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          Comment on Survey shows ‘hundreds of impacts’ on ESA’s Columbus module by Mat      Cache   Translate Page      
As I've suggested nasa should recycle some of their trash into ingots to be placed inside specially designed containers to slighty protect against micrometeorites and solar radiation. Rather than some of the trash being burnt in re-entry. It could be bolted to the outside of the space station. Pieces inside the containers would most likely need to be glued together. If not used for the station, containers could be combined for other space projects such as to provide structural support for space telescopes or satelites. Organic waste could be stored in specially designed containers stored outside as well to be stored for night soil to be used to grow plants on future lunar, mars or asteroid bases. As of right now if trash thier is gone it's gone. If it's stored it could be used later for a future resource.
          More than Meets the Eye (feature star show)      Cache   Translate Page      

More Than Meets The Eye uses original and scientifically-accurate space artwork to depict the planets and deep-sky objects as people can actually expect to see them with and without various instruments. Throughout the program, audiences experience the joys of night-sky observing using the naked eye, binoculars and small telescopes. The show also compares the views […]

The post More than Meets the Eye (feature star show) appeared first on UW Oshkosh Today.


          A Modern English Course for Foreign Students      Cache   Translate Page      
Автор:Eckersley Название: A Modern English Course for Foreign Students Издательство:Longman ASIN: B0000CHQ3E Год:1951 Формат:PDF Размер: 11МВ Страниц: 258 Язык:Английский It is hoped that this present volume will help towards supplying that want. The student who knows no English at all can make a beginning with this book, but those students who have already a slight knowledge of English can telescope the first ten lessons into two or three and will then find, I think, material that is new to-them. The main emphasis of the book is on conversational English,
          Newly Discovered Trans-Neptunian Comet Zooms By Earth in 3 Days      Cache   Translate Page      
In only a few days, newly-discovered Comet Iwamoto will split the orbits of Earth and Mars, making a relatively close approach to our planet visible through small telescopes. This is a rare visit. The comet comes from the realm of Extreme Trans-Neptunian Objects, a distant region of the solar system inhabited by strange objects such…
          2/10/2019: Where In The World?: WHERE IN THE WORLD?      Cache   Translate Page      

This futuristic-looking structure houses the biggest optical telescope in the southern hemisphere — and may be the town of Sutherland’s most famous attraction (see story below). A collaborative international effort, the telescope is used to analyse...
          Fullbore Friday      Cache   Translate Page      
Now for Part 2 of 2 from last week's FbF. If you have not read it yet, head back, give it a read, and come back. We'll wait.

Let's pick up the story of the Krait (renamed from Kofuku Maru).
Lyon located a replacement engine for the Krait in Hobart, Tasmania, and had it shipped to Townsville and installed. For simplicity’s sake and to save space, he scrapped the part of his plan to destroy harbor installations in Singapore and concentrated on shipping. Even so, when the 70-foot-by-11-foot Krait sailed to Cairns and was fitted out with supplies and stores for six months. With diesel fuel, kerosene, canoes, weapons, explosives, equipment, spare parts, and radio gear, there was only enough space left for the team to sleep a few at a time in hammocks slung in any vacant spot.

Lyon’s team included Donald Davidson, second-in-command, British Royal Navy, a tough, resourceful Englishman who had spent years in Australia’s outback and the jungles of Southeast Asia and had been commissioned in the Navy in Singapore with no previous naval experience; Lieutenant Bob Page, Australian Army, former third-year medical student who had swapped university studies for special operations; Lieutenant Ted Carse, Australian Navy, navigator, who had sworn off alcohol for this operation; Stoker Paddy McDowell, British Royal Navy, ship’s engineer and World War I veteran; Corporal Taffy Morris, a British Army medic who had escaped from Sumatra with Lyon; Corporal Andrew Crilley, an Australian Army engineer who had volunteered to be cook to get selected for the team; Telegraphist Horrie Young, Australian Navy; and six young Australian Navy seamen who had not yet been to sea—Wally Falls, Freddie Marsh, Cobber Cain, Andrew Huston, Arthur Jones, and Mostyn Berryman. All were volunteers from the Z Special Unit, usually called Z Force.
Studs.
On August 9, 1943, they left Cairns on a 2,400-mile voyage around the north of Australia to Exmouth Gulf in Western Australia. There the crew of the American submarine repair ship Chanticleer did some excellent repair work on the Krait while refusing to believe that the “crate” had made it all the way from Cairns. They prepared her with 150 pounds of plastic explosives so that she could easily be blown up if captured.
I had to add that because, well, you know my feelings about the incredible force multiplier tenders are. Before I get on another "where are my damn tenders today" rant, let's push on to the attack. Remember to read it all ... but let's get to the pointy end;
On September 8, the raiders were more than 700 miles north of Australia and within sight of Gunung Agung, the 10,000-foot sacred mountain of Bali, and the equally sacred 12,000-foot Gunung Rinjani on the nearby island of Lombok. That night they steered between the two islands into the 25-mile-long Lombok Strait, hoping their fishing boat flying the Japanese flag would not be challenged and to make it through by dawn.
...
On the night of September 16, the raiders anchored off a beach on the island of Pompong, and Davidson, Cain, and Jones went ashore and buried cans of water and emergency supplies. During the night they listened to the growl of engines as Japanese seaplanes were warmed up at the base on nearby Chempa Island and watched searchlight beams in the sky.
...
The gear was taken ashore—canoes, limpet mines, food and water, arms and ammunition, clothing, medical kits, and a bag of Dutch gold guilders. The Japanese patrol boat, whose engine they had heard earlier, again passed very close.

Lyon called a meeting of the team. It was decided that this island, Pandjang, 30 miles from Singapore, was too close as a pickup point after the raid, that 12 days should be allowed for the raid, and that the attack team should be picked up at Pompong Island—50 miles from Singapore—where they had buried the emergency rations. Pickup would be at midnight on October 1. If the attack team was not there, the Krait would return 48 hours later.
...
At 4 am, the attack team—Major Lyon, Lieutenants Davidson and Page, and Seamen Falls, Jones and Huston—shook hands with the others and were rowed ashore.
...
The canoes were 17 feet long and, loaded with two men, limpet mines, arms, equipment, food and water, weighed almost a third of a ton. They got them into the sea and waited, each man dressed in a black Japara silk suit and black exercise shoes, faces and hands blackened, pistols and knives strapped on, compasses and first aid kits in zippered pockets, each with a cyanide tablet within easy reach in case of need. When the regular Japanese patrol boat passed, they climbed into the canoes and began paddling toward Singapore, Lyon and Huston in one, Davidson and Falls in another, and Page and Jones in the third.
...
They paddled until midnight, covering 11 miles, and then, tired and sore from the unaccustomed labor, pulled in at the small, uninhabited island of Bulat. They unloaded the canoes and carried their gear to a grove of palms in the scrub and lay down and slept until daylight.

Waking, they looked out to sea to find a motorized sampan flying a Japanese flag moving slowly toward the beach, and on the beach there was still some of their gear. Two of the canoes were only partly hidden. Pistols ready, cursing themselves for their carelessness, they watched the sampan anchor just off the beach. During the next hour they held their breath as Japanese sailors moved around on the deck of the sampan, but none of them noticed the gear on the beach. When the sampan left, they quickly got the gear and canoes under cover.
Life is often the luck of another persons ill-attention, or lack of it. The mission continues;
After dark, still stiff and sore from the previous night’s paddling in the cramped canoes, they set off for the Bulan Strait. The strait was only a mile wide, and the rip tides and whirls among the islands made paddling the heavily laden canoes extremely difficult. They had traveled less than nine miles when they dragged the canoes among the mangroves of Bulan Island just before dawn. When dawn broke, they heard voices calling and could see people moving about in a village only a short distance away on the next island. Looking around, they saw more villages dotting other small islands, and sailboats and canoes began using a channel only yards away from them.

They laced mangrove branches as camouflage, ate some of their rations, and lay down in the stinking mangrove mud to sleep, their calm broken by calls coming from the villages, dog fights, and the shouts of boatmen passing so close that the sails of their boats blotted out the sun. It was a miserable day. Sandflies attacked them in swarms, and crabs nipped them as they lay baking in the sun, but in the late afternoon it rained heavily and, refreshed somewhat by it, they left in their canoes as soon as it was dark.

They were out of the Bulan Strait by midnight and by 2 am could see the lights of Singapore in the sky—they were too low in the water to see them directly. They landed on Dongas Island and hid their canoes and gear. They were eight miles from their target and 2,000 miles from their base at Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia.
In canoes.
The next morning they checked the island and found it uninhabited. From a high point, using a telescope, they spent hours looking through the haze into the harbor. For Huston, Falls, and Jones, Singapore was just another island, an island to be attacked, but for the other three there were emotional links. Bob Page’s father was a prisoner in Singapore as were Donald Davidson’s brothers, and for Ivan Lyon it was his wife and young son. They had escaped Singapore before its fall and reached Ceylon. Sailing to Australia to join Lyon, their ship was sunk in the Indian Ocean and they were taken as prisoners to Singapore. Lyon knew that much but did not know they had been moved to a prison camp in Japan. They survived in the camp until freed by American troops when Japan surrendered....
The attack team rested on Dongas Island for much of the next two days and watched the courses steered by a variety of ships for evidence of minefields.
...
On the second afternoon, a convoy of 13 ships moved into the Roads, preparatory to leaving the harbor. It was too good a target to miss, and after dark the team carried their canoes to the beach and launched them.

At midnight they were still two miles from the Roads, fighting a crosstide, when a searchlight snapped on. Motionless, they floated for half a minute in the glare, expecting an alarm to sound, and then the light went out. They closed up and decided that, because of the crosstide, they would have to give up for the night. They also decided they would find another island from which to launch their attack.

They left Dongas Island the next night and, fighting the tides between islands, they reached Subar Island, seven miles west of Dongas, just before dawn.
Patience. Luck. Training. Endurance.
Subar was a rocky island, the rocks too hot to touch, and so hot it was impossible to sleep during the day. The men lay on blankets on a cliff top where they could look down on the sea 60 feet below and watch the passing parade of junks and ketches, proas and sampans. The heat haze lifted in mid-afternoon, and through the telescope they examined the harbor, transferring what they saw to their chart and planning their attack that night.

Under a moonless sky they paddled for the lights of Singapore. In the harbor they twice lay forward and motionless in their canoes while searchlights played over them, but no alarm was raised. Then they separated, looking for targets.
It was time;
Along Bukum wharves where the sea glowed with reflected light, Bob Page and Arthur Jones passed a 5,000-ton freighter, then a small coastal ship and a big, well-lit tanker on which welders were working. Page decided on the freighter. They had to cross a large patch of full light before they came into the shadow of the freighter, and when their eyes adjusted they moved along its hull attaching limpet mines below the waterline, timed to explode at 5 am.

They hung on the anchor chain, resting and eating chocolate bars and listening to the chatter of the welders and other workmen on the tanker until, warned by instinct, they looked up to see a uniformed Japanese guard on the deck above them. Unmoving, they watched him for several minutes until he spat into the sea beside them and moved on. They paddled away.

Their second target was a large, modern ship low in the water with cargo. The glow of its lights on the water around it and the red dots of cigarettes being smoked by the crew on deck made it a dangerous target, but they took the risk and attached limpets. Leaving this ship, they were caught in a rip current that, before they realized what was happening, bumped the canoe against the rudder of a heavily laden tramp steamer. They attached their remaining limpets to it and, bathed in sweat and desperately tired, they began paddling for Dongas Island where they would meet the others.

Ivan Lyon and Andrew Huston paddled into Examination Anchorage where, in contrast to the lights that had plagued Page and Jones, there was almost complete darkness. Low in the water, it was almost impossible for them to spot ships against the blackness of the anchorage and the shoreline hills. They paddled for two hours unable to find a ship and then saw a red light and the silhouette of a tanker. They circled her, noting how low she was in the water and, knowing that it was difficult to sink a tanker with limpets, they decided to put all they had on her.

As they could hear voices on deck, they worked slowly and cautiously. They placed three limpets over her engine room, another three around her propeller, and moved along her starboard side. With two more limpets attached and the last one ready to go on, Lyon looked up to see, 10 feet above him, a man’s head out of a porthole, his face pale against the black hull. The man sniffed and cleared his throat, and Lyon, the limpet in his hands, wondered if he would have time to attach it. So he set a one-minute fuse to detonate it if they were challenged. The head disappeared, a light appeared in the porthole, and they waited for the man to return with a flashlight to shine on them. He did not. Lyon attached the limpet, and they paddled away.

Donald Davidson and Wally Falls paddled into Keppel Harbor, where they were almost run down by a steam ferry. Passing the yacht club, they could hear Japanese voices raised in song and other sounds of party revelry. In Empire Dock, where there were ships, it was so highly floodlit and there was so much activity going on they kept moving, following an ocean-going tug into the Roads off the business heart of Singapore. Here there were plenty of ships and a lot of light.

They drifted in beside a heavily laden freighter and attached three limpets, then moved on and did the same to a second freighter and a third. The Victoria Hall clock chimed 1 am. It was getting late. They decided not to return to Dongas Island but to make straight for the rendezvous on Pompong Island.

Lyon, Huston, Page, and Jones reached Dongas just before daylight, and after nine hours in the canoes they were so exhausted and sore they had great difficulty unloading and hiding the canoes. But they scrambled up the hill and waited expectantly in the growing daylight. At 5:15 they heard a dull explosion—and six minutes later a second one. They could hear the sound of sirens. In the next 20 minutes they heard five more explosions. “A good night’s work,” Jones said.
If you have not already, head over for the rest of the story at WarfareHistoryNetwork.

Not heard of this before? Well, there are reasons. Some was how well it was hidden ... the other the secondary cost;
Although the loss of Japanese shipping in the operation, 37,000 tons, was very small in comparison with, say, Japanese ships sunk by American submarines, the sheer daring of the operation would have given a boost to Allied morale if it had been publicized and would probably have created panic in every Japanese occupied port in the Pacific and Southeast Asia. But the operation was classified top secret as knowledge of it by the Japanese could jeopardize any future similar operations. The story of operation Jaywick was buried in the files until long after the war.

The Jaywick team returned to Z Force, not knowing that in Singapore the Japanese had blamed local saboteurs for the sinking of their ships and begun an investigation that led to the imprisonment, torture and execution of hundreds of Chinese and Malays, and some of the Europeans interned on the island.
That last bit is on the Japanese.

Anyway, for the men, remember, no matter what you do in life, you'll never be this cool.




          Words Crush Daily Puzzle Answers February 10 2019      Cache   Translate Page      
Here are the answers to Words Crush Daily Puzzle Sunday February 10, 2019 Words Crush Daily Puzzle Simple – Calf Words Crush Daily Puzzle Moderate – Pilot, Runway, Aisle Words Crush Daily Puzzle Hardcore – Telescope, Meteorite, Mercury, Meteor, Earth
          Twee kunstenaars hebben ruzie om het zwartste zwart, hoe zit dat?      Cache   Translate Page      

Een ruzie in de kunstwereld heeft een nieuwe kleur opgeleverd: Black 3.0, een extreem donkere variant van zwart. Zo'n donkere zwart bestaat al: Vantablack, maar die mag alleen de kunstenaar die er patent op heeft gebruiken. Als tegenreactie heeft een ander nu zelf maar zo'n zwarte zwart bedacht. Hoe zit dat?

De zoektocht naar een extreem zwarte vorm van zwart begon allemaal in de ruimtevaart. Het Britse Surrey Nanosystems maakte in 2014 Vantablack, het donkerste materiaal ter wereld. Dat absorbeert 99 procent van het licht. Handig voor satellieten en telescopen. Hoe donkerder die zijn, hoe donkerder de ruimte blijft, hoe meer licht telescopen opvangen. Zo kan de wetenschap beter nieuwe sterren ontdekken.

'Vantablack-zwart' ziet eruit als een gat. Je ziet geen reliëf, geen perspectief, alleen een groot, bedrieglijk zwart vlak. Ideaal voor kunstenaars om mee te experimenteren. Maar kunstenaar Anish Kapoor kreeg dus van Surrey Nanosystems het exclusieve gebruiksrecht op Vantablack.

Wereldwijd waren kunstenaars woedend, zij wilden die kleur ook. Een van hen, Stuart Semple, ontwikkelde als statement de meest roze verf ter wereld. Iedereen mocht die kleur kopen. Behalve Kapoor. Een ruzie was geboren. Kapoor kwam toch aan de verf en deelde onderstaande roze middelvinger op sociale media:

Nu heeft Semple ook een eigen pikzwarte kleur op de markt gebracht. Zijn Black 3.0 absorbeert 98 tot 99 procent van het licht, minder dan Vantablack dus. Met de bestellingen gaat het hard: hij heeft al voor 215.000 euro aan verf verkocht. Het is door iedereen te bestellen en te gebruiken, behalve door Anish Kapoor. Daar moet je voor tekenen als je de kleur online aanschaft.

"Ik wilde een punt maken. Het is een stuk performance art", vertelt Semple. Of het ooit nog goedkomt? "Alleen als Kapoor excuses aanbiedt en het potje roze verf teruggeeft."

Bekijk hieronder zelf hoe donker zwart kan zijn. Zo donker dat je details niet ziet:


          2/9/2019: LETTERS: Yes, please re-install observatory telescope      Cache   Translate Page      
Re: Let’s Open these Doors Again, Jan. 24. As a retired federal scientist who spent 36 years working in Building 7 Observatory Cres., immediately adjacent to the Dominion Observatory, I am very happy to see the proposal to re-install the telescope and...
          Haumea the egg and more. Ken Croswell, author, Lives of Stars.      Cache   Translate Page      
Photo:Keck image of 2003 EL61 Haumea, with moons Hi'iaka and Naumaka  CalTech, Mike Brown et al. - Keck Telescope, CalTech Permission details This work is copyrighted (or assumed to be copyrighted) and unlicensed. It does not fall into one of the blanket acceptable non-free content categories listed at Wikipedia:Non-free content § Images or Wikipedia:Non-free content § Audio clips, and it is not covered by a more specific non-free content license listed at Category:Wikipedia non-free file copyright templates. However, it is believed that the use of this work: To illustrate the subject in question Where no free equivalent is available or could be created that would adequately give the same information On the English-language Wikipedia, hosted on servers in the United States by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation, qualifies as fair use under United States copyright law. Any other uses of this image, on Wikipedia or elsewhere, may be copyright infringement. See Wikipedia:Non-free content and Wikipedia:Copyrights.View more Fair useview terms File:2003 EL61 Haumea, with moons.jpg Created: 05:41, 5 January 2012 (UTC) Kuiper Object like an Egg with a Ring. Ken Croswell, author, Lives of Stars. [](https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/2017/10/11/ring-discovered-around-egg-shaped-dwarf-planet-haumea/753805001/) [https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/2017/10/11/ring-discovered-around-egg-shaped-dwarf-planet-haumea/753805001/](https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/2017/10/11/ring-discovered-around-egg-shaped-dwarf-planet-haumea/753805001/)
          A trans-Neptunian comet is approaching Earth      Cache   Translate Page      
In only a few days, newly-discovered Comet Iwamoto will split the orbits of Earth and Mars, making a relatively close approach to our planet visible through small telescopes
          Uranus Looks Totally Messed Up      Cache   Translate Page      

Scientists with the Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program are studying pictures of Uranus and Neptune sent by the Hubble telescope during the period where these ice giants are closet to Earth. These unique new images give us a weather report from more than a billion miles away. The "changing of the seasons" is a new area of study, as Uranus takes 84 of our years to orbit the sun. This image shows that the normally blue planet is covered in white at its north pole.

The large white cap strewn over the north pole of Uranus is particularly dramatic. The likely cause of this feature has to do with the planet’s unique tilt, which causes sunlight to shine directly onto the north polar regions for an extended period of time during the summer. It’s currently mid-summer at Uranus’ north pole, resulting in the protracted white cap.

“The November 2018 image of Uranus occurs at a time 10 years after the equinox, when the northern hemisphere was just emerging into spring sunlight after spending decades in polar winter,” Leigh Fletcher, an astronomer at the University of Leicester, told Gizmodo. “Back in 2007, there didn’t appear to be anything like this polar cap over the springtime pole. But as time progressed, a reflective band—whitish against Uranus’ blue hues—began to appear encircling the north pole. And now, 10 years on, that band has turned into a thick polar cap of aerosols that’s hiding the deeper polar region from view.”

While we think of white on a planet's pole as ice and snow, this white area is the mist from a vast storm. But it's not the only thing going on. The OPAL program is also analyzing other storms on both Uranus and Neptune, which you can read about at Gizmodo.

(Image credit: NASA, ESA, A. Simon/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and M.H. Wong and A. Hsu/University of California, Berkeley)


          Coastar VTR-65 aluminum camera tripod early 1980s      Cache   Translate Page      
For Sale

This is a pretty cool tripod and very well built for its size. Not heavy, but not flimsy either. I've had a few Coastar tripods, I remember having a smaller version in my teen years for my 50mm binoculars.

This is the VTR-65, which I speculate stands for it standing 65-inches tall when everything is fully extended. Actually, it is taller than that.

Quick specs...

Materials: aluminum legs, cast aluminum head, polyurethane plastic knobs/grips, chrome steel hardware
Design: spring loaded vertical motion, tension-style clamps for locking, twist-to-loosen leg clamps,
twist-to-expose steel spike feet pegs, non-geared telescoping central shaft, nylon center brace
Height at full rest: 27.5-inches
Height at full leg extension: 58.8-inches
Height at full leg extension and center shaft: 70.0-inches
Weight: 6 pounds 13 ounces

The legs have (2) sets of loosening grip clamps, so this can be adjusted to just about anyone and it is tall enough to use binoculars relatively comfortably. The spring loaded pan head is unique in that it will always hold itself at 180-degrees at rest even when the angle clamp is loose. The long control arm locks and loosens depending on the direction you twist it.

You can put quite a bit of weight on this unit, but that all depends on HOW TIGHT you crank the knobs. So for safety's sake of not overdoing it and not overrating it (some may have weaker grips/more sensitive joints in the hands), I would say payload will be in the 2.5 to 3 pound range, no more. It will hold a TV-60, ANY of the C90s, and a ETX-90 without issue. I've also had the PST-40 and ST-80 on this.

Cosmetics are great overall with no ugliness. No rust or cracks in any of the plastic pieces. No dents. ALL legs telescope smoothly. Locks hold firm. Functionality is excellent.

Price doesn't include shipping. Will ship to anyone anywhere.

36.00
          Celestron C5 F6 750mm Schmidt Cassegrain Telescope      Cache   Translate Page      
For Sale

This is the relatively rare celestron C5 in the F6 wide field telephoto version. This model is also covered in a leatherette over the aluminum tube. These are one my top three favorite telescopes. Excellent optics and very versatile. Celestron took great care to insure the optics were well corrected in this F6 model. The tube has a 1/4-20 mounting block. Includes a 1.25" visual back, 1.25" star diagonal, front dust cover, and a carrying case. Nice condition except some writing on the band in the back is slightly smeared as can be seen in the second to the last picture.

Price is $275.00 with free shipping in the Conus.

275.00
          Original Celestron Orange Tube 10x40 Finderscope      Cache   Translate Page      
For Sale

This is a Celestron orange tube 10x40 finder telescope. It includes the bracket from a 70's orange tube C14 telescope. Eyepiece is focusable and the crosshairs are intact. Very nice condition just the usual small scratches to the paint.

Price is $59.00 plus $12.00 shipping in the USA.

59.00
          Meade F3.3 Focal Reducer      Cache   Translate Page      
Wanted

I want Meade F3.3 Focal Reducer but I couldn't find ....
I'd like to use it for ASI290 and observe comet , asteroid occulation and Exoplanet transit , senser of ASI290 is too small and my C8 is too dark because it's F10 telescope, so I need this Focal Reducer.

n/a
          Haumea the egg and more. Ken Croswell, author, Lives of Stars.      Cache   Translate Page      
Photo:Keck image of 2003 EL61 Haumea, with moons Hi'iaka and Naumaka  CalTech, Mike Brown et al. - Keck Telescope, CalTech Permission details This work is copyrighted (or assumed to be copyrighted) and unlicensed. It does not fall into one of the blanket acceptable non-free content categories listed at Wikipedia:Non-free content § Images or Wikipedia:Non-free content § Audio clips, and it is not covered by a more specific non-free content license listed at Category:Wikipedia non-free file copyright templates. However, it is believed that the use of this work: To illustrate the subject in question Where no free equivalent is available or could be created that would adequately give the same information On the English-language Wikipedia, hosted on servers in the United States by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation, qualifies as fair use under United States copyright law. Any other uses of this image, on Wikipedia or elsewhere, may be copyright infringement. See Wikipedia:Non-free content and Wikipedia:Copyrights.View more Fair useview terms File:2003 EL61 Haumea, with moons.jpg Created: 05:41, 5 January 2012 (UTC) Kuiper Object like an Egg with a Ring. Ken Croswell, author, Lives of Stars. [](https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/2017/10/11/ring-discovered-around-egg-shaped-dwarf-planet-haumea/753805001/) [https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/2017/10/11/ring-discovered-around-egg-shaped-dwarf-planet-haumea/753805001/](https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/2017/10/11/ring-discovered-around-egg-shaped-dwarf-planet-haumea/753805001/)
          Our Milky Way remains the most beautiful of all the galaxies in Heaven. Ken Croswell, @sciam.      Cache   Translate Page      
Photo: [The Earth with the Milky Way and moon] file_downloadDOWNLOAD save_alt Thumbnail 200x200 save_alt Small 640x474 save_alt Medium 1024x759 save_alt Original 1024x759 crop_originalORDER PRINT label_outline Tags milky wayearthmoonprophecydrawingsperiodical illustrationsthe earthmilkyway date_range Date 01/01/1918 person Contributors Benda, Wladyslaw T. (Wladyslaw Theodore), 1873-1948., artist collections In Collections Moon Science The Moon People and the Moon Moon in mass culture place Location Milky Way, -7.12804, 52.74484 Google Map of -7.1280388, 52.7448393 create Source Library of Congress link Link http://www.loc.gov/ copyright Rights advisory Public Domain http://www.astro.lu.se/LocalInfo/MWpanorama.html Our Milky Way remains the most beautiful of all the galaxies in Heaven. Ken Croswell, @sciam. "The word “galaxy” derives from the Greek for “milky,” but some such celestial systems look more like extremely skim milk. A new array of small telescopes has serendipitously discovered 47 “ultradiffuse” galaxies whose stars are so spread out from one another that they appear ghostly pale. Several of them are as large as our own, but each is much fainter, bearing roughly 1,000th as many stars as the Milky Way. No one knows how such odd galaxies originated. The phantom galaxies materialized to astronomers after they deployed Dragonfly, an array in New Mexico composed of eight Canon telephoto lenses. “We just couldn't resist looking at Coma,” says Roberto Abraham, an astronomer at the University of Toronto, referring to a rich galaxy cluster in the constellation Coma Berenices. The cluster houses thousands of galaxies 340 million light-years from Earth and has a storied legacy: in the 1930s astronomers first detected dark matter there..." http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/ghostly-galaxies-appear-in-the-coma-cluster/
          I see no ships      Cache   Translate Page      
At the Battle of Copenhagen, Horatio Nelson famously put a telescope to his blind eye and announced that he could not see the signal calling on him to end the action and to retreat. It wasn't quite 'I see no ships' but it wasn't far off, as the British Admiral, Sir Hyde Parker, was offering Nelson an honourable route out of a bloody action, which he feared could not be won against overwhelming odds. Nelson's courage and leadership would be quite handy in today's political climate, as the UK Government faces up to its own incompetence in dealing with Europe ...
          NASA Kepler’s Space Telescope Final Image Shows a Galaxy Full Of Possibilities      Cache   Translate Page      
NASA’s Kepler space telescope may be retired, but the discoveries continue to rack up for this historic planet-hunting mission.
          NASA Kepler’s Space Telescope Final Image Shows a Galaxy Full Of Possibilities      Cache   Translate Page      
NASA’s Kepler space telescope may be retired, but the discoveries continue to rack up for this historic planet-hunting mission.
          Saturn’s Moon, Iapetus, Could Have Been Artificially Made by Extraterrestrials      Cache   Translate Page      
Our solar system is fascinating, to say the least, and there is still so much we don’t know about it. What makes one even more curious is knowing the organizations and people who operate at the highest levels of ‘security clearances’ probably know a whole lot more.

That being said, if you’re independently curious, there are more than enough resources available to satisfy your curiosity, you will find a way to investigate. At the very least you could get access to the best telescope you have and stare at the other planets, our Moon, and the Moons of other planets.

Perhaps the best thing to do is simply sift through the literature and you will find no shortage of strange anomalies that have been discovered in space -there’s truly no shortage.

It’s also likely you will come across the tremendous amounts of controversy that come with these discoveries as well. Strange findings have been subject to ridicule within the mainstream, but that hasn’t stopped hundreds, if not thousands, of researchers and insiders from all backgrounds from continuing their study and education. [...]


Read Entire Article »
          The SWAP EUV Imaging Telescope Part I: Instrument Overview and Pre-Flight Testing      Cache   Translate Page      
Дата и время публикации : 2012-08-22T21:58:05Z Авторы публикации и институты : D. B. Seaton D. Berghmans B. Nicula J. -P. Halain A. De Groof T. Thibert D. S. Bloomfield C. L. Raftery P. T. Gallagher F. Auchère J. -M. Defise E. D’Huys J. -H. Lecat E. Mazy P. Rochus L. Rossi U. Schühle V. Slemzin [...]
          Compact high-resolution spectrographs for large and extremely large telescopes: using the diffraction limit      Cache   Translate Page      
Дата и время публикации : 2012-08-23T04:55:50Z Авторы публикации и институты : J. Gordon Robertson Joss Bland-Hawthorn Ссылка на журнал-издание: Ссылка на журнал-издание не найденаКоментарии к cтатье: 13 pages, 8 figures. To be published in Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 8446, paper 8446-74Первичная категория: astro-ph.IM Все категории : astro-ph.IM Краткий обзор статьи: As telescopes get larger, [...]
          Scientists found the 'missing link' in the theory on how planets are formed      Cache   Translate Page      

National Astronomical Observatory of Japan discovery objectKo Arimatsu

  • For decades, astronomers have been trying to prove a theory about how planets are formed from small asteroid-like objects called Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Objects.
  • Scientists at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan found an object on the edge of our solar system, and managed to prove its existence with an incredibly simple method called "occultation".
  • One of the astronomers who made the discovery described the find as "a real victory for little projects".


For several decades now, astronomers have been waiting to prove a theory about how planets are formed from small asteroid-like objects called Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Objects in our solar system.

The existence of these objects had been predicted, but as they were so too distant, small, and dim — even for world-leading telescopes — it was hard to find a way to observe them directly.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

NOW WATCH: Michael D'Antonio reveals Donald Trump's 'strange' morning ritual that boosts his ego

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SEE ALSO: This black hole is spinning so fast that it could make space itself rotate


          Bubbles of brand new stars      Cache   Translate Page      
This dazzling region of newly-forming stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud was captured by ESO s Very Large Telescope.
Submitted by Elle B to Science & Tech  |   Note-it!  |   Add a Comment

          Eckersley - A Modern English Course for Foreign Students      Cache   Translate Page      
It is hoped that this present volume will help towards supplying that want. The student who knows no English at all can make a beginning with this book, but those students who have already a slight knowledge of English can telescope the first ten lessons into two or three and will then find, I think, material that is new to-them.
          A tale of 2 colliding exoplanets | Space - EarthSky      Cache   Translate Page      
  1. A tale of 2 colliding exoplanets | Space  EarthSky
  2. Space Photos of the Week: The Galaxy Next Door  WIRED
  3. Kepler planet-hunting telescope goes dark after sending last light image  Digital Trends
  4. View full coverage on Google News

          How to fail at astrophotography      Cache   Translate Page      
This is part 1 of what I hope will become a series of posts. I’m going to focus in this post on my getting started and some mistakes I made on the way. So, back in 2017 I got a telescope. I fancied trying to do some astrophotography – I saw people getting great results … Continue reading How to fail at astrophotography
          See the Bizarre Storm Blanketing Uranus Right Now      Cache   Translate Page      
A newly released image taken by Hubble provides a stunning view of the massive storm currently covering the north pole of Uranus.

Annual Check-Up Once a year, the Hubble telescope snaps photos of our solar system’s gas giants for the Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, an initiative to help us better understand the four planets. On Thursday, NASA released the latest OPAL image of Uranus — and it offers a stunning view of a mind-bogglingly massive storm […]

The post See the Bizarre Storm Blanketing Uranus Right Now appeared first on Futurism.


          Astronomer Warns Against SETI: “Maybe They Will Come and Eat Us.”      Cache   Translate Page      
In a new interview with The Times, University of St. Andrews astronomer Martin Dominik cautioned against sending messages into the unknown of deep space.

To Serve Man For decades, scientists have used radio telescopes to listen for cosmic signals that could originate with an extraterrestrial civilization. Increasingly, they’re also broadcasting messages to the stars in hopes that someone is listening. But in a new interview with The Times, University of St. Andrews astronomer Martin Dominik cautioned against sending messages into […]

The post Astronomer Warns Against SETI: “Maybe They Will Come and Eat Us.” appeared first on Futurism.


          Comment on Items You Might Have Forgotten Exist in The Sims 4 by Samber      Cache   Translate Page      
Yes. I remain disappointed in that “telescope”. Can I please just have the tube on the tri-pod? I would have thought a portable on could have been put in the camping GP. I digress
          Comment on Items You Might Have Forgotten Exist in The Sims 4 by Alex      Cache   Translate Page      
I actually forgot that the telescope and microscope exist in The Sims 4. These objects are so large and impractial that I stopped using them years ago.
          Nasa spot mysterious storm clouds gathering over Uranus and Neptune - The Independent      Cache   Translate Page      
  1. Nasa spot mysterious storm clouds gathering over Uranus and Neptune  The Independent
  2. Hubble Shows Just How Stormy Uranus Gets in The Summer  Interesting Engineering
  3. Uranus looking totally messed up right now  Tech Explorist
  4. Epic storms rage across Neptune and Uranus in new Hubble images  Digital Trends
  5. Hubble Observes Ice Giant Vortexes and Polar Storms on Neptune and Uranus  Popular Mechanics
  6. View full coverage on Google News

          TRANS-NEPTUNIAN COMET APPROACHES EARTH      Cache   Translate Page      
One of the best titles ever… From SpaceWeather: TRANS-NEPTUNIAN COMET APPROACHES EARTH: In only a few days, newly-discovered Comet Iwamoto will split the orbits of Earth and Mars, making a relatively close approach to our planet visible through small telescopes. … Continue reading
          Bubbles of brand new stars      Cache   Translate Page      
This dazzling region of newly-forming stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud was captured by ESO’s Very Large Telescope.
          Telescope "Lunette"      Cache   Translate Page      
Lunette is a full rigged telescope with amazing realistic details.
The gears turn like the actual thing when you turn the telescope Horizontal or Vertical.
The set comes with highly, detailed polygon models and resolution texture maps.
Realistic shader presets for Poser and DS

Price: $8.50 Special Price: $5.00


          Nasa spots mysterious storm clouds gathering over Uranus and Neptune      Cache   Translate Page      
Images from Hubble space telescope reveal unusual weather patterns on giant gas planets
          New Astro Camera Spots Thousands of Celestial Flashes - Sky & Telescope      Cache   Translate Page      
  1. New Astro Camera Spots Thousands of Celestial Flashes  Sky & Telescope
  2. Scientists figure out how to build future space stations inside asteroids  RT
  3. Scientists Want to Build a Space Station Inside an Asteroid  Futurism
  4. Scientists Are Investigating Building a Space Station Inside a Giant Asteroid  ScienceAlert
  5. NASA asteroid tracker: Two HUGE asteroids to travel TOWARDS EARTH in 'close approach'  Express.co.uk
  6. View full coverage on Google News

          Last Kepler images capture numerous planetary systems      Cache   Translate Page      

Numerous planetary systems are visible in the final images taken by NASA's Kepler telescope on Sept. 25, 2018, just before it ran out of fuel.

The post Last Kepler images capture numerous planetary systems appeared first on SpaceFlight Insider.


           Telescope, v. 28, n. 3 (May-June 1979 )       Cache   Translate Page      
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           K - MUSIC LIST - FEB 2019      Cache   Translate Page      
K T Oslin - Greatest Hits Songs from an Aging Sex Bomb K T Tunstall - 2004 - Eye To The Telescope K T U - 2005 - 8 Armed Monkey K T U - 2009 - Quiver K2 - 2005 - Book Of The Dead (USA, Neo Prog) K2 - 2010 - Black Garden Kaarst - from our friends to our friends Vol I ('76) Kaarst - from our friends to our friends Vol II ('76) KABAKA- STEVE WINWOOD-AMAO (THIRD WORLD) - Aiye Keta (1973) Kada - 1998 - Kada Kadavar - 2012 - Kadavar Kahvas Jute - 1971 - Wide Open ( OZ Heavy Prog - with ...
          gebr. TSWA 32mm Okular (Gewerbliche Anzeigen)      Cache   Translate Page      
Neu im Gewerbliche Anzeigen - gebr. TSWA 32mm Okular (von apmtelescopes)


          Borg 1,25" Schneckenfokussierer (Gewerbliche Anzeigen)      Cache   Translate Page      
Neu im Gewerbliche Anzeigen - Borg 1,25" Schneckenfokussierer (von apmtelescopes)


          2" Zenitspiegel - 91% Reflektion - Ringklemmung - (Gewerbliche Anzeigen)      Cache   Translate Page      
Neu im Gewerbliche Anzeigen - 2" Zenitspiegel - 91% Reflektion - Ringklemmung - (von apmtelescopes)


          Uranus Looks Totally Messed Up      Cache   Translate Page      

Scientists with the Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program are studying pictures of Uranus and Neptune sent by the Hubble telescope during the period where these ice giants are closet to Earth. These unique new images give us a weather report from more than a billion miles away. The "changing of the seasons" is a new area of study, as Uranus takes 84 of our years to orbit the sun. This image shows that the normally blue planet is covered in white at its north pole.

The large white cap strewn over the north pole of Uranus is particularly dramatic. The likely cause of this feature has to do with the planet’s unique tilt, which causes sunlight to shine directly onto the north polar regions for an extended period of time during the summer. It’s currently mid-summer at Uranus’ north pole, resulting in the protracted white cap.

“The November 2018 image of Uranus occurs at a time 10 years after the equinox, when the northern hemisphere was just emerging into spring sunlight after spending decades in polar winter,” Leigh Fletcher, an astronomer at the University of Leicester, told Gizmodo. “Back in 2007, there didn’t appear to be anything like this polar cap over the springtime pole. But as time progressed, a reflective band—whitish against Uranus’ blue hues—began to appear encircling the north pole. And now, 10 years on, that band has turned into a thick polar cap of aerosols that’s hiding the deeper polar region from view.”

While we think of white on a planet's pole as ice and snow, this white area is the mist from a vast storm. But it's not the only thing going on. The OPAL program is also analyzing other storms on both Uranus and Neptune, which you can read about at Gizmodo.

(Image credit: NASA, ESA, A. Simon/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and M.H. Wong and A. Hsu/University of California, Berkeley)


          Save The Far Side!      Cache   Translate Page      
This seems a little overblown to me, certainly currently. I agree that it’s a special place in terms of radio silence, and would be a great location for very large radiotelescopes. But I don’t know many people who would want to live there, and never see the home planet. And they could do comm via … Continue reading Save The Far Side!


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