi for contemporary social developments. This event is sponsored by the UAA Confucius Institute and the UAA Campus Bookstore. 
  
ANCHORAGE | Author Richard Chiappone 
Monday, September 12 from 5:00 pm-7:00 pm 
Author Richard Chiappone presents Liar’s Code: Growing Up Fishing (Skyhorse Publishing). It is full of warm, funny, and memorable musings on a life spent fishing. According to E. Donnall Thomas Jr., author of Redfish, Bluefish, Ladyfish, Snook, “Rich Chiappone has accomplished a goal even more challenging than landing a permit on a fly: the creation of a classic.” Richard Chiappone is a two-time recipient of the Robert Traver Award and author of Opening Days, a collection of essays, stories and poems, and the short story collection Water of an Undetermined Depth. His writing has appeared in Alaska MagazinePlayboy, Gray’s Sporting Journal, and The Sun; and in literary journals including Crescent ReviewMissouri Review, and ZYZZYVAHe teaches writing in the UAA Master of Fine Arts Program and serves on the faculty of the annual Kachemak Bay Writers’ Conference. He lives in Homer with his wife and cats.

Note: There is free parking for UAA Bookstore events in the South Lot, Sports Complex NW Lot, West Campus Central Lot, Sports Campus West Lot. 


ANCHORAGE | Anchorage essayist and author Bill Sherwonit will teach a 12-week nature and travel writing class beginning September 21st in the Sierra Club office downtown. Participants in this workshop-style class will explore and refine their own writing styles, with an emphasis on the personal essay form. The class will also read and discuss works by some of America’s finest nature and travel writers. $240. To sign up for this Wednesday night class (7 to 9:30 pm), or for more information, contact Sherwonit at 245-0283 or akgriz@hotmail.com.

PALMER | Untold Stories returns this fall, with a "Getting Ready for Winter" theme. Seven storytellers will tel their tales live on stage at the Palmer Museum. Submit a story for consideration: palmermuseum.org/untoldstories/



ANCHORAGE | Publication Consultants, in association with Alaska Book Week, is hosting the Great Alaska Book Fair sponsored in part by The Mall at Sears and Anchorage Public Library. They suggest that anyone interested in participating in The Great Alaska Book Fair respond before all tables are reserved. Concurrent event will include: a Farmer's Market, a Sidewalk Sale and the Better Business Bureau's Shred Day, and a Financial Fitness Fair; it's the same day that The Mall at Sears features an annual sidewalk sale to coincide with the release of Permanent Fund Dividends. If you're interested you can sign up for a table hereBook fair hours are 10 AM to 6 PM on Saturday, October 8, 2016. Tables will be allocated on a first come, first serve basis. Authors are responsible for their own sales—and pocket all the money. There will not be a central check out register. There is a charge of $50 per table. Authors may share tables if they'd like. 


BUILDING FIRES IN THE SNOW (BFITS) ALASKA BOOK TOUR

BFITS READING & BOOK SIGNING
Saturday, September 17, 2016, 4-5 PM
Fireside Books, 720 S Alaska St # B, Palmer, AK
Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking book featuring work from some of Alaska’s finest writers. While collecting for the first time Alaska-themed LGBTQ short fiction and poetry, for the most part the work relates to concerns all Alaskans share. Editors Martha Amore and Lucian Childs, along with contributor Teeka Ballas, will sign books and give a short reading. FREE

BFITS DINNER, PANEL DISCUSSION, READING & BOOK SIGNINGWriting Against Stereotypes: Dinner and Artist Talk
Saturday, September 17, 2016, 6-8:30 PM
Turkey Red Restaurant, 550 S. Alaska St., Suite 100, Palmer, AK
Join editors Martha Amore and Lucian Childs, along with contributor Teeka Ballas, for dinner at Turkey Red. They will share their work and discuss the process of writing a different Alaska. Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking anthology that opens a window onto the diverse lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer Alaskans. From quotidian urban outings to intimate encounters with breathtaking natural beauty, the collection shatters stereotypes to reveal a little seen side of the state. A Question and Answer session and book signing will follow. 
Dinner tickets are $30 per person and only available in advance of the event at Fireside Books. Purchase at the store, by calling 745-2665 or online.

BFITS PRESENTATION, READING & BOOK SIGNINGA Community Tells Its Story
Thursday, September 22, 2016, 5-7 PM
University of Alaska Anchorage Bookstore, 2901 Spirit Way, Anchorage, AK
Join editors Martha Amore and Lucian Childs, along with contributors Susanna Mishler, Mei Mei Evans and others, as they share their work and discuss the process of writing about the Alaska LGBTQ community. Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking book featuring work from some of Alaska’s finest writers. How does the anthology reveal different aspects of the Alaska LGBTQ community? How can collaborative projects such as Building Fires in the Snow or Arctic Entries open windows onto little-seen aspects of our state? Can literature empower a community or does it stand outside political and social movements? A Question and Answer session and book signing will follow. FREE

READING & BOOK SIGNING
Saturday, September 24, 2016, 6-7:30 PM
Homer Public Library, 500 Hazel Avenue, Homer, AK
Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking book, the first to anthologize stories and poems from this perspective. The collection explores the deep connection between LGBTQ Alaskans, the urban context and the wilderness that surrounds them both. Editor Martha Amore, along with contributors Teresa Sundmark, Dawnell Smith and Teeka Ballas, will give a short reading.
A Question and Answer session and book signing will follow. FREE | Presented with Friends of the Homer Library.

BFITS BOOK SIGNING
Thursday, September 29, 2016, 5-7 PM
Barnes & Noble, 200 East Northern Lights Boulevard, Anchorage, AK, 99503
Anthology contributors will sign books and answer questions about the collection.
Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry is a pathbreaking book featuring work from some of Alaska’s finest writers. While collecting for the first time Alaska-themed LGBTQ short fiction and poetry, for the most part the work relates to concerns all Alaskans share. FREE

49 Writers presents Crosscurrents 
Tales of the City: Writing from Alaska’s Urban Hubs
ANCHORAGE | October 13, 2016 
5-6:45 pm – Building Fires in the Snow celebratory meet-and-greet at MUSE
7-8:30 pm – Crosscurrents event in the Anchorage Museum auditorium



As part of an author exchange facilitated by Susan McBeth at Adventures by the Book in partnership with 49 Writers, Inc., four authors will present programs of interest to writers in Anchorage Sept. 24 - 28: 
Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 9:50 -10:50 am
Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Best Practices to Present Your Book
Presenter: Kathi Diamant
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman (AWG), Jeremy Pataky (49W)
Description: How do you present your book to an audience so that they will buy it? This workshop will offer specific techniques to craft talking points about your book, and adapt those messages to various audiences, covering the spectrum from the inhabitants of an elevator, to book club groups, classrooms, speaking engagements, and print, web, radio and television interviews. Topics covered include creating a 30-second "elevator speech" and how to prepare for a live broadcast interview or speaking engagement.   


Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 11 am - noon
Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Strategic Event Planning – How to Market Your Book, Building an Author Foundation
Presenter: Susan McBeth
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman (AWG), Jeremy Pataky (49W)
Description: You wouldn’t dream of building your house without a foundation, yet counterintuitively, that’s precisely what most authors do. It’s not until after they create their book that they typically start to think about a marketing foundation to launch it successfully. In this session, Susan will share tips on how you can start building your foundation, no matter where you are at in the publishing process. Learn about some innovative ways to host your book events, whether you are setting up your very first book signing, or you are a seasoned author looking to inject new life into your book signings.


Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 11 am - noon
Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Native Tongues: Blending the Other into Dialogue
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman, Jeremy Pataky
Description: In an increasingly diverse world community, writers face the challenge of replicating a myriad of voices into their stories. In this session, writers will learn to create memorable, authentic characters by capturing the cadence of English as it is spoken by non-English speakers and weaving other languages into their dialogues, including strategies for replicating the nuanced speech patterns of characters from varied cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. Participants will examine excerpts from stories by Jhumpa Lahiri, Edwidge Danticat, and Soliven's own work. Following this discussion, writers will draft passages of dialogue inspired by writing prompts. Those comfortable with sharing their work will be encouraged to read their scenes aloud for feedback.


Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016 2:10 – 3:10 pm
Breakout Session: Alaska Writers Guild Conference
Location: BP Energy Center, 900 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage
Event: Cooking Up Memoirs: How to Record History
Presenter: Kitty Morse
More Info and Registration:  http://alaskawritersguild.com/2016-conference
Open to: conference registrants only
Host: Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, SCBWI
Contact: Brooke Hartman, Jeremy Pataky
Description: Have you ever daydreamed, while standing at the stove, of handing down family recipes to the next generation? Better yet, of recording your family’s history in the process? Don’t wait to tell your story. This sense of urgency motivated Kitty to write her award-winning memoir, Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories. During this hour-long seminar, find out how she gathered family recipes and stories, tested the dishes, organized text and photographs, and mastered the publishing and marketing processes.


Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, 6 PM
Event: An Evening at the Kasbah
Location: Turkey Red Restaurant, 550 South Alaska St.
Presenter: Kitty Morse
Cost: $35 | tickets 
Host: Fireside Books
Contact: David Cheezem; Barbara Hecker barbara@goodbooksbadcoffee.com
Estimated attendance: venue seats 50
Book sales: by Fireside Books
Description: Savor the authentic flavors of Morocco with Casablanca-born Kitty Morse, author of Cooking at the Kasbah: Recipes from my Moroccan Kitchen, now in its tenth printing from Chronicle Books. Chef Alex will prepare a menu featuring recipes from Kitty’s book using local Alaskan products. Have dinner while Kitty entertains guests with tales of Moroccan culture and cuisine from Dar Zitoun, her family home south of Casablanca. Books will be available for sale courtesy of Fireside Books.
Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, 9 – 10:15 am (40 minute talk)
Event: 9 AM service Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship: “Uniting Writers and Readers for Social Justice”
Location: 2824 E. 18th Ave, Anchorage
Presenters: Susan McBeth, Marivi Soliven
Cost: none
Host: Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship
Contact: Gary Holthaus
Estimated attendance: 50 - 60
Description: Susan McBeth, founder of Adventures by the Book, and Marivi Soliven, author of The Mango Bride, will discuss how they collaborated on “Saving Beverly,” a literary event that raised awareness and funds to assist immigrant victims of domestic violence, as well as the broader challenge of enabling meaningful interactions between writers and readers.
  

Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm (40 minute talk)
Event: 11 AM service Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship: “Saving Beverly”
Location: 2824 E. 18th Ave., Anchorage
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
Cost: none
Host: Anchorage Unitarian Universalist (AUU) Fellowship
Contact: Gary Holthaus
Estimated attendance: 80 – 90
Book sales: following service
Description: Inspired by her work as an interpreter for immigrant survivors of domestic violence, San Diego author Marivi Soliven wrote The Mango Bride. Within the context of the novel, Beverly, an immigrant wife whose dreams of a better life vanish when her marriage turns violent, is a composite of the anonymous women for whom Soliven translates.
Domestic violence cuts through all socio-economic classes. Despite their widely differing backgrounds, immigrant wives are especially vulnerable when their legal status is controlled by an abusive spouse. During the 11 am service, Soliven will discuss the expanded protections of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), the Filipino diaspora, and the Saving Beverly movement, which raises funds for community organizations that support immigrant survivors of domestic violence.

Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, 5:00 - 7:00pm
Event: Salon Meet and Greet; includes informal panel (20 – 30 minutes) “Novel Ways to Get Noticed” featuring all visiting authors
Location: Home of Martha Amore, address forthcoming to RSVPers
Presenters: Susan McBeth, Kathi Diamant, Marivi Soliven, Kitty Morse
More Info: http://49writers.org/special-events-and-salons
Cost: Potluck; BYOB
Open to: 49 Writers, Alaska Writers Guild, and Alaska SCBWI current members only 
Host: 49 Writers
Contact: Jeremy Pataky
Estimated attendance: 25 - 35
Description: An informal meet-and-greet potluck event, by invitation to members of 49 Writers, Alaska SCBWI, and the Alaska Writers Guild. Visiting authors will speak as an informal panel on their success with novel ways of connecting readers with their books.


Monday, Sept. 26, 5 – 7 pm
Event: Kafka’s Last Love—Dora Diamant
Location: University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) Bookstore, 2901 Spirit Way, Anchorage
Presenter: Kathi Diamant
More info: https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/bookstore/events/special-events-calendar.cfm
Cost: free
Open to: public
Host: UAA Philosophy Dept/Honors College/UAA Bookstore
Contact: John Mouracade, Rachel Epstein
Description: In her book Kafka’s Last Love: The Mystery of Dora Diamant, author Kathi Diamant explores the relationship between Franz Kafka and his companion and confidante Dora Diamant (1898-1952). It details their life in Berlin and, after his death in 1924, her passionate commitment to keep Kafka’s literary flame alive while caught in the maelstroms of fascism, communism, and the Holocaust.

Kathi Diamant is Director of the Kafka Project at San Diego State University which is an ongoing international search for Kafka's missing literary treasure: 35 letters and 20 notebooks written by Kafka in the last year of his life, and confiscated from Dora by the Gestapo in Berlin 1933. Just returning from investigations in Berlin, Kathi will also share her latest findings and her extraordinary adventures through archives and history.


Tuesday, Sept. 27, 1 – 2:30 pm
Event: “The Mango Bride: A Frank Talk about Domestic Violence in Immigrant Communities and the Filipino Diaspora”
Location: University of Alaska (UAA) Bookstore, 2901 Spirit Way, Anchorage
Presenter: Marivi Soliven
More info: https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/bookstore/events/special-events-calendar.cfm
Cost: free
Host: UAA Public Health, UAA Bookstore
Contact: Gabe Garcia, Rachel Epstein
Description: Marivi Soliven reads from her award-winning debut novel, The Mango Bride, inspired by her work as an interpreter for immigrant survivors of domestic violence.  Discussion will include the expanded protections of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), the Filipino diaspora, and the Saving Beverly movement, which raises funds for community organizations that support immigrant survivors of domestic violence.


Tuesday, Sept. 27, 5:30 – 7 pm
Event: Ten Things You Should Know about Kafka (Before You Waste the Rest of Your Life) 
Mountain View Branch Library, 120 Bragaw, Anchorage
Presenter: Kathi Diamant
Cost: free
Open to: public
Host: Mountain View Library
Contact: Virginia McLure
          49 Writers | Roundup for Literary Alaska      Cache   Translate Page      
Have news, events, or opportunities you'd like to see listed here? Email details to 49roundup (at) gmail.com.  Spread the word. Your message must be received by noon on the Thursday before the roundup is scheduled to run at the latest. Unless your event falls in the "Opportunities and Awards" category, it should occur no more than 30 days from when we receive your email.


EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

SOUTHCENTRAL
John Luther Adams 
ANCHORAGE | The Alaska Humanities Forum will welcome John Luther Adams for a series of events as part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative to celebrate excellence in journalism and the arts. 

John Luther Adams is a composer and author whose life and work is deeply rooted in the natural world—especially in Alaska, where he lived for forty years before moving to New York City in 2015. Adams was awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for music for his symphonic work Become Ocean, and a 2015 Grammy Award for “Best Contemporary Classical Composition.” He has taught widely, including at Harvard University and the Oberlin Conservatory, and served as composer in residence with the Anchorage Symphony, Anchorage Opera, Fairbanks Symphony, Arctic Chamber Orchestra, and APRN.  
The public is invited to a series of three free events during John Luther Adams' visit to Anchorage; you can also tune in to 106.1 FM KONR to listen to selected works from september 1-7.

ARTIST'S TALK & RECEPTION | Friday, September 2, Talk: 7 P.M. | Reception 8 P.M. at  Anchorage Museum. A growing number of geologists believe we have entered a new period - the Anthropocene - in which the dominant geologic force is humanity itself. What does this mean for a composer, or for any creative artist working in any medium today?


VEILS AND VESPER INSTALLATION | Friday & Saturday, September 2 & 3 | 6 P.M. - midnight. Veils and Vesper is a series of distinct but related electronic pieces written
by Adams in 2005. When the pieces are installed together, listeners are able to create their own ‘mix’ and experience the music by moving through an immersive environment.


ANCHORAGE | Arctic Entries 
Tickets for the first Arctic Entries storytelling event of the season go on sale at 2 pm, Tuesday, September 6th. The actual event is the following week, Tuesday September 13th, at 7:30 pm. Details

ANCHORAGE | UAA Professor Emerita Phyllis Fast 
Tuesday, September 6 from 5-7 pm
UAA Professor Emerita Phyllis Fast discusses her mystery books, Half-Bead of Fundy and Midnight Trauma.
Professor Emerita Phyllis Fast is an anthropologist, artist and mystery writer. Author of the acclaimed Northern Athabascan Survival Women, Community, and the Future, her current focus is writing Alaska Native mysteries.  At this event she discusses   Half-Bead of Fundy and Midnight Trauma, which take place in Fairbanks, Alaska. 
Phyllis Fast‘s heritage is Koyukon Athabascan and white American. She was born in Anchorage, in 1946 to Elsie and Oscar Fast, graduated from East Anchorage High School. Her academic accomplishments include earning a B.A. in English from the University of Alaska, an interdisciplinary Master of Arts from UAA, and a PhD in Anthropology from Harvard University. After teaching at UAF and UAA, she retired Professor Emerita in 2014. She now lives in Washington.

ANCHORAGE | Historian Erika Monahan 
Wednesday, September 7 from 5:00pm-7:00 pm
Historian Erika Monahan
discusses her book The Merchants of Siberia: Trade in Early Modern Eurasia, recently nominated for the 2016 Early Slavic Studies Association Book Prize. She'll offer a fresh analysis of Siberian trade and the Russia state during the late sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. According to Donald Ostrowski (Muscovy and the Mongols), "Erika Monahan sets out nothing less than a revision of the way we imagine the Muscovite economy in the early modern era. With a deeply researched examination of trade and commerce across Eurasia, she challenges a number of ingrained assumptions about Russian trade policies as backwards, xenophobic, state-driven, and monopolistic”.

ANCHORAGE | Dr. Liu Zhen presents Political Ideas Conceived in the Zhouyi (The Book of Change) 
Friday, September 9 from 12-1:30 pm
Dr. Liu Zhen presents Political Ideas Conceived in the Zhouyi (The Book of Change). 
Zhen is Associate Professor at China University of Political Science and Law and currently a visiting professor at College of William and Mary Confucius Institute. His talk will focus on the rituals, political advocacy, and virtuous pursuit conceived in the Book of Change (Zhouyi) for government administrators. And it will analyze the value of traditional ideas in the Zhouyi for contemporary social developments. This event is sponsored by the UAA Confucius Institute and the UAA Campus Bookstore. 
  
ANCHORAGE | Author Richard Chiappone 
Monday, September 12 from 5:00 pm-7:00 pm 
Author Richard Chiappone presents Liar’s Code: Growing Up Fishing (Skyhorse Publishing). It is full of warm, funny, and memorable musings on a life spent fishing. According to E. Donnall Thomas Jr., author of Redfish, Bluefish, Ladyfish, Snook, “Rich Chiappone has accomplished a goal even more challenging than landing a permit on a fly: the creation of a classic.” Richard Chiappone is a two-time recipient of the Robert Traver Award and author of Opening Days, a collection of essays, stories and poems, and the short story collection Water of an Undetermined Depth. His writing has appeared in Alaska MagazinePlayboy, Gray’s Sporting Journal, and The Sun; and in literary journals including Crescent ReviewMissouri Review, and ZYZZYVAHe teaches writing in the UAA Master of Fine Arts Program and serves on the faculty of the annual Kachemak Bay Writers’ Conference. He lives in Homer with his wife and cats.

Note: There is free parking for UAA Bookstore events in the South Lot, Sports Complex NW Lot, West Campus Central Lot, Sports Campus West Lot. 

HOMER | Debra Magpie Earling Reading
Thursday, September 8th, at Kachemak Bay Campus, Kenai Peninsula College UAA. Debra is the author of The Lost Journals of Sacajawea and Perma Red, recipient of the American Book Award and the Western Writers Association Spur Award, and and Gugggenheim Award (2007). She directs the University of Montana's Creative Writing program and is the guest instructor for the 7th annual 49 Writers Tutka Bay Writers Retreat. Free and open to the public. 


ANCHORAGE | Anchorage essayist and author Bill Sherwonit will teach a 12-week nature and travel writing class beginning September 21st in the Sierra Club office downtown. Participants in this workshop-style class will explore and refine their own writing styles, with an emphasis on the personal essay form. The class will also read and discuss works by some of America’s finest nature and travel writers. $240. To sign up for this Wednesday night class (7 to 9:30 pm), or for more information, contact Sherwonit at 245-0283 or akgriz@hotmail.com.

PALMER | Kitty Morse, September 24


ANCHORAGE | 49 Writers Salon Meet and Greet | Includes informal panel (20 – 30 minutes). Sunday, September 25, 2015, 5-7pm. This informal meet-and-greet 49 Writers potluck event (BYOB) is open by invitation only to all members of 49 WritersAlaska SCBWI, and the Alaska Writers Guild. Visiting authors Susan McBeth, Kathi Diamant, Marivi Soliven, Kitty Morse will speak as an informal panel on their success with novel ways of connecting readers with their books. Members are welcome to bring one guest. RSVP by email (info@49Writers.org) to receive the address. Stay tuned for more info.  

ANCHORAGE | Publication Consultants, in association with Alaska Book Week, is hosting the Great Alaska Book Fair sponsored in part by The Mall at Sears and Anchorage Public Library. They suggest that anyone interested in participating in The Great Alaska Book Fair respond before all tables are reserved. Concurrent event will include: a Farmer's Market, a Sidewalk Sale and the Better Business Bureau's Shred Day, and a Financial Fitness Fair; it's the same day that The Mall at Sears features an annual sidewalk sale to coincide with the release of Permanent Fund Dividends. If you're interested you can sign up for a table hereBook fair hours are 10 AM to 6 PM on Saturday, October 8, 2016. Tables will be allocated on a first come, first serve basis. Authors are responsible for their own sales—and pocket all the money. There will not be a central check out register. There is a charge of $50 per table. Authors may share tables if they'd like. 

49 Writers presents Crosscurrents | Tales of the City: Writing from Alaska’s Urban Hubs
ANCHORAGE | October 13, 2016 
5-6:45 pm – Building Fires in the Snow celebratory meet-and-greet at MUSE

7-8:30 pm – Crosscurrents event in the Anchorage Museum auditorium


ANCHORAGE | Tickets are selling for the Anchorage Concert Association's David Sedaris appearance on May 13, 2017. David Sedaris is one of America’s preeminent humor 

David Sedaris 
ANCHORAGE | Tickets are selling for the Anchorage Concert Association's David Sedaris appearance on May 13, 2017. David Sedaris is one of America’s preeminent humor writers. Wielding sardonic wit and incisive social critiques, he slices through cultural euphemisms and political correctness with great skill. One of the most observant writers addressing the human condition today, Sedaris is returning to Anchorage with all new stories. His original radio pieces can be heard on “This American Life,” and he has seven million books in print, including “Naked,” “Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim,” and his most recent, “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls.” The San Francisco Chronicle says “Sedaris belongs on any list of people writing in English at the moment who are revising our ideas about what’s funny.” Buy tickets here

INTERIOR 
FAIRBANKS | Fairbanks Arts Association hosts the oldest literary reading series in the state. Every month, writers reading their own work publicly at a community meet-up where people can connect with other lovers of literature. Readings are held on the day after First Friday, usually the first Saturday of the month at 7 pm. Most reading are held in the Bear Gallery in Pioneer Park, although occasionally in the summer (June, July, and August) the weather is beautiful reading are held outside to another spot in Pioneer Park. Upcoming: 
SeptemberUAF Faculty Reading
OctoberSusheila Khera
NovemberNicole Stellon O'Donnell
DecemberRosemary McGuire
Additional readings and events may be held, but the First Saturday Literary Reading Series is monthly at 7 pm the day after First Friday (except February). 

FAIRBANKS | The Folk School offers a semester-long class for high school students who want to become better essay writers. Details and registration here


SOUTHEAST 
JUNEAU | Introducing Juneau’s anonymous poetry publication, MYTH Zine, currently available at The Rookery Café, Kindred Post, Alaska Robotics, The JACC, Rainy Retreat Books, The Goldtown Nickelodeon, and High Tide Tattoo. Send your poetry, prose, philosophical wonderings, or love letters to myythzine@gmail.com

                                                                   SOUTHWEST 
NA

ARCTIC 
NA

OUT OF STATE

EAST COAST and UK | After launching her new book, To the Bright Edge of the World in Palmer, Eowyn Ivey headed to the west coast to promote her book. She's made it to the east coast, now, and soon heads to the UK on a whirlwind book tour. Full schedule here

BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON | A Cirque reading will be held at the Mount Baker Theater, Encore Room, August 28, at 3 pm. more info   


CONFERENCES, RETREATS, and RESIDENCIES

2016 Tutka Bay Writers Retreat
September 9-11th, 2016 
TUTKA BAY LODGE | This 49 Writers program takes place at the fantastic Tutka Bay Lodge. Faculty instructor award-winning writer Debra Magpie Earling will lead fiction writers in an in-depth writing workshop. Emphasizing in-class writing supportiveness, collegiality, and a constructive atmosphere, the engaged student will emerge with improved techniques for further work. Sold out and waitlisting. 


2016 Alaska Writers Guild Annual Conference for Writers & Illustrators
September 24th plus optional intensives and roundtables on Sept. 23rd.
SCBWIAlaska Writers Guild
ANCHORAGE | This year's conference is a partnership between Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, and the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators. This all-day event takes place at the BP Energy + Conference Center and includes keynotes and panels, as well as writing craft, marketing, traditional publishing, self publishing, children's literature, illustration tracks. Sign up for optional Intensives or Roundtable Critiques, or take advantage of One-on-One Manuscript Excerpt Reviews. Early bird discount extended until July 31st at only $95 for AWG/49 Writers/SCBWI members or $145 for non-members. More info and registration here.  


OPPORTUNITIES and AWARDS for WRITERS

The Alaska Literary Awards are open to poets, playwrights, screenwriters, writers of fiction and literary nonfiction, writers of multi-genre, cross-genre, or genre-defying work. Any Alaska writer over 18 who is not a full-time student is eligible to apply. Quality of the work is the primary consideration in determining who receives the awards. $5,000 awards will be given, all from privately donated funds. Apply at www.callforentry.org by Sept. 1, 2016 at 9:59 AKDT. 



In early August, the Alaska State Council on the Arts will seek nominations for the 2017 Governor's Awards for the Arts, as well as the next Alaska State Writer Laureate. The deadline for nominations for Governor's Awards for the Arts is September 15, 2016 and nominations for State Writer Laureate will be accepted through October 3, 2016This year, the categories for the Governor's Awards for the Arts are: Arts Education, Individual Artist, Arts Organization and Alaska Native Arts. The Governor's Awards for the Arts and Humanities ceremony will be held in Juneau on Thursday, January 26, 2017Visit ASCA's website here for information about last year's Governor's Awardees, and here for the Alaska State Writer Laureate program.


Caitlin Press is currently accepting submissions The Pacific Ocean: Protecting Our Endangered Coast, an anthology of poems that will explore the Pacific Ocean as a wilderness, a haven, and a part of our natural world that needs protecting. Yvonne Blomer, Victoria, B.C.’s poet laureate, will edit the anthology. Blomer has published three collections of poetry, most recently As if a Raven (Palimpsest Press) and co-edited Poems from Planet Earth (Leaf Press). Her first book, a broken mirror, fallen leaf, was shortlisted for the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award. Learn more, including how to submit two poems, here. Deadline: September 15, 2016.  

Call for Creative Teens The Anchorage Museum is looking for passionate, innovative high school-aged students to be a part of the Museum Teen Council, a group of young, creative leaders. They need teens who are passionate about something: doodling, blogging, technology, comedy, writing, music, photography, fashion, theater — anything — whose voices, ideas, and creativity can shape how they build community at the Anchorage Museum. Apply by Oct. 1. Details at anchoragemuseum.org.


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          Guest Bloggers Lucian Childs and Martha Amore | The Successful Failure: Drawing a Picture of an Alaska Community      Cache   Translate Page      

When contemplating telling a story as large as that of Alaska’s LGBTQ community, we editors understood the anthology we set out to create would be a failure of a kind. No one book can fully describe the variety and depth of this community, nor indeed, of any community. However, as Alice Munro says, “The story fails but your faith in the importance of doing the story doesn’t fail.”

Over the course of the three-year project to create Building Fires in the Snow, we sustained our faith in the uniqueness of Alaska and the importance of telling its story through the LGBTQ experience. After sifting and editing the work, we can now see both a little more clearly.That “… despite my distance/and the tendency of light/over ice toward mirage,/some shape comes through/that both of us/can recognize.” So Elizabeth Bradfield describes the successful failure in one of the collected poems.

And what shapes there are to recognize! Through M.C. Mohagani Magnetek’s tragic-comic stories, we get to stand in the life of a transgendered woman and witness how saucily she handles the daily abuse that comes her way. Through the stories of Alyse Knorr and Morgan Grey, we experience the failure of love on both sides of the equation of a closeted relationship. Reading Lucian Childs’ tale of a mature married couple, we get to view gay unions beyond the prevailing script of promiscuity and bar life.  

Other tracks in which we place our own feet: Gabrielle Barnett’s fading southern queen, clinging to the homesteader’s dream; Rosemary McGuire’s innocent young fishermen, caught up in a tragic first love; Indra Arriaga’s passionate traveler, torn between past loves and landscapes, confusing “the sweet odor of night with the blue smell of snow about to fall in Alaska.” We follow these tracks into a queer literary space.

And yet, our queer voices describe thoughts and feelings everyone shares. Some would go so far as to say now that queer people have the freedom to simply be ourselves, like a butterfly who has abandoned its caterpillar skin, we’ve no need any longer for Queer Literature.

Perhaps, but the power of literature resides in specificity. Our queer lives, though they be similar to those of our straight neighbors, have particular stories to tell. Queer people yearn to see these representations on the printed page. Yet they remain a rarity.

That this is so speaks to the publishing bias against gay stories. In the current business environment, authors worry being branded a “gay writer” can stunt or even end a budding career. Some develop protective strategies that write around the issue of sexuality. They relegate gay characters to an ancillary or supportive status. Some poets choose a gender-neutral second person address to a beloved. Or writers simply give in to publishing pressure and write straight material.

Anthologies such as Building Fires in the Snow are of vital importance if the stories of minority communities are to be told. Anthologies are uniquely positioned to span the breadth of these communities by having a wide range of voices, ethnicities, sexualities, and genders. With the support of academic presses, they are freed from the “bottom line” exigencies of commercial publishing to open a window onto rarely-seen aspects of culture.
The result can be powerfully liberating. Anthologies such as ours foster communities of shared struggle and can catalyze political and social action. Or they can simply be a book one holds in one’s hands and finds, with deep pleasure, that one is not alone.

With the publishing of Building Fires in the Snow, our faith in Alaska and its LGBTQ community has been realized. That the collection is the first of its kind creates an expectation for it to represent all the varieties of queer experience in the state. Though this was our mission, we quickly understood the limitations under which we labored: the relatively small pool of queer material from LGBTQ and ally Alaskans, the number of people too busy with their own projects or not sufficiently ‘out’ to be published in a gay book.

In the end, just a quarter of our writers identify as people of color/bi-racial, none are Alaska Native, and, like the bulk of our state’s residents, most of the works are set in urban areas. Within these limitations, we have carved out what success we can by taking a pointillist approach. As complex as the picture we’ve drawn, the shape you see of Alaska and its LGBTQ community is incomplete. We leave it to others to fill in all the dots.

We look forward to discussing these issues and more at the launch events for Building Fires in the Snow being held throughout the state this fall. You can check out what’s happening at our website and keep up to date on our Facebook page.

Martha Amore teaches writing at the University of Alaska Anchorage. She achieved her Masters of Fine Arts from UAA, and she has published stories in a number of journals and magazines. Her first novella came out in 2013 in the anthology Weathered Edge: Three Alaskan Novellas. In 2015, she won a Rasmuson Individual Artist Award to complete her collection of short stories. She lives in Anchorage with her husband, three daughters, two cats, and one big dog.

Lucian Childs divides his time between Anchorage, Alaska and Toronto, Ontario where he lives with his husband. In 2013, he received a Rasmuson Foundation Individual Artist Project Grant as well as the Prism Review Short Story Prize. He has been awarded residencies at Brydcliffe Art Colony and at Artscape Gibraltar Point and was a Peter Taylor Fellow at the 2015 Kenyon Review Writers Workshop. His short stories have appeared in Grain, Sanskrit, The Puritan, Jelly Bucket, Quiddity, and Cirque, among others.

A 49 Writers Crosscurrents event featuring panelists Lucian Childs and Martha Amore with moderator Heather Brook Adams will begin at 7 pm, October 13th, at the Anchorage Museum. This event, called “Tales of the City: Writing from Alaska’s Urban Hubs”, will be preceded by an informal Building Fires in the Snow meet and greet at MUSE Restaurant between 5 and 6:45 pm.




          Susan McBeth | Connecting People and Communities Through Books      Cache   Translate Page      
Susan McBeth is part of a group of authors who will visit Anchorage Sept. 24-28, 2016 through an author exchange program sponsored by Adventures by the Book. In partnership with the Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers is featuring these visiting authors in workshops at the AWGconference on Saturday, Sept. 24 and also at a members-only salon event on Sunday, Sept. 25. 







“The world is so empty if one thinks only of mountains, rivers & cities; but to know someone who thinks & feels with us, & who, though distant, is close to us in spirit, this makes the earth for us an inhabited garden.” 
 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Adventures by the Book™ (ABTB) was founded on the premise that books connect people and communities, so it probably comes as no surprise that I believe the success of a book will not only be determined by the quality of the writing, but also by an author’s ability to connect with readers and the reading community. Writing is a solitary profession, so how, then, does an author (you) leave your protective cocoon to fulfill your yearning to connect with readers? Promotion of your book can indeed be a daunting task, but it is crucial for its success and likely will not be as difficult as you think.

Perhaps it will be helpful for you to think of your book promotion in terms of a set of concentric circles, with you at the bull’s eye, the actual center of those circles. This makes sense considering you are the creator, and you are the most invested in the success of your own book. You certainly cannot expect others to help promote your book if you are not doing so yourself.

With that in mind, it is incumbent upon you to lead the way by making available and disseminating information about your book as many ways as possible, through whatever channels are available to you, such as your mailing list, social media, and your website. Once you schedule your book signing event(s), make sure to not only include crucial details like date, time, venue, cost etc., but other relevant and often overlooked information such as how readers register to attend an event (making sure to include a direct link), where and how readers may purchase books, and what they can expect from their experience.

Once you have laid this groundwork, you can expand to the next closest circle, that of family, friends and colleagues. After all, these are the close-reach people who are invested in you and want to see you succeed. Do not be shy about asking then to spread the word to their friends and book clubs, whether by word of mouth, e-mail, or their own social media, or to help you host events. As I built ABTB from ground zero, my first event consisted solely of a wonderful group of my girlfriends and colleagues, some of whom brought members of their family or book club members, and my following has grown organically from there.

The next concentric circle belongs to your immediate community. This is where you can post events at local libraries, community centers, or public event calendars, and at any other businesses or organizations with whom you have a connection or may have an interest in your event. This does not have to be a bookstore. Non-traditional book signings at alternative venues are a great option for Alaskan authors who are geographically dispersed or who live in areas that don’t have brick and mortar bookstores. Another benefit from working with community organizations is that they typically have their own mailing lists and are usually happy to help you promote your event, as they are also vested in its success. Just do not assume they will do so automatically, so make sure to ask.

Your last and outer circle consists of media, whether the traditional radio, television, and print media, or of the social media variety. Do not be afraid to send out press releases for your event, and do not be afraid of jumping into the social media world, even if you have never before done so. Conduct a little research to see which are the most relevant social media formats for your reading demographic, and focus on those few rather than overwhelming yourself by utilizing every social media outlet available.

While this is just a guideline to get you started, remember that the amount of effort you put into promoting your event will bear a direct correlation to the success of your event(s) and your book sales. If you work hard at promoting your book, the rewards are worth it, as there is nothing more satisfying than connecting people and communities through books. So go out and create your own Adventure by the Book!

Susan McBeth founded Adventures by the Book™ in 2011 after having specialized in event management for over twenty years, including four and a half years as Director of Marketing and Events for one of the oldest independent bookstores in the United States. Her passion to more intimately connect readers with authors and their books through unique and interactive literary events and travel has led her to redefine traditional author readings. Susan is also the founder of AuthorPreneurs™, an incubator program for writers She is a contributor to Midge Raymond’s Everyday Book Marketing and a contributing editor to international online magazine Wine Dine & Travel, with her column “Travel by the Book”.

She has been featured on NBC San Diego, KPBS, San Diego Union-Tribune, San Diego Magazine, Women’s Radio, Reading with Robin Radio, Hera Hub Podcast, IBPA Independent Magazine, and others Susan is a facilitator for the San Diego State University Osher Institute’s ‘Ed’-ventures and sits on the committee for KPBS One Book, One San Diego, and is a former Board member for the Southern California Independent Booksellers Association She holds a Masters in Comparative Literature with an emphasis in German Literature from San Diego State University, where she earned membership in Phi Beta Kappa and Mortar Board Honor Society after graduating Magna cum Laude from San Diego State University with a degree in business administration, with distinction in management, and a minor in German. Find out more at www.adventuresbythebook.com






          Jeremy Pataky | Silences So Deep: A Conversation with John Luther Adams      Cache   Translate Page      
A slightly shorter version originally appeared in the Anchorage Press, here.

photo credit: Pete Woodhead
I call John Luther Adams from my cabin near McCarthy. He’s maintained his 907 area code, though I know he’s relocated to New York City after 40 years in Alaska. My spot in the woods seems more akin to his former habitat than the deep urban place where he answers the phone. I’m picturing Adams inside his old studio cabin nestled in calm, subarctic boreal forest, as documented by filmmaker Bob Curtis-Johnson before Adams left. Afterimages of that short—and completely silent—film clash with the intermittent city sirens that whine through the phone. They’re an odd soundtrack to our conversation about art, purpose, and living.

Adams is a composer. He’s also an author, presently finishing up his third book, called Silences So Deep: A Memoir of Music and Alaska, recently excerpted in Alaska Quarterly Review and forthcoming from Wesleyan University Press.

Both his life and work are deeply rooted in the natural world. Adams was awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Music for his symphonic work Become Ocean, and a 2015 Grammy Award for “Best Contemporary Classical Composition”. Inuksuit, his outdoor work for up to 99 percussionists, is regularly performed all over the world. He’s won a number of other prestigious awards.

Born in 1953, John Luther Adams grew up in the South and in the suburbs of New York City. He studied composition at the California Institute of the Arts, where he was in the first graduating class (in 1973). He became an environmental activist in the mid-1970s, campaigning for the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act and then serving as executive director of the Northern Alaska Environmental Center.

Adams has taught at Harvard University, the Oberlin Conservatory, Bennington College, and the University of Alaska. He has also served as composer in residence with the Anchorage Symphony, Anchorage Opera, Fairbanks Symphony, Arctic Chamber Orchestra, and the Alaska Public Radio Network.

Though his recognition stems almost entirely from his musical career, his book Winter Music: Composing the North placed him on my radar a dozen years ago. His work has been a steady presence for me since.

I’ve also admired his depictions of two other Alaskan artists, the poet John Haines and conductor Gordon Wright. Adams has written evocatively of his friendship with them. Adams’ anecdotes about how he and Wright would hoot at each other and a visitation from an owl after Wright died came to mind the night before our interview. I was prepping for our conversation when a Great Horned Owl flew passed the cabin and landed in a spruce. I went outside and it stayed put for minutes, bobbing its head and watching me. It was the first owl I’d seen since spring. Adams’ joked: “That was probably Gordon. He always wanted to be my press agent.” 

You first came to Alaska in 1975 and stayed for forty years. You said you came to Alaska instead of going to grad school, and that your time playing timpani in Fairbanks was more valuable than graduate school could have been. How exactly did Alaska educate you?

Because I was in Fairbanks, I had opportunities that just wouldn’t have been available to me perhaps anywhere else…. I was immediately hired as the timpanist. I’d never played timpani in my life, but I was a kind of lapsed percussionist. I had the most important qualification for employment in Fairbanks in those days, though—I was there. It didn’t hurt that the conductor was my best friend. By the time I finished I was probably at the best I ever played anything.

As timpanist and composer in residence at the Fairbanks Symphony, I had the opportunity to learn things that I probably wouldn’t have had anywhere else. I got to get inside of orchestral music of all sorts and learn it from the inside out. I learned about orchestration from inside the orchestra, from hearing the different sections practice different passages and then hearing how things went together. I always got the score for everything we were playing so I was not only learning my part as the timpanist, but I was learning the score. Previously, I’d had little or no interest in the canon of western classical music. In my youthful rebellion, I had thrown that baby out with the bathwater. But because I was the timpanist in the Fairbanks Symphony, I came to terms with that music and learned it from the inside, and it was incredible.

In time, you know, part of the devil’s bargain that Gordon [Wright] made with me was “Okay, you play timpani in my orchestra and I’ll play your music.” So really, as I used to tell Gordon, I got the better end of both sides there. I got to write things and hear them played. I got to learn how to compose for orchestra by doing it, not just by reading about it, and I got this incredible education about the history of orchestra music that I probably wouldn’t have gotten any other way. It was a win-win for me.

And for us. You’re primarily identified as a composer, but you are also an author. You’ve corresponded or collaborated with some fantastic writers in addition to composers, musicians, and producers. What artistic obligations span your twin practices of composing and writing?

You know, I didn’t answer the phone when you first called because my editor was just leaving. We’re ploughing through the third draft of a new book, which is the story of my life and work in Alaska. But it’s funny—I try not to think of myself as a writer; I still talk of myself as a composer who sometimes writes. Maybe that’s just superstition, but… I want to keep it fun. Composing is difficult.

There was a pitcher—I can’t remember who it was, but it was a major league pitcher a number of years ago—who was also a pretty good hitter. Someone said to him “You know, you’re a good pitcher, but you’re a pretty good hitter, too,” and he said “Pitching is hard. Hitting is fun.” I sort of feel like that about writing. I know better, but composing is hard and writing is fun, at least by comparison.

You write quite a bit about the ideas and process behind your music. Has it felt important to “explain” yourself as a composer through writing?

Well, I’m usually writing for the same person for whom I’m composing—that is, myself. When I’m composing, it’s almost as though I’m composing home. I’m trying to hear something I haven’t heard before. I’m trying always to discover new sonic territory, new musical territory. If I’m lucky, I get hopelessly lost in those strange new landscapes. And, of course, that’s what I want for myself, but it’s also what I want for you, the listener.

As a writer, I write primarily to figure out what the work wants of me. The great painter Barnet Newman once quipped—he was a pretty fair writer himself—that the artist sometimes writes so he’ll have something to read. I think I know what he meant. I think I understand that. I write sometimes before, sometimes during, and sometimes after the process of composing to try and figure out what the music wants from me. It helps me understand the work and where the work wants to lead me.  

So this book I’m working on now is the story of my life and work in Alaska. I really found home in Alaska, and it is home in the deepest sense and it always will be. I really came of age, as an artist and a man, in Alaska.

So now that I’ve left home, I’m trying to figure out what it was that drew me there in the first place, what I discovered there, what I thought I was doing, and what it might have meant, and ultimately why the time came for me to leave. So once again, I’m writing a book as a process of discovery for myself, and then I hope to make it a good enough story that somebody else is going to be interested in reading it.

And you’ll be reading from that new manuscript soon in Anchorage.

Yes—I haven’t decided yet what I want to read. It’s sort of carrying coals to Newcastle, bringing this story home, because everyone in the room will have their own Alaska story, but I’m excited about it.

You’ve written at length about the impact of creative collaborations and conversations with fellow artists, the conductor Gordon Wright and poet John Haines. How has your creative process changed in their absence and your own maturation as an artist?

John and Gordon are two of the three most important people in my life. The dedication in the new book is to Cynthia, Gordon, and John. Cynthia, of course, is the love of my life, my soulmate for thirty nine years, now. John and Gordon are not absent in my life. They’re still with me every day in so many ways. You know—I shared with those three people a life and a vision of how the world is and how the world might be that still sustains me every day in everything that I do.

Did their passing help prompt or even permit your own choice to leave Alaska?

Absolutely. The short version is that when Gordon died, I knew the time was coming, and when John died, I knew the time had come.

As a poet, I was interested in how you describe Gordon Wright eventually learning that “sound rather than syntax was the key to making sense of [your] music,” and that it was Haines’s poetry that helped Wright realize that. Can you comment on how yourexperience of poetry and music have informed each other, or how they might relate?

Ya, when I was an adolescent, like all of us, I wrote bad poetry. I read a lot of poetry and literature and I might have been a writer, I might have been a poet instead of a composer. I’ve always had that frame of reference or sensitivity to language. In addition to John Haines, one of my other dearest friends is Barry Lopez. Barry and I delight in the feeling that we’re doing the same work in different forms. We take no end of pleasure in discovering not the differences but the parallels between our work in different artistic media. So I would say in a way that as a composer I’ve learned as much—probably more—from writers and from visual art than I have from music and other composers.

Interesting. I know you’ve endorsed Walter Pater’s notion that “all the arts constantly aspire to the condition of music,” so it’s interesting to pair those thoughts.

Well, I’m slumming, right? [laughs] I think all the arts aspire to be whole. I think all of human intelligence and our human senses—we want to be whole, and we’ve become so divided—from ourselves, let alone from one another. We’re at a time in a culture in which human consciousness itself is dangerously fragmented and I think part of what we’re trying to do through poetry, through music, through the science of ecology, through all forms of creative thought… and good science is every bit as creative as good art… is to re-innovate ourselves, to make ourselves whole again, to find, as Gregory Bateson would say, “the pattern which connects.” And in feeling more fully integrated as individuals, hopefully we feel more integrated with one another and this whole miraculous world we inhabit, and all the forms of life with which we share this world.

That speaks to the condition of music and its relevancy across the arts and other disciplines.

Look, I’ve devoted my life to music and still I have no idea what music is. Music doesn’t care. Music can be whatever it wants to be. Sure, it can tell a story. Sure, it can express emotions, but it can also be a place or weather or it can be things that we haven’t yet imagined or understood. Ultimately, for me, as a composer—and I say this often—music is not what I do, music is how I understand the world. And the flip side of that is the whole world is music.

That certainly calls to mind The Place Where You Go To Listen, which was installed ten years ago at the Museum of the North. The Rasmuson Foundation just announced plans last month to fund a $104,000 upgrade. How has the meaning of The Place for you has changed over the course of its first decade?

That’s a great question. I’m amazed that The Place is still up and running ten years later. It’s a complex piece with a lot of moving parts, you know, a lot of hardware and a lot of software. I’m delighted and a little astonished that it’s still running. You know I wrote a whole book about The Place Where You Go To Listen and its evolution; in my body of work—and maybe in a larger sense— The Place Where You Go To Listen is unique. Within the context of my work, it’s both a point of arrival and departure. In some ways, it’s my most Alaskan work and if you want to experience The Place Where You Go To Listen you can’t download it on the internet, you can’t buy a CD. You have to go to Fairbanks and you have to sit in that room and wait. And listen. And wait. And listen. And wait. And listen. It’s all about being there in that place.

You could have just been describing, in a way, your creative process itself over the last forty years. Your description of how one could experience The Place Where You Go To Listen also describes, in a way, your approach to the world itself.

Ya, I think that is astute and generous of you to say. I think that’s right. It’s profoundly satisfying to me to know that there are people like you—that you can go to The Place Where You Go To Listen and sit in silence and deep attention and feel as though you’re in tune with, in touch with, the forces of the world, this music that is swirling around us all the time, some of it just beyond the reach of our ears.

None of the forces that actually create the music, none of the forces behind the sounds in The Place Where You Go To Listen, are normally audible to us. It’s driven by seismic activity, by the photoperiod, by the phases of the moon, by geomagnetic weather, the solar winds, by the rhythms of night and day. These are things that we’re not usually able to hear. So you go there, and they’re transposed into the reach of your ears. You go and you sit in The Place Where You Go To Listenand feel as though—even though you won’t recognize a single sound—that somehow it’s real, it’s alive, and it’s connected to the larger world, and you are there, alone, in the center of the world. That’s what I want for myself. It’s what I want for you, the listener, in all of my work.

I’m curious how indigenous people have responded over the years to your work.

Generally speaking… I’ve not worked directly with native music. There is one piece from many years ago—Earth and the Great Weather—that is subtitled “A Sonic Geography of the Arctic”. That’s grounded in the geography of the eastern north slope—what we now call the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, which of course is the home country of both Iñupiaq people to the north and Gwich’in Athabascan people to the south. So in that piece, I worked very closely with four native performers and even so, I didn’t borrow directly from native music.

I tried to translate what I had experienced as the energy of—the spirit of—native music into my own musical world. I think the profound influence of native culture on my life’s work has been through—what would I call it?—the wisdom of native experience. The deep and ancient experience of that place as home. The knowledge that the whole world has intelligence. The Yupik people talk about the spirit in all things. That really is close to the heart of my own faith, my own belief system. Everything in the world—everything in what we call “nature”—has presence, and dignity, and awareness, and everything in the world is in counterpoint with everything else, and in some way influences everything else… which is a fundamental principle of ecology, isn’t it? So that’s probably the deepest influence of native culture on my work.

Is there anything else you want to share in advance of your trip to Alaska?

I’m very, very excited about coming home. I miss Alaska every day, and as I said earlier, it’s home and it always will be, and I can’t wait to be home for a while.

~
photo credit: Donald Lee

John Luther Adams will read from his new book Silences So Deep: A Memoir of Music and Alaska in Anchorage at Cyrano's at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1

On Friday, Sept. 2 at 7 p.m., he will give an artist's talk at the Anchorage Museum titled Music in the Anthropocene. A reception at 8 p.m. will occur in the atrium adjacent to the auditorium. The talk will be simulcast at the Museum of the North at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, site of his installation The Place Where You Go to Listen.

From 6 p.m. to midnight on Sept. 2 and 3 the Museum will present the six-hour-long Veils and Vesper, a series of electronic pieces composed by Adams in 2005. The Alaska Humanities Forum is a sponsor of Adams' visit. 


Jeremy Pataky is the author of Overwinter (University of Alaska Press 2015) and the Interim Executive Director of 49 Writers, Inc. He splits his time between Anchorage and McCarthy.   

          49 Writers | Roundup for Literary Alaska      Cache   Translate Page      

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

SOUTHCENTRAL
Book launch and celebration: Blue Ticket by Kris Farmen 
ANCHORAGE | Friday, August 26 from 7-10 pm at the Writer's Block Bookstore and Cafe (3956 Spenard Road). Farmen will read from and sign his new novel. Refreshments and additional entertainment as well. 

John Luther Adams 
ANCHORAGE | The Alaska Humanities Forum will welcome John Luther Adams for a series of events as part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative to celebrate excellence in journalism and the arts. 

John Luther Adams is a composer and author whose life and work is deeply rooted in the natural world—especially in Alaska, where he lived for forty years before moving to New York City in 2015. Adams was awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for music for his symphonic work Become Ocean, and a 2015 Grammy Award for “Best Contemporary Classical Composition.” He has taught widely, including at Harvard University and the Oberlin Conservatory, and served as composer in residence with the Anchorage Symphony, Anchorage Opera, Fairbanks Symphony, Arctic Chamber Orchestra, and APRN.  
The public is invited to a series of three free events during John Luther Adams' visit to Anchorage; you can also tune in to 106.1 FM KONR to listen to selected works from september 1-7.

READING AND BOOK SIGNING | Thursday, September 1, 6-8 pm at Cyrano's Playhouse. Adams will read from his upcoming memoir, Silences So Deep: A Memoir of Music and AlaskaPassages reflecting on his friendships with poet John Haines and composer Gordon Wright have been excerpted in the New Yorker and Alaska Quarterly Review.


ARTIST'S TALK & RECEPTION | Friday, September 2, Talk: 7 P.M | Reception 8 P.M. at  Anchorage Museum. A growing number of geologists believe we have entered a new period - the Anthropocene - in which the dominant geologic force is humanity itself. What does this mean for a composer, or for any creative artist working in any medium today?


VEILS AND VESPER INSTALLATION | Friday & Saturday, September 2 & 3 | 6 P.M. - midnight. Veils and Vesper is a series of distinct but related electronic pieces written
by Adams in 2005. When the pieces are installed together, listeners are able to create their own ‘mix’ and experience the music by moving through an immersive environment.


HOMER | Debra Magpie Earling Reading, Thursday, September 8th, at Kachemak Bay Campus, Kenai Peninsula College UAA. Debra is the author of The Lost Journals of Sacajawea and Perma Red, recipient of the American Book Award and the Western Writers Association Spur Award, and and Gugggenheim Award (2007). She directs the University of Montana's Creative Writing program and is the guest instructor for the 7th annual 49 Writers Tutka Bay Writers Retreat. Free and open to the public. 


ANCHORAGE | Anchorage essayist and author Bill Sherwonit will teach a 12-week nature and travel writing class beginning September 21st in the Sierra Club office downtown. Participants in this workshop-style class will explore and refine their own writing styles, with an emphasis on the personal essay form. The class will also read and discuss works by some of America’s finest nature and travel writers. $240. To sign up for this Wednesday night class (7 to 9:30 pm), or for more information, contact Sherwonit at 245-0283 or akgriz@hotmail.com.

ANCHORAGE | Publication Consultants, in association with Alaska Book Week, is hosting the Great Alaska Book Fair sponsored in part by The Mall at Sears and Anchorage Public Library. They suggest that anyone interested in participating in The Great Alaska Book Fair respond before all tables are reserved. Concurrent event will include: a Farmer's Market, a Sidewalk Sale and the Better Business Bureau's Shred Day, and a Financial Fitness Fair; it's the same day that The Mall at Sears features an annual sidewalk sale to coincide with the release of Permanent Fund Dividends. If you're interested you can sign up for a table hereBook fair hours are 10 AM to 6 PM on Saturday, October 8, 2016. Tables will be allocated on a first come, first serve basis. Authors are responsible for their own sales—and pocket all the money. There will not be a central check out register. There is a charge of $50 per table. Authors may share tables if they'd like. 

David Sedaris 
ANCHORAGE | Tickets are selling for the Anchorage Concert Association's David Sedaris appearance on May 13, 2017. David Sedaris is one of America’s preeminent humor writers. Wielding sardonic wit and incisive social critiques, he slices through cultural euphemisms and political correctness with great skill. One of the most observant writers addressing the human condition today, Sedaris is returning to Anchorage with all new stories. His original radio pieces can be heard on “This American Life,” and he has seven million books in print, including “Naked,” “Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim,” and his most recent, “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls.” The San Francisco Chronicle says “Sedaris belongs on any list of people writing in English at the moment who are revising our ideas about what’s funny.” Buy tickets here

INTERIOR 
FAIRBANKS | Fairbanks Arts Association hosts the oldest literary reading series in the state. Every month, writers reading their own work publicly at a community meet-up where people can connect with other lovers of literature. Readings are held on the day after First Friday, usually the first Saturday of the month at 7 pm. Most reading are held in the Bear Gallery in Pioneer Park, although occasionally in the summer (June, July, and August) the weather is beautiful reading are held outside to another spot in Pioneer Park. Upcoming: 
SeptemberUAF Faculty Reading
OctoberSusheila Khera
NovemberNicole Stellon O'Donnell
DecemberRosemary McGuire
Additional readings and events may be held, but the First Saturday Literary Reading Series is monthly at 7 pm the day after First Friday (except February). 

FAIRBANKS | The Folk School offers a semester-long class for high school students who want to become better essay writers. Details and registration here


SOUTHEAST 
JUNEAU | Introducing Juneau’s anonymous poetry publication, MYTH Zine, currently available at The Rookery Café, Kindred Post, Alaska Robotics, The JACC, Rainy Retreat Books, The Goldtown Nickelodeon, and High Tide Tattoo. Send your poetry, prose, philosophical wonderings, or love letters to myythzine@gmail.com

                                                                   SOUTHWEST 
NA

ARCTIC 
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OUT OF STATE

EAST COAST and UK | After launching her new book, To the Bright Edge of the World in Palmer, Eowyn Ivey headed to the west coast to promote her book. She's made it to the east coast, now, and soon heads to the UK on a whirlwind book tour. Full schedule here

BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON | A Cirque reading will be held at the Mount Baker Theater, Encore Room, August 28, at 3 pm. more info   


CONFERENCES, RETREATS, and RESIDENCIES

Woosh Kinaadeiyi's Summer Writer's Retreat 

JUNEAU | Woosh Kinaadeiyí presents a SUMMER WRITER'S RETREAT, a unique opportunity for those who yearn for an immersive and inclusive experience. Build community and delve deeper into your own writing through guided activities and time away from your busy lives. Set in a waterfront house off the beaten path from 3 pm on August 20th until 11am on August 21st, space is limited. $45.00. Click here for the application

2016 Tutka Bay Writers Retreat
September 9-11th, 2016 
TUTKA BAY LODGE | This 49 Writers program takes place at the fantastic Tutka Bay Lodge. Faculty instructor award-winning writer Debra Magpie Earling will lead fiction writers in an in-depth writing workshop. Emphasizing in-class writing supportiveness, collegiality, and a constructive atmosphere, the engaged student will emerge with improved techniques for further work. Sold out and waitlisting. 


2016 Alaska Writers Guild Annual Conference for Writers & Illustrators
September 24th plus optional intensives and roundtables on Sept. 23rd.
SCBWIAlaska Writers Guild
ANCHORAGE | This year's conference is a partnership between Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, and the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators. This all-day event takes place at the BP Energy + Conference Center and includes keynotes and panels, as well as writing craft, marketing, traditional publishing, self publishing, children's literature, illustration tracks. Sign up for optional Intensives or Roundtable Critiques, or take advantage of One-on-One Manuscript Excerpt Reviews. Early bird discount extended until July 31st at only $95 for AWG/49 Writers/SCBWI members or $145 for non-members. More info and registration here.  


OPPORTUNITIES and AWARDS for WRITERS

The Alaska Literary Awards are open to poets, playwrights, screenwriters, writers of fiction and literary nonfiction, writers of multi-genre, cross-genre, or genre-defying work. Any Alaska writer over 18 who is not a full-time student is eligible to apply. Quality of the work is the primary consideration in determining who receives the awards. $5,000 awards will be given, all from privately donated funds. Apply at www.callforentry.org by Sept. 1, 2016 at 9:59 AKDT. 



In early August, the Alaska State Council on the Arts will seek nominations for the 2017 Governor's Awards for the Arts, as well as the next Alaska State Writer Laureate. The deadline for nominations for Governor's Awards for the Arts is September 15, 2016 and nominations for State Writer Laureate will be accepted through October 3, 2016This year, the categories for the Governor's Awards for the Arts are: Arts Education, Individual Artist, Arts Organization and Alaska Native Arts. The Governor's Awards for the Arts and Humanities ceremony will be held in Juneau on Thursday, January 26, 2017Visit ASCA's website here for information about last year's Governor's Awardees, and here for the Alaska State Writer Laureate program.


Caitlin Press is currently accepting submissions The Pacific Ocean: Protecting Our Endangered Coast, an anthology of poems that will explore the Pacific Ocean as a wilderness, a haven, and a part of our natural world that needs protecting. Yvonne Blomer, Victoria, B.C.’s poet laureate, will edit the anthology. Blomer has published three collections of poetry, most recently As if a Raven (Palimpsest Press) and co-edited Poems from Planet Earth (Leaf Press). Her first book, a broken mirror, fallen leaf, was shortlisted for the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award. Learn more, including how to submit two poems, here. Deadline: September 15, 2016.  

Call for Creative Teens The Anchorage Museum is looking for passionate, innovative high school-aged students to be a part of the Museum Teen Council, a group of young, creative leaders. They need teens who are passionate about something: doodling, blogging, technology, comedy, writing, music, photography, fashion, theater — anything — whose voices, ideas, and creativity can shape how they build community at the Anchorage Museum. Apply by Oct. 1. Details at anchoragemuseum.org.

Ghostwriting opportunity | A search is underway to find an experienced ghostwriter to write a series of twelve non-fiction articles for publication. These articles will be about the history of an immigrant family arriving in Alaska in the late '40s. The selected ghostwriter will be expected to agree on the proposed content and timeline for a series of articles and then interview the client and develop the articles from the interviews. Interested writers are invited to provide a CV, recent examples of work as a ghostwriter, demonstration of the ability to write in the client’s voice, examples/references which show an ability to meet deadlines and communicate effectively and efficiently, references which show an ability to work well with a client to enable a sharing of ideas, fact checking and research skills, pay rate, ability to discuss ideas and research with the client in a non-judgmental way; description of process to give the client the opportunity to approve, ask questions and give feedback on the material, and agreement to sign a nondisclosure agreement. If interested, please send questions, documents, and/or your rates to 13gwriter13@gmail.com by Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Thank You for Your Support!
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Have news, events, or opportunities you'd like to see listed here? Email details to 49roundup (at) gmail.com. Your message must be received by noon on the Thursday before the roundup is scheduled to run. Unless your event falls in the "Opportunities and Awards" category, it should occur no more than 30 days from when we receive your email.

          49 Writers: Guest Blogger Lucian Childs | Literary Chardonnay: Exploring Alaska's Urban Wilds      Cache   Translate Page      

When people Outside think of Alaska, they imagine snow, rugged mountains, sled dog races, grizzlies, homestead cabins and “The Deadliest Catch.” That people would be living up here in an urban context would probably not occur to them.

Lucian Childs
But over half of us Alaskans live in cities. What makes our experience unique is the dichotomy we often feel between our ordinary travails—taking kids to school, dashing into Carrs for groceries, or meeting friends at the PAC for a musical—and what we think of as the Great Land, that vastness teeming with wildlife. Our lives are as helter-skelter as city folks anywhere, but we live surrounded by wilderness, which exerts a mighty influence on our lives. 

This hit me last spring when I flew into Anchorage for my semi-annual sojourn. After I picked up my car, I drove to my friend’s house on Government Hill where I was to stay. It was early evening, one of those days we get in the spring: cloudless and crystalline. Near my friend’s house, I pulled off at the park that overlooks the Tank Farm. All the expectations about my upcoming stay—the dinner parties and meet-ups with friends—all that dropped away. Beyond the oil tanks and our small port, Mt. Susitna reclined and the Alaska Range disappeared down Cook Inlet, white peaks silhouetted against the approaching sunset. I’ve lived in Anchorage almost twenty-five years, but I’d forgotten the formidable beauty in which it is located. Looking down Cook Inlet took my breath away.

In an hour, though, I was showered and shaved, catching up with my friend Julie over a good Chardonnay in the bar at Kinley’s. To me, this combination of activities is as deeply Alaskan as setting a trapline or dipnetting for reds—being awed by the beauty of the Inlet, then having that glass of Chard at a fine restaurant with a friend.

To be honest, I haven’t always felt that other Alaska writers share this sentiment. As compelling as their work is, so often it concerns the natural world and our place in it. So, when Martha Amore and I started reading submissions for the anthology we were editing, Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry, I expected works relating climbing accidents, backcountry bear encounters or childhoods in remote homestead cabins. Let me say, there is nothing wrong with those stories. I love those stories. I’ve even been part of some of them. But where are our Alaska stories with that glass of literary Chardonnay?

To my great delight, we found them in the submissions we read: stories of a couple interviewing for a rental house and unexpectedly finding a new friend, roommates dealing with a hornet’s nest, a lovelorn young man pouring his heart out to a stranger over drinks at Mad Myrna’s. There were urban bonfire parties, journalists, geologists, fiddle players, bloggers and roller derby enthusiasts. There was the loving mom thinking back on her wild and crazy single life; the long-time married couple, recent transplants to Anchorage, unhappy with the choices they’d made.

Martha and I worked hard to identify writers whose work was set in rural and bush communities, but as so many of us live in Anchorage, many of the stories and poems we read were set there as well. Yet always there was wilderness lurking at the edges, glimpsed in the rearview window, appreciated on an afternoon hike. But more than that, the characters in these stories and poems looked to nature for models of how to live. A lover ponders a difficult relationship by walking the Chugach Mountains alone. Taking a wild and wooly road trip through Pipeline-era Alaska, a young girl finds herself. A man on the cusp of old age accepts his new situation, seeing the way trees cling to life at the edge of a bog. In those stories and poems, the two halves of the dichotomy were wed—the urban and the wild.

Certainly, there was work we read that took place in non-urban locales and where wildness exerted its instructing influence, such as Jerah Chadwick’s stunning poems set in the Aleutians. Here, men grappled with themselves and a life with a lover while hauling in provisions or stoking a potbellied stove.

After all the submissions had been read, we selected works for the anthology from twenty-six contributors, including Martha and myself. These writers, some established pros, others emerging artists, weave the rich tapestry of Alaska life, for the first time using stories and poems from our LGTBQ community.

As I prepare to return to Anchorage for the launch of Building Fires in the Snow, I’m excited to soon be a part of this unique place again. I look forward to dinner at a friend’s overlooking the Inlet, Redoubt letting off steam in the distance. To celebrating the end of a long day’s hike by having an honest Alaska brew at a downtown eatery. To First Friday-ing in the sharp autumn air. To being an explorer again in Alaska’s urban wilds.

There will be launch events for Building Fires in the Snowall over the state this fall. You can check out what’s happening at our website and keep up to date on our Facebook page. Martha and I hope to see you at an event and to learn how wilderness and the city come together in your life.

Lucian Childs divides his time between Anchorage, Alaska and Toronto, Ontario where he lives with his husband. In 2013, he received a Rasmuson Foundation Individual Artist Project Grant as well as the Prism ReviewShort Story Prize. He has been awarded residencies at Brydcliffe Art Colony and at Artscape Gibraltar Point and was a Peter Taylor Fellow at the 2015 Kenyon Review Writers Workshop. He is a co-editor of Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry. His short stories have appeared in Grain, Sanskrit, The Puritan, Jelly Bucket, Quiddity, and Cirque, among others.

A 49 Writers Crosscurrents event featuring panelists Lucian Childs and Martha Amore with moderator Heather Brook Adams will begin at 7 pm, October 13th, in the Anchorage Museum auditorium. This event, called “Tales of the City: Writing from Alaska’s Urban Hubs”, will be preceded by an informal
Building Fires in the Snow
meet and greet at MUSE Restaurant between 5 and 6:45 pm. 



          49 Writers | Roundup for Literary Alaska      Cache   Translate Page      

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

- We are in the midst of planning our fall line up of classes and events and will announce options and open registration in the coming weeks.  

- We (still) want your best 49 Writers photographs! We're sprucing up; if you have quality, print-ready photos (or video, audio, courtroom-sketch-style workshop doodles, etc) from any point in our 6+ years history that 1) you'd like to donate and 2) you suspect we don't already have, we'd love them! Email small doses to 49Writers@gmail.com, or get in touch about transferring large amounts. Thanks! 

SOUTHCENTRAL
Alaskan Author and Historian Dan O’Neill
PALMER | Saturday, August 20 at Fireside Books and Turkey Red. Reading at the bookstore at 4 PM, and dinner with the author at Turkey Red at 6 PM. Tickets for dinner are $30 and can be purchased at Fireside Books or here.
ANCHORAGE | Sunday, August 21 from 1-3 pm at UAA/APU Consortium Library room 307

Dan O’Neill has written three books of literary non-fiction. A Land Gone Lonesome is literary travel writing centered on a canoe trip along the Yukon River. The Alaska Library Association selected it as 2006’s best book on Alaska, published anywhere, and The New York Times Book Review awarded it an “Editor’s Choice.” His first book, a political history called The Firecracker Boys, also won the Library Association’s best book award, and for it Dan was named Alaska Historian of the Year by the Alaska Historical Society. In between, he wrote The Last Giant of Beringia, which blends the biography of a unique scholar with an explication of his scientific work on the Bering Land Bridge. The Times (London) called it “a beautiful and engrossing book…a wonderful integration of science and history.” The University of Alaska Press has just released his first children’s book: Stubborn Gal: The True Story of an Undefeated Sled Dog RacerDan was born in San Francisco, educated at U.C. Berkeley, and moved to Alaska 40 years ago. There, he studied creative writing, worked construction jobs, built log cabins, hunted, fished, trapped, and ran dogs. He and his wife once ran their teams 800 miles to Nome. As research associate at the University of Alaska’s Oral History Program, he produced radio and television documentaries for public broadcasting. For several years he wrote a column of political opinion for the Fairbanks daily newspaper.

The “Female” in Indigenous and Pre Socratic Cultures
ANCHORAGE | Wednesday, August 24 from 4-6 pm at the UAA Campus Bookstore
Guest speakers include Dr. Jacqueline Rahm (UAF Dept. of Indigenous Studies), Dr. Rachel Mason, (UAA Anthropology Dept., NPS), Dr. Kirsten Helweg Hanson (UAA Philosophy Dept.), and Wolfgang Olsson (UAA Honor’s College graduate). This multi-disciplinary event will contrast theories that focus on the “female” and why the “female” has been suppressed and/or discarded over the years. Topics will include wisdom teachings, the Goddess, the importance of Aspasia, and the fate of Feminist Anthropology. Free parking for this event in the South Lot, Sports Complex NW Lot, West Campus Central Lot, and Sports Campus West Lot.

Book launch and celebration: Blue Ticket by Kris Farmen 
ANCHORAGE | Friday, August 26 from 7-10 pm at the Writer's Block Bookstore and Cafe (3956 Spenard Road). Farmen will read from and sign his new novel. Refreshments and additional entertainment as well. 

John Luther Adams 
ANCHORAGE | The Alaska Humanities Forum will welcome John Luther Adams for a series of events as part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative to celebrate excellence in journalism and the arts. 

John Luther Adams is a composer and author whose life and work is deeply rooted in the natural world—especially in Alaska, where he lived for forty years before moving to New York City in 2015. Adams was awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for music for his symphonic work Become Ocean, and a 2015 Grammy Award for “Best Contemporary Classical Composition.” He has taught widely, including at Harvard University and the Oberlin Conservatory, and served as composer in residence with the Anchorage Symphony, Anchorage Opera, Fairbanks Symphony, Arctic Chamber Orchestra, and APRN.  
The public is invited to a series of three free events during John Luther Adams' visit to Anchorage; you can also tune in to 106.1 FM KONR to listen to selected works from september 1-7.

READING AND BOOK SIGNING | Thursday, September 1, 6-8 pm at Cyrano's Playhouse. Adams will read from his upcoming memoir, Silences So Deep: A Memoir of Music and AlaskaPassages reflecting on his friendships with poet John Haines and composer Gordon Wright have been excerpted in the New Yorker and Alaska Quarterly Review.

ARTIST'S TALK & RECEPTION | 
Friday, September 2, Talk: 7 P.M | Reception 8 P.M. at  
Anchorage Museum. A growing number of geologists believe we have entered a new period - the Anthropocene - in which the dominant geologic force is humanity itself. What does this mean for a composer, or for any creative artist working in any medium today?

VEILS AND VESPER INSTALLATION | 
Friday & Saturday, September 2 & 3 | 6 P.M. - midnight. 
Veils and Vesper is a series of distinct but related electronic pieces written
by Adams in 2005. When the pieces are installed together, listeners are able to create their own ‘mix’ and experience the music by moving through an immersive environment.

INTERIOR 
FAIRBANKS | Fairbanks Arts Association hosts the oldest literary reading series in the state. Every month, writers reading their own work publicly at a community meet-up where people can connect with other lovers of literature. Readings are held on the day after First Friday, usually the first Saturday of the month at 7 pm. Most reading are held in the Bear Gallery in Pioneer Park, although occasionally in the summer (June, July, and August) the weather is beautiful reading are held outside to another spot in Pioneer Park. Upcoming: 
SeptemberUAF Faculty Reading
OctoberTBA
NovemberTBA
DecemberRosemary McGuire
Additional readings and events may be held, but the First Saturday Literary Reading Series is monthly at 7 pm the day after First Friday (except February). 

SOUTHEAST 
JUNEAU | Introducing Juneau’s anonymous poetry publication, MYTH Zine, currently available at The Rookery Café, Kindred Post, Alaska Robotics, The JACC, Rainy Retreat Books, The Goldtown Nickelodeon, and High Tide Tattoo. Send your poetry, prose, philosophical wonderings, or love letters to myythzine@gmail.com

DYEA | Reading and Printmaking Demo at Alderworks, Sunday, August 21, 2 PM: 



SITKA | Sitka Rumi Fest: 


                                                                   SOUTHWEST 
NA

ARCTIC 
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OUT OF STATE
EAST COAST and UK | After launching her new book, To the Bright Edge of the World in Palmer, Eowyn Ivey headed to the west coast to promote her book. She's made it to the east coast, now, and soon heads to the UK on a whirlwind book tour. Full schedule here

BOTHELL, WASHINGTON | A Cirque reading will be held on August 19, 5:30 pm, at Tsuga Gallery on Main Street. more info  

BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON | A Cirque reading will be held at the Mount Baker Theater, Encore Room, August 28, at 3 pm. more info   


CONFERENCES, RETREATS, and RESIDENCIES

Woosh Kinaadeiyi's Summer Writer's Retreat 
JUNEAU | Woosh Kinaadeiyí presents a SUMMER WRITER'S RETREAT, a unique opportunity for those who yearn for an immersive and inclusive experience. Build community and delve deeper into your own writing through guided activities and time away from your busy lives. Set in a waterfront house off the beaten path from 3 pm on August 20th until 11am on August 21st, space is limited. $45.00. Click here for the application

2016 Tutka Bay Writers Retreat
September 9-11th, 2016 
TUTKA BAY LODGE | This 49 Writers program takes place at the fantastic Tutka Bay Lodge. Faculty instructor award-winning writer Debra Magpie Earling will lead fiction writers in an in-depth writing workshop. Emphasizing in-class writing supportiveness, collegiality, and a constructive atmosphere, the engaged student will emerge with improved techniques for further work. Sold out and waitlisting. 


2016 Alaska Writers Guild Annual Conference for Writers & Illustrators
September 24th plus optional intensives and roundtables on Sept. 23rd.
SCBWIAlaska Writers Guild
ANCHORAGE | This year's conference is a partnership between Alaska Writers Guild, 49 Writers, and the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators. This all-day event takes place at the BP Energy + Conference Center and includes keynotes and panels, as well as writing craft, marketing, traditional publishing, self publishing, children's literature, illustration tracks. Sign up for optional Intensives or Roundtable Critiques, or take advantage of One-on-One Manuscript Excerpt Reviews. Early bird discount extended until July 31st at only $95 for AWG/49 Writers/SCBWI members or $145 for non-members. More info and registration here.  

The North Words Writers Symposium has announced their 2017 dates: May 31-June 3rd, which should better accommodate educators. More details to come. 


OPPORTUNITIES and AWARDS for WRITERS

The Alaska Literary Awards are open to poets, playwrights, screenwriters, writers of fiction and literary nonfiction, writers of multi-genre, cross-genre, or genre-defying work. Any Alaska writer over 18 who is not a full-time student is eligible to apply. Quality of the work is the primary consideration in determining who receives the awards. $5,000 awards will be given, all from privately donated funds. Apply at www.callforentry.org by Sept. 1, 2016 at 9:59 AKDT. 


In early August, the Alaska State Council on the Arts will seek nominations for the 2017 Governor's Awards for the Arts, as well as the next Alaska State Writer Laureate. The deadline for nominations for Governor's Awards for the Arts is September 15, 2016 and nominations for State Writer Laureate will be accepted through October 3, 2016This year, the categories for the Governor's Awards for the Arts are: Arts Education, Individual Artist, Arts Organization and Alaska Native Arts. The Governor's Awards for the Arts and Humanities ceremony will be held in Juneau on Thursday, January 26, 2017Visit ASCA's website here for information about last year's Governor's Awardees, and here for the Alaska State Writer Laureate program.

Ghostwriting opportunity | A search is underway to find an experienced ghostwriter to write a series of twelve non-fiction articles for publication. These articles will be about the history of an immigrant family arriving in Alaska in the late '40s. The selected ghostwriter will be expected to agree on the proposed content and timeline for a series of articles and then interview the client and develop the articles from the interviews. Interested writers are invited to provide a CV, recent examples of work as a ghostwriter, demonstration of the ability to write in the client’s voice, examples/references which show an ability to meet deadlines and communicate effectively and efficiently, references which show an ability to work well with a client to enable a sharing of ideas, fact checking and research skills, pay rate, ability to discuss ideas and research with the client in a non-judgmental way; description of process to give the client the opportunity to approve, ask questions and give feedback on the material, and agreement to sign a nondisclosure a
greement. If interested, please send questions, documents, and/or your rates to 13gwriter13@gmail.com by Tuesday, September 13, 2016
Thank You for Your Support!
49 Writers members and donors make this blog possible, along with our workshops, Crosscurrents events, readings and craft talks, and other programs. Not a member yet? Join Us 

Have news, events, or opportunities you'd like to see listed here? Email details to 49roundup (at) gmail.com. Your message must be received by noon on the Thursday before the roundup is scheduled to run. Unless your event falls in the "Opportunities and Awards" category, it should occur no more than 30 days from when we receive your email.

          Last moments of sailing : after over 2 months at sea      Cache   Translate Page      

Cruising along the Chilean Patagonia


We made it to Chile today! In the afternoon, we entered the fjords through the Magellan Straight . It was so nice and different to steer while looking at mountains instead of endless water. We put the sails down and started to motor as the sun was setting.





We motored all night and the following day. We were lucky as the water was very flat. The sun was back as well, so we enjoyed a colorful sunrise over the mountains.






We spent the whole day enjoying the warmth and the sun, taking lots of pictures and just being in the moment. We saw a whale, some birds, magellanic penguins, seals, and sea lions. We picked an anchorage stop next to Puerto Natales and enjoyed a friendly sea-shanty competition and had to wait for the next day to clear the customs.







First step on dry land after over two months at sea!!


After being cleared by Chilean customs, everybody got in the tender for our first trip ashore since Antarctica. We were welcomed by a very cute puppy, who then followed us around town. In Puerto Natales, there are many dogs roaming the streets, about half of them have an owner, but are still free to wander. After our two and a half months at sea, we needed some well-deserved partying! We enjoyed our time in Baguales, a local microbrewery, where we practiced our Spanglish with our new amigos.


We spent a few days in Puerto Natales, relaxing and catching up on our almost normal life, and trying the many great Chilean wines. We took a room at the Patagonia Adventure Hostel for what we thought was going to be just 2 days, but we felt so at home that we extended our stay, while trying to figure out our next move.




          Antarctica : Our Experience of the Coldest Continent on Earth      Cache   Translate Page      

A Few Hours on the Land of Ice: Antarctica


Almost halfway through our Southern Ocean crossing on board SV Infinity, we were lucky enough to step foot on the southernmost continent. AA was steering with Gabo when he noticed what we though was an iceberg but turned out to be land: ANTARCTICA!!!!



It took us all day from the moment we first saw land to reach Cape Adare. We enjoyed the view of black mountains covered with snow. The water surrounding us was filled with huge icebergs everywhere. It took a while to be able to go through all the ice blocks, but with a team up in the crow's nest and one on the bow, the Captain was able to manoeuvre the boat safely toward its anchorage spot in Robertson Bay.



On our way, while avoiding big ice chunks, somebody spotted some whales in the distance. We stopped everything we were doing and enjoyed a private show from the many killer whales that were busy feeding in the area. At first, they did not seem very interested by the boat, but as we were slowly getting closer to the beach, they came in to have a closer look. We even saw a mommy killer whale and her little baby.







Shortly after, while enjoying the magnificent views of the Antarctic continent, glaciers and icebergs, we saw a lone seal on his little piece of ice. We drove around him, getting very nice close up pictures. He seemed curious but not enough to actually move anything more than his head.




We approached land and anchored the boat close to Ridley Beach to go explore the area on foot. We could see many rookeries of Adelie penguins with our binoculars. We lowered the tender and everybody got ready. We had to split the group in three as we can't all fit in the smaller boat, and we needed people to stay on board in case the anchor would not stay in place.


When it was our turn, we sat in the dinghy and, beginners mistake, we let go of the boat before the engine was on. We started drifting immediately, while Clemens was still trying to get the engine started. We were fast getting away from Infinity and the engine was still not on, so eventually we had to start paddling, against pretty strong currents. The team left on board hurried to get some ropes ready in the water to help us reach the boat. We finally made it, taking turns to paddle. As soon as we grabbed the rope, we made our way faster towards Infinity. We got back on, changed gloves and anything else that was wet and went back in the tender, this time with a running engine to make it to land!

With the smaller boat, we landed on Ridley Beach. The beach was made of very dark rocks and also covered by ice. We jumped out of the dinghy as soon as we touched land, and tried to hold on to it so it would not leave with the waves. It took a few tries to bring the boat closer to the ice. We tried to attach a rope to a big chunk of ice, but it was not heavy enough, so we had to try again. It took a few trial and error, holding on to the boat, feet in the water before we could secure it.

One thing that we noticed as soon as we arrived on land, was the smell of penguin poo. A big seal watched us coming in, and it didn't seem too sure on how to react. After a few minutes of us being too humans (very loud excited sounds), it moved a few meters away. We landed right next to an Adelie penguins rookery. They looked at us, some of them moving their wings at us, but mostly, they couldn't care less about us.


Every few meters, there was another penguin group followed by another group and so on forever. We spent some time watching them and taking many pictures. We saw more lazy Weddell seals, countless Adelie penguins and some skuas, amongst other birds.


We walked around slowly, going towards the oldest building in Antarctica. We walked some more, meeting more penguins. One even came straight towards us and stopped a few feet away probably wondering what kind of creature we were. We stopped moving and after a moment, he walked right around Seb, smelling around, and kept going, not worried at all.





Our Captain found a different penguin in one of the group. It was a chinstrap penguin, by himself, hiding in a large group of Adelie penguins. Some penguins were walking in groups following each other and sliding on their bellies. It was awesome to watch!




The scenery was amazing; many icebergs, mountains, deserted land, blue water and even a colorful sunset in the distance. We enjoyed the area for a while but as soon as the sun disappeared it started to be much colder.





We made it back to Infinity, changed into dry and warm clothes and tried to process our day. There was a lot to take in, almost too much, like an overload of awesomeness. We were waiting for dinner to be ready, hanging out in our cabin and talking about our day, when we heard something about Sea Shepherd and heard some unknown voices. We went upstairs, and we had company!



The Sea Shepherd encounter


Who would expect to get visitors in this isolated part of the world, after being alone at sea for a month. Four guys from Sea Shepherds took their zodiac and came up to ask us to help them. They were trying to keep the Japanese whalers from killing as many whales as possible as part of their "research" program. The whalers are a group of harpoon ships and support vessels and one processing ship. The Sea Shepherds have three big ships and as soon as they get close to the whalers, the Japanese support vessels follow them to prevent them for taking any actions on the main ships. They wanted our help to act as a decoy, making the whalers follow us instead of them so they could get away from their tailing vessel.


We gladly accepted the mission and quickly went around to shut all the lights so the Japanese ship would not see us. The Steve Irwin came in the bay, followed five miles behind by the Japanese vessel. They shut all their lights coming in the bay so we could trick the Japanese into following our boat instead when we would turn our lights back on. We slowly made our way out of the bay, dodging ice bits and waited to see if the plan would work. The Japanese ship started following us going west. The Steve Irwin waited a little longer for all of us to be far enough so they would be undetectable on the radar and then would try to go around the cape and find the processing ship. As soon as the sun came out, the Japanese ship noticed their mistake. They must have been furious to have been following the wrong ship for part of the night!
  
They came rushing towards Infinity, double checking their mistake, and showing off their powerful engine by circling us, before storming off to find the Steve Irwin once again. They unfortunately caught up with them before they could escape. We were very sad that they missed their shot by about half-hour, but we have to admit this was a very funny adventure! (to read more about the Sea Shepherds and their missions in Antarctica or to read their account of our encounter visit:



After the Japanese realized their mistake, we returned to our anchorage spot in Ridley Beach so the last group of people could go ashore. Later in the day, the Steve Irwin came back towards us, unfortunately followed by the Japanese ship. We attached our boat to theirs and they transferred quite a lot of fuel to top up our tanks as their thank you for helping them. It was very funny to see everybody excited to meet new people, on both boats, as they too had been at sea for a long time. After the fuel transfer, we went out of the bay and south into the Ross Sea, hoping to reach a different anchorage in prevision of the storm that was coming up our way.


Sadly leaving this wonderful place


During the night, we had to speed through thick ice and slushy water. We then gave up finding the new anchorage location and decided to face the heavy winds in the open sea, far off coast. We headed East for a while until the winds where too strong and we then motored through the storm. We were motoring forward and were pushed backward by the winds and currents for a good part of this storm. For a change, we had to look behind us for icebergs. We had to make a reasonable decision and changed our original plans. We tried to go back to Ridley beach but this wasn't possible due to an excessive amount of ice in the bay. We had to give up and leave Antarctica to head East for Chile as we still had a long way ahead of us and the sea conditions were changing quickly.


After getting the first glimpse of Antarctica in company of Gabo, AA steered as we watched the continent disappear slowly and said our farewell to the frozen continent. We will be back one day, but until then, we are off to South America!




          Out in the Great Alone      Cache   Translate Page      
           "I landed Anchorage in the middle of the night. The next morning, I drove an hour north to Wolf Lake Airport, a private airfield near Wasilla. You know those old photo-backdrop screens that little kids in department stores used to have their portraits taken in front of? It was like driving into one of […]
          🔥 Moose made its way into a hospital lobby in Anchorage, Alaska 🔥      Cache   Translate Page      
🔥 Moose made its way into a hospital lobby in Anchorage, Alaska 🔥 Posted by to_the_tenth_power
          After nine grueling days, the Iditarod has a new champion      Cache   Translate Page      

The Iditarod is coming home.

Alaskan musher Pete Kaiser won the annual sled dog race — which covers nearly 1,000 of frigid Alaskan terrain from Anchorage to Nome — when he crossed the finish line early on Wednesday morning, The Anchorage Daily News reported. Kaiser finished the race in nine days, 12 hours, 39 minutes, and six seconds, holding off the defending champion, Norway's Joar Ulsom in the process. Ulsom finished just 12 minutes after Kaiser, making the race the fifth closest in the Iditarod's history dating back to 1967.

Kaiser is the first musher of Yup'ik — an indigenous peoples from western Alaska and the Russian Far East — descent to win the race.

This year's race fielded the smallest group of mushers since 1989, as organizers said they had to regroup amid declining sponsorship, a dog doping scandal, and animal-rights protest, Reuters reported before the race began last Sunday. Protests also played a role during the race itself, just not from animal-rights activists: on Monday, then-leader Nicholas Petit's dogs decided they'd had enough and refused to continue the trail. It then became Kaiser's race to lose.

As a reward for his victory, Kaiser received a $50,000 check and a new truck.


          Alaskan musher wins his first Iditarod, crossing finish line in Nome      Cache   Translate Page      

Alaskan musher wins his first Iditarod, crossing finish line in NomeANCHORAGE, Alaska (Reuters) - The 1,000-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race ended in a predawn close finish on the snow-covered streets of Nome on Wednesday, with Alaskan Pete Kaiser and his dogs barely holding off defending champion Joar Leifseth Ulsom of Norway.



          Anchorage police investigate child’s stabbing at overlook      Cache   Translate Page      
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          3/13/2019: SBJ: Food-delivery companies acquire a taste for smaller markets      Cache   Translate Page      

When Lexi Blalock opened the DoorDash Inc. app in Anchorage, Ala., earlier this year, the 24-year-old teacher found far fewer restaurant options than when she had used the delivery service while visiting friends in Seattle last fall. Her sushi order...


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