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          US voters head to midterm polls to render judgment on turbulent Trump era       Cache   Translate Page      

A turbulent election season that tested President Donald Trump’s slash-and-burn political style against the strength of the Democratic resistance comes to a close as Americans cast ballots in the first national election of the Trump era on Tuesday.

US voters will decide whether Trump will keep his Republican majority in Congress or face a hostile Democratic majority after a bitter campaign for midterm elections described by both sides as a battle for America's soul.

For almost two years, Trump's rule-breaking, sometimes chaotic administration has enjoyed a largely free hand from the twin Republican-controlled chambers, but the midterms could finally see his wings clipped.

The entire 435-member House of Representatives and a third of the 100-seat Senate are up for grabs.

US midterm elections
US midterm elections

Anxious Republicans privately expressed confidence in their narrow Senate majority but feared the House was slipping away. Trump, the GOP’s chief messenger, warned that significant Democratic victories would trigger devastating consequences.

“If the radical Democrats take power they will take a wrecking ball to our economy and our future,” Trump declared in Cleveland, using the same heated rhetoric that has defined much of his presidency. He added: “The Democrat agenda is a socialist nightmare.”

Tuesday’s results will be colored by the dramatically different landscapes in the fight for the House and Senate.

Most top House races are set in America’s suburbs where more educated and affluent voters in both parties have soured on Trump’s presidency, despite the strength of the national economy. Democrats were buoyed by a wave of Republican retirements and an overwhelming fundraising advantage.

They need to pick up two dozen seats to claim the House majority.

Democrats face a far more difficult challenge in the Senate, where they are almost exclusively on defense in rural states where Trump remains popular. Democratic Senate incumbents are up for re-election, for example, in North Dakota, West Virginia, and Montana — states Trump carried by 30 percentage points on average two years ago.

Democrats need to win two seats to claim the Senate majority.

Given Trump’s stunning victory in 2016, few were confident in their predictions.

“I feel less comfortable making a prediction today than I have in two decades,” Republican pollster Frank Luntz said.

'Awakening of the Democratic Party'

Democrats, whose very relevance in the Trump era depended on winning at least one chamber of Congress, were laser-focused on health care as they predicted victories that would break up the GOP’s monopoly in Washington and state governments.

Voters cast their ballots for Early Voting at the Los Angeles County Registrar's Office in Norwalk, California. ─ AFP
Voters cast their ballots for Early Voting at the Los Angeles County Registrar's Office in Norwalk, California. ─ AFP

“They’ve had two years to find out what it’s like to have an unhinged person in the White House,” said Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, who leads the Democratic Governors Association. “It’s an awakening of the Democratic Party.”

Democrats could derail Trump’s legislative agenda for the next two years should they win control of the House or the Senate. Perhaps more important, they would claim subpoena power to investigate Trump’s personal and professional shortcomings.

Some Democrats have already vowed to force the release of his tax returns. Others have pledged to pursue impeachment, although removal from office is unlikely so long as the GOP controls the Senate or even maintains a healthy minority.

Democrats’ fate depends upon a delicate coalition of infrequent voters — particularly young people and minorities — who traditionally shun midterm elections.

If ever there was an off-year election for younger voters to break tradition, this is it. Young voters promised to vote in record numbers as they waged mass protests in the wake of the February mass shooting at a Parkland, Florida, high school that left 17 students and staff dead.

Democrats are drawing strength from women and college-educated voters in general, who swung decidedly against Trump since his election. Polling suggests the Republican coalition is increasingly older, whiter, more male and less likely to have a college degree.

Diversity in national elections

Democrats boast record diversity on the ballot.

Three states could elect their first African-American governors, while several others are running LGBT candidates and Muslims. A record number of women are also running for Senate, House, governorships and state legislative seats.

“The vast majority of women voters are angry, frustrated and they are really done with seeing where the Republican Party is taking them, particularly as it related to heath care and civility,” said Stephanie Schriock, who leads EMILY’s List, a group that help elect Democratic women. “You’re going to see the largest gender gap we’ve ever seen.”

The political realignment, defined by race, gender and education, could re-shape US politics for a generation. The demographic shifts also reflect each party’s closing argument.

While the economy continues to thrive, Trump has spent much of the campaign’s final days railing against a caravan of Latin American immigrants seeking asylum at the US border. He dispatched more than 5,000 troops to the region, suggesting soldiers would use lethal force against migrants who throw rocks, before later reversing himself.

Republicans have privately encouraged the president to back off, to no avail.

Democrats, meanwhile, have beat their drum on health care.

“Health care is on the ballot,” former President Barack Obama told Democratic volunteers in Virginia. “Health care for millions of people. You vote, you might save a life.”

Bernie Sanders, the leftist populist who some feel would have had a better chance than Clinton to take on Trump in 2016, lashed out Monday at the president, calling him a "pathological liar".

"He is a sexist, a racist, a homophobe, a xenophobe and a religious bigot. He is trying to do what we have never seen in the modern history of this country, to do what he is doing right now, to gain votes by trying to divide the American people up based on where we came from," Sanders said on SiriusXM Progress radio.


          Krönikan 5-6/11 (2) 2018. Serielögnaren i Vita Huset.      Cache   Translate Page      
Världen: Trump fortsätter att ljuga om att ha påbörjat sin mur och hans supportrar bryr sig inte. Presidenten säger att kongressen har gett honom nästan 5 miljarder dollar för att … Läs mer...
          Krönikan 4-5/11 2018. Konstnär, anarkist och sufist.      Cache   Translate Page      
Världen: Donald Trump hotar nu med att skjuta skarpt på de fattiga immigranter som är på väg i karavan från Centralamerika till USAs södra gräns. Det är som R. Crumb … Läs mer →
          Why Not Vote? Anarchists and Libertarians Weigh In      Cache   Translate Page      
Conscientious non-voters have many reasons for not voting. Don't listen to them. by Katie Herzog
GettyImages-1058207668.jpg
David Becker/Getty Images

You'd think after nearly 250 years we'd have this voting thing down by now, yet all across the country Americans are once again marking Election Day by waiting in long-ass lines. (Except, that is, for the three enlightened states that have adopted vote-by-mail, which, coincidentally, were also the first three states to legalize weed.)

Voter participation is expected to be record high this week, but voting rates in the U.S. are still abysmally low compared to many countries. Australia, where voting is mandatory, ranks at the top of the heap, followed by Malta, Chile, Belgium, Italy, and Luxembourg, all of which have a voter turnout of over 90 percent. On the lower end, you have Russia, Switzerland, Pakistan, and the United States, where, on a good year, only around 60 percent of eligible voters show up. Why doesn’t nearly half the popular vote? I suspect it's because most people just don't give a shit and their stories are on. If you asked this apathetic portion of the populace who the Attorney General is, I’m guessing they'd say, "What army?" But there's also a population of people who do give a fuck but who still opt not to participate in this particular part of the civic process: conscientious non-voters.

For some conscientious non-voters, it all comes down to who's running. A 53-year-old home-builder who is primarily concerned about government spending (and who benefits from it) told me that he will "vote again when we have a viable third party that values freedom for all, not just the ones whose ideas they favor but especially for those who have ideas they despise." He will not, he added, "vote again until I see politicians that understand and prioritize spending within our means."

I also spoke with a 28-year-old conservative who told me that he was so disappointed in Obama's victories in 2008 and 2012 that the prospect of getting invested and losing again just isn't worth it. Another non-voter, an anarchist and philosophy PhD student, said that voting is damaging because it allows people to "focus on policy and what people in power do instead of what they can do themselves." When I asked what the public should do about policies they disagree with—for example, separating and imprisoning immigrant families—he advocated for direct action like assisting immigrants at border crossings instead. "Voting does matter in the aggregate," he said, "but it doesn't matter if you are talking about the individual.”

This point—that individual votes don't matter—is also made by Katherine Mangu-Ward, the editor-in-chief of Reason, the libertarian magazine based in Washington, D.C. For her, it all comes down to numbers. "You are very, very, very, very, very, very unlikely to be a decisive vote," Katherine said. "Your vote turning the outcome of an election is vanishingly rare, whereas, there are all kinds of things you can do with the hour or two hours of your time that it takes you to vote that are objectively, clearly good."

When I asked Katherine if voting took less time—if she could, say, vote-by-mail, which takes about as much time as walking to your mailbox—she would still feel it’s a waste of time, she said that there are other, more affirmative arguments against voting. "If you think the system is basically corrupt or broken, I think there's a very strong case to make that you actually have a duty not to vote."

On that, we disagree. Democracy isn't inherently corrupt. It's corrupt when the people running it are corrupt, and one of the only means of swaying who is steering the ship is to show up and vote. Sure, your individual vote might not change the outcome of an election, but as Kant would argue, if everyone failed to vote, the system itself would fail. For some non-voters (for instance, the anarchist philosophy student), that may be the goal, but Katherine says she's not in favor of the collapse of the system as we know it. Rather, she prefers to participate in the system in other ways, including calling her elected representatives.

Still, I'm not convinced. Sure, calling your representative is one way to be heard, but if your representative is, say, a rabid, God-fearing, conservative who thinks non-Christians should burn on Earth and will burn in hell, he's probably not going to listen when you call up and demand he vote in favor of access to abortion. Same if you're represented by a member of the DSA and you've got a complaint about tax rates on the rich. So what can you, as an individual, actually do? Show up to vote. Your particular vote might not change the election, but the collective vote does, and the collective is just a bunch of individuals taking action.

Now, I understand why people don't trust the system. Just look at recent history, namely the 2000 and 2016 presidential elections, both of which were ultimately won by the person who got fewer votes. But the only way to correct the system is to elect candidates who will at least try and fix it—and right now, there's only one party in the running that is even remotely interested in that. The other side is busy starting trade wars and locking up children. When the stakes are this high, when the chance to curb Donald Trump comes down to our ballots, I don’t see how not voting can be morally justified—unless, that is, you vote Republican. In that case: Listen to Katherine.

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          White House asks Supreme Court to rule on DACA sooner, not later      Cache   Translate Page      
The Justice Department has asked the court to decide whether the Trump administration can dismantle the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — without waiting for rulings from lower courts.
          Trump views midterms through presidency-defining lens      Cache   Translate Page      
President Donald Trump packed his closing argument with hardline immigration rhetoric and harsh attacks on Democrats as he stared down the prospect of Republican losses that could shadow his presidency.
          Good Morning, News: Wheeler's Protest Ordinance Considered, Aliens Are (Maybe) Real, and Go Vote!      Cache   Translate Page      
by Blair Stenvick

Stay up to date on Portland news and politics. Looking for fun? Here are the best Things to Do in Portland today.

vote.jpg
MAIA BOAKYE

Happy Election Day! Procrastinators: you still have until 8 pm to turn in your ballot; here are our endorsements. If 2016 left you too vulnerable to watch election results alone, check out our list of election watch parties.

The Final Countdown: Kate Brown and Knute Buehler traversed the state yesterday for one final day of campaigning in the closest governor’s race Oregon has seen in decades. The Cook Political Report is officially calling this race a toss-up, so what happens tonight is anyone’s guess.

Out-Foxed: Trump loves a rally, and last night he brought his friends with him. Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, and Jeanine Pirro all joined him onstage last night to rev up the crowd in Missouri before the midterms. “All those people in the back are fake news,” Hannity told the MAGA mob. Cool.

Speaking of Racists and Fox News: CNN, NBC, Facebook, and even Fox News refused to air a Trump campaign ad for being too obviously racist. The 30-second ad “featured courtroom video of a Mexican citizen convicted in the 2014 killings of two police officers, juxtaposed with scenes of a US-bound caravan of Central American migrants and refugees.”

Last in the Nation: If Louisiana votes yes on its Proposition 2 today, Oregon will be the only state left in the country where you could be convicted of a felony without a unanimous jury.

Methinks He Doth Protest Too Much: The Portland City Council will consider Mayor Ted Wheeler’s proposed new protest ordinance at a Thursday meeting. The ordinance would give the Police Commissioner “the authority to restrict where groups who have clashed in the past may gather and demonstrate.”

The ordinance has faced harsh criticism from many, including the ACLU of Oregon, for being unconstitutional. That has kept Wheeler busy defending it on Twitter:

First Grifter: Chinese regulators granted Ivanka Trump approval for 16 trademark applications. The trademarks will give her a presence in a wide range of Chinese markets, including “senior homes and lightning diffusing machines; for batteries, wedding gowns and sausage casings” – and also voting machines.

HARVARD WANTS TO BELIEVE: Researchers at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics think that aliens might have tried to visit Earth last year in a cigar-shaped spacecraft. They have nicknamed the object “Oumuamua,” which translates to “a messenger that reaches out from the distant past" in Hawaiian.


Our new alien overlords might soon render democracy obsolete—but until that happens, get out there and vote!

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          This Is How Druglord Pablo Escobar Abused Young Girls      Cache   Translate Page      
- - COLOMBIA (South America) This is how Pablo Escobar's goons gathered village girls from rural Colombia and brought them to their boss for his "amusement". Pablo Escobar was 4 times richer than Donald Trump when he was gunned down by police. - -
          Trump Univerisity Proven to be a Fraud      Cache   Translate Page      
Another Trump Fraud
          Ex-GOP strategist drops the hammer on Trump for concocting fake caravan crisis      Cache   Translate Page      
Shameful if you support this mess
          Comment on 39th Congressional District Candidates Kim and Cisneros Trade Barbs During Heated TV Debate by Power Up: Trump is making a last-minute pitch to women. Is it too late? – The Conservative Investor Daily      Cache   Translate Page      
[…] The first Korean American congresswoman: Republican Young Kim, who could be the first Korean-American congresswoman, is a California House contender has distanced herself from Trump and has stated support for DACA.  […]
          Comment on 39th Congressional District Candidates Kim and Cisneros Trade Barbs During Heated TV Debate by Power Up: Trump is making a last-minute pitch to women. Is it too late? – USA News Hub      Cache   Translate Page      
[…] The first Korean American congresswoman: Republican Young Kim, who could be the first Korean-American congresswoman, is a California House contender has distanced herself from Trump and has stated support for DACA.  […]
          Doodsoorzaak van Amerikaanse rapper Mac Miller bekend      Cache   Translate Page      

De Amerikaanse rapper Mac Miller, die zich liet opmerken met zijn liedjes over de Amerikaanse president Donald Trump en een moeilijke scheiding met zangeres Ariana Grande, is begin september accidenteel overleden aan een mix van drugs en alcohol. Dat is gebleken uit de autopsie.


          Comment on 39th Congressional District Candidates Kim and Cisneros Trade Barbs During Heated TV Debate by Power Up: Trump is making a last-minute pitch to women. Is it too late? | Atlanta Reports      Cache   Translate Page      
[…] The first Korean American congresswoman: Republican Young Kim, who could be the first Korean-American congresswoman, is a California House contender has distanced herself from Trump and has stated support for DACA.  […]
          Pelosi Tells Democratic Allies Party Will Make Big Gains in Midterms      Cache   Translate Page      
The House Minority Leader, speaking at a luncheon on Election Day, also warned that President Trump might try to assert the election was “rigged.’’
          Some actual facts about Trump tax cuts      Cache   Translate Page      
In describing the GOP tax cuts, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said that they and bonuses American workers were getting were “crumbs.” They were “tax cuts for the rich.” Some argued that the tax cuts would reduce revenues. Pelosi predicted, “This thing will explode the deficit.” How about some tax facts? The argument that tax […]
          Midterms in den USA - Wie die Sozialen Netzwerke mit ihrer Rolle im Wahlkampf hadern      Cache   Translate Page      
Eine Frau fotografiert Donald Trump bei einer Wahlkampf-Veranstaltung mit ihrem Smartphone. (Brendan Smialowski / AFP)CNN bezeichnet ihn als rassistisch und selbst dem konservativen Sender Fox ist er zuviel: Mehrere TV-Sender haben den neuen Wahlwerbespot von Donald Trump aus dem Programm genommen. Doch in den Sozialen Medien läuft er weiter - denn Tech-Unternehmen tun sich mit der Kontrolle ihrer Netzwerke immer noch schwer.

Von Anne-Katrin Eutin
www.deutschlandfunk.de, @mediasres
Hören bis: 15.05.2019 16:42
Direkter Link zur Audiodatei



          “Truth” and “False News”      Cache   Translate Page      
As some readers know, I’ve never cared much for the word “truth,” largely because, these days, it has come to hold a moral and political certitude that goes far beyond facts and their accuracy. In fact, for most people, whether something is “true” depends more on their beliefs than upon any accuracy. Most Trump voters […]
          10 Mid-Term Election Day Reads      Cache   Translate Page      

My election-day morning train reads: • Did Scott Walker and Donald Trump Deal Away the Wisconsin Governor’s Race to Foxconn? (New Yorker) see also Governors & Mayors, America’s Biggest Suckers! (The Big Picture) • Women donated 36% of the money in the midterms this year. That’s a huge deal. (Vice) see also Working-class people are underrepresented in politics. The problem…

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The post 10 Mid-Term Election Day Reads appeared first on The Big Picture.


          BBRG: Best Tool for Understanding the Market and Trump      Cache   Translate Page      

The Best Tool for Understanding the Market and Trump Consider the counterfactual. It puts this year’s paltry returns on stocks and the president’s popularity into perspective. Bloomberg, November 5, 2018       Consider the Counterfactual: The term itself was coined by Nelson Goodman in his article, “The Problem of Counterfactual Conditionals.” But the idea has…

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The post BBRG: Best Tool for Understanding the Market and Trump appeared first on The Big Picture.


          How to Have a Financial Debate      Cache   Translate Page      

How to Debate Finance Without Being a Jerk A few rules can help prevent financial discussions from becoming as overheated and useless as our political exchanges. Bloomberg, October 29, 2018.     The arrest of a partisan extremist who mailed explosive devices to political and media critics of President Donald Trump was a reminder of…

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The post How to Have a Financial Debate appeared first on The Big Picture.


           Trump cierra la campaña republicana rodeado de presentadores de Fox News      Cache   Translate Page      
El presidente de EEUU, Donald Trump, cerró este lunes la campaña de las elecciones de medio mandato con un mitin en Misuri, en el que se rodeó de presentadores de Fox News, su cadena favorita, como Sean Hannity.
          Putin y Trump no se reunirán en París por cuestiones de agenda, según el Kremlin      Cache   Translate Page      
Los presidentes de Rusia, Vladímir Putin, y de Estados Unidos, Donald Trump, no se reunirán en París el próximo 11 de noviembre, pero aprovecharán la celebración del centenario del fin de la Primera Guerra Mundial para "ponerse de acuerdo sobre su próximo encuentro", informó hoy el Kremlin.
          SWIFT says suspending some Iranian banks' access to messaging system      Cache   Translate Page      
The Belgium-based SWIFT financial messaging service said on Monday it is suspending some unspecified Iranian banks’ access to its messaging system in the interest of the stability and integrity of the global financial system. In a brief statement, SWIFT made no mention of U.S. sanctions coming back into effect on some Iranian financial institutions on Monday as part of U.S. President Donald Trump’s effort to force Iran to curtail its nuclear, missile and regional activities. The SWIFT statement said suspending the Iranian banks access to the messaging system was a "regrettable" step but was "taken in the interest of the stability and integrity of the wider global financial system." Having abandoned the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, Trump is trying to cripple Iran's oil-dependent economy and force Tehran to quash not only its nuclear ambitions and its ballistic missile program but its support for militant proxies in Syria, Yemen, Lebanon and other parts of the Middle East. SWIFT's
          UPDATE: U.S. targets Iran with fresh round of sanctions; EU seeks to protect its firms      Cache   Translate Page      
The United States on Monday restored sanctions targeting Iran's oil, banking and transportation sectors and threatened more action to stop its "outlaw" policies, steps the Islamic Republic called economic warfare and vowed to defy. The sanctions cover 50 Iranian banks and subsidiaries, more than 200 persons and vessels in its shipping sector, and targets Tehran's national airline, Iran Air, and more than 65 of its aircraft. The measures are part of a wider effort by U.S. President Donald Trump to curb Tehran's missile and nuclear programs and diminish the Islamic Republic's influence in the Middle East, notably its support for proxies in Syria, Yemen and Lebanon. Trump's moves target Iran's main source of revenue - its oil exports - as well as its financial sector, essentially making the 50 Iranian banks and subsidiaries off limits to foreign banks on pain of losing access to the U.S. financial system. The administration said it had toughened the sanctions by roughly 300 new designations
          U.S. allows eight importers to keep buying Iran oil for now      Cache   Translate Page      
The United States said on Friday it will temporarily allow eight importers to keep buying Iranian oil when it re-imposes sanctions on Monday to try to force Iran to curb its nuclear, missile and regional activities. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who announced the decision, did not name the eight, which he referred to as "jurisdictions," a term that might include importers such as Taiwan which the United States does not regard as a country. Having abandoned the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, U.S. President Donald Trump is trying to cripple Iran’s oil-dependent economy and force Tehran to quash not only its nuclear ambitions and its ballistic missile program but its support for militant proxies in Syria, Yemen, Lebanon and other parts of the Middle East. On Twitter, in a message designed to emphasize his "maximum pressure" policy toward Iran, Trump included a photograph of himself modeled on a entertainment industry poster with the headline: "Sanctions are coming November 5." China,
          RNC Chair: Economic message doesn't 'move needle as much' with GOP voters      Cache   Translate Page      
Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel explains why Trump may have elected to go with a closing message focused on immigration rather than the economy.
          President Trump feeling confident heading into the midterm elections      Cache   Translate Page      
Former RNC Chairman, Michael Steele and Former Advisor to Bill Clinton's Campaign, James Carville join Katy Tur to talk about Trump’s impact on the GOP ahead of the midterms. Carville says Trump has made himself the issue this election.
          Paul Craig Roberts: What this election is ultimately about - and its far-reaching implications      Cache   Translate Page      
Trump has been so harassed by the Establishment that he is having trouble thinking straight I never cease to be amazed at the insouciance of Americans. Readers send me emails asking why I ever supported Trump when he was the Establishment's candidate. If Trump was the Establishment's candidate, why has the Establishment spent two years trying to destroy him? The failure to put two and two together is extraordinary. Trump declared war on the Establishment throughout the presidential campaign and in his inaugural address. As I wrote at the time, Trump vastly over-estimates the power of the president. He expected the Establishment, like his employees, to jump to his will, and he did not know Washington or who to appoint to support his goals. He has been totally defeated in his intention to normalize relations with Russia. Instead, we are faced with both Russia and China preparing for war. In other words, the same outcome that Hillary would have achieved.
          Hannity szerint váratlanul hívta fel Trump a színpadra      Cache   Translate Page      
none
          Pentagon now realizes that 'made in China' has left the US Army desperate for 'made in America'      Cache   Translate Page      
In the system of national defense of the US a gaping vulnerability was found that is very difficult to close. The reaction of the Pentagon is reminiscent of badly hidden panic, and journalists who examined the results of the research of American experts, who thoroughly studied the condition of the American army and defensive industry, admit that there is iron logic in the recent "strange" actions of president Trump - he wants to save America from transforming into a cardboard tiger with paper claws. The essence of the problem, according to the retelling of the columnist of the Reuters agency Andy Home, who obtained a copy of the September report of the US Department of Defence on the situation concerning key deliveries necessary for the American army, is reduced to one important figure. More than 300 (!) key elements necessary for the normal functioning of the US Armed Forces and defensive industry are under threat: American producers are either on the verge of bankruptcy or were...
          SOTT FOCUS: Liberals Are Betting More of The Same to Win US Midterm Elections      Cache   Translate Page      
The 2018 US midterm elections are shaping up to be not just a rematch of the 2016 presidential race but a rerun, as Democrats and the media seem determined to repeat the same mistakes that produced the presidency of Donald Trump. Just look at the headlines, the polls, and the talking heads on television. Doesn't this remind you of 2016? Once again, celebrities and late-night show hosts are beseeching their fans to vote, while newspapers pen fawning pieces about Democrats "making history," the inevitability of the "Blue Wave," and the racist, racist, RACIST nature of every Republican ever, especially Trump. The only thing that has changed is that most media outlets - which had overwhelmingly endorsed Hillary Clinton in 2016 - don't even bother hiding their preferences. Everything is out in the open now, stripped of all pretense and posturing. Ironically, that is one of the effects of the Trump presidency.
          Deja vu? Was the New Yorker just inspired by an old soviet cartoon on US elections?      Cache   Translate Page      
A new cartoon published by the New Yorker depicting voter suppression in the US has drawn comparisons with an old Soviet propaganda poster about electoral fraud and disenfranchisement in 1950s America. The New Yorker cartoon published on Monday showing a whole series of obstacles in the way of American voters; a barbed wire fence, rings of fire, a crocodile - and finally, President Donald Trump arranging traffic cones in front of a ballot box at the end of the obstacle course.
          Trump offers 'softer tone' after midterm elections - whoever wins      Cache   Translate Page      
President Donald Trump said Monday, on the eve of the 2018 midterm elections, that he looked forward to a "softer tone" after Tuesday - regardless of who won. The Sinclair Broadcast Groups's Scott Thurman asked Trump if he had any regrets about his first two years in office. Trump replied: "I would say tone. I would like to have a much softer tone. I feel to a certain extent I have no choice, but maybe I do, and maybe I could have been softer from that standpoint."
          Trump calling allies, tweeting endorsements      Cache   Translate Page      
President Donald Trump completed a six-day campaign rally blitz in Missouri late Monday.
          Is there really a 'militia caravan' traveling south to protect US border from marching migrants?      Cache   Translate Page      
Most media outlets have published as fact claims that vigilante groups incited by Donald Trump are organizing themselves to confront the migrant caravan, but the story appears to be based on little more than an unverified boast. Variously named as "armed militias" and "far right activists," some "gun-toting" groups have been reported as "forming their own caravan" in scores of media reports over the weekend, from the Huffington Post to The Hill in the US to international outlets such as the UK's the Sun, Turkey's Anadolu, and Russia's Sputnik. The vigilantes are reportedly equipped with military-level tech, and will form units hundreds-strong. They have caused alarm among both local residents - afraid that their land will be invaded- and the army contingent forced to separate sides. Twitter luminaries have circulated dire warnings of bloodshed and calls to curb "domestic terrorism."
          Facebook, TV networks ban 'controversial' Trump ad day before midterms      Cache   Translate Page      
As Americans prepare to vote in the most expensive midterm election in US history, three TV networks and Facebook pulled a controversial Trump-endorsed ad that plays on voters' fear of illegal immigrant crime, saying it's racist. The ad, paid for by the Republican Party, depicts convicted cop-killer Luis Bracamontes laughing about killing cops, juxtaposed with scenes of the Central American migrant caravans and a Fox News clip where a man claims to have fled Honduras because of an attempted murder conviction. "President Donald J. Trump and Republicans Are Making America Safe Again!" it proclaims. Facebook was the latest platform to ban the ad, claiming it violates their policy against "sensational content." NBC aired the spot during its "Sunday Night Football" broadcast but decided not to run it again on Monday after being flooded with complaints overnight, while CNN chose not to play the ad at all.
          Fox News says host’s appearance at Trump rally ‘an unfortunate distraction’      Cache   Translate Page      
Sean Hannity attended the president’s final event before the midterm elections.
          La administración Trump va a referendo en elecciones de medio término      Cache   Translate Page      
Millones de estadounidenses acuden este martes a las urnas en las elecciones de medio término, en las que se define el balance partidario en la Cámara de Representantes y el Senado, además de una parte de las gobernaciones del país y que, según analistas, por la polarización política y la fuerte campaña que les ha precedido, son vistas como un referendo sobre la gestión del presidente Donald Trump.
          Trump boasts about best ever sanctions against Iran, many countries given 'temporary' waivers as new sanctions go into effect      Cache   Translate Page      
Touted by Donald Trump as the "strongest" ever imposed by the US, the embargo on Iranian oil has just gone into effect. Washington, however, had to grant several waivers to countries that refused to cut economic ties with Tehran. The sweeping package of sanctions, targeting Tehran's energy, finance and shipping sectors, went into effect November 5. This marks a full reversal of whatever small relief was given to Iranian companies and individuals by Washington following the historic international nuclear deal (JCPOA) in 2015. Even though the US administration, and the president personally, repeatedly trumpeted the embargo as a great achievement at numerous public events in the run-up to midterm elections, Washington had to make significant concessions, as it failed to rally enough international support for its bold move.
          What's Happening With Florida Today? Plus-- A Note From Matt Haggman      Cache   Translate Page      

Politico: "The general consensus among Republicans is that they will lose the House, and end up in at least a five-seat minority-- that would correspond to a 28-seat loss. Senior Republicans tell us that even in a worst-case scenario, they do not expect to lose 40 seats. A prescient prediction or famous last words?"

Of all the senior Republican lawmakers they spoke with over the weekend, "only one made the case that the GOP will keep the House." If it's who I think it was, he was staggering drunk for the entire weekend. Many Republicans expected the House races to tighten up by election day. Instead the generic ballot polls have gotten even worse for them. The last one for CNN by SSRS shows an absolutely massive 55% to 42% preference for Democrats among likely voters. As I've said before, the pollsters' likely vote modeling is wrong because it is not taking increased Latino and millennial voting into account. Polls predicting less than 30 flipped seats will all be off by as much as 100% tonight.




Let's look at Florida. Yesterday's Marist poll shows Andrew Gillum leading Ron DeSantis in the gubernatorial race-- 50% to 46%-- and Bill Nelson leading Scott in the Senate race by the same 50% to 46%. Democrats are very lucky to have Gillum at the head of the ticket instead of dull conservative Gwen Graham, who had been the establishment candidate and who would have dragged the party down the toilet with her. But it's a shame Florida doesn't have any good congressional candidates who could ride the wave and Andrew's coattails into office. Instead, it's a bunch of DCCC-recruited backs from the Republican wing of the party-- New Dems and Blue Dogs. This is the key today: "Democrats in both races are performing better than their Republican counterparts with likely voters who are independents, minorities and women."


Stoking domestic terrorism goes over especially badly with independent voters

Results from Quinnipiac are nearly identical: seven point leads for both Gillum and Nelson, entirely because of double-digit leads for both among women, minorities and independent voters. Writing Sunday for the Miami Herald Steve Bousquet reported on the surge in early voting for Democrats. On Sunday, "Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Hillsborough and Orange, the five biggest 'blue' counties, all reported their highest one-day early voting totals of the 2018 campaign. As a result, on a day when President Donald Trump rallied thousands of Republicans in Pensacola, the GOP’s ballot advantage over the Democrats shrank to six-tenths of 1 percentage point (0.6), with GOP ballots at 40.8 percent of the statewide total and Democrats at 40.2 percent." By Monday morning Dems had a +0.5% lead over Republicans in ballots cast. In 2014 Republicans held almost a 6% lead over Dems going into election day.

So how many Democratic candidates will Gillum's coattails and the anti-red wave drag to victory in Florida today? Most of the candidates are so terrible that it's hard to say-- but even the worst of them are less horrible than the Republicans they're opposing. Donna Shalala, as bad a candidate as you'll find anywhere, will probably beat Maria Salazar in bright blue FL-27 (PVI- D+5) despite herself. Nate Silver gives her a 6 in 7 chance to win (84.7%). Next door in Carlos Curbelo's district (FL-26-- where the DCCC and Pelosi's PAC have spent $7,175,066 attacking Curbelo-- another weak Democrat, Debbie Mucarsel-Powell looks like she'll take the seat (PVI is D+6). Silver gives her a 5 in 9 chance (55.6%). The other Republican-held Miami-Dade seat, Mario Diaz-Balart's 25th district (PVI- R+4) has the best of the 3 Democratic challengers, Mary Barzee Flores, but in the toughest race. Silver gives her a 2 in 7 chance (27.8%) to beat Diaz-Balart. The wave will have had to have turned into a tsunami tonight for her to win.




Silver gives Wasserman Schultz a 99.9% chance of retaining her seat in a 3-way contest against progressive Tim Canova and some Republican sacrificial lamb, more or less the same chance Joe Crowley had in beating Congresswoman-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. The only polling in the district-- by a GOP firm-- shows Wasserman Schultz exactly tied with Canova.

The DCCC has 4 other Democratic candidates on their Red to Blue page-- Nancy Soderberg (FL-06, Ron DiSantis' open seat with an R+7 PVI), Kristen Carlsen (FL-15, Dennis Ross' open seat stretching from the Tampa suburbs to the Orlando area with an R+6 PVI), David Shapiro (FL-16, Vern Buchanan's Sarasota, Bradenton seat with an R+7 PVI) and Lauren Baer (FL-18, Brian Mast's Treasure Coast district with an R+5 PVI). Silver doesn't give any of them much of a chance to win. Soderberg 1 in 4, Carlsen 3 in 7, Shapiro 1 in 7, and Baer 1 in 12. Soderberg, Baer and Shapiro (as well as Mucarsel-Powell) are all New Dems. The 2 Florida candidates in red districts with the best shot are 2 normal Dems, Kristen Carlsen and Mary Barzee Flores. The DCCC has spent modestly in a few of the races-- $499,932 in FL-06, $146,362 in FL-16, $868,290 in FL-18, and $694,360 in FL-15
.




Matt Haggman is one of the progressive Democrats Blue America endorsed this cycle but who didn't win his primary, losing out, in this case, to an establishment nothing with lots of name recognition and money but with nothing to offer the voters except that she's not a Trumpist. Tragic waste of a blue seat but Matt has been good sport about it, endorsed her and has been working to help elect her. He agreed to catch us up on what he's been up to down in South Florida. He reiterated that "This is the most important mid-term election in our lifetimes. It’s a moment when we will decide as a country who we are and who we are not. Here in Florida I have been working to help Andrew Gillum, Donna Shalala, Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, Mary Barzee Flores and Bill Nelson all win. Just this weekend I was out canvassing. But, before this, I was a candidate. I was one of the many across the country who left good jobs to up and run for Congress following the 2016 presidential election. For me, it didn’t go as hoped. I lost to Donna Shalala in Florida’s Congressional District 27. Howie asked that I share a blog post I wrote in the weeks after the Aug. 28 Florida primary. It’s a reminder of the reasons why this mid-term is so important. Why each of us can have a big impact even if we’re not on the ballot. And why, whether a candidate or supporter, we must do all we can to ensure everyone gets out to vote this Election Day to turn a new page in our politics."

Until Next Time, Thank you

It’s been a few weeks since the primary election. Obviously, for me, it was a disappointment. But the many great wishes since election night from friends and supporters has been wonderful. I wanted to write a post and say thank you. And also reflect a bit on the past 13 months campaigning for US Congress.

Before doing that, I again congratulate Donna Shalala on her victory. This is a moment in our politics that is bigger than any individual and it’s critical that the Democratic party take control of the U.S. House of Representatives. We must unite behind her. In addition, we have to elect Andrew Gillum as our next Governor! His campaign has energized us all, and it’s time to bring it home.

Looking back on the primary, my overriding feeling is gratitude. I’m extremely thankful to my wife Danet, who supported me in this effort, and thankful to all of the people who propelled our campaign--  the volunteers, fellows, staff, donors and, ultimately, voters. I had never run for any elected office, yet so many went all-in supporting our campaign. Thank you very, very much.

Our fellows were, in particular, an inspiration to me. We recruited more than 50. Most were in college, some still in high school. Working on the campaign after class or full-time during summer break. Weekends, nights. Calling voters, knocking on doors. They were passionate and dedicated. Now, they are back on campus. At schools from Miami Dade College and Michigan to Boston University and Palmetto Senior High School. At a time when our political system badly needs a reset, they showed what it means to take hold of our democracy. With them, our future is so blazingly bright.

Along with our fellows, what I loved about being a candidate was talking with voters and being out in the community. I loved it. Going door to door on sweltering summer afternoons in Kendall, or Little Havana, or Richmond Heights. Evenings canvassing in Westchester or Palmetto Bay. Unfiltered and alone, it was just us; talking about our community and country. On those days and nights there was no place I would rather be.

Life revealed itself in its many forms on these unannounced visits. The couple celebrating their daughter who was headed to college. The single mom working three jobs to keep current on her mortgage. The middle-aged woman who tried to chat amiably but, after a time, couldn’t hold it back any longer, sharing that she’d just been diagnosed with cancer. “I need a hug,” she said, a tear running down her cheek, which she quickly and defiantly wiped away.

The conversations were always so real--  standing at front doors, sitting in living rooms, meeting people where they are, learning about their hopes and concerns, aspirations and struggles. At a time when Washington has so fundamentally and collectively lost its way, at the grassroots people are making sense. We need to spend more time listening to them.

Indeed, throughout the campaign I often said the best ideas come from the community, not candidates. I really meant it. Change happens from the ground up, and that’s never been more true than today. From start to finish, our campaign sought to stay true to that ethos. Namely, we focused on voters, rather than cutting down competitors as a means to win.

We visited every precinct, we knocked on some 45,000 doors. Again and again, I found a sincerity, thoughtfulness and a belief that things will get better. I always thought we lived in a special community, but over the last year I’ve vividly seen it with my own eyes in one neighborhood after another. Those thousands of conversations leave me today more hopeful and optimistic than ever.

If only our politics can be as good as them. I think it can, but we are going to have to change in big ways.

To me, election night 2016 was a shattering moment--  and it’s what ultimately prompted me to run. I had believed that America would never elect a person who said and did the things that Donald Trump said and did. I believed that America today would never elect a bully, a liar, someone who preyed upon our worst fears and sought to divide us to win support. We might come close to electing such a demagogue, but at this stage in our country’s history we would never actually do it. I was obviously wrong.

The better angels of our nature had given way to our most base sensibilities. A presidency built on hope was followed by one grounded in our worst fears.

In early January, as President Obama prepared to leave office, he gave his farewell address, warning that we can’t take democracy for granted. That it “falls on each of us to be anxious, jealous guardians of our democracy.” What the speech said to me is that, yes, America is a special place. But it’s only special because generation after generation has continually engaged in making it so--  even as there are setbacks, sometimes dramatic setbacks, along the way.

Then, at Danet’s urging, on January 21st we attended the Women’s March in Washington, D.C. My sister Meghan and our friend Lissette went too. It was an extraordinary day as millions around the world rose up. It was there that I thought to myself that this remarkable moment of protest must also be a moment of real and lasting change--  and wondered how to try and live that. It was there that I decided to run.

The reason I decided to drop everything, leave my job at Knight Foundation and do something I’d never done before was because I believed we were--  and are--  at a pivotal moment. This is not a normal election year.

I firmly believe that years from now people will ask about this time, what did we do?

What did we do when a President--  along with a compliant Republican-controlled Congress--  called for border walls, Muslim bans, tore thousands of immigrant children from their parents, bowed to a foreign power that meddled in our election, sympathized with neo-Nazis, sought to use law enforcement as a means to settle political scores, and declared the press an enemy of the state.

This election is our moment to reaffirm and declare who we are-- and who we are not--  as a country.

But, in doing so, we have to realize that this election is about what’s next. It can’t just be about what we’re against, but it has to be about what we’re for. Indeed, while Donald Trump has contributed much to our dysfunctional politics, the truth is that he’s the result of a dysfunctional system that has been spiraling for some time.

We are only going to achieve the change we need if we dispense with the incrementalism that has defined our politics for so long and think--  and do--  in dramatic new ways. And allow new leaders to emerge in a political system that’s long become stuck.

Put another way, it’s a two-part challenge: ensure that today does not become the new normal, and provide a vision for what tomorrow will look like. With that in mind, we sought to run a campaign that actually represented the change we seek.

At a time when money is undermining our democracy, we didn’t accept any funding from political action committees, federal lobbyists or special interests like big sugar.

At a time when so many have given up on politics, our campaign was powered by extraordinary campaign fellows who were the heart and soul of our effort.

At a time when so many are disconnected from our government, we built a field program that sought to personally engage voters in every neighborhood in every part of the district.

At a time when the leadership in Congress hasn’t changed in years, we called for an entirely new slate of people in leadership roles in the House. The new faces in the next Congress must not be just newly elected members, but the leaders at the top too.

Of course, our efforts did not result in a victory. But I have no regrets. After all, this is a moment to take chances. And throughout my life I’ve always sought to take chances by diving into entirely new things; and going all-in when I do.

Whether it was going to New Orleans to write a biography on Professor Longhair (still unfinished). Or moving to Miami-- where I didn’t know a soul (but met my soulmate)--  to become a journalist (where I had a great run that lasted nearly a decade). Or leaving the Miami Herald to join Knight Foundation (where I had an even better run), in which I launched an entirely new program that planted the seeds and propelled Miami’s rapidly emerging startup and entrepreneurial community.

I want to stretch myself, test boundaries and be willing to do entirely new things. Incumbent to that approach will be wins and losses. It’s the in-between that I want to avoid.

Make no mistake, I dearly wish I was part of the Blue Wave at this critical point in our country’s history. But I’m not. This moment belongs to candidates with names like Gillum, O’Rourke, Pressley, Lamb, Ocasio-Cortez, and so many others. I will be cheering every one of them on, and support in any way I can. We need them to win and be good leaders when a new Congress is sworn in in January.

And, each in our own way, we all need to lean in and help. The moment is too important. The challenges are too great. The stakes too high. No one can sit this out.

So what’s next? The short answer is, I don’t know.

I do know that I have many people to thank. I remember when I decided to run, a friend advised that people look at you differently when you’re a political candidate. He cautioned that you’ll be disappointed by friends you thought would be there. But he also said you’ll be surprised by the support from those you didn’t know before or never expected. Focus and delight in the latter, he said. And I will.

(One quick note: Danet and I took some time away after the election. If you haven’t heard from me yet, you’ll be hearing from me soon.)

After such an all-consuming period I also have many friendships to renew, which I am looking forward to doing.

Life is about chapters and seasons. The thing about political campaigns is the chapter ends so suddenly. After such an intense period, it’s quickly and suddenly over. It’s a crash landing. But a new chapter begins. There is power in blank canvases. I’ve experienced it before. It’s at moments like these when you can edit your life and think completely anew. It’s often at these moments when the unimagined happens, when you follow completely new paths and find unexpected success.

I have no idea what this next chapter will bring, but I’m excited to find out.

After the race, I spoke with Reggie, who is a great friend and the father of Joshua, my little through Big Brother Big Sister for more than a decade. Reggie said to me: “You gotta keep pressing on my man. It’s all good.”

That pretty much says it all. Keep pressing on.




          Yes, There's Still Something You Can Do Today Besides Voting      Cache   Translate Page      

We all want Trump and his servile, enabling Republicans to lose control of Congress. But many of us feel the Democrats are nothing more than the lesser evil, with a leadership that pursues opportunism and careerism rather than the party's values and principles. How do we change that? One way is to elect as many members of Congress we can who are not beholden to the corrupt party leadership. For example, these are progressive candidates who won their primaries and who the DCCC and Nancy Pelosi have refused to support:
Randy Bryce (WI-01)
Ammar Campa-Najjar (CA-50)
Audrey Denney (CA-01)
Kara Eastman (NE-02)
Kendra Fershee (WV-01)
Jess King (PA-11)
Nate MuMurray (NY-27)
J.D. Scholten (IA-04)
Mike Siegel (TX-10)
Dayna Steele (TX-36)
James Thompson (KS-04)
Instead, the DCCC and Pelosi are spending tens of millions of dollars on New Dems and Blue Dogs from the Republican wing of the Democratic Party, consciously shifting the congressional caucus in a sharply rightward.corporate direction-- in the opposite direction the Democratic base wishes it to move.


Today we have to deal with an existential problem-- Trump and his GOP enablers. But we should concentrate on making sure the progressives running for Congress today have every chance possible to win. Think back to when you were in school or the military or at summer camp. Did you have any pals back then who like in Omaha? Can you call them and ask them to vote for Kara Eastman? Sunday Kara told her supporters that her race "is one of the most closely watched in the entire country. Everyone’s eyes are on this district, waiting to see what happens on election day. If we can win here, it’s proof that our common-sense progressive platform can work around the rest of the country as well. We have grown this small grassroots movement into something bigger than all of us. We are ready to make history and create meaningful change in our country. Your vote matters. This race will be incredibly close, and we need you to show up and be counted on election day. Make sure you have a plan to get to the polls on Tuesday, November 6th and make your voice heard. Your vote would be the best birthday gift I could get this year." And her win would be a gift for every progressive in America. Think again... maybe you have a cousin in Omaha? No? Perhaps an old chum you haven't talk to in years who lives in Gretna or La Vista or Papillion? Today, only phone calls can help, not checks; too late for that.



How about someone who lives in Racine or Kenosha or Janesville, Wisconsin? Those are the 3 biggest towns in Randy Bryce's district. A persuasive GOTV call to someone you know, is worth more than any financial contribution right now. Maybe someone who moved to Elkhorn or Burlington? Lake Geneva? Muskego? Or maybe the suburbs south of Milwaukee-- Oak Creek, Franklin, Greendale, Caldonia? This is going to be a close race. Every vote counts.

In western New York, there's a big space with lots of suburbs and small towns between Buffalo and Rochester. Anyone you know up there who you could talk to about Nate McMurray. Most people who hear that Chris Collins is an extreme Trumpist and that he was arrested for corruption charges and is out on bail, are very open to hearing reasons to vote for Nate McMurray.

Same in Escondido, Ramona, Lakeside, Santee and the other suburbs east and north of San Diego. And Temecula... and the eastern parts of El Cajon-- that's all Ammar Campa-Najjar's district, where the incumbent, Druncan Hunter, is also an extreme Trumpist out on bail after being arrested by the FBI.

And on the exact opposite end of California, up in the northeast... maybe you know someone with a phone who moved to Grass Valley? Oroville, Redding, Chico, Paradise, Yreka, Red Bluff? Someone living on a houseboat in Lake Shasta or Goose Lake? That's all part of CA-01, where Berniecrat Audrey Denney is making tremendous headway against Doug LaMalfa and can use every vote she can get.


Don't tell me you don't know anyone in Austin. Everyone does... just think. Mike Siegel's district includes lots of Austin neighborhoods-- The Triangle, Rosedale, Ridge Top, Coronado Hills, St Johns, Broadacres, Brentwood, Oakmont Heights, Balcones Park, Abercrombe, Skyview, Crestview, Allandale, Wooten, North Shoal Creek, Mesa Forest, Quail Hollow, Gracywoods, North Oaks, up into Pflugerville and then out towards Houston in towns like Bastrop, La Grange, Brenham, Sealy, Weimar, as well as towns like Tombatt, Cypress, Prairie View and Fairfield on the outskirts of Houston. Mike's race to replace the Trumpist incumbent-- who helped formulate the babies in cages policy-- is going to depend on getting people to come out to vote today in those Austin neighborhoods, Houston suburbs and everything in between. Know anyone there you could call?

And on the other side of Houston... maybe you know someone from a past life who went to work for NASA? Dayna Steele's race is going to be decided tonight by voters in Seabook, Deer Park, Channelview, Sheldon and Crosby on the outskirts of Houston-- as well as by folks living in La Porte, Baytown, Beach City and up in Lumberton, Liberty, Livingston, Jasper, Bon Wier (right on the Louisiana border), Kirbyville, and in the Beaumont suburbs like Vidor and Rose City.

Maybe you know people in Lancaster, Pennsylvania or up in Ephrata or Elizabethtown or down in Hanover in York County. Call them and persuade them to vote for Jess King.

Is it possible you know someone teaching at Iowa State in Ames? Steve King's district isn't 100% farmland. Anyone in your phonebook from Sioux City? Mason City? Forest City? Rockwell City? How about Fort Dodge or Pocahontas? For J.D. to win today, he's going to need votes from all those places. Think! Anyone? A sister's old boyfriend? The coach of your high school basketball team?

Maybe coach moved to Kansas, not Iowa. James Thomson's district is mostly Wichita and Sedgewick County but he's going to need whatever votes he can pick up in Eureka, Howard nd Sedan in the east, Kinsley, Greensburg, Goldwater in the west and towns like Kingman, Medicine Lodge and Winfield in between.

That leaves us with the toughest district we're trying to flip this cycle, WV-01 (PVI R+19), where Kendra Fershee is running a progressive campaign in a district where Bernie did incredibly well. It includes Wheeling, Parkersburg and Morgantown (West Virginia University's Evansdale campus). Maybe an old babysitter? I used to volunteer at a People for the American Way office and I met a young woman there who helped me figure out what I was doing. She lives in that district now. In fact... she's the candidate!




A friend of mine, Richard Foos, worked with his wife and Ted Lieu and another friend of ours, Jody Uttal, and me, to put on a fundraising event for Ammar Campa-Najjar and Randy Bryce. We raised them each some money but that didn't feel proactive enough for Richard. He wanted to do something way more visceral. So... he called a dozen friends, printed up some voter guides and called up Katie Hill's campaign manager and offered to stand outside a dozen polling places and hand out the guides. He's done it before-- and it works, especially well for down-ballot candidates and propositions on the ballot. I asked him to explain what it's like doing this kind of volunteer work. He told me he believes "that the most effective thing we can do today is to work at a polling place with a three fold plus purpose.
1) hand out voter guides for the congressional Dems (not as important for the congressional race, but very important for down ballot candidates, non-partisan candidates and propositions.
2) Catch any voter irregularities by ensuring all Dems successfully voted on the way out of the polls.
3) Check the voter roles which are posted inside the polling place every couple hours and tell headquarters who has not voted yet so that they can get their GOTV team to remind the ones who didn't vote to do so.
I am going to be doing it for Katie Hill’s campaign and if interested email jake@katiehillforcongress.com/ Otherwise call your local Dem office or congressional candidate’s campaign headquarters."


Voter Suppression by Nancy Ohanian


          Midterms: Amerika, der Aufbruch und die Angst      Cache   Translate Page      

Rette sich wer kann: So werben Republikaner wie Demokraten um Stimmen. Wer schafft den Sieg bei den Zwischenwahlen? Republikaner, die auf die Angst vor Migranten setzen? Oder junge Demokraten, die Trump und die Waffenlobby fürchten?


          Por Favor Vote Hoy-- PorTodo Nuestro Bien      Cache   Translate Page      

This isn't a new poll but it could be the numbers we see on our TV screens tonight. Say a prayer. A result like that in Texas today is going to be dependent on, among other things, Latino turnout. Virtually all polling models assume Latinos will not turn out in large numbers. If that changes today, say goodbye to Ted Cruz and... HELLO BETO! Nearly 39% of Texans are Latino. BETO will win if they vote today in larger numbers than has been usual. AND, a big Latino turnout in Texas today could also help in more than a few districts with big Hispanic populations-- here's who has the most to gain:
TX-02- 29.6% Todd Litton
TX-07- 31.5% Lizzie Fletcher
TX-10- 25.9% Mike Siegel
TX-21- 27.7% Joseph Kopser
TX-23- 70.8% Gina Jones
TX-27- 50.8% Eric Holguin
TX-32- 28.3% Colin Allred


California is another state with a huge Hispanic population-- like Texas, around 39%-- where an oversized Latino turnout today could be determinative, maybe even electing a progressive senator, Kevin de León, instead of reelecting the conservative Dianne Feinstein, with a shameful anti-immigrant history unworthy of our state. In California congressional races, a big Latino turnout will make all the difference in 7 close, key races:
CA-10- 40.0% Josh Harder
CA-21- 72.1% TJ Cox
CA-22- 45.9% Andrew Janz (Devin Nunes' district)
CA-25- 37.9% Katie Hill
CA-39- 34.6% Gil Cisneros
CA-49- 25.7% Mike Levin
CA-50- 29.7% Ammar Campa-Najjar
And then there are the key Senate races in Arizona (30.1% Latino) and Nevada (27.1% Latino) which have both tightened up in the last month.



So... has Trump been enough of a determinant to rouse Latino voters up in big numbers tomorrow? All cycle, the answer has been a disappointing "NO!" But that seems to have changed in the last few weeks. Yesterday, Chris Kahn and Dan Trotta, reporting for Reuters, wrote that a new IPSOS tracking poll shows a 
marked increase in Latino enthusiasm for voting this week.




Hispanics are more interested in voting this year than in the last U.S. congressional midterm elections in 2014 and their enthusiasm outpaces that of all U.S. adults, according to a Reuters/Ipsos national tracking poll released on Sunday.

The poll also found likely Hispanic voters nearly twice as inclined to support Democrats for the House of Representatives as Republicans in Tuesday's elections.

Voter registration groups are using Republican President Donald Trump's nationalist, anti-immigrant rhetoric as an opportunity to drive up Latino enthusiasm. In an illustration of their passion, one group that is part of an alliance that has reached out to more than 1 million potential voters in Arizona took its name from the Spanish word for "fight."

...Latinos could play a crucial role in several races, from tight Senate battles in Arizona and Texas to Florida's close Senate and governor's races. In California, the flourishing Latino population has helped put in play some Republican-controlled House districts Democrats hope to flip.

The Reuters/Ipsos poll, taken Sept. 1 to Oct. 29, found that 36 percent of Hispanic voters said they were "certain" to vote, up from 27 percent in 2014. That increase is nearly double the five percentage point rise in voter enthusiasm among all Americans over the same period, the poll showed.

Enthusiasm appears especially high among Hispanic Democrats.

Forty-two percent of Hispanic Democrats said they were "certain" to vote, up from 29 percent in 2014. Among likely Hispanic voters, 60 percent said they will vote for a Democratic candidate for the House, and 32 percent would back a Republican.

Hispanics are a politically diverse group, with 55 percent of likely voters identifying as Democrats, 31 percent as Republicans and 12 percent as independent, the poll showed.

Just over half, 53 percent, of likely Hispanic voters said they were "very motivated" to pick a candidate for Congress who opposes Trump, compared with 43 percent of all likely voters, 75 percent of likely Democratic voters and 9 percent of likely Republican voters.

...America's 29 million Latinos account for nearly 13 percent of eligible voters this year, but their turnout rate has declined since 2006, according to the Pew Research Center. Only 27 percent of eligible Latinos voted in the last midterm elections in 2014, and only 16 percent of those aged 18 to 35, Pew said.

          Voters get their chance to shape US politics in Donald Trump era      Cache   Translate Page      
The president warned against a ‘socialist nightmare’ while Democrats hoped for an ‘awakening’ after losing the White House two years ago.
          The Dozen Worst Democrats Facing The Voters Are Better Than The Dozen Best Republicans      Cache   Translate Page      



Perhaps trying to torture Señor Trumpanzee, a 4 month old Pew Research poll was widely circulated on the internet over the weekend, showing that President Obama, by far, is the president who the most Americans think was the best in their lifetimes (31%) followed by Reagan (21%) and Clinton (13%).

I didn't have time to conduct a poll, but I'm going to tell you who the best non-incumbent candidates running for Congress on Tuesday are. In alphabetical order-- based strictly on how well they will perform in Congress if they are elected. These are a dozen potential superstars:
Lisa Brown (WA-05)
Randy Bryce (WI-01)
Kara Eastman (NE-02)
Jared Golden (ME-02)
Jess King (PA-11)
Nate McMurray (NY-27)
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (NY-14)
Katie Porter (CA-45)
JD Scholten (IA-04)
Mike Siegel (TX-10)
James Thompson (KS-04)
Rashida Tlaib (MI-13)
Nor did I poll anyone about who the worst Democrats are running for the House. I'm tempted to put this list in order of horribleness but I'll keep it alphabetical, so I don't get into any arguments about why I say Jeff Van Drew (NJ-02) is worse than, for example, Abigail Spanberger (VA-07). Hard to narrow it down to just 12 and I was tempted to sneak in another, calling it a baker's dozen, but I'll save Paul Davis (KS-02) and Anne Kirkpatrick (AZ-02) for another time. 12 Democrats-- bolstering and strengthening the Republican wing of the Democratic Part-- who will make Congress a far worse and less productive place than it would be without them:
Anthony Brindisi (NY-22)
Gil Cisneros (CA-39)
Jason Crow (CO-06)
Gretchen Driskell (MI-07)
Brendan Kelly (IL-12)
Joseph Kopser (TX-21)
Susie Lee (NV-03)
Kathy Manning (NC-13)
Dan McCready (NC-09)
Max Rose (NY-11)
Mikie Sherrill (NJ-11)
Abigail Spanberger (VA-07)
[Oops, I forgot New Jersey Blue Dog Jeff Van Drew... probably because I don't even think of him as a Democrat. But he's the worst Democratic candidate this cycle. The DCCC begged him to run. And he has absolutely no chance of being defeated. He will be in Congress next year, a real tragedy.]

Hold your nose and vote for these lunks so Trump winds up getting checked and balanced. The only horrible Democrat running for the House who I would not hold my nose, shut my eyes, vomit in my mouth and vote for is an incumbent, the shockingly Debbie Wasserman Schultz (FL-23). But in that case, the alternative is a progressive running as an independent, Tim Canova, who will caucus with the Democrats, making not just the House, but the wretched party, a better institution. The video message from Elizabeth Warren below is specifically about the Senate but... same, same; the principle works for the House as well. I have a question for progressives-- real ones only, please-- in Arizona: Are you going to vote for Sinema?



One more thing about the Senate. With a horrible map for Democrats, the likelihood of it flipping from red to blue in minimal-- though not impossible. Trump is counting on ignoring his likely evisceration in the House by claiming he saved the GOP from doom in both houses. That will be fun.


          Ödesdag för Trump i mellanårsval      Cache   Translate Page      


          Trump and Scott Walker Championed an 'Absolute Fraud': The GOP's Foxconn Boondoggle Is Revealed as a Government-Funded Scam      Cache   Translate Page      
There's no end to the deception.

Wisconsin's Koch-funded Republican Gov. Scott Walker lavished the Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn with over four billion in taxpayer subsidies last year in a deal that he claimed would create 13,000 jobs in the state, but that agreement is increasingly looking like a massive con-job amid new reports on Tuesday that Foxconn is planning to bring in Chinese workers to fill spots that the governor insisted would be filled by Wisconsinites.

"If Foxconn has to import Chinese engineers to Wisconsin, that would be yet another insult to Wisconsin taxpayers," Greg LeRoy, executive director of Good Jobs First, told Common Dreams. "This is already The Great Disappearing Jobs Deal of recent U.S. history. It's also the biggest mega-subsidy deal ever given to a foreign-based company. How tone-deaf would it be if the best-paid jobs don't even go to Wisconsin taxpayers?"

According to the Wall Street Journal, Foxconn "is considering bringing in personnel from China to help staff a large facility under construction in southern Wisconsin as it struggles to find engineers and other workers in one of the tightest labor markets in the U.S."

President Donald Trump and outgoing House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) have both openly championed the Foxconn agreement as a boon for Wisconsin workers. Last year, Trump took credit for convincing Foxconn to build a factory in Wisconsin.

"The company, the Taiwanese supplier to Apple Inc., has been trying to tap Chinese engineers through internal transfers to supplement staffing for the Wisconsin plant," the Journal reported, citing anonymous sources familiar with the matter. "Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou is looking to company engineers in China to transfer."

While Foxconn issued a statement denying the Journal's reporting, critics of Walker—who is locked in an extremely close race with Democratic challenger Tony Evers—were quick to highlight the company's alleged plans as further evidence that the governor's "deal" with the Taiwanese multinational has been a massive fraud from the start:

With Walker ensnared in what CNN described this week as his "toughest race yet," the Foxconn deal is increasingly becoming a political liability that could cost him the governor's mansion in Tuesday's midterm elections.

As the New Yorker's Dan Kaufman noted in a detailed look at the Foxconn deal over the weekend, the agreement—which is rapidly declining in popularity among Wisconsin voters—includes "taxpayer subsidies to the company totaling more than $4.5 billion, the largest subsidy for a foreign corporation in American history."

"Since Wisconsin already exempts manufacturing companies from paying taxes, Foxconn, which generated a hundred and fifty-eight billion dollars in revenue last year, will receive much of this subsidy in direct cash payments from taxpayers," Kaufman observes. "Depending on how many jobs are actually created, taxpayers will be paying between two hundred and twenty thousand dollars and more than a million dollars per job."

In an op-ed for The Progressive last year, Wisconsin ironworker and Democratic House candidate Randy Bryce—AKA "The Iron Stache"—declared, "We deserve better than corporate boondoggles like Foxconn, and our government’s leadership needs to stand on the side of workers."

Echoing this sentiment in a tweet on Tuesday as voters headed to the polls, the advocacy group People for Bernie tweeted, "Don't let Scott Walker and his billionaire cronies steal an election."

    

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          Under Assault by Trump's GOP and Supreme Court, Unions Lead Massive Get Out the Vote Effort for Midterms: 'We Vote, We Win'      Cache   Translate Page      
"We don't know any other way. For us, it's a very natural way to survive: organize, organize."

In the face of a coordinated, corporate-funded assault on their very existence by President Donald Trump, Republicans at the federal and state level, and the right-wing Supreme Court, labor unions nationwide have mobilized massive numbers of struggling workersto turn out for Tuesday's critical midterms with the goal of defeating anti-union candidates and electing politicians willing to fight for progressive policies that benefit the working class like Medicare for All, a higher minimum wage, and the fundamental right to organize.

"The Culinary Workers Union registered 10,300 voters for the midterms. This union really gets it done. Still impressed by what I saw reporting on them in Vegas."
—David Jamieson, Huffington Post

"We don't know any other way," said Geoconda Arguello-Kline, the Secretary-Treasurer for the Culinary Workers Union in Las Vegas, which has registered over 10,300 new voters ahead of Tuesday's midterm elections to defeat Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.). "For us, it's a very natural way to survive here in Las Vegas: organize, organize."

With the rallying cry, "We vote, we win!" the union has provided resources for workers to learn about the candidates on the ballot, spread the word about the issues at stake in the midterms, and find the closest polling site.

The Culinary Union's get-out-the-vote efforts have been replicated throughout the nation, including in so-called "right-to-work states," where Republican legislatures have barred unions from collecting dues from all workers they represent in collective bargaining efforts to raise wages and improve working conditions.

"Things aren't changing for the better like they thought would happen. Real wages are not keeping pace with inflation. We haven't replaced the well-paying manufacturing jobs that we lost."
—Tim Burga, Ohio AFL-CIO

In Southern states like North Carolina, Tennessee, Florida, and Georgia, the Communications Workers of America (CWA)—which represents 700,000 workers nationwide—say it organized canvassing, mail, and phone bank operations that resulted in over four million door knocks."

In the Midwest, where workers have suffered from decades of deindustrialization, corporate outsourcing, and neglect from politicians who so often claim to care about their plight, the AFL-CIO says it has convinced thousands of union workers who backed Donald Trump in 2016 to turn out for progressive Democrats on Tuesday.

"About half of union households that voted for Trump said they are planning to vote for Democrats in two key statewide races," Vox reported on Monday, citing figures from the Ohio AFL-CIO. "That includes 51.4 percent of Trump voters who plan to cast a ballot for progressive Democrat Richard Cordray for governor and 49.9 percent of Trump voters who favor incumbent Sen. Sherrod Brown—the only Democrat currently holding statewide office."

Tim Burga, president of the Ohio AFL-CIO, said many union workers who initially backed Trump have realized after two years of plutocratic policies and stagnant wages that the president and his billionaire-filled cabinet are not on their side, and never were.

"Things aren't changing for the better like they thought would happen," Burga said. "Real wages are not keeping pace with inflation. We haven't replaced the well-paying manufacturing jobs that we lost."

With a historic number of House Democratic candidates backing Medicare for All, National Nurses United (NNU)—the largest organization of registered nurses in the U.S.—has also been tirelessly canvassing and phone banking in Maryland, Florida, and the many other states where candidates are standing up to America's disastrous for-profit healthcare industry.

See NNU's full list of all 225 House Democratic candidates running on Medicare for All here.

     

          Trump Economy: Wisconsin's Foxconn plant looking to bring in Chinese workers for US taxpayer-funded jobs      Cache   Translate Page      
The plant has been heavily subsidized with $3 billion in American tax dollars

A Wisconsin tech plant which has been hailed by President Donald Trump as a major step forward for American manufacturing is looking to bring in Chinese workers to staff the plant, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Foxconn Technology is a key supplier to Apple, and is opening a large new plant in the Midwest. The plant has been heavily subsidized with $3 billion in American tax dollars, potentially up to one million dollars per job.

But with a tight market for qualified American workers, Foxconn is "trying to tap Chinese engineers through internal transfers to supplement staffing."

“It’s very difficult to find skilled labor in our market,” said a staffing agency near the plant. “All the technical schools and local universities are gearing up their programs, but I still think Foxconn is going to fall short in terms of finding the people they need."

The company's plan is to bring in Chinese workers.

The big problem the company is facing? Chinese workers don't want to move to Wisconsin.

"One engineer who declined to give his name said he wouldn’t want to move to a place he worried could be as cold as Harbin, a northern Chinese city known as 'Ice City,'” reports the Wall Street Journal.

 

     

           GOTV Strategies; Turnout History; Charitable Tendencies; Lincoln's Crucible      Cache   Translate Page      
Good morning. It’s Tuesday, November 6, 2018, Election Day. Although Americans are choosing a new Congress, along with governors in 36 states -- and not a president -- Donald J. Trump is very...

           Five Midterm Races That Matter Most      Cache   Translate Page      
I've been arguing for months that the ideal outcome in the midterm elections to set up Donald Trump for a landslide re-election in 2020 is for Republicans to hold the Senate and narrowly lose the...

           Trump Will Always Fight Dirty      Cache   Translate Page      
WASHINGTON -- Whatever the outcome of the midterm elections, this we already know: Donald Trump will do anything to win. He will exaggerate. He will lie. He will smear his opponents. He will stoke...

           Republicans Run the Most Racist Political Campaign Since 1968      Cache   Translate Page      
WASHINGTON -- President Trump and the Republican Party have run the most racist national political campaign since the 1968 presidential bid of segregationist George Wallace. We shall soon see how...

           Trump Warns of 'Fragile' Victories in Final Midterm Sprint      Cache   Translate Page      
CLEVELAND (AP) — In his final pitch to voters, President Donald Trump implored Republicans on Monday to help preserve “fragile” GOP victories that could be erased by Democrats as he...

           Trump Presidency Faces High Stakes in Midterm Elections      Cache   Translate Page      
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has been acting like a candidate on the ballot this week, staging daily double-header rallies and blasting out ads for Republicans up for election on...

           Trump Sees the Migrant Caravan as a Winning Election Issue      Cache   Translate Page      
WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump has reason to believe that the caravan of migrants heading toward the Southwest border might bring out his base of what he calls "forgotten" Americans....

           The Donald Made Them Do It      Cache   Translate Page      
If Abraham Lincoln were alive today, as Yogi Berra might put it, he’d be spinning in his grave. Lincoln was more than America’s greatest rhetorician; before Donald J. Trump came along, he...

          Mira el polémico anuncio anti-inmigrante de Trump que ha sido prohibido      Cache   Translate Page      

El día de hoy se llevan a cabo las elecciones intermedias en Estados Unidos y se disputa el control de las cámaras de representantes del país anglosajón; derivado de ello el gobierno de Donald Trump...

La entrada Mira el polémico anuncio anti-inmigrante de Trump que ha sido prohibido se publicó primero en Frogx Three.


          The United States and the Middle East nations are bracing themselves for the sanctions that will be reimplemented on Iran      Cache   Translate Page      
Listen to Today's Program Play

JD: Ken yesterday I got a Twitter from Potus President of the United States Donald Trump he made the statement that the United States was going to re-implement the sanctions on Iran. So I guess now that means that the United States and Middle Eastern forces are going to brace for trouble over these new or renewed Iranian sanctions.

KT: Well it’s certainly possible the Iranians themselves are making a lot of noise about this. They’re calling the United States an illegal power where as they are legal and they are respecting the world order. They claim that we are not because these sanctions have not been approved by the United Nations. But the Iranians also know that they will pay a very high price for any direct attack on US forces in the Middle East.

Now they could attack us indirectly they could for example reinforce those Shabbat militia that I was telling you about in northern Iraq that are outside of Mosul that are in the Nineveh plain. They could also conduct provocative actions along the land bridge into Syria and on to the Lebanese border with Israel. There’s lots of things Iran can do. They have many many military forces throughout the region. I happen to think they’re a little bit over extended but I do not see them launching any kind of direct attack against the US. I think they know very well that the price would be very high.

JD: And that land bridge you’re talking about includes Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon all the way from Iran to the Mediterranean and that’s key for what their plans are for the future.

KT: That’s correct. Absolutely, and they’ve been testing that since last December when they opened it for the first time. We’ve been talking about that regularly here on this broadcast. You don’t hear a lot of people in the national media talk about it but it’s a very important event.

JD: Ken Timmerman and his insights on what Iran’s response may well be as the United States re-implaments the sanctions on the Islamic State of Iran.

We report this information because it is setting the stage for Bible prophecy to be fulfilled.

Remember President Trump withdrew from the Iranian nuclear deal. As of today the United States has applied sanctions once again on Iran. The Middle East nations and the United States are braced for Iran’s reactions. We don’t know what Iran will be willing to do. We do know however that as we move deeper and deeper into the last days Iran will become a major player as foretold by the ancient Jewish prophets Daniel and Ezekiel, that was Daniel 11:44 and Ezekiel 38:5 where Iran is mentioned as Persia.

The stage is set for these prophecies to be fulfilled.
There's no end to the deception.

Wisconsin's Koch-funded Republican Gov. Scott Walker lavished the Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn with over four billion in taxpayer subsidies last year in a deal that he claimed would create 13,000 jobs in the state, but that agreement is increasingly looking like a massive con-job amid new reports on Tuesday that Foxconn is planning to bring in Chinese workers to fill spots that the governor insisted would be filled by Wisconsinites.

"If Foxconn has to import Chinese engineers to Wisconsin, that would be yet another insult to Wisconsin taxpayers," Greg LeRoy, executive director of Good Jobs First, told Common Dreams. "This is already The Great Disappearing Jobs Deal of recent U.S. history. It's also the biggest mega-subsidy deal ever given to a foreign-based company. How tone-deaf would it be if the best-paid jobs don't even go to Wisconsin taxpayers?"

According to the Wall Street Journal, Foxconn "is considering bringing in personnel from China to help staff a large facility under construction in southern Wisconsin as it struggles to find engineers and other workers in one of the tightest labor markets in the U.S."

President Donald Trump and outgoing House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) have both openly championed the Foxconn agreement as a boon for Wisconsin workers. Last year, Trump took credit for convincing Foxconn to build a factory in Wisconsin.

"The company, the Taiwanese supplier to Apple Inc., has been trying to tap Chinese engineers through internal transfers to supplement staffing for the Wisconsin plant," the Journal reported, citing anonymous sources familiar with the matter. "Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou is looking to company engineers in China to transfer."

While Foxconn issued a statement denying the Journal's reporting, critics of Walker—who is locked in an extremely close race with Democratic challenger Tony Evers—were quick to highlight the company's alleged plans as further evidence that the governor's "deal" with the Taiwanese multinational has been a massive fraud from the start:

With Walker ensnared in what CNN described this week as his "toughest race yet," the Foxconn deal is increasingly becoming a political liability that could cost him the governor's mansion in Tuesday's midterm elections.

As the New Yorker's Dan Kaufman noted in a detailed look at the Foxconn deal over the weekend, the agreement—which is rapidly declining in popularity among Wisconsin voters—includes "taxpayer subsidies to the company totaling more than $4.5 billion, the largest subsidy for a foreign corporation in American history."

"Since Wisconsin already exempts manufacturing companies from paying taxes, Foxconn, which generated a hundred and fifty-eight billion dollars in revenue last year, will receive much of this subsidy in direct cash payments from taxpayers," Kaufman observes. "Depending on how many jobs are actually created, taxpayers will be paying between two hundred and twenty thousand dollars and more than a million dollars per job."

In an op-ed for The Progressive last year, Wisconsin ironworker and Democratic House candidate Randy Bryce—AKA "The Iron Stache"—declared, "We deserve better than corporate boondoggles like Foxconn, and our government’s leadership needs to stand on the side of workers."

Echoing this sentiment in a tweet on Tuesday as voters headed to the polls, the advocacy group People for Bernie tweeted, "Don't let Scott Walker and his billionaire cronies steal an election."

 

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          'Because I'm White': A Texas Poll Worker Was Just Fired After Reportedly Hurling a Racist Insult and Pushing a Black Voter      Cache   Translate Page      
An election judge in Houston made a shockingly racist comment to an African-American voter who protested being flagged by poll workers.

On Tuesday, the Houston Chronicle reported that a Harris County poll worker named Juanita Barnes has been fired and faces criminal assault charges over a fight she got into with local voter Rolanda Anthony over the address on her photo ID, during which she reportedly made a racist outburst:

Anthony went to vote at her polling location before 8 a.m. at Iglesia Bautista Libre in north Houston, a poll worker, Evelyn Tillman, told her there was an issue with her address in the system and she needed to fill out a residency verification form.

Anthony, who is in her early 40s, asked Tillman why she needed to fill out the form, since as far as she could tell, the address in the system and on her ID matched up perfectly. Before Tillman could respond, Juanita Barnes, the alternate election judge, came very close to Anthony and began yelling and pointing her finger in Anthony's face.

Anthony said Barnes told her it, "It's illegal for you not to change her address on your driver's license if you move." About five or six voters were looking on, Anthony said.

Anthony told her, "Ma'am, I've been living here for years. What are you talking about? The address is correct."

Barnes, who is white, then told Anthony, who is black, "Maybe if I'd worn my blackface makeup today you could comprehend what I'm saying to you." Witnesses confirmed this is what they heard Barnes say.

After this exchange, other poll workers intervened on behalf of Anthony, at which point Barnes reportedly cornered her against a wall and started shouting. Barnes later "bumped" into Anthony, the report said, and told her that the police would not help her because Barnes was white and Anthony was a "loiterer."

"If you call the police, they're going to take you to jail and do something to you, because I'm white," Barnes reportedly said.

Barnes was eventually escorted from the building by Harris County deputies, according to the Chronicle.

This incident is not even the only case of a Texas poll worker landing in hot water for an altercation with a black voter. On Friday, Liza Guzman, another poll worker in Round Rock, screamed at a black voter who was confused about where to vote, saying "Get out. Get out. Get out. You are rude. You are not following the law," and threatening to call the police. Guzman resigned after a video of the incident went public.

Texas is one of the most closely watched states in the midterm election. Up to ten GOP-held Texas House seats have serious Democratic challenges, and race between GOP Sen. Ted Cruz and El Paso Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke has become one of the most expensive Senate races in history.

 

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          Trump Is Bracing for the Worst as White House Aides Warn the Election Results Could Be 'Brutal': Report      Cache   Translate Page      
The president has no public events scheduled.

After weeks on the campaign trail for Republicans around the country, President Donald Trump has hunkered away in the White House Tuesday as Americans head to the polls.

And according to a new report in the New York Times, the president and his aides are bracing for the worst.

Reporters Michael Shear and Maggie Haberman say the mood in the White House was "gloomy" on Tuesday, citing aides and others who have talked to the president. The majority of pollsters and analysts expect Democrats could make significant gains in the House of Representatives and are likely to flip control of the chamber. The fact that the GOP is expected to keep control of the Senate — due in large part to the favorable terrain this year for Republicans on the ballot — is offering some comfort in the White House, the report said.

"For days, Mr. Trump’s advisers have warned him that the losses could be brutal, even as they have said that the Senate should be a bright spot," the report said. "Advisers acknowledge that Mr. Trump has a problem with women voters as he begins his own re-election effort."

The report notes that Trump seemed to admit in an interview Monday with an ABC affiliate that his rhetoric may have gone too far at times — a rare admission of error on the president's part. People familiar with his thinking told Haberman and Shear that he does, in fact, believe he may have stepped over the line. Yet even Monday night, Trump was his usual pugnacious self at the final rally of the cycle, attacking Justice Brett Kavanaugh's accusers — who say he is guilty of sexual assault and misconduct — were part of a "scam" as his supporters cheered "lock her up."

Whether or not the dire warnings for his administration and his party will be borne out can only be confirmed once the votes around the country are tallied. The possibility of contested results and close calls may even leave the question of who controls Congress up for grabs until Wednesday, or possibly even later.

 

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          'I Am So F*cking Mad': Fox News Employees Are Reportedly Furious at Sean Hannity's Appearance at Trump Rally      Cache   Translate Page      
He had promised he wouldn't go on stage — and then he did.

After Fox News and host Sean Hannity himself definitively declared that he would not be speaking on stage Monday at President Donald Trump's final rally of the 2018 midterm campaign season, Hannity broke that promise.

On Tuesday, the network issued a statement expressing its displeasure with his appearance, as well as that of Fox News host Jeanine Pirro. But behind the scenes, Fox News employees were even more scathing about the obvious ethical breach, according to a new CNN report.

"It disturbs me to my core," one senior employee told CNN of the appearance. "I am so f*cking mad."

"The whole thing is just so embarrassing that this guy basically has free rein to do whatever he wants, and management is either helpless or uninterested in doing anything about it," another reportedly said.

One staffer is quoted as saying that Pirro and Hannity's involvement in an explicitly political rally crossed a new line.

However, it's actually somewhat surprising that Fox News insiders would have this sort of reaction. While Hannity and Pirro's appearances were clearly an ethical breach for any news station employees — even for hosts who acknowledge their own opinions — it's hard to see it as much different than other ethical lapses the pair have displayed. Hannity even used the services of Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen, the center of much controversy in recent years, which he never disclosed until after it was revealed in court. Pirro explicitly advises the president as if she were his lawyer from her perch at Fox News.

But it appears there are some staffers who still believe there's a meaningful distinction between the White House and the right-wing network, which many critics derisively say is akin to state TV. If they truly care about journalistic standards, they could consider finding a new employer.

 

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          ‘Saturday Night Live’ Got It Right: New Gallup Poll Finds High Anxiety Among Democrats on Election Day      Cache   Translate Page      
There's a lot at stake.

NBC’s long-running “Saturday Night Live” has never been shy about making fun of Democrats along with Republicans. A hilarious “SNL” skit that aired on November 3 depicted Democratic voters as being in a state of maximum anxiety over the 2018 midterms no matter how much they tried to pretend they were feeling optimistic—and according to a new Gallup survey, that skit isn’t off base. Gallup, on Election Day, reported that 81% of voters it described as either Democrats or “Democratic leaners” are “very or somewhat worried” about what will happen in the U.S. if Republicans maintain their majority in either the House of Representatives or the Senate. And only 19% of them are “not too or not at all worried” about the results of that possibility.

However, Gallup finds that Republicans and “Republican leaners,” in contrast, are less worried about what will happen in the U.S. if Democrats obtain a majority in either house of Congress. According to Gallup, 66% of Republicans or “Republican leaners” are “very or somewhat worried” about what would happen with a Democratic majority in the House or Senate—while 34% are “not too or not at all worried.”

Gallup also found that Democrats are less optimistic than Republicans when it comes to their chances of having a majority in the House in 2019.

Of the Republicans surveyed, 87% predicted that the GOP would maintain its House majority on Election Day, while only 74% of Democrats believed that their party would retake the House. And Democrats were even less optimistic about the Senate.

Gallup found that 83% of Republicans predicted that the GOP would keep its Senate majority on Election Day, while only 49% of Democrats believed their party would obtain a majority in the Upper House.

In order to achieve a Senate majority this year, Democrats would need to maintain every seat they presently hold while capturing two Republican-held seats. If Democrats could capture the Republican-held seats in Arizona and Nevada and not lose any seats, they would obtain a narrow Senate majority. But those races, according to many polls, are close—and Democratic incumbent Sen. Heidi Heitkamp has been trailing Republican Kevin Cramer in North Dakota’s Senate race.

The morning of Election Day, pollster Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight.com found that Democrats had an 87% chance of retaking the House but only a 19% chance of retaking the Senate. All 435 House seats are up for grabs today. 

Watch the SNL skit below:

 

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          Here's How Former Green Party Candidate Angela Green Still Be a Spoiler in This Key Senate Race      Cache   Translate Page      
The race could be the key to control of the Senate.

On November 1, Angela Green—the Green Party candidate in Arizona’s U.S. Senate race—made a major announcement: she was dropping out and urging Arizona residents to vote for centrist Democratic candidate Kyrsten Sinema, who has been in a nail-biter race against Republican nominee Martha McSally. Green, obviously fearing that she was taking votes away from Sinema, didn’t want to be a spoiler. But Green’s name still appears on absentee ballots in Arizona, and with the competition between Sinema and McSally being so tight, could Green end up being a spoiler anyway?

Green has performed relatively well for a third-party candidate. In October, an NBC News poll showed her winning 6% of the vote, and RealClearPolitics’ average of various polls had her at around 3%.

Green’s participation in the Arizona Senate race wouldn’t have been a big deal if Sinema had a double-digit lead over McSally. But poll after poll has indicated that the race could swing to either Sinema or McSally, depending on turnout. Some polls in early November showed that Sinema was ahead by 1% (Emerson College) or 3% (Trafalgar Group), while in other polls, McSally was leading by 3% (HarrisX) or 1% (ABC 15/OH Predictive Insights).

Truth be told, even the most scientific, meticulously conducted polls have a margin of error of 5%. But polls are good for giving candidates a general idea of where things stand—and when one poll shows Sinema slightly ahead while another shows McSally slightly ahead, the race is clearly a nail-biter.

Had things worked out differently, Sinema might be running against Sen. Jeff Flake instead of against McSally. But Flake, who has been quite critical of President Trump at times, decided not to seek reelection. And the hard-right McSally won the GOP nomination after defeating two fellow Republicans who are even more extreme: former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and Tea Party wingnut Kelli Ward (who challenged the late Sen. John McCain in Arizona’s 2016 GOP Senate primary, arguing that he wasn’t far enough to the right).

When she dropped out of the race, Green urged Arizona residents to “vote for a better Arizona, and that would be for Kyrsten Sinema, the Democratic Party.” But the question is: how many Arizona residents have already voted for Green already via absentee ballots? We won’t know that for certain until after the election, but Arizona is very friendly to absentee voting—and according to the NBC-affiliated Channel 12 in Phoenix, an estimated 60% of all votes in the midterms in Arizona have already been cast via absentee ballots. So among that 60%, Arizona residents who have already voted for Green won’t have a chance to vote for Sinema or McSally instead.

But among the other 40%, Sinema still has some wiggle room. Any voters of the Grand Canyon State who think that their vote in the Arizona Senate race doesn’t count haven’t been paying attention to the polls—and Arizona residents might be up really late tonight waiting to find out whether Sinema or McSally will be taking over Jeff Flake’s seat in 2019.

 

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          Se guarda Trump durante las elecciones      Cache   Translate Page      
La Casa Blanca informó que el Presidente de EU se mantendrá en la residencia oficial monitoreando el desarrollo de la jornada electoral.
          Fox News Calls Sean Hannity’s Appearance with President Trump at GOP Rally in Missouri ‘An Unfortunate Distraction’      Cache   Translate Page      
Sean Hannity likewise insisted speaking onstage at the event "was NOT planned."

Fox News’ former slogan “fair and balanced” (which it dropped in 2017) has long been the butt of jokes among the far-right cable news outlet’s critics and detractors—and Fox News’ Sean Hannity wasn’t exactly going for “balance” or objectivity when he appeared with President Donald Trump at a GOP rally in Missouri on November 5 (the day before the 2018 midterms). But Fox News addressed the incident on Election Day, calling it “an unfortunate distraction.”

After Trump called Hannity to the stage at the rally, the long-time Fox News host and unapologetic Trump supporter told the Republican crowd that reporters covering the event “are fake news.”

Hannity was not the only member of the right-wing media who joined Trump at the rally. Fox News’ Jeanine Pirro appeared onstage with the president as well, as did veteran talk radio host Rush Limbaugh.

In an official statement, Fox News said, “Fox News does not condone any talent participating in campaign events. We have an extraordinary team of journalists helming our coverage tonight, and we are extremely proud of their work. This was an unfortunate distraction and has been addressed.” 

In an Election Day Twitter post, Hannity insisted that he hadn’t planned to speak at last night’s event in Missouri. Hannity posted, “When the POTUS invited me on stage to give a few remarks last night, I was surprised, yet honored by the president’s request. This was NOT planned.”

In another tweet, Hannity asserted, “And to be clear, I was not referring to my journalist colleagues at FOX News in those remarks. They do amazing work day in and day out in a fair and balanced way, and it is an honor to work with such great professionals.”

MSNBC and NBC News’ Dylan Byers (formerly of CNN) found Fox News’ claim that it “does not condone any talent participating in campaign events” to be laughable, posting on Twitter, “Respectfully, @seanhannity has been effectively campaigning for Trump for over a year on a much bigger platform than the stage at last night’s rally.”
 


          Trump views midterms through presidency-defining lens      Cache   Translate Page      
President Donald Trump packed his closing argument with hardline immigration rhetoric and harsh attacks on Democrats as he stared down the prospect of Republican losses that could shadow his presidency.
          The View’s Abby Huntsman Praises Trump for Motivating People to Vote — And Gets Immediately Shut Down by Whoopi Goldberg      Cache   Translate Page      
“I don’t know if that’s worth the tone,” Whoopi Goldberg said.

“The View” co-host Abby Huntsman insisted voter intensity was worth President Donald Trump’s blistering rhetoric, but host Whoopi Goldberg set her straight.

The president claimed he regrets the tone he’s set so far in the White House, and co-host Joy Behar argued Trump only said that to reassure women voters.

“He said it because he realizes that women like him less than menstrual cramps,” Behar said. “That’s why he said it.”

Huntsman tried to find a silver lining in Trump’s falsehoods and partisan attacks.

“I try to find the positive in these moments,” Huntsman said, “and I think the one thing about his tone that has been helpful for this country is it motivated people to get out and vote. Whether you like the tone or you hate the tone, people are voting. We’re already seeing this — 31 million people have already cast their ballots for this election.”

Goldberg wasn’t so sure.

“I don’t know if that’s worth the tone,” she said. “I don’t know if that’s worth it. I don’t know if him calling people names and talking about families and, you know, scaring people into thinking that brown people are coming to get them and take their jobs.”

Huntsman insisted that voting shows Americans care.

“No,” Goldberg said. “It shows that people are scared and they know that this is not what you want in the guy that’s supposed to be running stuff, but I don’t know if the tone is — I can take a lot of stuff. As I said weeks ago, you know, when you start the conversation with, they are murderers and rapists or they are this or they are that, for me that shuts everything down. I can’t hear anything.”

 


          Former FBI Director James Comey Urges Americans to Reject President Trump’s ‘Lying, Misogyny, Racism’ in Epic New York Times Op-Ed      Cache   Translate Page      
"The history of America consoles us, but also, calls us to action.”

Although James Comey spent much of his adult life as a registered Republican and made donations to the presidential campaigns of Sen. John McCain in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012, he has hardly been an ally of President Donald Trump—who fired him as FBI director in May 2017. And in an epic New York Times commentary published on Election Day, the former FBI director urges American voters to reject “the lying, misogyny, racism and attacks on the rule of law from our president.”

In 2018, Comey has not been shy about encouraging Americans to vote Democrat in the midterms—even if they are Republicans who, like himself, have policy differences with the Democratic Party. Republicans in Congress, Comey has complained, have been putting their party before the good of their country and become subservient to the Trump Administration. And that theme asserts itself in his Election Day piece.

Comey’s article delves into U.S. history, noting that periods of social progress can be followed by an angry backlash—which is how he characterizes the Trump administration.

“Our country has changed dramatically in recent years,” the former FBI director explains. “We elected a black man president for two terms, and a woman won the popular vote in the 2016 presidential election. We legalized gay marriage, have an entirely new approach to work and technology and families, and we are on a path to the white majority becoming a minority. History shows us that with so much progress and change, a spasm of negativity and backlash was inevitable.”

Drawing a parallel between the Trump era and the 1920s, the 57-year-old Comey notes that progress for African-Americans, women and Jews after World War I was followed by a resurgence in Ku Klux Klan activity during the following decade.

“The years after the end of World War I were a period of stunning progress for our country,” Comey asserts. “Women got the right to vote. Blacks moved into the growing industrial economy. Catholics and Jews flooded in as immigrants. But that change brought reaction. In the 1920s, the Klan was reborn. Millions of Americans joined the KKK, including 16 United States senators, 11 governors and dozens of members of the House of Representatives.”

Comey quickly adds, however, “The Klan fever broke in the late 1920s, and we resumed our upward progress. That’s the story of America.”

Comey goes on to note that Sen. Joseph McCarthy’s witch hunt of the 1950s “disappeared almost overnight” after he was discredited, and that the racist bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church (a black church) in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963 “led to bipartisan support in Congress to pass the Civil Rights and Voting Rights acts that changed our country for the better.” And history, according to Comey, shows that sooner or later, Americans “resume our upward march.”

“Every American should be speaking about our nation’s values,” Comey concludes. “Every American should be voting those values, which are far more important than even the most passionate policy differences. The history of America consoles us, but also, calls us to action.”
 


          Information Warfare and Security Flaws: Why the American Voting System Is Still at Serious Risk      Cache   Translate Page      
As this election’s results come back, they will reveal whether the misinformation and propaganda campaigns conducted alongside the political ones were effective.

As the 2018 midterms proceed, there are still significant risks to the integrity of the voting system – and information warfare continues to try to influence the American public’s choices when they cast their ballots.

On the day of the election, there were a number of early hitches in voting at individual polling places, such as polling places opening late and vote-counting machines not plugged in. But there seem not – at least not yet – to be major problems across the country.

However, not all the election-related news and information voters have been encountering in recent days and weeks is accurate, and some of it is deliberately misleading. As this election’s results come back, they will reveal whether the misinformation and propaganda campaigns conducted alongside the political ones were effective.

Securing election systems

America’s electoral process remains highly fragmented, because of the country’s cherished tradition of decentralized government and local control. While this may leave some individual communities’ voting equipment potentially vulnerable to attack, the nation’s voting process overall may be more trustworthy as a result of this fragmentation. With no unified government agency or office to provide, administer and protect election technologies, there’s not one central national element that could fail or be attacked.

Across the country, though, many districts’ voters will cast ballots with the help of machines that have long-standing security concerns. Fortunately, 45 states keep a paper record of each vote cast – whether for fear of threats to voting integrity or just budget constraints preventing purchase of newer gear. But that means five states – Louisiana, Georgia, South Carolina, New Jersey and Delaware – don’t keep paper records of their voters’ choices.

Voting machine vendors have been reluctant to appear before Congress to explain their systems’ security practices – and shortcomings. However, federal agencies have helped some states reduce the likelihood of voting machines being hacked or physically tampered with.

Beyond voting machines

Election security is about much more than voting machines and vote-counting systems, though they are the most visible technologies at work on Election Day. State systems that track voter registrations, or allow users to register online, are enticing targets for hackers, too. Security firm Carbon Black reported that 81 million voter records from 20 states are available in online forums. This data, obtained by hacking various official and corporate databases, could be used to facilitate voter fraud or sow confusion at polling places on Election Day: How would you feel if you were told that someone using your name and address had already voted?

There are security concerns even in states like Oregon, where everyone votes on paper and mails in their ballots in advance of Election Day. That state’s election officials were targeted by hackers seeking to gain access to state email and database systems. With that access, attackers might be able to digitally impersonate a government official to send false or confusing emails, press releases or other notifications to citizens, journalists or poll workers.

Also at risk are public-facing official websites that carry election information. Merely changing the reported location of polling places or voting hours could prevent some people from voting. Also vulnerable are states’ methods of announcing preliminary election results. At a major internet security conference in August, children were able to compromise replicas of several states’ election-reporting systems. The most remarkable was that in just 10 minutes, an 11-year-old boy cracked the security on a copy of the Florida secretary of state’s website and was able to change the publicly announced vote totals for candidates. That could be enough to cast doubt on whatever was later reported as the official results – and the integrity of the system itself.

Managing information on social media

A more difficult threat to defend against is information warfare, which doesn’t attack voting machines or election officials’ computers. Rather, it targets voters’ perceptions and decisions, seeking to influence how they vote.

Long before the 2016 U.S. presidential election, information warfare was influencing elections around the world, including in Ukraine, Myanmar and Egypt. But after 2016, Facebook and Twitter came under intense scrutiny for their role in providing digital environments that facilitated the spread of misinformation to sow discontent, and special counsel Robert Mueller began investigating Russians’ influence efforts.

In the run-up to the 2018 midterms, Russians and others were still hard at work trying to influence Americans to vote in ways that help foreign interests. In October, the U.S. Department of Justice charged a Russian woman with creating thousands of fake social media accounts allegedly representing American citizens to “create and amplify divisive social media and political content” before the election.

This year, though, unlike two years ago, social media companies are taking action. Twitter and Facebook have both deleted thousands of accounts they identified as engaging in propaganda and influence-peddling. And they have made other efforts to identify and fight falsehoods on their platforms, too.

Nevertheless, online misinformation continues to thrive. More than 80 percent of the Twitter accounts that often shared links to false and misleading information in 2016 are still active today. And the amount of online misinformation is higher than it was two years ago.

Investigating alleged wrongdoing

U.S. intelligence and police agencies are concerned about the potential effects of misinformation on the American electorate. But large proportions of the country don’t trust those organizations to be politically independent. It doesn’t help that the White House continues to claim, without evidence, that voter fraud is a significant problem.

Mainstream news organizations can find themselves under scrutiny too, either for reporting falsehoods that appear to gain traction online or for failing to filter out or properly identify inaccurate information for their readers.

Looking ahead

Protecting democracy is a huge challenge. I’ve written before that it involves more than technical solutions to computer problems. The U.S. government, and the people it serves, must find the desire and the drive to establish secure and trustworthy procedures for running elections across the country. Education is also key, teaching people from an early age how to recognize propaganda and misinformation, and think critically about the information they encounter. Facts are not subject to alternative views; without widespread agreement on common objective realities, society and government cannot function well.

Technology continues to evolve, presenting challenges to individuals and society alike. Emerging “deepfake” technology is already helping create convincing videos of people appearing to say and do things they never said or did. In addition, intelligent social media bots are becoming more human-like, making identifying and blocking them much more difficult. That’s just some of the challenges that democracies will face in the future.

Many of these problems will not have a clearly defined fix, because they involve a nuanced balancing of individual rights and social necessities. Real and lasting solutions must come from civil discourse by rational and objectively informed people who have, above all, the actual honest desire to do it right.

Richard Forno, Senior Lecturer, Cybersecurity & Internet Researcher, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

 

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          Internet Ruthlessly Mocks Trump for Warning that Democrats Will 'Obliterate Obamacare'      Cache   Translate Page      
Wait, what did he just say?

At one of his final pre-midterm rallies in Missouri, President Donald Trump made an utterly bizarre claim: Democrats are coming for your ... Obamacare.

"One of their very first projects will be a socialist takeover of American health care, you know what's happening, and your taxes are going to triple, maybe quadruple," he said. "You're not going to be happy, I know you well. The Democrat plan would obliterate Obamacare, it will also — which is good, but will leave the bad parts behind."

Even Trump seemed to realize halfway into that rant the absurdity of claiming Democrats will "obliterate Obamacare" — the party's landmark accomplishment that he and Republicans have spent years sabotaging and trying to repeal.

And in no time, social media exploded with mockery and disbelief at the president:

 

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          GOP Candidates Face Outcry For Depicting Jewish Opponents Clutching Fistfuls of Cash      Cache   Translate Page      
The GOP isn't even trying to be subtle about it anymore.

The dust has barely settled from the horrific Tree of Life shooting in Pittsburgh, committed by a neo-Nazi who believed Jewish groups are funding an influx of nonwhite migrants into the United States for nefarious purposes.

But Republicans apparently feel no responsibility to stand up to anti-Semitic sentiment. On the contrary, many GOP candidates are exploiting age-old stereotypes to attack Jewish opponents as avaricious and money-grubbing.

On Tuesday, with the polls opening nationwide, the Washington Post detailed multiple instances around the country of Republicans who have gone after Jewish Democrats by depicting them clutching fistfuls of cash.

One ad in Alaska depicted a Jewish state Senate candidate as a shadowy figure stuffing $100 bills into his suit, captioned "If you give Jesse Keihl your vote, you may as well give him your wallet." Republicans in Washington's 8th District illustrated the Democratic candidate, Dr. Kim Schrier, clutching a wad of $20 bills with the line "Dr. Tax will see you now!"

Another mailer in North Carolina showed Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer with a stack of bills, while a GOP state assembly candidate in California showed challenger Josh Lowenthal tinted green and clutching $100s, and the Connecticut Republican state Senate candidate put out an attack against opponent Matthew Lesser showing him grasping a wad of cash with a bug-eyed, demonic grin.

The anti-Semitic attacks are getting so grotesque that even some Republicans are sickened. "Jesse is proudly and prominently a member of Juneau's Jewish community," said Scott Kendall, a Jewish Republican who served as chief of staff to outgoing Gov. Bill Walker. "It is tough for me to process through that and not see an ill intent."

The stereotype of the Jewish people as money-grubbing and usurious dates back centuries, originating from Roman and medieval Church depictions of Judas' betrayal of Christ for thirty pieces of silver. It has been used to justify horrific persecution of Jews — a key fixture of Nazi propaganda was that the postwar German economy was suffering because Jews had bled the nation of all its money.

But Republicans have been increasingly willing to lean on this poisonous imagery for political ends. In 2016, the Trump campaign shared an image of Hillary Clinton depicting her on a pile of cash with a Star of David, an image first posted on an anti-Semitic message board (Clinton is a Methodist).

More recently, they have sought to tie the Honduran migrant caravan to George Soros, a Jewish Hungarian-born philanthropist billionaire and Holocaust survivor known for his contributions to liberal causes.

 

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          Here's How Progressives Can Win — No Matter What Happens on Election Day      Cache   Translate Page      
Race, class and justice: After the midterms, a new way forward for Democrats

This week's midterm elections are likely the most important in recent American history, a referendum on the present and future of the country’s multiracial democracy. On one side there is Donald Trump and a Republican Party which has fully embraced white backlash politics and the lie that white Americans are under siege in “their own country.” Trump and his movement represent an emerging American form of fascism and a full-on assault on democracy. On the other side is the Democratic Party and its multiracial coalition of mostly younger, more educated and cosmopolitan voters who correctly see in Donald Trump and his movement an existential threat to their human rights, safety, dignity and prosperity.

Running through both sides of this fractious political divide – what feels like a domestic cold war about to turn hot — are old and unresolved questions about the relationship between race and class in America.

Donald Trump bellows about the “forgotten” (white) American and taking the “country back” for the (white) “working class.” This is fake populism and classic Herrenvolk right-wing "producerism." Or to put things more simply, white identity politics repackaged as something else.

In response, the Democratic Party have struggled to create a unifying narrative. Too many of its most vocal spokespeople – especially on the left – have suggested that “identity” politics and too much focus on issues of race and gender allowed Donald Trump to steal the presidency from Hillary Clinton and the Democrats in 2016.

López’s new research project suggests that Democrats need to embrace a more sophisticated way of talking about race, class and human rights as being inseparable from one another. Ultimately, it is plutocrats like Donald Trump, Republican donors and funders, and other members of the 1 percent who are using racism -- as they have done throughout American history -- to divide and conquer, leaving the large majority of people less prosperous, less secure and less free.

How do racial “dog-whistle” politics play into this right-wing strategy? What does white racial identity mean for white Americans at present? In what ways has Trump-style white identity politics actually hurt white people? How can a smarter and more nuanced discussion of race and class unite voters in support of the Democratic Party specifically, and liberal and progressive policies more broadly? How have right-wing libertarians and other conservatives combined racism with a narrative about “big government” to destroy the social safety net, make the rich even richer and more powerful, and hurt the American people as a whole?

My conversation with Ian Haney López has been edited for clarity and length.

How was Donald Trump able to win the White House? What do we know about that now that we didn't know two years ago?

I would say that Trump’s path was eased by a half-century-long process in which the Republican Party purposefully remade itself as the white men’s party. They did this by harnessing racial demagoguery as a weapon. But the fact of the matter is that racial demagoguery is not a weapon which can be controlled. Every Republican politician who gets elected as a racial demagogue is vulnerable to being bested on the right by someone who’s even more extreme in terms of racial demagoguery.

The big advantage Donald Trump had was that he didn’t actually believe he was going to become president. Therefore he didn’t care about the fate of the Republican Party. This meant Trump had few if any constraints – beyond what worked strategically to his advantage – on his use of racial demagoguery. Because Trump was willing to go much further in terms of his racist innuendo, he ran the field on the Republicans. He took them all out.

You look at these folks: Mitt Romney had his own track record with racial demagoguery, Ted Cruz and Jeb Bush started talking about deporting people. All of them were racial demagogues themselves, but they were constrained by the sense of what it might take to actually get elected, by the sense that Republicans needed a bigger base and a concern with their own integrity and public reputation. Trump was unburdened by any of that. Essentially what Donald Trump did was walk into a game that the Republicans had set up, one which had a few nominal constraints. He broke the rules and won the game.

There is a more or less straight line from John McCain and Sarah Palin to this moment with Donald Trump.

There is this deeper fear of actually naming what’s been happening in our country over the last 50 years. You have a lot of people who want to treat Trump like an anomaly and say, “Wow! That guy is out of control. If only we could back to 2016.” Here are the facts. In 2016 we were in a deep crisis as a country, a slow-moving crisis which has been on the march since the civil rights movement. Which direction are we going to go as a society? Will we proceed in the direction of multiracial democracy, or will we instead proceed away from democracy and towards rule by the rich? That question has been front and center in this country for the last 50 years. Trump didn’t raise that question. He only drew the dynamics into view.

Similarly, McCain brought Sarah Palin in and also engaged in significant racial demagoguery himself. He understood it was immoral. He understood it was racist. When McCain felt that his own election was jeopardized, he started talking about building a wall on the Mexico-U.S. border. McCain was more than happy to campaign with Donald Trump and with [former Phoenix sheriff] Joe Arpaio, and this is somebody that we know understood that those were racial demagogues. Shame on him! I think it’s a mistake to say, “Well, McCain was this wonderful centrist. If only we had more people like him.” No, McCain was very much a part of the problem.

Frankly, the people who refused to see McCain as part of the problem are part of the problem too, because they’re blinding themselves to the actual challenges we face as a country. Do we move self-confidently and purposefully towards multiracial democracy, or do we follow a set of leaders who are intentionally and strategically dividing us by race, moving us away from democracy and toward rule by the rich?

I have a standard warning I give when writing about Trump and this moment, or giving talks about it. I point out that America’s multiracial democracy is contingent and in many ways an outlier in the country’s history. White backlash under Trump and the Republican Party is a threat to post-civil rights America, a country too many people – especially younger Americans – have taken to be a norm and a given for all time. Are my worries and cautions misplaced? 

Not at all. If I were to push back at all, I’d say it’s not clear to me that we have yet achieved a multiracial democracy that we might be in the process of losing. We moved dramatically in that direction in the 1960s, but then, very quickly, progress was cut off. Definitions are important. When I use the term “multiracial democracy,” I mean a democracy in which all people are fully enfranchised and people are not disenfranchised in a way that significantly parallels the country’s racial hierarchy. When have we had that in the United States?

Since the mid-1970s, we’ve been moving back quite aggressively from that ideal. If you look at what’s been happening with the Republican Party, essentially from 1980 onward, they came to understand that their election depended upon disenfranchising people of color. They have been aggressively pursuing the disenfranchisement of people of color through such policies as felony disenfranchisement laws, gerrymandering and now this whole narrative about almost nonexistent “voter fraud.”

Meanwhile, of course, these are the same Republicans who will not lift a finger to ensure that our voting systems are protected against hacking by Russia. There is a profoundly antidemocratic impulse at work on the American right wing, and it’s embodied institutionally in the Republican Party. It has forestalled any actual move towards multiracial democracy.

This hostility towards multiracial democracy is part of a hostility by Republicans and conservatives to democracy more generally. For example, the rule of law, freedom of the press and what is happening with America’s courts from the appellate to the federal system also show how the conservative movement is hostile to democracy. Trump is just more obvious about it.

The right-wing assault on the judicial branch is also a clear example of how conservatism and racism are one and the same thing in America at present.

Yes, although I would not go that far. I would say that the Federalist Society for example takes a view of race relations which they claim is “anti-racist.” Yet it’s a view that tends to ensure the continuation of white dominance. But this is not just Trump. Conservatives have been engaged in a purposeful remaking of the courts that has two complementary parts. This is pure “dog-whistle” politics.

One part is to attack the courts for their recent role in promoting racial integration and gender equality and to say, “Well, the courts are full of activist judges.” In this logic, the courts do not deserve legitimacy because they are promoting this illegitimate liberal agenda of integration and gender equality: “We have to get rid of activist judges.” What that means in practice is that we have to install court justices who are hostile to the basic idea that human rights should exist for everybody in society.

The other half of this logic and strategy is that conservatives are going to take the opportunity to put on the court justices and judges who are friendly to the business community. This is part of one big strategy.

The more we shut down human rights as a society, the more we create space to open up for a pro-business orientation. What we have in the Supreme Court as it exists now – and where Brett Kavanaugh will only make this worse – is an institution that is historically one of the most hostile to civil rights and one of the friendliest to big business. That is a product of dog-whistle politics.

How does this work? Right-wing politicians say to voters, “Hey! People of color are a threat. You know who else is a threat? Government and in particular, the courts, because the courts keep forcing you to have to deal with these people. Let’s remake the courts so that you’re protected from these activist judges.”

In the process of remaking the courts, they install business-friendly judges who are busy making life difficult for unions, making life difficult for people who want to sue corporations, making life wonderful for big money in politics, making life wonderful for polluters.

These are the wages of dog-whistle politics: The promise that you’re going to be protected from people of color and activist judges and government that protects them, when in reality what you’re really going to get is a judicial system and a government that helps rig the rules for the new plutocrats.

Here is an obvious and common objection by conservatives – especially College Republican types who still have Ayn Rand in their back pocket – to your observation. “We have to free business and get rid of regulations because capitalism and the market are antithetical to racism. Those are market inefficiencies. If we just free business, then racism will go away.” 

Anybody who says that is not paying attention to what’s actually happening in the economy. The whole idea of unfettered competition, that’s just theoretical libertarian nonsense. One would have to be crazy to believe that stuff.

What you really have is not deregulation, but re-regulation on the part of the corporations and the family dynasties and the lobbyists themselves. This is the rich writing the rules for themselves, and they write the rules in ways that protect them from market competition and liability when in the course of making billions they do damage to regular people.

The whole sort of college libertarian thinking is so much self-induced blindness about what’s lurking behind these arguments. It wouldn’t take but 15 or 20 minutes of serious reading to discover that very few people are actually serious about a deregulated marketplace. It wouldn’t take that much more to discover that many of the big libertarians, including Rand Paul and his father, are people who came to libertarianism as a way of opposing civil rights.

It doesn’t take that much reflection to recognize that libertarianism as a political ideology is most attractive to young (white) men of great means who can, because of their age and gender, imagine themselves as dominant and heroic and self-sufficient. And also because of their privilege and means, these same libertarians don’t worry about how they are going to pay for education, how they are going to pay for health care, how they are going to pay for shelter, how they are going to pay for food. They have not experienced the hardships of life or its sudden reversals.

Ultimately, there is a type of political and psychological immaturity to libertarianism. There is also a disregard for human rights, through libertarianism, for many different people in our society.

What are some examples of how racism actually hurts white people? Of course, there is what the historian and sociologist W.E.B. Du Bois famously described as the “psychological wages of whiteness.” But there is a huge material component to whiteness as well.

I think you’ve hit on a really critical point. What is the relationship between most white people today, in 2018, and whiteness as an identity? Being considered “white” is a type of social identity. But in this moment with Trump we have an opportunity to show white folks that seeking meaning in being white is actually very dangerous to their welfare and the welfare of their children. In a remarkable way, given the politics of this crisis, we’re in a different position in 2018 than we were in 1968 -- let alone than we were in the 1600s -- to make this point.

For centuries the radical idea has been cross-racial solidarity between working people. But the reality has also been that the psychological and material benefits of whiteness have been enormous and thus sufficient to win over the loyalty of many whites. Whiteness has granted certainty about one’s place in society, one’s own inherent goodness, one’s own rationality, one’s human capacity, one’s ability to engage in self-governance.

Whiteness also provided jobs, neighborhoods, houses, the clubs, the churches, etc. These are tremendous benefits. How do they compare to the one percent, or the one-tenth of one percent, in terms of class and money? Relatively speaking, they're crumbs. But these wages of whiteness are still significant.

What has happened in 2018, by comparison? Two different things. On the one hand, if we think about the psychological wages of whiteness, for many whites those wages have been going down because of the civil rights movement, and going down in a way that I think many whites would actually describe as positive. That is, many whites have internalized the idea that foregrounding your sense of self in race pride is racist, immoral and ugly.

That has diminished the value of thinking of yourself as white. I can’t really be proud of being white: That’s morally wrong. That reduces the psychological wages of whiteness. Now, to be absolutely clear, many whites are fighting to reaffirm the wages of whiteness. This is the real meaning of Trump’s slogan, “Make America Great Again.”

On the other hand, what’s happened to the material wages of whiteness? Those have been going down as American society racially integrated. But even more profoundly, white racial fear has been weaponized by the rich over the last 50 years through dog-whistle politics. This is the basis upon which many whites have been convinced to support a siphoning of wealth from themselves and their families skywards, up into the economic stratosphere for the plutocrats.

With Donald Trump, progressives have a chance to make two critical points to whites. Critical point No. 1: Think about the psychological wages of whiteness in terms of Trump. Trump exemplifies what it means to build your identity around being proud of being white. It means to be a liar. It means to be cruel. It means to dehumanize others. It means to steal from others. It means to be a bully and a cheat. That’s what it means if you want to build your identity around white pride.

Second, look at Trump and ask yourself: Is whiteness helping regular white folks, or is whiteness just a weapon that billionaires can use against everybody? Trump gives us the opportunity to say to many whites that the biggest financial threat in your life comes from other whites voting their racial fears and handing the country over to greedy billionaires who only really care about themselves.

These two dynamics, I think, put us in a remarkable place in 2018 where we can say this old dream of cross-racial solidarity that has always foundered on the shoals of the value of whiteness to whites might finally be possible now -- if we can convince enough whites that seeking to be white as a source of identity is a moral disaster and a financial disaster as well.

How would you explain “dog-whistle” politics – the term is increasingly common in American political discourse but rarely properly defined? What examples would you offer of how dog-whistle politics hurt Americans on both sides of the color line?

Donald Trump went to the American people and said, “You need to worry about illegal aliens. You need to worry about Mexico sending rapists. You need to worry about Muslim terrorists.” He also said, “Crime in the black communities is awful. People can’t go outside without getting shot. We can fix that. We can ban Muslims. We can get tougher on crime in black neighborhoods. We can build a wall on the border.”

How are these examples of dog-whistle politics? On their surface, they do not mention race. They do not use a racial epithet. They do not come across as white supremacy, and yet just below the surface, that’s the narrative. It’s a narrative of racial fear.

Yes, Trump says “Muslims.” Yes, he says “Mexicans.” But his defense is that “Mexican” is a nationality or “Mexico” is a country. “Muslims” are a religion. That’s today’s dog-whistle. You have people engaging in a classic form of race-baiting that understands race as both ancestry and culture, but who then turn around and say, “These Mexicans are rapists.” That has nothing to do with race, right? That’s the dog-whistle: To use a racial provocation and to know that you’re doing such a thing. That’s the political speech.

What outcomes has this all enabled? The reality of what people are getting with Donald Trump and his Republican Party is a cabinet full of billionaires, rampant corruption, a $1.5 trillion tax cut for the very rich, a Department of Education that wants to make it easier for predatory companies to rip off people who are taking loans for a chance at a better life, an EPA that only cares about making sure polluters can make more money. This is all dog-whistle politics personified. One could not have a more powerful example of the way in which racially charged language is consistently used and where race is combined with rule by the rich.

What do we know empirically about white racial identity and public opinion in this moment of Trumpism?

The data is really compelling and very disturbing. We know that racial resentment, measured under what social scientists call the “modern racism” scale, is the No. 1 driver of support for Donald Trump. But there is an even better and more powerful means of measuring white antipathy towards people of color and government.

Since the early 1970s, what the American right-wing has been doing is conjoining race and government in the economy. Their basic message has been to fear and dislike people of color. There is another component to this as well:  Hate “big government” because it coddles “those people” with welfare and refuses to control them through criminal law. Turn away from government, trust the marketplace.

These three ideas, race, government and economy, are all linked. If you really want to understand how race is working in the United States, you really need to think about new racial frames that combine not only dislike for people of color, but also distrust in government and support for individual efforts in the marketplace.  When you look at that combination we see the correlation between those three values and support for Trump. The relationship is even more powerful than racial resentment.

There is a second component: What does race mean to whites? Race is a social construction. How is it evolving? How is it shifting? How is it responding to politics?

New research asked self-identified white people: "How important is being 'white' to you?" About 60 percent said anywhere from moderately to extremely important, and right around half said they felt that it was important for them to work together with other whites to protect the interests of whites as a group. Those are remarkable findings because what they’re telling us is there is a public etiquette of colorblindness. Whites routinely assert this set of rules when they’re trying to get people of color to stop talking about race.

Post-civil rights era racial colorblindness demands, “Hey, it’s wrong to foreground race. It’s wrong to notice it. It’s wrong to talk about it. It’s wrong to think about yourself and racial identity.” That might be the public rhetoric, but it’s not the reality, because at present somewhere upwards of half of whites are self-consciously thinking of themselves as white.

You are involved in an exciting new project which explores how we can think more strategically about the relationship between race and class in America.   

In this new research we asked a set of questions about race, class and government. We used the answers to sort the American public into three groups. We call them “base,” “persuadables” in the middle and “opposition.”

The “base” are people who basically said, “People of color are beset by structural problems. People are poor for structural reasons. Government has an important role to play.”

People who are the “opposition” took the opposite points of view. They said consistently that people of color are poor because there’s something wrong with them. Poor people are poor because there’s something wrong with them, and government is the problem. Base, we’re looking at about one-quarter of the population, 23 percent. Opposition, you’re looking at 18 percent. Let’s be crystal clear about that 18 percent. We will never get them. Their views are consistently hostile to progressive views on race, on what it means to be poor and the economy and the role of government.

But, that leaves about 60 percent of the people in the middle. This “persuadable” category constitutes three out of five Americans. With such a large group, it includes a lot of people of color. It includes a lot of Democrats. It includes a lot of union members. It also includes some Republicans, and maybe a few Trump voters, It’s a very broad group. When we look at this group, especially on race and the economy, what we found was that they held reactionary views. They would say things such as “Poverty among people of color is explained by a lack of effort.”

At the same time, they also held racially progressive views. They would toggle between the two perspectives. This was tremendously important because I think a lot of us have thought, “Wow! There’s a lot of racism out there, how are we going to overcome that?” Yes, there is a lot of racism out there, but it turns out there’s also a lot of racially progressive views. That creates the possibility of actually connecting with and activating those racially progressive views.

A common criticism of Hillary Clinton in the last campaign was that she talked too much about race and that this type of “identity politics" made her vulnerable to Trump’s right-wing “populist” message about class. How would you respond?

I think Hillary Clinton talked too much race in the wrong way. It was not the amount of time she dedicated to talking about race, but rather the way she talked about it. If we talk about race as white racism against people of color, that’s a frame which has negative effects both for whites and for people of color. What we found is that if we talk about racism that way, then white audiences feel implicated and they’re turned off. This is not at all surprising.

More surprising, we found that when we talked to communities of color and we offered a political analysis which said, “The main problem is politicians who are racists and racist voters who vote for them,” people of color were demobilized by that narrative. That story seemed to invoke 300 years of history. It made things seem insurmountable. People went very quickly from a sense of what’s politically possible to a narrative of what they could control as individuals. Whenever you see people shifting to stories of individual responsibility and what they can control, this reaffirms the right-wing framework that says, “You’re on your own. Take care of yourself. If you fail, it’s your own fault.”

Now let’s try a different frame: “Racism is a weapon of the rich that’s being used against all of us.” In our focus groups  we talked about racism as a weapon of the rich and explained that this is a "divide and distract" tactic that they are using against whites, against blacks, against brown folks, against Native Americans and Asian-Americans and immigrants. This is a weapon of the rich. This allowed whites to see how they are also targeted by the racial manipulation by the rich.

This narrative framework also allowed people of color to say, “We know that we need to fight racism, but now there’s a chance that white people might be in this fight with us too --maybe not with the same stakes, but still in this fight.”

There’s power to creating a sense of cross-racial solidarity, not alone on a moral ground because fighting racism is the right thing to do, but centered more firmly in the idea that fighting racism is the only way that white and black and brown folks are going to be able to thrive in this society. Cross-racial solidarity can defeat racism as a “divide and distract” weapon. It can get the government back on the side of people and have it create economic prosperity and racial justice for all people.

What are some narratives that you would suggest the Democrats use to defeat the Republican Party and Donald Trump?

Our research shows that there is a core narrative which progressives need to adopt.

Part one: Defeat, “divide and distract” as a tactic by insisting on cross-racial solidarity that includes whites and other communities of color.

Part two: Identify cross-racial solidarity as the way to take government back for working people and away from big business and the very rich.

Part three: Through government, build shared prosperity and promote racial justice.

Those are the three steps and it is applicable to many issues. Welfare reform, education, mass incarceration, mass deportation -- whatever policy you want to start with. The basic story is, “You know why we have mass deportation? Because politicians are running around trying to scare white people by saying that people of color are threatening. Well, they’re not. The real agenda is to distract us because we’re not paying attention to the way the rich and plutocrats are picking our collective pockets."

It doesn’t matter what issue you focus on. You can focus on the ones that are highly race-identified, like mass deportation or mass incarceration, public education and welfare. Or you can focus on issues like the environment, Wall Street regulation, and what’s happening in terms of higher education, free college, things that don’t seem directly connected to race. They’re all connected through the way in which government has been demonized.

Let’s reject distraction based on race or based on what we look like or where we come from or the gods we worship or the foods we eat, our gender, our sexual preference. Reject all of those distractions. Come together as working people to take this country back to elect the types of leaders we need -- and through these leaders demand human rights for all and a shared prosperity for all. That’s the basic narrative.

Good government, shared prosperity, human rights and shared prosperity creates a greater possibility of cross-racial solidarity. That is the message the Democrats really need to carry. If you think about 2016, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton both eventually came to the position that we need to do economic justice and racial justice. Unfortunately, neither of them had a story about how they were connected.

We need to start focusing on the way in which the rich are ripping off all the rest of us while trying to distract us with fear-mongering about undocumented immigrants or Muslims. If we can recognize and defeat that ploy then we can come together across racial lines and take this country back.

 

 

I would say that Trump’s path was eased by a half-century-long process in which the Republican Party purposefully remade itself as the white men’s party. They did this by harnessing racial demagoguery as a weapon. But the fact of the matter is that racial demagoguery is not a weapon which can be controlled. Every Republican politician who gets elected as a racial demagogue is vulnerable to being bested on the right by someone who’s even more extreme in terms of racial demagoguery.

The big advantage Donald Trump had was that he didn’t actually believe he was going to become president. Therefore he didn’t care about the fate of the Republican Party. This meant Trump had few if any constraints – beyond what worked strategically to his advantage – on his use of racial demagoguery. Because Trump was willing to go much further in terms of his racist innuendo, he ran the field on the Republicans. He took them all out.

You look at these folks: Mitt Romney had his own track record with racial demagoguery, Ted Cruz and Jeb Bush started talking about deporting people. All of them were racial demagogues themselves, but they were constrained by the sense of what it might take to actually get elected, by the sense that Republicans needed a bigger base and a concern with their own integrity and public reputation. Trump was unburdened by any of that. Essentially what Donald Trump did was walk into a game that the Republicans had set up, one which had a few nominal constraints. He broke the rules and won the game.

There is a more or less straight line from John McCain and Sarah Palin to this moment with Donald Trump.

There is this deeper fear of actually naming what’s been happening in our country over the last 50 years. You have a lot of people who want to treat Trump like an anomaly and say, “Wow! That guy is out of control. If only we could back to 2016.” Here are the facts. In 2016 we were in a deep crisis as a country, a slow-moving crisis which has been on the march since the civil rights movement. Which direction are we going to go as a society? Will we proceed in the direction of multiracial democracy, or will we instead proceed away from democracy and towards rule by the rich? That question has been front and center in this country for the last 50 years. Trump didn’t raise that question. He only drew the dynamics into view.

Similarly, McCain brought Sarah Palin in and also engaged in significant racial demagoguery himself. He understood it was immoral. He understood it was racist. When McCain felt that his own election was jeopardized, he started talking about building a wall on the Mexico-U.S. border. McCain was more than happy to campaign with Donald Trump and with [former Phoenix sheriff] Joe Arpaio, and this is somebody that we know understood that those were racial demagogues. Shame on him! I think it’s a mistake to say, “Well, McCain was this wonderful centrist. If only we had more people like him.” No, McCain was very much a part of the problem.

Frankly, the people who refused to see McCain as part of the problem are part of the problem too, because they’re blinding themselves to the actual challenges we face as a country. Do we move self-confidently and purposefully towards multiracial democracy, or do we follow a set of leaders who are intentionally and strategically dividing us by race, moving us away from democracy and toward rule by the rich?

I have a standard warning I give when writing about Trump and this moment, or giving talks about it. I point out that America’s multiracial democracy is contingent and in many ways an outlier in the country’s history. White backlash under Trump and the Republican Party is a threat to post-civil rights America, a country too many people – especially younger Americans – have taken to be a norm and a given for all time. Are my worries and cautions misplaced? 

Not at all. If I were to push back at all, I’d say it’s not clear to me that we have yet achieved a multiracial democracy that we might be in the process of losing. We moved dramatically in that direction in the 1960s, but then, very quickly, progress was cut off. Definitions are important. When I use the term “multiracial democracy,” I mean a democracy in which all people are fully enfranchised and people are not disenfranchised in a way that significantly parallels the country’s racial hierarchy. When have we had that in the United States?

Since the mid-1970s, we’ve been moving back quite aggressively from that ideal. If you look at what’s been happening with the Republican Party, essentially from 1980 onward, they came to understand that their election depended upon disenfranchising people of color. They have been aggressively pursuing the disenfranchisement of people of color through such policies as felony disenfranchisement laws, gerrymandering and now this whole narrative about almost nonexistent “voter fraud.”

Meanwhile, of course, these are the same Republicans who will not lift a finger to ensure that our voting systems are protected against hacking by Russia. There is a profoundly antidemocratic impulse at work on the American right wing, and it’s embodied institutionally in the Republican Party. It has forestalled any actual move towards multiracial democracy.

This hostility towards multiracial democracy is part of a hostility by Republicans and conservatives to democracy more generally. For example, the rule of law, freedom of the press and what is happening with America’s courts from the appellate to the federal system also show how the conservative movement is hostile to democracy. Trump is just more obvious about it.

The right-wing assault on the judicial branch is also a clear example of how conservatism and racism are one and the same thing in America at present.

Yes, although I would not go that far. I would say that the Federalist Society for example takes a view of race relations which they claim is “anti-racist.” Yet it’s a view that tends to ensure the continuation of white dominance. But this is not just Trump. Conservatives have been engaged in a purposeful remaking of the courts that has two complementary parts. This is pure “dog-whistle” politics.

One part is to attack the courts for their recent role in promoting racial integration and gender equality and to say, “Well, the courts are full of activist judges.” In this logic, the courts do not deserve legitimacy because they are promoting this illegitimate liberal agenda of integration and gender equality: “We have to get rid of activist judges.” What that means in practice is that we have to install court justices who are hostile to the basic idea that human rights should exist for everybody in society.

The other half of this logic and strategy is that conservatives are going to take the opportunity to put on the court justices and judges who are friendly to the business community. This is part of one big strategy.

The more we shut down human rights as a society, the more we create space to open up for a pro-business orientation. What we have in the Supreme Court as it exists now – and where Brett Kavanaugh will only make this worse – is an institution that is historically one of the most hostile to civil rights and one of the friendliest to big business. That is a product of dog-whistle politics.

How does this work? Right-wing politicians say to voters, “Hey! People of color are a threat. You know who else is a threat? Government and in particular, the courts, because the courts keep forcing you to have to deal with these people. Let’s remake the courts so that you’re protected from these activist judges.”

In the process of remaking the courts, they install business-friendly judges who are busy making life difficult for unions, making life difficult for people who want to sue corporations, making life wonderful for big money in politics, making life wonderful for polluters.

These are the wages of dog-whistle politics: The promise that you’re going to be protected from people of color and activist judges and government that protects them, when in reality what you’re really going to get is a judicial system and a government that helps rig the rules for the new plutocrats.

Here is an obvious and common objection by conservatives – especially College Republican types who still have Ayn Rand in their back pocket – to your observation. “We have to free business and get rid of regulations because capitalism and the market are antithetical to racism. Those are market inefficiencies. If we just free business, then racism will go away.” 

Anybody who says that is not paying attention to what’s actually happening in the economy. The whole idea of unfettered competition, that’s just theoretical libertarian nonsense. One would have to be crazy to believe that stuff.

What you really have is not deregulation, but re-regulation on the part of the corporations and the family dynasties and the lobbyists themselves. This is the rich writing the rules for themselves, and they write the rules in ways that protect them from market competition and liability when in the course of making billions they do damage to regular people.

The whole sort of college libertarian thinking is so much self-induced blindness about what’s lurking behind these arguments. It wouldn’t take but 15 or 20 minutes of serious reading to discover that very few people are actually serious about a deregulated marketplace. It wouldn’t take that much more to discover that many of the big libertarians, including Rand Paul and his father, are people who came to libertarianism as a way of opposing civil rights.

It doesn’t take that much reflection to recognize that libertarianism as a political ideology is most attractive to young (white) men of great means who can, because of their age and gender, imagine themselves as dominant and heroic and self-sufficient. And also because of their privilege and means, these same libertarians don’t worry about how they are going to pay for education, how they are going to pay for health care, how they are going to pay for shelter, how they are going to pay for food. They have not experienced the hardships of life or its sudden reversals.

Ultimately, there is a type of political and psychological immaturity to libertarianism. There is also a disregard for human rights, through libertarianism, for many different people in our society.

What are some examples of how racism actually hurts white people? Of course, there is what the historian and sociologist W.E.B. Du Bois famously described as the “psychological wages of whiteness.” But there is a huge material component to whiteness as well.

I think you’ve hit on a really critical point. What is the relationship between most white people today, in 2018, and whiteness as an identity? Being considered “white” is a type of social identity. But in this moment with Trump we have an opportunity to show white folks that seeking meaning in being white is actually very dangerous to their welfare and the welfare of their children. In a remarkable way, given the politics of this crisis, we’re in a different position in 2018 than we were in 1968 -- let alone than we were in the 1600s -- to make this point.

For centuries the radical idea has been cross-racial solidarity between working people. But the reality has also been that the psychological and material benefits of whiteness have been enormous and thus sufficient to win over the loyalty of many whites. Whiteness has granted certainty about one’s place in society, one’s own inherent goodness, one’s own rationality, one’s human capacity, one’s ability to engage in self-governance.

Whiteness also provided jobs, neighborhoods, houses, the clubs, the churches, etc. These are tremendous benefits. How do they compare to the one percent, or the one-tenth of one percent, in terms of class and money? Relatively speaking, they're crumbs. But these wages of whiteness are still significant.

What has happened in 2018, by comparison? Two different things. On the one hand, if we think about the psychological wages of whiteness, for many whites those wages have been going down because of the civil rights movement, and going down in a way that I think many whites would actually describe as positive. That is, many whites have internalized the idea that foregrounding your sense of self in race pride is racist, immoral and ugly.

That has diminished the value of thinking of yourself as white. I can’t really be proud of being white: That’s morally wrong. That reduces the psychological wages of whiteness. Now, to be absolutely clear, many whites are fighting to reaffirm the wages of whiteness. This is the real meaning of Trump’s slogan, “Make America Great Again.”

On the other hand, what’s happened to the material wages of whiteness? Those have been going down as American society racially integrated. But even more profoundly, white racial fear has been weaponized by the rich over the last 50 years through dog-whistle politics. This is the basis upon which many whites have been convinced to support a siphoning of wealth from themselves and their families skywards, up into the economic stratosphere for the plutocrats.

With Donald Trump, progressives have a chance to make two critical points to whites. Critical point No. 1: Think about the psychological wages of whiteness in terms of Trump. Trump exemplifies what it means to build your identity around being proud of being white. It means to be a liar. It means to be cruel. It means to dehumanize others. It means to steal from others. It means to be a bully and a cheat. That’s what it means if you want to build your identity around white pride.

Second, look at Trump and ask yourself: Is whiteness helping regular white folks, or is whiteness just a weapon that billionaires can use against everybody? Trump gives us the opportunity to say to many whites that the biggest financial threat in your life comes from other whites voting their racial fears and handing the country over to greedy billionaires who only really care about themselves.

These two dynamics, I think, put us in a remarkable place in 2018 where we can say this old dream of cross-racial solidarity that has always foundered on the shoals of the value of whiteness to whites might finally be possible now -- if we can convince enough whites that seeking to be white as a source of identity is a moral disaster and a financial disaster as well.

How would you explain “dog-whistle” politics – the term is increasingly common in American political discourse but rarely properly defined? What examples would you offer of how dog-whistle politics hurt Americans on both sides of the color line?

Donald Trump went to the American people and said, “You need to worry about illegal aliens. You need to worry about Mexico sending rapists. You need to worry about Muslim terrorists.” He also said, “Crime in the black communities is awful. People can’t go outside without getting shot. We can fix that. We can ban Muslims. We can get tougher on crime in black neighborhoods. We can build a wall on the border.”

How are these examples of dog-whistle politics? On their surface, they do not mention race. They do not use a racial epithet. They do not come across as white supremacy, and yet just below the surface, that’s the narrative. It’s a narrative of racial fear.

Yes, Trump says “Muslims.” Yes, he says “Mexicans.” But his defense is that “Mexican” is a nationality or “Mexico” is a country. “Muslims” are a religion. That’s today’s dog-whistle. You have people engaging in a classic form of race-baiting that understands race as both ancestry and culture, but who then turn around and say, “These Mexicans are rapists.” That has nothing to do with race, right? That’s the dog-whistle: To use a racial provocation and to know that you’re doing such a thing. That’s the political speech.

What outcomes has this all enabled? The reality of what people are getting with Donald Trump and his Republican Party is a cabinet full of billionaires, rampant corruption, a $1.5 trillion tax cut for the very rich, a Department of Education that wants to make it easier for predatory companies to rip off people who are taking loans for a chance at a better life, an EPA that only cares about making sure polluters can make more money. This is all dog-whistle politics personified. One could not have a more powerful example of the way in which racially charged language is consistently used and where race is combined with rule by the rich.

What do we know empirically about white racial identity and public opinion in this moment of Trumpism?

The data is really compelling and very disturbing. We know that racial resentment, measured under what social scientists call the “modern racism” scale, is the No. 1 driver of support for Donald Trump. But there is an even better and more powerful means of measuring white antipathy towards people of color and government.

Since the early 1970s, what the American right-wing has been doing is conjoining race and government in the economy. Their basic message has been to fear and dislike people of color. There is another component to this as well:  Hate “big government” because it coddles “those people” with welfare and refuses to control them through criminal law. Turn away from government, trust the marketplace.

These three ideas, race, government and economy, are all linked. If you really want to understand how race is working in the United States, you really need to think about new racial frames that combine not only dislike for people of color, but also distrust in government and support for individual efforts in the marketplace.  When you look at that combination we see the correlation between those three values and support for Trump. The relationship is even more powerful than racial resentment.

There is a second component: What does race mean to whites? Race is a social construction. How is it evolving? How is it shifting? How is it responding to politics?

New research asked self-identified white people: "How important is being 'white' to you?" About 60 percent said anywhere from moderately to extremely important, and right around half said they felt that it was important for them to work together with other whites to protect the interests of whites as a group. Those are remarkable findings because what they’re telling us is there is a public etiquette of colorblindness. Whites routinely assert this set of rules when they’re trying to get people of color to stop talking about race.

Post-civil rights era racial colorblindness demands, “Hey, it’s wrong to foreground race. It’s wrong to notice it. It’s wrong to talk about it. It’s wrong to think about yourself and racial identity.” That might be the public rhetoric, but it’s not the reality, because at present somewhere upwards of half of whites are self-consciously thinking of themselves as white.

You are involved in an exciting new project which explores how we can think more strategically about the relationship between race and class in America.   

In this new research we asked a set of questions about race, class and government. We used the answers to sort the American public into three groups. We call them “base,” “persuadables” in the middle and “opposition.”

The “base” are people who basically said, “People of color are beset by structural problems. People are poor for structural reasons. Government has an important role to play.”

People who are the “opposition” took the opposite points of view. They said consistently that people of color are poor because there’s something wrong with them. Poor people are poor because there’s something wrong with them, and government is the problem. Base, we’re looking at about one-quarter of the population, 23 percent. Opposition, you’re looking at 18 percent. Let’s be crystal clear about that 18 percent. We will never get them. Their views are consistently hostile to progressive views on race, on what it means to be poor and the economy and the role of government.

But, that leaves about 60 percent of the people in the middle. This “persuadable” category constitutes three out of five Americans. With such a large group, it includes a lot of people of color. It includes a lot of Democrats. It includes a lot of union members. It also includes some Republicans, and maybe a few Trump voters, It’s a very broad group. When we look at this group, especially on race and the economy, what we found was that they held reactionary views. They would say things such as “Poverty among people of color is explained by a lack of effort.”

At the same time, they also held racially progressive views. They would toggle between the two perspectives. This was tremendously important because I think a lot of us have thought, “Wow! There’s a lot of racism out there, how are we going to overcome that?” Yes, there is a lot of racism out there, but it turns out there’s also a lot of racially progressive views. That creates the possibility of actually connecting with and activating those racially progressive views.

A common criticism of Hillary Clinton in the last campaign was that she talked too much about race and that this type of “identity politics" made her vulnerable to Trump’s right-wing “populist” message about class. How would you respond?

I think Hillary Clinton talked too much race in the wrong way. It was not the amount of time she dedicated to talking about race, but rather the way she talked about it. If we talk about race as white racism against people of color, that’s a frame which has negative effects both for whites and for people of color. What we found is that if we talk about racism that way, then white audiences feel implicated and they’re turned off. This is not at all surprising.

More surprising, we found that when we talked to communities of color and we offered a political analysis which said, “The main problem is politicians who are racists and racist voters who vote for them,” people of color were demobilized by that narrative. That story seemed to invoke 300 years of history. It made things seem insurmountable. People went very quickly from a sense of what’s politically possible to a narrative of what they could control as individuals. Whenever you see people shifting to stories of individual responsibility and what they can control, this reaffirms the right-wing framework that says, “You’re on your own. Take care of yourself. If you fail, it’s your own fault.”

Now let’s try a different frame: “Racism is a weapon of the rich that’s being used against all of us.” In our focus groups  we talked about racism as a weapon of the rich and explained that this is a "divide and distract" tactic that they are using against whites, against blacks, against brown folks, against Native Americans and Asian-Americans and immigrants. This is a weapon of the rich. This allowed whites to see how they are also targeted by the racial manipulation by the rich.

This narrative framework also allowed people of color to say, “We know that we need to fight racism, but now there’s a chance that white people might be in this fight with us too --maybe not with the same stakes, but still in this fight.”

There’s power to creating a sense of cross-racial solidarity, not alone on a moral ground because fighting racism is the right thing to do, but centered more firmly in the idea that fighting racism is the only way that white and black and brown folks are going to be able to thrive in this society. Cross-racial solidarity can defeat racism as a “divide and distract” weapon. It can get the government back on the side of people and have it create economic prosperity and racial justice for all people.

What are some narratives that you would suggest the Democrats use to defeat the Republican Party and Donald Trump?

Our research shows that there is a core narrative which progressives need to adopt.

Part one: Defeat, “divide and distract” as a tactic by insisting on cross-racial solidarity that includes whites and other communities of color.

Part two: Identify cross-racial solidarity as the way to take government back for working people and away from big business and the very rich.

Part three: Through government, build shared prosperity and promote racial justice.

Those are the three steps and it is applicable to many issues. Welfare reform, education, mass incarceration, mass deportation -- whatever policy you want to start with. The basic story is, “You know why we have mass deportation? Because politicians are running around trying to scare white people by saying that people of color are threatening. Well, they’re not. The real agenda is to distract us because we’re not paying attention to the way the rich and plutocrats are picking our collective pockets."

It doesn’t matter what issue you focus on. You can focus on the ones that are highly race-identified, like mass deportation or mass incarceration, public education and welfare. Or you can focus on issues like the environment, Wall Street regulation, and what’s happening in terms of higher education, free college, things that don’t seem directly connected to race. They’re all connected through the way in which government has been demonized.

Let’s reject distraction based on race or based on what we look like or where we come from or the gods we worship or the foods we eat, our gender, our sexual preference. Reject all of those distractions. Come together as working people to take this country back to elect the types of leaders we need -- and through these leaders demand human rights for all and a shared prosperity for all. That’s the basic narrative.

Good government, shared prosperity, human rights and shared prosperity creates a greater possibility of cross-racial solidarity. That is the message the Democrats really need to carry. If you think about 2016, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton both eventually came to the position that we need to do economic justice and racial justice. Unfortunately, neither of them had a story about how they were connected.

We need to start focusing on the way in which the rich are ripping off all the rest of us while trying to distract us with fear-mongering about undocumented immigrants or Muslims. If we can recognize and defeat that ploy then we can come together across racial lines and take this country back.

 


          Trump Economy: Wisconsin's Foxconn plant looking to bring in Chinese workers for US taxpayer-funded jobs      Cache   Translate Page      
The plant has been heavily subsidized with $3 billion in American tax dollars

A Wisconsin tech plant which has been hailed by President Donald Trump as a major step forward for American manufacturing is looking to bring in Chinese workers to staff the plant, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Foxconn Technology is a key supplier to Apple, and is opening a large new plant in the Midwest. The plant has been heavily subsidized with $3 billion in American tax dollars, potentially up to one million dollars per job.

But with a tight market for qualified American workers, Foxconn is "trying to tap Chinese engineers through internal transfers to supplement staffing."

“It’s very difficult to find skilled labor in our market,” said a staffing agency near the plant. “All the technical schools and local universities are gearing up their programs, but I still think Foxconn is going to fall short in terms of finding the people they need."

The company's plan is to bring in Chinese workers.

The big problem the company is facing? Chinese workers don't want to move to Wisconsin.

"One engineer who declined to give his name said he wouldn’t want to move to a place he worried could be as cold as Harbin, a northern Chinese city known as 'Ice City,'” reports the Wall Street Journal.

 


          Under Assault by Trump's GOP and Supreme Court, Unions Lead Massive Get Out the Vote Effort for Midterms: 'We Vote, We Win'      Cache   Translate Page      
"We don't know any other way. For us, it's a very natural way to survive: organize, organize."

In the face of a coordinated, corporate-funded assault on their very existence by President Donald Trump, Republicans at the federal and state level, and the right-wing Supreme Court, labor unions nationwide have mobilized massive numbers of struggling workersto turn out for Tuesday's critical midterms with the goal of defeating anti-union candidates and electing politicians willing to fight for progressive policies that benefit the working class like Medicare for All, a higher minimum wage, and the fundamental right to organize.

"The Culinary Workers Union registered 10,300 voters for the midterms. This union really gets it done. Still impressed by what I saw reporting on them in Vegas."
—David Jamieson, Huffington Post

"We don't know any other way," said Geoconda Arguello-Kline, the Secretary-Treasurer for the Culinary Workers Union in Las Vegas, which has registered over 10,300 new voters ahead of Tuesday's midterm elections to defeat Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.). "For us, it's a very natural way to survive here in Las Vegas: organize, organize."

With the rallying cry, "We vote, we win!" the union has provided resources for workers to learn about the candidates on the ballot, spread the word about the issues at stake in the midterms, and find the closest polling site.

The Culinary Union's get-out-the-vote efforts have been replicated throughout the nation, including in so-called "right-to-work states," where Republican legislatures have barred unions from collecting dues from all workers they represent in collective bargaining efforts to raise wages and improve working conditions.

"Things aren't changing for the better like they thought would happen. Real wages are not keeping pace with inflation. We haven't replaced the well-paying manufacturing jobs that we lost."
—Tim Burga, Ohio AFL-CIO

In Southern states like North Carolina, Tennessee, Florida, and Georgia, the Communications Workers of America (CWA)—which represents 700,000 workers nationwide—say it organized canvassing, mail, and phone bank operations that resulted in over four million door knocks."

In the Midwest, where workers have suffered from decades of deindustrialization, corporate outsourcing, and neglect from politicians who so often claim to care about their plight, the AFL-CIO says it has convinced thousands of union workers who backed Donald Trump in 2016 to turn out for progressive Democrats on Tuesday.

"About half of union households that voted for Trump said they are planning to vote for Democrats in two key statewide races," Vox reported on Monday, citing figures from the Ohio AFL-CIO. "That includes 51.4 percent of Trump voters who plan to cast a ballot for progressive Democrat Richard Cordray for governor and 49.9 percent of Trump voters who favor incumbent Sen. Sherrod Brown—the only Democrat currently holding statewide office."

Tim Burga, president of the Ohio AFL-CIO, said many union workers who initially backed Trump have realized after two years of plutocratic policies and stagnant wages that the president and his billionaire-filled cabinet are not on their side, and never were.

"Things aren't changing for the better like they thought would happen," Burga said. "Real wages are not keeping pace with inflation. We haven't replaced the well-paying manufacturing jobs that we lost."

With a historic number of House Democratic candidates backing Medicare for All, National Nurses United (NNU)—the largest organization of registered nurses in the U.S.—has also been tirelessly canvassing and phone banking in Maryland, Florida, and the many other states where candidates are standing up to America's disastrous for-profit healthcare industry.

See NNU's full list of all 225 House Democratic candidates running on Medicare for All here.


          'Women Are Just Deserting the Republican Party': CNN Analyst Argues Trump Just Realized He's Gone Too Far      Cache   Translate Page      
Trump is making his final election pitch with women surrogates. Gloria Borger thinks that's not an accident.

On Monday, in one of his final campaign stops before the polls open on Election Day, President Donald Trump brought two White House officials to help him stump for Senate candidate Mike Braun at a rally in Fort Wayne, Indiana: White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, and Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway.

The presence of two of the Trump administration's most prominent, forward-facing women, and Trump's simultaneous comments to local reporters about his "tone" were not lost on CNN political analyst Gloria Borger, who discussed the rally with Anderson Cooper and hit on a key point: that he may understand the most recent House polls show the Republican Party getting crushed among women, in the largest political gender gap in modern times.

"What do you make of President Trump bringing out Kellyanne Conway, bringing out Sarah Huckabee Sanders?" said Cooper. "Also saying, talking about tone, which is something he talked about a lot during the campaign, saying that when he became president he would change his tone ... maybe this was like a one-off in some local affiliate interview, but it's interesting that he's talking about, oh, it's kind of my regret."

"Gee, do you think it could be about women?" said Borger. "I mean, I'm just sort of thinking here that, he brings out all these women onstage, talks about his daughter, talks about his tone. Could it be about that women favor Democrats by about two to one now, and he understands that this is going to be a problem for him, particularly in the House?"

"And you know that he's usually not really reflective about these kind of things, so I thought it was actually quite surprising that he said that," she continued. "But the fact that he is saying it leads me to believe that he really understands that women are just, you know, deserting the Republican Party in droves."

"It doesn't mean he's going to change his tone," said Cooper.

"No," agreed Borger. "No, but I think he wanted to sound like he was."

Watch below:

 

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          Where the Trump Presidency Could Go in This Fever-Dream world of Ours in the Wake of Today’s Election      Cache   Translate Page      
A look at the age of Trump from November 2016 to November 2018 -- and beyond

Who could forget that moment?  The blue [red] wave -- long promised but also doubted -- had, however modestly [however massively], hit Washington and [the Democrats had just retaken Congress] [the Republicans had held Congress] [the Democrats had taken the House].  The media, Fox News and the usual right-wing websites aside, hailed the moment. [Fox News and the usual right-wing websites cheered the president on.] Donald Trump’s grip on America had finally been broken [reinforced].  Celebrations were widespread.  Congressional investigations, possibly even impeachment, were only months and a new Congress away [were now a faint memory], and it was then, of course, that the unexpected struck.  It was then that President Trump, citing national security concerns and a crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border, began the process whose end point we, of course, already know...

Okay, consider that the dystopian me speaking.  We don’t, of course, really know how our story yet ends, not faintly.  While I was writing this piece, I didn’t even know how Tuesday’s vote would turn out, though by the time you read it, you may.  Given the experience of election 2016, it would take a brave [foolish] soul to make a prediction this time around.

I certainly learned a lesson that November.  During the previous months of campaigning that election season, I never wrote a piece at TomDispatch that didn’t leave open the possibility of Donald Trump winning the presidency.  In the couple of weeks before that fateful November day, however, I got hooked on the polling results and on Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight website and became convinced that Hillary Clinton was a shoo-in.

Of course, I was in good company.  As Michael Wolff would later report in his bestselling book Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, on election eve, few in the Trump campaign, including the candidate himself, expected to win.  Most of them, again including The Donald, were already trying to parlay what they assumed was an assured loss into their next jobs or activities, including in the candidate’s case a possible “Trump network.”

So when, sometime after midnight, reality finally began to sink in -- fittingly enough, I had a 103-degree fever and was considering heading for an emergency room -- I was as disbelieving as the president-to-be. (He had, Wolff tells us, “assured” his wife, Melania, who was reportedly in tears of anything but joy that night, that he would never win and that she would never find herself in the White House.)  By then, it was for me a fever dream to imagine that bizarre, belligerent, orange-haired salesman-cum-con-artist entering the Oval Office.

Honestly, I shouldn’t have been the least bit surprised.  During election campaign 2016, I grasped much of this.  I wrote of the future president, for instance, as a con artist (particularly in reference to those taxes of his that we couldn’t see) and how Hillary Clinton’s crew hadn’t grasped the obvious: that many Americans would admire him for gaming the system, even if they couldn’t do the same themselves.  As I wrote at the time: “It’s something Donald Trump knows in his bones, even if all those pundits and commentators and pollsters (and for that matter Hillary Clinton’s advisers) don’t: Americans love a con man.”

I also saw that he was daring in ways unimaginable to an American politician -- because, of course, he wasn’t one -- particularly in promoting his slogan, MAGA, whose key word few of the political cognoscenti paid the slightest attention to: “again.”  At that moment, for presidents or politicians who wanted to become just that, it was obligatory to claim that the United States wasn’t just great but the greatest, most exceptional, most indispensable land ever.  (As Hillary Clinton typically put it that election season: “America is indispensable -- and exceptional -- because of our values.”)  Trump’s “again” in Make America Great Again suggested something quite different and so rang a bell in the heartland.  In the process, he became America’s first declinist presidential candidate. Early that October, I wrote this:

“[A] significant part of the white working class, at least, feels as if, whether economically or psychologically, its back is up against the wall and there’s nowhere left to go.  Under such circumstances, many of these voters have evidently decided that they’re ready to send a literal loose cannon into the White House; they’re willing, that is, to take a chance on the roof collapsing, even if it collapses on them. That is the new and unrecognizable role that Donald Trump has filled.  It’s hard to conjure up another example of it in our recent past. The Donald represents, as a friend of mine likes to say, the suicide bomber in us all. And voting for him, among other things, will be an act of nihilism, a mood that fits well with imperial decline.

“Think of him as a message in a bottle washing up on our shore...”

And yet, on that day of decision, I evidently reverted to the boy I had once been, the boy who grew up with a vision of an idealized America that would always do the right thing.  So I was shocked to the core by Donald Trump’s victory.

In that fever dream of a night, when he washed up on all our shores, I had certainly been trumped, but then, so had he, so had we all.  Under the circumstances, I’m sure you’ll understand why I’ve remained hesitant about putting my faith in polls in this election season or giving special significance to reports that the White House staff was glum as hell about the coming midterms and expected the worst. (After all, mightn’t this be that Michael Wolff election night all over again?)

The American Shooting Gallery

Two years after that fateful November night in 2016, we’re still living in a fever dream of some sort, enveloped 24/7 by the universe of President Trump and the “fake news media,” that provides him and the rest of us with a strange, all-encompassing echo chamber.  America, you might say, now has a 103-degree temperature and there isn’t an emergency room in sight.

And it’s unlikely to get better, whatever happens in the midterm elections.  Those who expect that a Democratic victory or a devastating Mueller reportin the weeks to come will be the beginning of the end for the Trump presidency (or, for that matter, that the victory of an ever more extreme Republican Party will simply prove more of the grisly same) might want to reconsider. Perhaps it's worth weighing other grimmer possibilities in the as-yet-unending rise of what’s still called “right-wing populism,” not just locally but globally.  Here in the United States, with hate and venom surging (and, yes indeed, being encouraged by President Trump for his own purposes), a genuinely ugly strain central to this country’s history is being resurrected.  In the process, a burgeoning number of deeply disturbed (and deeply animated) figures from among the most over-armed civilian population on the planet -- Yemen, of all the grim places, comes in a distant second -- are turning this country into a shooting gallery.

Win or lose today, don’t think that the Donald Trump we have is the one we’re fated to have until the day he goes down in flames. He is distinctly a work in progress, or perhaps it would be more accurate to say: in regress.  In that context, let me mention an evolution of a grim sort in my own thinking over the last two years.

For some time now there have been both thinkers and activists who have been convinced that Donald Trump is an American Mussolini, an outright fascist.  (According to his ex-wife, in the early 1990s he kept a book of Hitler’s speeches by his bedside and, during the 2016 election campaign, he retweeted a Mussolini quote, defending himself for doing so.)  I’ve always disagreed, however.  To my mind, he’s clearly been a man who wants to be idolized and adulated (as happens at any of his rallies) -- wants, that is, to have fans, not (in the fascistic sense) followers; applause and the eternal spotlight, not a social movement.  That, it seems to me, has been an accurate description of the president who entered the Oval Office and occupied it in such a suggestive way these last nearly two years.  But I’ve recently started to wonder.  After all, once upon a time, Donald Trump wasn’t a Republican either.  Let’s face it, he’s a quick learner when it comes to whatever may benefit The Donald.

And keep in mind that he entered an unsettled world already well preparedfor such a presidency by his predecessors in Washington.  If the fascist or, if you prefer, autocratic tendency that lurks in him and in the situation that surrounds him does come out more fully, he will obviously be aided by the ever more imperial presidency that was created in the decades before he left Trump Tower for the White House.

When he entered the Oval Office, he found there a presidency in which -- particularly on the subject of war (the president was, for instance, already America’s global assassin-in-chief) -- his powers increasingly stood outside both Congress and the Constitution. The weapons he’s now bringing to bear, including executive orders and the U.S. military, were already well prepared for him.  The refugees he makes such effective use of, whether from Syria or Central America, came to him, at least in part, thanks to this country’s war and other policies that had already roiled significant parts of the planet.  Before entering the Oval Office, the only aspect of such preparations he had any role in was the increasingly staggering inequalitythat gave a “populist” billionaire president, always ready to put more money in the hands of his .01% pals, a pained but receptive audience in the heartland.

In other words, this world and the fever dream that goes with it were Donald Trump’s oyster before he ever lifted a finger in the White House.  As a result, no election results, no matter whether the Democrats or the Republicans “win,” are likely to bring that temperature down.  In fact, if the Democrats do take the House (or even Congress), Donald Trump is unlikely to become more pliable.  If the Mueller report results in impeachment proceedings in the House, he won’t be humbled.  In the face of any such development, my guess is that his impulse will be to become more autocratic, more imperial, and even possibly more fascistic.  And the same may hold if the Republicans hang onto both houses of Congress.

Waiting for the Red Hats

Even before the vote was in, the evidence was there.  In the lead-up to the election, 5,000-plus U.S. troops (or maybe 15,000?) are headed for the U.S.-Mexico border to deal with what the president has called both an “invasion” and a “national emergency.” ("Fake news!") There, those troops will essentially twiddle their thumbs (since they are legally allowed to do little) simply because the president wanted it so.  There may, in fact, be two soldiers for every desperate refugee, including children and babies, headed toward the U.S. border in that now notorious “caravan” from Honduras.  In other words, on a whim, Donald Trump is already capable of building a wall (of troops) at that border.  The question worth asking is this: In an embattled near-future moment in which a truly Trumpian military figure (think of “him” as the next John Bolton) is in place as secretary of defense and another “national emergency” is declared, where might those troops go next because the president wanted it so?

In the days before the election, the president also threatened to sign an executive order to nullify birthright citizenship -- in the process, threatening to functionally nullify the Constitution (see the 14th Amendment), while bringing back to life the ugliest strains of American racial history just because he wanted it so.  At the moment, he might not even sign that order or, if he does, it might go down big time in Congress and the courts.  But who knows what the future of an executive-order presidency holds, especially with another Supreme Court justice pick or two in place, no matter who controls Congress?

As for those rallies of his: tell me you can’t conceive of a future America in which his adulatory crowds have stopped simply cheering and shouting for him (“Build the wall!” “Lock her up!”) and are now marching for him as well.  Is it really so hard to imagine a future in which there would be a place for a Trump Corps or for “the Red Hats”; for, that is, the kind of social movement that would no longer be confined to the arenas and stadiums of red-state America or even the polling booths of Election Day, one that might indeed be in the streets of this country at the beck and call of a fierce and autocratic billionaire?

In an increasingly unsettled world, an Autocrats, Incorporated moment globally, with an ever more powerful chief executive, and a right wing still on the march, everything that Donald Trump inherited could certainly be intensified further.  And he might be just the man to do it.  In a world in which Congress is no longer fully in his camp, in which legal charges against him, his family, and his cronies only grow, to adapt a title from a Russian novel of the early twentieth century, unquiet could flow The Don -- and in that lies peril for us all.   

Now, excuse me, I’m heading out to vote. 

Tom Engelhardt is a co-founder of theAmerican Empire Projectand the author of a history of the Cold War,The End of Victory Culture. He is a fellow of theNation Instituteand runsTomDispatch.com. His sixth and latest book isA Nation Unmade by War (Dispatch Books).

FollowTomDispatchon Twitter and join us on Facebook. Check out the newest Dispatch Books, Beverly Gologorsky's novelEvery Body Has a Storyand Tom Engelhardt'sA Nation Unmade by War, as well as Alfred McCoy'sIn the Shadows of the American Century: The Rise and Decline of U.S. Global Power, John Dower'sThe Violent American Century: War and Terror Since World War II, and John Feffer's dystopian novelSplinterlands.

 


          'One of the Biggest Fraud Cases Ever': Trump Biographer David Cay Johnston Uncovers Rudy Giuliani's Alleged Role In Massive $10 Billion Theft      Cache   Translate Page      
The complaint is aimed at uncovering the full details of Russian money flowing to various Trump projects using so-called anonymous wealth companies.

A human rights organization has asked Dutch prosecutors to open a criminal investigation into multi-billion dollar money laundering schemes that they say were aided by Donald Trump’s lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, and his old law firm.

This story first appeared at DC Report.

The complaint is clearly aimed at examining how much money stolen from a former Soviet satellite ended up benefitting Trump. He is named 16 times in the complaint’s footnotes.

The complaint describes “one of the biggest fraud cases ever” in which “some of these money flows ultimately ended up in the Netherlands” because “Dutch service providers helped to cover up the money laundering acts.”

Watch David Cay Johnston’s Video Commentary Below:

“The money laundering network started in Kazakhstan, where a figure of up to USD 10 billion was purportedly embezzled,” the complaint asserts. “This money was subsequently circulated by two Kazakh oligarch families via a worldwide network of shell companies. A number of these companies were established in the Netherlands. The money was subsequently invested in real estate projects in the United States and Europe, after which it was paid out as ‘profits’ via – once again – a network of shell companies.”

Netherlands banks and other firms play a significant role in illicit flows of cash around the world through sophisticated techniques to hide income and corporate profits. Many of these techniques appear to push the envelope on legal tax avoidance. When money laundering is involved these aggressive techniques could cross a line into aiding and abetting criminal tax evasion.

The complaint asserts that a small slice of the missing billions was run through Dutch shell corporations with help from Rudy Giuliani’s old law firm, Bracewell & Giuliani. Until 2016, Giuliani was a partner in the 470-lawyer firm.

Neither Giuliani nor anyone at his firm Giuliani Security & Safety LLC responded to requests for his side of the story. Multiple requests for comment prompted no response from Greg M. Bopp, managing partner of what was then Bracewell & Giuliani but is now called only Bracewell.

The complaint was filed by Avaaz, a global human rights organization in Washington which claims 48 million members. It has issued an open call to prosecutors around the world to investigate “the giant web of corruption” that it says propelled Trump’s rise.

Avaaz says it has approximately 290,000 members in the Netherlands. The complaint was filed Oct. 22 with J.J.M. van Dis-Setz of the Dutch Public Prosecution Service by Barbara van Straaten, a lawyer in Amsterdam.

The complaint filed with the Netherlands Public Prosecution Service in Amsterdam relies on court records from several countries that were dug up by investigative journalists, including James S. Henry, the investigative economics editor of DCReport.

The Dutch television program Zembla aired an investigative piece on Trump and his Russian associates in 2017. It followed up with an expose of a Trump business partner’s role in a Dutch money laundering scheme.

The complaint is aimed at uncovering the full details of Russian money flowing to various Trump projects using so-called anonymous wealth companies. Those are shell companies created to hide the identities of the owners. Trump and his family are known to have received vast sums from shell companies and have bragged about how much of it came from people in Russia and other parts of the former Soviet empire. Trump contends the deals were all lawful and he has no knowledge of any money laundering.

A criminal investigation by Dutch prosecutors could help that country avoid banking sanctions and loss of reputation by showing that Amsterdam enforces its own laws and respects laws on transnational crimes.

Roughly $10 billion was stolen from Kazakhstan, a former Soviet satellite located in Central Asia. The current Kazakh government is in court in Switzerland and elsewhere trying to recover the money and prosecute members of two families it says stole the money and laundered it in the West. Other lawsuits connected to the stolen money are being litigated in London, Paris, New York and Los Angeles.

The $10 billion theft was uncovered by PricewaterhouseCoopers during its 2009 audit of BTA Bank, the largest in Kazakhstan. In addition, there is about $300 million missing from Almaty, the largest city in Kazakhstan.

Court documents identify the suspected thieves as Viktor Khrapunov and Mukhtar Ablyazov, oligarchs whose families are bound not just by extensive business ties, but also by marriage. Khrapunov is the former mayor of Almaty. His son Illyas is married to Ablyazov’s daughter.

“There are strong indications that the revenues of these crimes were probably mixed via a complex money-laundering network, and there was a great deal of mutual overlap” between the companies and people suspected of the crimes, the complaint states.

Both Khrapunov and Ablyazov are fugitives.

Khrapunov, who was tried in absentia in Kazakhstan, has been convicted of corruption.

Ablyazov, who was president of the looted bank, had his worldwide assets with an estimated value of $4.9 billion frozen six years ago by a British High Court.

Trump has done business since 1983 with Russian oligarchs and wealthy former officials and business people in former Soviet satellites, including Kazakhstan, Georgia and Azerbaijan. A number of mobsters – American, Russian and others – live in Trump Tower apartments. The building has long been known to local, federal and international law enforcement as a nest of criminal residences.

In 1987 the Kremlin, then still a communist state, provided Trump and his first wife Ivana with a luxury trip to Russia.

While a number of journalistic investigations have looked into Trump’s dealings with oligarchs and their money using public records and sources they were limited to public records, which are often scant. Dutch prosecutors, however, have the power to subpoena banking and other records, forcing their disclosure to prosecutors and, potentially, the public.

Trump is known to have done deals with some of those mentioned in the complaint, including Felix Sater, a violent Long Island felon who was born in Russia. For years Sater traveled extensively with Trump working on deals named in the complaint and handing out his Trump Organization business card. Despite these long ties and both videos and still photos showing the men together, Trump claimed during the presidential campaign that he would not recognize Sater if they were in the same room.

Sater is believed to be cooperating with Robert Mueller, the American special prosecutor investigating Trump.

In one deal involving Sater, millions of dollars from the Trump SoHo hotel and apartment tower disappeared into an Icelandic bank that was under the control of a Russian oligarch. That bank was part of a multi-billion-dollar scheme to defraud Dutch and British pension funds. Trump has testified that he was due 18% of profits from the building.

The faux gold letters bearing the name, under an agreement reached a year ago, have been pried from the building façade.

Just three weeks before the 2016 election, a massive expose of Trump’s role in helping Kazakh oligarchs hide their illicit money appeared in The Financial Times, a British business newspaper.

“Dirty Money: Trump and the Kazakh Connection” described “evidence a Trump venture has links to alleged laundering network.”

The newspaper said its investigation found that Trump had “assembled an eclectic collection of backers and collaborators. Some had chequered pasts, with links to organized crime or fraud schemes. But perhaps the biggest risk for Mr. Trump’s complex, often opaque, business empire was that it might be used for a purpose US officials fear is rife in the country’s real estate sector: laundering dirty money.”

Trump’s SoHo project “has multiple ties to an alleged international money laundering network. Title deeds, bank records and correspondence show that a Kazakh family accused of laundering hundreds of millions of stolen dollars bought luxury apartments in a Manhattan tower part-owned by Mr. Trump and embarked on major business ventures with one of the tycoon’s partners,” the British newspaper The Financial Timesreported after an extensive investigation.

Trump and his partners, the FT asserted, engaged in condo sales that appear to have violated the Patriot Act, the post 9/11 law that requires banks, developers and others to know who their customers are and the sources of their money.

Investigations to identify anonymous buyers of luxury apartments in New York and Florida to determine the extent of any money laundering were announced in January 2016 by the federal government’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN).

Three months later the FinCEN director, Jennifer Shasky Calvery, spoke about her years of work on transnational Russian organized crime networks. Much of her work involved Russian crime families “laundering their funds through the U.S. financial system. Often, this involved the suspected purchase of personal residences with criminal proceeds.”

In July 2016, the month the GOP nominated Trump, FinCen announced it would be investigating sales of luxury apartments beyond New York and Florida because of its growing concern about flows of illicit cash disguised in real estate deals.

While Giuliani calls himself Trump’s personal lawyer, his role is primarily to spread Trumpian disinformation about Special Prosecutor Mueller’s investigations into Russian collusion and related matters concerning Trump and his 2016 presidential campaign. Because Giuliani appears on so many cable and other television shows, but not in court, MSNBC host Lawrence O’Donnell calls the former New York City mayor “Trump’s TV lawyer.”


          White House Officials Reportedly Fear a Major Move from Robert Mueller Coming Soon: 'I’m Very Worried About Don Jr.'      Cache   Translate Page      
Once the midterms are done, Mueller may start right back up again.

With the entire political world laser-focused on the 2018 midterm elections, Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation has slipped beneath the radar in recent weeks.

But according to a new report in Vanity Fair, the specter of the investigation is still hanging over the White House.

Gabriel Sherman reported that President Donald Trump's team is fearful that a report from Mueller could come as early as Wednesday — the day after the midterms. Though Mueller's investigation has continued apace behind the scenes, the special prosecutor has respected Justice Department protocol by avoiding any major investigative steps that might affect the election.

Once the election is over, there will be nothing holding him back.

"Sources say besides the president, the ones with the most exposure are Roger Stone and Donald Trump Jr.," Sherman wrote. "'I’m very worried about Don Jr.,' said another former West Wing official who testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee. The possible exposure would be that Mueller would demonstrate that Don Jr. perjured himself to investigators when he said he didn’t tell his father beforehand about the June 2016 Trump Tower meeting to gather 'dirt' on Hillary Clinton."

Sherman also notes that Rudy Giuliani has been conspicuously absent from cable news in recent weeks. He reports that one source said Trump told Giuliani to stay away during the run-up to the election — presumably to avoid focusing the nation's attention on the Russia issue.

If Mueller does celebrate the end of the midterm campaigns with a new investigative salvo, there's no telling what could happen. Trump might even try to preempt any such move by firing Attorney General Jeff Sessions and perhaps even Mueller himself. What happens thereafter could be determined by Congress — and its fate is in the voters' hands on Tuesday.

 

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          Beyonce endorses Beto O’Rourke as Triumph the Insult Dog roasts Ted Cruz      Cache   Translate Page      



A multitude of celebs have endorsed Beto O’Rourke. From fellow texan Travis Scott or NBA super star LeBron James, now with hours left on voting day Beyonce sports a Beto hat. Beto is up 2 points.




Triumph told the Zodiac Killer “I support spaying and neutering, just like Trump did to you.” Eddie Munster just stood there with his default I have to shit face.





source= https://twitter.com/scottbix/status/1059932365332602882 & https://twitter.com/thehill/status/1059918108473856007
          Big turnout as America votes in test of Trump presidency      Cache   Translate Page      
American voters poured out across their bitterly divided country Tuesday to deliver judgment on Donald Trump in midterm polls where opposition Democrats hope to seize at least partial control of Congress.
          Ivanka Trump hit by ethics watchdog over China trademarks      Cache   Translate Page      
NEW YORK: US first daughter and presidential advisor Ivanka Trump is facing ethics questions after she was granted Chinese trademark approvals for her brands in the midst of a trade war her father is leading against Beijing. Ivanka Trump Marks LLC received preliminary approval for 16 new ...
          Maas: "USA bleiben wichtigster Partner"      Cache   Translate Page      
Bundesaußenminister Heiko Maas (SPD) hält es für illusorisch, auf einen Kurswechsel von US-Präsident Donald Trump zu hoffen. "Es wäre ein Irrglaube, auf Kurskorr [...]

1 Stimmen
          Election Day test for Trump as America votes      Cache   Translate Page      
All 435 seats in the House, 35 seats in the 100-member Senate and 36 governorships are up for grabs as Americans cast their ballots.
          Americans start voting in midterm verdict on Trump rule      Cache   Translate Page      
Americans started voting Tuesday in critical midterm elections that mark the first major voter test of Donald Trump's controversial presidency, with control of Congress at stake.
          Trump agenda at stake as voters decide control of US Congress      Cache   Translate Page      
WASHINGTON: Americans cast votes on Tuesday to decide whether Donald Trump's Republicans maintain their grip on the U.S. Congress, or if Democrats gain the power to slow the president's agenda after a divisive campaign marked by clashes over race, immigration and trade. The first national ...
          Play of the Day: Talking About the Caravan      Cache   Translate Page      
President Trump is naming operations and talking about who is coming to the U.S. border.
          TRUTH JIHAD: “Trump vs. Soros”: Everything you know is wrong!      Cache   Translate Page      
Support Truth Jihad Radio on Patreon  Hey Trump fans! Before you vote or cheer for for Republicans in the midterms, do some homework on the respective careers of Donald Trump and George Soros. Yes, one of them isworking for the, er, “elders of Zion”…but which one? Veterans Today editor Ian Greenhalgh argues (and I don’t […]
          US voters give verdict on Trump as control of Congress at stake      Cache   Translate Page      
(Corrects paragraph 8 to remove Pennsylvania)
          Americans start voting in mid-term verdict on Trump rule      Cache   Translate Page      
About three quarters of the 50 states in the east and centre of the country were already voting as polls began opening at 6.00am for the day-long ballot.
          Sanders a jóvenes de EE.UU.: La tarea es poner “muy nervioso” a Trump votando por los demócratas      Cache   Translate Page      

El senador izquierdista Bernie Sanders dijo en Orlando (Florida, EE.UU.) que la “tarea” de los jóvenes en las elecciones del próximo 6 de noviembre es poner “muy, muy nervioso” al presidente Donald Trump votando por los demócratas. LEA AQUI

The post Sanders a jóvenes de EE.UU.: La tarea es poner “muy nervioso” a Trump votando por los demócratas appeared first on noticias.jp.


          EE.UU. vota en unas elecciones cruciales para el futuro de Donald Trump y su gobierno      Cache   Translate Page      

Estados Unidos vota este martes en unas elecciones de mitad de mandato (midterms) marcadas por la expectación, en un país muy dividido que vive los comicios como un referéndum sobre la presidencia de Donald Trump, quien corre el riesgo de perder su mayoría en el Senado y la Cámara de Representants. Las urnas abrieron a las 06:00 (hora […]

The post EE.UU. vota en unas elecciones cruciales para el futuro de Donald Trump y su gobierno appeared first on noticias.jp.


          AP survey: Health care, immigration high on voters’ minds      Cache   Translate Page      

WASHINGTON (AP) — Health care and immigration were high on voters’ minds as they cast ballots in the midterm elections, according to a wide-ranging survey of the American electorate conducted by The Associated Press. AP VoteCast also shows a majority of voters considered President Donald Trump a factor in their votes. A majority of voters […]
          Emerging from the Fog: ‘America, We Call Your Name: Poems of Resistance and Resilience’      Cache   Translate Page      

The first image we encounter in America, We Call Your Name: Poetry of Resistance and Resilience (203 pages; Sixteen Rivers Press) is that of Lady Liberty in the midst of a grey fog; it’s unclear as to whether she is receding or emerging. The editors have stated that the impetus for this anthology was a desire to help unify the country after the 2016 Presidential Election. The Trump Administration symbolizes the oppression that these poets are resisting; the collection acknowledges that the election woke up many people who had grown politically complacent. For this anthology, Sixteen Rivers Press, a shared …Continue reading

The post Emerging from the Fog: ‘America, We Call Your Name: Poems of Resistance and Resilience’ appeared first on ZYZZYVA.


          Futures Movers: Oil ends lower in wake of U.S. reprieve from Iran sanctions for major consumers      Cache   Translate Page      
Oil prices decline Tuesday, a day after the Trump administration granted waivers to allow eight nations to continue buying Iranian crude despite U.S.-driven economic sanctions against the Islamic Republic.

          Trump Calls Sarah Sanders up on Stage at Massive Rally – Her First Words Bring the House Down      Cache   Translate Page      
President Donald Trump made a surprise introduction midway through his rally yesterday.
          President Trump Tells Levin GOP Will ‘Do Better … Than Anyone Expects’      Cache   Translate Page      
Mark Levin began his radio show yesterday evening with an exclusive interview of President Trump.
          U.S. Sanctions On Iran Could Impact How Trump Responds To Killing Of Jamal Khashoggi      Cache   Translate Page      
The sanctions the U.S. is imposing on Iran could make it less likely the White House will punish Saudi Arabia for the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, because Saudi oil will be needed to replace Iranian oil being taken off the market.
          U.S. Unilaterally Reinstates Sanctions On Iran In Attempt To Change Its Behavior      Cache   Translate Page      
The Trump administration says it will be relentless with its sanctions against Iran until it's a "normal country," but still giving major importers of Iranian oil a chance to continue business without penalties.
          News Brief: Midterms, Census Question, Sanctions On Iran      Cache   Translate Page      
President Trump campaigns ahead of Tuesday's midterms. A legal battle begins over whether a controversial question remains on the 2020 census. Iran plans to sell oil and break U.S.-imposed sanctions.
          Sebastian Gorka on the Biggest Threat Facing America and What Trump Is Doing About It      Cache   Translate Page      
On 11.06.18 12:01 AM posted by Rob Bluey Sebastian Gorka, former deputy assistant to President Donald Trump, is author of the new book, “Why We Fight: Defeating America’s Enemies—With No Apologies (https://amzn.to/2JFqXW9).” He recently spoke to The Daily Signal. Listen to his full interview on our podcast (https://www.dailysignal.com/2018/11/05/podcast-sebastian-gorka-on-the-dangers-of-socialism/). A slightly edited version is below. *Rob Bluey: What are the most serious threats that America faces today?* *Sebastian Gorka:* In “Why We Fight (https://amzn.to/2JFqXW9),” I go through the whole catalog of the threats that face us today—whether it’s North Korea, Russia, Iran, or China, or global jihadism, which was a subject of my first book “Defeating Jihad (https://amzn.to/2DoRHtW).” After my time in the White House, it’s very clear to me that we’re going to deal with all of these threats. The ISIS caliphate is already gone. The Iran deal is dead. Russia is being put back...
          Thousands of Troops and Razor Wire: US Border Reinforced Against Migrant ‘Invasion’ (Videos)      Cache   Translate Page      

President Trump has initiated the military to protect our border from the invading migrants.

The post Thousands of Troops and Razor Wire: US Border Reinforced Against Migrant ‘Invasion’ (Videos) appeared first on Truth Uncensored.


          7 of the Most Epic Midterm Elections in American History      Cache   Translate Page      
On 11.05.18 01:40 PM posted by Fred Lucas President Donald Trump isn’t on the ballot, but will face the biggest electoral test of his presidency so far during Tuesday’s midterm election—one that may well end in repudiation or vindication. History is not on any president’s side in a midterm election. Since 1862, the president’s party on average loses 32 House seats (https://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2010/sep/07/mary-jordan/do-presidents-always-get-shellacked-midterm-electi/) and more than two Senate seats in a midterm. And in the 47 midterms (https://www.wsj.com/articles/midterms-have-been-punishing-incumbents-since-1826-1540477044) since 1826, the president’s party lost seats in 41 of them. Several scenarios could play out.
          Routine Election Monitoring Spurs ‘Suppression’ Claims From Left      Cache   Translate Page      
On 11.05.18 02:49 PM posted by Fred Lucas In a routine pre-election action, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced (https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/justice-department-monitor-compliance-federal-voting-rights-laws-election-day) that the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division will monitor polling sites in a total of 35 jurisdictions in 19 states. Some left-leaning websites cast the move as a voter-suppression effort because the attorney general’s announcement talked about voter fraud. In a press release Monday, Sessions said voter fraud “corrupts the integrity of the ballot.” President Donald Trump later tweeted that fraudsters at the polls would face “maximum criminal penalties.” Law Enforcement has been strongly notified to watch closely for any ILLEGAL VOTING which may take place in Tuesday’s Election (or Early Voting). Anyone caught will be subject to the Maximum Criminal Penalties allowed by law. Thank you!
          Why Trump Can End Birthright Citizenship by Executive Order      Cache   Translate Page      
On 11.04.18 10:47 AM posted by Hans von Spakovsky When it comes to the 14th Amendment, my good friend and fellow Justice Department veteran Andy McCarthy agrees that it does not require birthright citizenship. And we’re not alone: Other experts, such as noted constitutional law scholar John Eastman, law professor and former dean of the Fowler School of Law at Chapman University and a senior fellow at the Claremont Institute, take the same position on the citizenship clause (“All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside”). But Andy and I differ on one very important point: whether the misinterpretation of the amendment can be changed by executive order.*He doesn’t think so (https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/donald-trump-end-birthright-citizenship-by-executive-order/); I say that it can. Simply put, the president does have the ability through executive...
          Podcast: Sebastian Gorka on the Dangers of Socialism      Cache   Translate Page      
On 11.05.18 12:01 AM posted by Rob Bluey On today’s show we feature an interview with Sebastian Gorka,*former deputy assistant to President Donald Trump and author of the new book “Why We Fight: Defeating America’s Enemies—With No Apologies (https://www.amazon.com/Why-We-Fight-Recovering-Americas/dp/162157640X).” Gorka breaks down the most serious threats to American security and how Trump is combatting them. We also discuss how Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings remade the Republican Party. Plus, Gorka’s analysis of immigration, the dangers of socialism, and his first encounter with Trump. Also on today’s show:
          Taking Back The House Could Be 'Life And Death' For Democrats       Cache   Translate Page      
Veteran Democratic strategist Paul Begala doesn't think it's hyperbolic to say that "everything" is at stake for Democrats heading into Tuesday's elections. "They always say it's the most important election of your life," he says, explaining that in the past two years, Democrats learned the consequences of being "completely shut out" as the GOP controlled both Congress and the White House. If Democrats fail to take back the House and make significant gains at the state level, they'll be shut out again, without a say in legislation and judicial appointments. Ron Klain, a former top aide in the Clinton and Obama White Houses, calls the upcoming election an issue of "life and death" for Democrats. He says if Democrats lose on Tuesday, their worst fears come true and President Trump has a free hand. "[It will mean] he can fire Jeff Sessions and essentially end the Mueller investigation and replace him with the attorney general of his choosing. It means that Trump could continue to roll
          Fox News says host’s appearance at Trump rally ‘an unfortunate distraction’      Cache   Translate Page      
Sean Hannity attended the president’s final event before the midterm elections.
          Fox News says host’s appearance at Trump rally ‘an unfortunate distraction’      Cache   Translate Page      
Sean Hannity attended the president’s final event before the midterm elections.
          Ljuspunkten finns runt hörnet – om vi vill se den      Cache   Translate Page      
Vi är ofantligt många som inte längre vill se Trump stå vid en helikopter skrikandes att media är folkets fiende och hotet mot miljön en lögn. Eller se svenska populister och fascister vädra morgonluft på temat hat. Det finns en annan berättelse där demokratin byggs ut och människornas lika värde är centralt. Arbetarrörelsen och likasinnade…
          Voters get their chance to shape US politics in Donald Trump era      Cache   Translate Page      
The president warned against a ‘socialist nightmare’ while Democrats hoped for an ‘awakening’ after losing the White House two years ago.
          Voters get their chance to shape US politics in Donald Trump era      Cache   Translate Page      
The president warned against a ‘socialist nightmare’ while Democrats hoped for an ‘awakening’ after losing the White House two years ago.
          Election Eve Wrangle      Cache   Translate Page      
Whatever happened to 'vote your hopes and dreams'?


There will be a blue wave, unless there isn't.  The red firewall will break the azure tsunami, unless Trump's hate spew has punched suburban holes in it.  The US House flips (but maybe not), and the Senate stays in Mitch McConnell's terrapin-like appendages, except maybe for a systematic polling error, a la 2016.

No wonder Team Donkey is experiencing some cognitive dissonance.



Who, or what, gets the blame if the Ds can't get it done tomorrow?  Voter suppression, from Georgia to North Dakota to Texas college campuses like Prairie View A&M and Texas State?  Voting machines flipping straight-ticket votes (to Ted Cruz?)  There will still be plenty of finger-pointing at Russian hackers and Green candidates, I feel certain.  Even if some dropped out of their race and endorsed the Democrat.

[The old Catch-22: "Greens should run in state and local races and build up to presidential races" instead of playing spoiler (sic) every four years.  "Greens should drop out and endorse Democrats because this is the most important election of our lifetime".  You know, since the one two years ago.  That was their fault Democrats lost.  Blah blah.]

There may be some less nefarious, more legitimate reasons the election will be won -- or lost; for example, the strength of women voters.  Notable for the demographers, moderate Republican women who live in suburban America turning out to cast their ballots against Trump and the GOP.  No, wait; it's the youth vote.  That's it *snaps fingers*, the children are our future.  Either is better than blaming the Latinxs, after all.  We're all tired of hearing that.

Hold on a minute: this is a midterm election, and Texas Democrats who haven't elected one of theirs since, you know, Jim Hightower was Ag Commissioner always lose because they can't raise any money for consultants, advisers, pollsters, etc.  Except they did, a shitpot full of dough, in 2018 -- at least those running for Congress; not so much the statewides save Congressman SuperBeto, whose massive Bernie-like ATM machine reversed both the prevailing Texas narrative and the cash flow, doubling the take of Senator Serpent Covered in Vaseline.


The Cult of RFO'R aims for the upset tomorrow evening.  Rumor has it happening.


So as President Shitler is fond of saying: we'll see what happens.  I'm ready it to be over; how about you?  Here's your roundup of lefty blog posts and news from the final week before E-Day.

==================

One unplumbed premise that the midterms might reveal is whether the strength of the Lone Star grassroots has shifted from one major party to the other, either because of 'outsiders' becoming 'insiders' or because there needs to be a "bad guy" to focus on and motivate the base.

Jim Henson, director of the Texas Politics Project at the University of Texas at Austin, says Democrats nationally — and in some parts of Texas — have unleashed the kind of intensity we used to see from the tea party.

“So the question of whether there is still that ability to motivate Republican voters on the other side is the big question going into this cycle,” Henson said.

Henson believes one reason the tea party’s galvanizing force has slipped in local and congressional races is that conservatives no longer have Barack Obama to target. And Donald Trump has taken over the role of chief agitator of conservatives.

Tea party-backed candidates have also been elected. In Texas, the movement has been changed by that success.

“I think once you have people who are part of institutions, it inevitably looks different, because you aren’t banging from the outside,” Henson said. “Like it or not, you are part of the status quo, and you are part of the establishment.”

Perhaps the only competitive statewide contest down the ballot shows signs of GOP panic, as indicted felon/AG Ken Paxton digs in to the deepest pockets of the friends he has left.

In addition to the TV ads, Paxton’s recent campaign finance filings have indicated that Republicans in high places are tuned in to the race in its home stretch. In recent days, the attorney general has received a $282,000 in-kind donation from Gov. Greg Abbott’s campaign; more than $350,000 in in-kind contributions from Texas for Lawsuit Reform, the political arm of the tort reform group; and $10,000 each from two of the biggest donors in the Republican Party: Sheldon and Miriam Adelson.

Millard Fillmore's Bathtub linked to a picture of Sweaty Beto, which may have been the Halloween costume of the year.


Stirred by Trump's call, armed militia groups head south to welcome the tired, poor, huddled masses yearning to breathe free intercept the invading (sic) migrant caravan.

Asked whether his group planned to deploy with weapons, McGauley laughed. “This is Texas, man,” he said.

Off the Kuff examined a pair of statewide judicial races.

In Harris County, the Texas Observer foresees a day of reckoning for Republican judges who have held fast to the money bail system, rewarding their friends and penalizing the poor.

Isiah Carey of Fox26 was first with the news that Houston mayor Sylvester Turner's first announced challenger next year will be former Democrat*, now (?) not-Trump Republican, non-DWI-convict and megawealthy trial lawyer -- Rick Perry's defense attorney, for those catching up -- Tony Buzbee.  *Lookie here, from Texpatriate:

(D)espite being the one-time Chairman of the Galveston County Democratic Party, a two-time Democrat nominee for the State Legislature and the once rumored Democratic candidate for Lieutenant Governor. However, of late, Buzbee has been appointed to the Board of Regents of his alma matter, Texas A&M University, and become a key financial supporter of both Perry and (Gov. Greg) Abbott.

Durrel Douglas at Houston Justice blogged the 2019 Houston City Council District B early line.  And in an excellent explainer, described how the local activist/consultant game -- getting paid to do politics, that is -- is a lot like having the app on your phone for the jukebox down at the local bar.

Socratic Gadfly, returning from a recent vacation, took a look at a major nature and environment issue that fired up up opposition to Trump — the Bears Ears downsizing — and offered his thoughts on the value of the original national monument site versus critics of several angles, and things that could make it even better.

Therese Odell at Foolish Watcher also leavens the politics with some Game of Thrones news.

And Harry Hamid's midnight tale from last week moves ahead to 1 a.m. (with no accounting for Daylight Savings Time and 'falling back' noted).

          Chaos Reigns in the Trump Administration      Cache   Translate Page      

Sanctions may indeed be coming but will they have the bite that Donald Trump is hoping for? It’s a good question as we open November with a flurry of edicts from Trump’s State and Treasury Departments. Let’s go over them all and see just how contradictory they are while at the same time acceding to the reality of just how much the world has changed in the six years since President Obama first went nuclear on Iran with sanctions. It starts with Trump’s tweet that “Sanctions are Coming.” Okay, fine we knew this. But sanctions don’t account for much if … Continue reading

The post Chaos Reigns in the Trump Administration appeared first on LewRockwell.


          As 3% Conference readies to tap into women’s anger, its founder works to extend its reach      Cache   Translate Page      

The power of women’s anger will be a central theme when the 3% Conference 2018 kicks off on 8 November. Behind the scenes, its team has been working to open up the program far beyond its US location.

Kat Gordon, founder of creative diversity organization The 3% Movement, is unsure what the mood will be like among delegates when the seventh annual 3% Conference begins tomorrow. The polls for the US midterm elections had just opened when she spoke to The Drum and the outcome of the vote — an unofficial referendum of the Trump presidency — is far from clear.

Gordon believes a Democratic comeback in the House and the Senate may spark optimism in women and minorities who hope the notion of inclusion will be placed back on the political roadmap. Conversely, she imagines a Republican win will further ignite the anger that has been crackling among these groups throughout the year.

“I have no idea what the temperature in the venue is going to be around this,” she said. “The 3% Movement is all about building bridges and the [current] administration is all about building walls.”

Still, anger — whether it be at the system, at industry injustices, or at specific agency HR practices — has a place at the marketing conference, which is making its Chicago debut. Gordon reports that in the first full year since the #MeToo movement emboldened generations of women to report cases of sexual harassment and abuse, emotions of rage and frustration have bubbled to the surface of the female workforce.

This year’s conference will address how to put these feelings to good use.

“We criminalize anger as an emotion for women to feel and bring into the workplace,” she explained. “But, actually, being in touch with your frustration and anger is a form of self-expression and self-care and if we want creative environments where people are ... in touch with all of their feelings, we have to sanction anger for women.

“It doesn’t mean women should be going around breaking walls, but we should allow them to feel frustrated, to state their frustration, and to be heard. That is the central theme of the conference this year.”

3 per cent conference
Cindy Gallop is a popular keynote at the event
 
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The schedule will also mirror the movement’s efforts to help people look beyond gender when exploring diversity: other panels will discuss disability and neurodiversity, for instance, while new research from 3% and VMLY&R on the topic of parenthood in advertising will be published and discussed.

And Gordon’s ongoing crusade to get more men attending appears to finally be paying dividends. Women still dominate the speaker list, but the founder is confident that more men than ever will be listening, thanks in part to the vocal support of big network agencies.

Publicis, the holding company that famously did not attend Cannes Lions this year, has promised to send 250 people to Navy Pier in Chicago. And, three years since 3% keynote speaker Cindy Gallop publicly called out Leo Burnett for hiring an all-white, male leadership team, the agency has committed to sending 75 delegates — including its entire leadership team — and livestreaming the program to all of its employees around the world.

For Gordon, getting the messages out beyond the conference hall floor has been a priority this year. The solution is ‘Conference in a Box’ — online access to films of conference sessions, deep dives into key themes, blogs, and discussion guides.

“This way, when the event wraps, agencies can host gatherings of leaders and employees to have these discussions from within their own walls,” Gordon explained.

This ‘mobile conference’ will be made freely available to advertising schools across the globe as part of 3%’s mission to “educate the educators.”

“We were hearing that a lot of ad programs are being taught by people who have been out of the industry for a while, so they're not as aware that the move for inclusive cultures is taking root,” said Gordon. “We feel a big part of our brand and responsibility is ... to make sure [program leaders] are aware of best-in-class thinking around creative cultures and use these materials in their classroom.”

Further ahead — and further abroad — Gordon believes the 3% Conference’s expansion will come via well-established conferences in markets outside the US. Rather than organizing standalone events across the globe, she envisages “plugging” the program into existing events to reach the widest range of marketing professionals at a lower cost.

“We are open to so many possibilities,” she said. “We just need partners to open doors for us.”


          Trump pauses speech for over 8 minutes while an audience member receives medical assistance      Cache   Translate Page      
Forum: Politics & Continuing Crises Posted By: Florida Attorney Post Time: 11-06-2018 at 02:08 PM
          Frm Florida’s Brunch Box comes Wisdom      Cache   Translate Page      
One diner at Florida’s Brunch Box comes wisdom. One diner said “Vote Democrat and our country goe down the drain.” A second diner observed he has een to four Trump rallies, and had yet to see an attendee who had … Continue reading
          Trump and the GOP Reach New Racist Lows, But Democrats Won’t Stop Them      Cache   Translate Page      
Leading up to the midterms, Democrats have been running away from the issue of immigration in any form.

The post Trump and the GOP Reach New Racist Lows, But Democrats Won’t Stop Them appeared first on Truthout.


          Trump’s War on the Fed      Cache   Translate Page      
When higher rates trigger another recession, Trump can point an accusing finger at the central bank, absolving himself.

The post Trump’s War on the Fed appeared first on Truthout.


          Episode 288 Scott Adams: Elections, Alien Probes, Racist Ads      Cache   Translate Page      

Topics:  CNN reports cigar-shaped interstellar object, possible alien probe President Trump says he’s going to tone it down…be nicer Have interstellar aliens taken over our President? “Even” Fox News won’t show the GOP ad accused of racism The standards of 2018 Both parties have tried to brand other side by the worst few The possibility […]

The post Episode 288 Scott Adams: Elections, Alien Probes, Racist Ads appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


          Re: Debunking Christianity: A Jesus Cult’s Assault on Science      Cache   Translate Page      

But they all refer to Trump as "he's one of us". Were it not for needing their vote, he wouldn't know or care whether or not they existed.


          Election pits Trump's brute strength vs Dems' resistance      Cache   Translate Page      
The energy and outrage of the Democratic resistance faced off against the brute strength of President Donald Trump's GOP on Tuesday as voters across America decided whether Democrats should control at least one chamber of Congress for the first time in the Trump era.
          Election Day underway, voters turning out in record numbers      Cache   Translate Page      

A turbulent election season that tested President Donald Trump’s slash-and-burn political style against the strength of the Democratic resistance comes to a close as Americans cast ballots in the first national election of the Trump era.


          Rihanna issues legal warning over Donald Trump using her music      Cache   Translate Page      
The singer described the US president’s rallies as ‘tragic’ and her lawyers sent a cease-and-desist letter to the White House.
          Comment on Limerick-Off Monday – Rhyme Word: PLACED or MISPLACED OR REPLACED or DISPLACED at the end of any one line by Tim Gray      Cache   Translate Page      
Trump was riding rough-shod Trampling all that's decent and good, But he's cobbled together His "Hell for Leather" To a path that's becoming well trod.
          Breakfast Briefing: 5 things for PR pros to know on Tuesday morning      Cache   Translate Page      
What 11 brands are doing on #ElectionDay; Facebook tries to stay on top of possible election meddling; Facebook, CNN, Fox News, and NBC reject Trump immigration ad; and other news to know this morning.

          Trump won them. Republicans rely on them. But what is the future of white evangelicals?      Cache   Translate Page      
Group:

Evangelicals


Headline: Trump won them. Republicans rely on them. But what is the future of white evangelicals?

-- Delivered by Feed43 service


          Inarrestabile marea umana dall'Honduras      Cache   Translate Page      


Sulla marea umana, praticamente una vera e propria alluvione che straripa (mai termine è più appropriato con quanto stiamo vivendo in questi giorni di sconquasso metereologico) che dall'America Latina marcia spedita e inesorabile verso gli Stati Uniti avrete letto vari resoconti. Ma tutti i reportage mainstream sembrano favorire la tesi della "povertà". "Fuggono da fame, violenza, disoccupazione". "Scappano dall’emarginazione, dalla disoccupazione e dalla mancanza totale di opportunità", "Vogliono allontanarsi dal potere del dittatore Juan Orlando Hernandez". "Sono in cerca della terra promessa", "Perché, da sempre, chi ha fame si sposta per cercare il pane". E via con la retorica dell'esodo biblico e dell'accoglienza che ne deve conseguire.
Provate come ha fatto la sottoscritta a farvi un Google con le parole-chiave Honduras e migrazioni e vi arriverà il solito piagnisteo a cui noi Italiani siamo stati abituati da anni e anni con gli sbarchi circa il  mettere a rischio la propria vita, sulle condizioni igieniche disumane, sul fatto che rischiano la disidratazione ecc. Quindi questo fiume straripante e tracimante di persone è un fatto "spontaneo", "ineludibile" e "inevitabile". Soprattutto si muovono di loro spontanea volontà, ma quel cattivone di Trump senza cervello e senza cuore, ha già predisposto cordoni di forze dell'ordine facendo presidiare i confini. Allo stesso modo viene fatta la cronaca sui passi del governo messicano che invia la polizia federale (su ordini degli Usa, of course) per intercettare la carovana di migranti diretti negli Stati Uniti. Come osano? ci sono donne, bambini...hanno fame, sete, sonno, sono stanchi...Dopo tante ricerche mi imbatto nel sito "Vietato parlare" e - toh! - finalmente trovo la convalida ai miei sospetti: qualche megalomane sociopatico col complesso di Mosé (chi sa chi sarà?) sta scatenando tempeste umane più o meno "perfette" addosso ad uno stato sovrano con lo scopo di destabilizzarlo.

Ed ecco la domanda da porsi:  è pensabile che 5000 persone si organizzino da sole per una impresa del genere? E chi sta sostenendo i costi organizzativi ed individuali? Ebbene esistono prove che questi fenomeni non sono affatto spontanei ma finanziati da determinati gruppi di pressione e "filantropici" che sembrano essersi dati un compito "morale" di cambiare globalmente le società occidentali secondo le loro opportune ‘linee guida’.

PUEBLO SIN FRONTIERAS E ALTRE ORGANIZZAZIONI  




Precisamente la carovana “March of the Migrant” è organizzata da un gruppo chiamato Pueblo Sin Fronteras, mentre lo sforzo è sostenuto dalla coalizione CARA Family Detention Pro Bono Project, che include Catholic Legal Immigration Network (CLIN), American Immigration Council (AIC), il Il Refugee and Immigration Centre for Education and Legal Services (RICELS) e l’American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA).


Almeno tre dei quattro gruppi sono finanziati dalla Open Society Foundation di George Soros, mentre altri gruppi di supporto sono finanziati dalla MacArthur Foundation, dalla Ford Foundation e dalla Carnegie Corporation.

Il gruppo dietro la carovana, cioè l’organizzazione ‘Pueblo Sin Fronteras’, che significa ‘persone senza frontiere’, si impegna ad infrangere la legge sull’immigrazione per fornire “rifugio” a migliaia di centroamericani. I finanziamenti dietro il gruppo sono sconosciuti dato che riceve sul proprio sito donazioni spontanee con Pay Pal.

SOROS TRA I PROBABILI "BENEFATTORI"

Tra i benefattori di queste associazioni c’è il multimiliardario George Soros che ha da tempo promesso di sostenere società a beneficio di migranti e rifugiati “in fuga da situazioni pericolose per la loro vita”. Egli ha iniziato a gettare le basi per la fondazione per continuare la sua missione dopo la sua morte. I documenti della Hacked Open Society Foundation pubblicati la scorsa estate fanno luce sul modo in cui Soros ha usato le sue fondamenta per far progredire le politiche progressiste e aperte ai confini nazionali e internazionali.

Carte prepagate per immigrati: paga lo zio George con l'avallo di Ue e di ONU. La carta reca in alto il marchio UNCHR


A questo scopo Soros lo scorso autunno, ha trasferito $ 18 miliardi alle ‘Open Society Foundations‘, la rete di organizzazioni non profit che egli usa per far avanzare la sua ideologia globalista e senza confini negli Stati Uniti e in tutto il mondo. Il trasferimento massiccio, che è stato segnalato per la prima volta dal Wall Street Journal, è approssimativamente equivalente al prodotto interno lordo dell’Afghanistan, secondo i dati della Banca Mondiale.

Negli Stati Uniti, la sua fondazione ha fornito finanziamenti per il movimento Black Lives Matter e gli attivisti di frontiere aperte. La fondazione ha anche fornito finanziamenti a gruppi di “resistenza” anti-Trump, ha finanziato la ricerca di creare un’opposizione ai critici dell’Islam radicale e ha tentato di influenzare le decisioni della Corte Suprema.
La fondazione di Soros è ora la seconda organizzazione filantropica negli Stati Uniti dietro solo alla Fondazione Bill e Melinda Gates.

Soros sta anche finanziando programmi per finanziare l’ingresso di “rifugiati” in Italia, Ungheria e Israele. (Ndr: per quest'ultimo, sarà dura). 


IL GOVERNO HONDUREGNO FAVORISCE LA FUGA MIGRATORIA

La carovana che è partita dall’Honduras è anche favorita dal governo Honduregno. Ciò può sembrare contraddittorio perché alcuni capi-carovana hanno accusato il governo honduregno di corruzione e non riescono ad affrontare la povertà, il crimine e le condizioni economiche costringendo le famiglie a fuggire a migliaia. Questo può essere vero ma è anche vero che l’asilo è in gran parte una truffa colossale progettata per fornire ai paesi dell’America Latina una valvola di sicurezza politica ed economica e una mucca in contanti di valuta estera. Nel 2017, le rimesse inviate in Honduras hanno totalizzato $ 4,33 miliardi e costituiscono una parte significativa dell’economia honduregna.




Nell’arco di pochi decenni, i migranti sono diventati un motore essenziale di sostegno economico per l’Honduras. Le rimesse comprendono il 17% del prodotto interno lordo (PIL) della nazione nel 2011, secondo le stime della Banca Mondiale, la seconda più grande quota di qualsiasi paese dell’America Latina o dei Caraibi. In quanto tali, gli emigranti honduregni hanno un enorme significato per l’economia del paese e per il sostentamento di molte comunità e famiglie altrimenti impoverite.

Queste informazioni sono pubbliche ed hanno riscontri documentabili. La domanda è ovviamente a questo punto su che tipo di informazione noi riceviamo.
FonteVietato parlare: ma è veramente spontanea la carovana dei migranti che si dirige verso gli Usa? 

che a sua volte trae queste sue informazioni  dalle seguenti fonti: Fox News, News Now, Wnd, Amerikan Thinker.

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Quali lezioni trarre da questa esperienza a dir poco sconvolgente? 

Che gli Usa, da sempre grande potenza mondialista  in perenne espansione, è a sua volta sotto attacco da oligarchi sociopatici legati alla Finanza che già destabilizzano l'Europa. E' una sorta di grande e grosso prelibato boccone che i voraci predatori intendono mangiare per ultimo, ma che hanno intenzione di voler fare. Pertanto la resistenza di Trump va nella direzione degli interessi del popolo americano. Come va nella giusta direzione voler abolire quello "ius soli"  (ovvero l'acquisizione della cittadinanza di un dato paese come conseguenza del fatto giuridico di essere nati sul suo territorio, indipendentemente dalla cittadinanza dei genitori) che la loro Carta costituzionale dei Padri Fondatori  gli impone.  Provvedimento durissimo, certo, ma è l'unico modo per scongiurare quello scenario apocalittico da Campo dei Santi, che, come dice l'amico Massimo, non sarà mai abbastanza ricordato, consigliato e citato.  
Parliamo di esodo di clandestini da America del Centro-Sud ad America del Nord, ma come al solito de te fabula narratur



          Midterm elections: First polls close as voters cite Trump and health care as key issues - Washington Post      Cache   Translate Page      

Washington Post

Midterm elections: First polls close as voters cite Trump and health care as key issues
Washington Post
Polls have now closed in parts of Indiana and Kentucky — the beginning of the end for Tuesday's momentous midterm elections. The results of Tuesday's election, only now beginning to trickle in, could bring significant changes to Washington after two ...
What Time the Polls Close, State by StateNew York Times
Election Day: Blue wave? Red wave? Turnout? Finally, voters have their sayUSA TODAY
2018 Election: Live Coverage And ResultsFiveThirtyEight (blog)
CNN -Wall Street Journal -CBS News
all 6,880 news articles »

          What This Election Is About      Cache   Translate Page      

What This Election Is About Paul Craig Roberts I never cease to be amazed at the insouciance of Americans. Readers send me emails asking why I ever supported Trump when he was the Establishment’s candidate. If Trump was the Establishment’s candidate, why has the Establishment spent two years trying to destroy him? The failure to…

The post What This Election Is About appeared first on PaulCraigRoberts.org.


          Comey urges voting on values as he accuses Trump of 'lying, misogyny, racism and attacks on the rule of law' - Washington Post      Cache   Translate Page      

Washington Post

Comey urges voting on values as he accuses Trump of 'lying, misogyny, racism and attacks on the rule of law'
Washington Post
Former FBI director James B. Comey on Tuesday decried the “lying, misogyny, racism and attacks on the rule of law from our president” and urged Americans to vote based on their values in a new op-ed. Writing in the New York Times, Comey, who was fired ...
James Comey pens Election Day op-ed: 'Let's vote to uphold our nation's values'The Hill
James Comey: An anti-Trump 'awakening' in America is underwayWashington Examiner

all 12 news articles »

          Huntington Beach couple want to send Trump a message      Cache   Translate Page      

          Donald Trump a un excellent bilan économique, mais pour combien de temps encore?      Cache   Translate Page      
Donald Trump se vante, à raison, d'excellents chiffres économiques. Mais quand on regarde dans le détail, d'autres indicateurs inquiètent. Pour certains analystes, il y aura une crise l'année prochaine.
          Midterms : les 5 choses à savoir avant de découvrir les résultats aux Etats-Unis      Cache   Translate Page      
Les bureaux de vote ont ouvert mardi aux Etats-Unis pour les "midterms", les élections de mi-mandat, qui représentent un test majeur pour Donald Trump et détermineront, par le renouvellement du Congrès, quelle sera la fin de mandat du républicain. Voici ce qu'il faut surveiller.
          US Midterm Elections: Donald Trump knows he's on the line      Cache   Translate Page      
US President Donald Trump knows he's on the line.
          Was Trump the deciding factor in your election day vote? Tell us what motivated you to cast your ballot      Cache   Translate Page      

          Iran Sanctions Explained: U.S. Goals, and the View From Tehran      Cache   Translate Page      
NYT  Nov. 5, 2018 President Hassan Rouhani of Iran called the sanctions imposed on Monday an act of “economic war.”Office of the Iranian Presidency, via Associated Press The Trump administration called it the biggest sanctions action the United States had ever undertaken against Iran. Iran’s president called it an act of “economic war” and said his country would win. The package of severe economic penalties imposed against Iran on Monday by the United States is the most significant part of President Trump’s decision last May to abandon the Iranian nuclear agreement of 2015, which he has described as a disaster. The penalties include some gaping exceptions Read More
          Dems Hold 7-Point Lead in Polls for Governor, Senator in Florida      Cache   Translate Page      
T. Belman. How can this be in a state that voted for Trump and currently attend his rallys in historic numbers. And then there is all the good he has done for their economy. It doesn’t make sense. By John Gizzi, NEWSMAX Andrew Gillum (AP) In Quinnipiac Polls released just 48 hours before the election, Democratic nominees for governor and U.S. Senator from Florida both held seven-point leads over their Republicans opponents. In the race for the governorship, Democrat and Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum led Republican former Rep. Ron DeSantis by 50 to 43 percent among likely voters.  The margin Read More
          Trump and the stones of remembrance      Cache   Translate Page      
By Lynne Lechter, AMERICAN THINKER Much has been written about President Trump and his relationship with Jews and Israel.  A few critical issues have been overlooked. It is true he moved the American embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, when many other presidential nominees promised but did not deliver once elected.  It is also true that through his spectacular ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, he has singularly pushed back ferociously against the Israel-bashing predominant at that organization for decades. But he has done far more service than that to global Jewry.  By these acts, President Trump has unilaterally enhanced Israel’s legitimacy and status in the Read More
          CNN: Viele US-Wähler wollen Zeichen gegen Trump setzen      Cache   Translate Page      
Bei den US-Kongresswahlen wollen viele Wähler laut einer Nachwahlbefragung des Fernsehsenders CNN ihren Ärger über Donald Trump
          Entenda por que é polêmico transferir para Jerusalém a embaixada brasileira em Israel      Cache   Translate Page      
O anúncio do presidente eleito Jair Bolsonaro de que pretende transferir de Tel Aviv para Jerusalém a embaixada brasileira em Israel – seguindo os passos do colega norte-americano Donald Trump – envolve uma controvérsia: a medida violaria resoluções da ONU (Organização das Nações Unidas) segundo as quais o destino da cidade sagrada para as três...
          History, Trump and partisan bitterness collide in Georgia      Cache   Translate Page      
As voters cast ballots in the bitter race for Georgia governor, widespread reports of technical malfunctions and long lines at polling stations came in from across the state
          WATCH: Rush Limbaugh Opens For Final Trump Rally Before Election Day      Cache   Translate Page      
WATCH: Rush Limbaugh Opens For Final Trump Rally Before Election Day

(YWN World Headquarters - NYC)

Read more on Yeshiva World News >


          Winning huge with The Donald      Cache   Translate Page      
It is likely President Trump will record an unprecedented success in the midterm elections. Mid-term elections invariably go against the…
          S. Korea, US resume suspended joint marine drills      Cache   Translate Page      
Seoul (AFP) Nov 5, 2018
South Korea and the United States on Monday resumed small-scale military training that was indefinitely suspended following an historic summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The combined marine drills were among "select" joint exercises that were indefinitely delayed in June, after Trump met with Kim in Singapore and pledged to halt "very provocative"
          Pompeo says he will meet N.Korea number two in New York      Cache   Translate Page      
Washington (AFP) Nov 4, 2018
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Sunday he will meet this week in New York with North Korea's number two to discuss denuclearization and a possible second summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. "I expect we'll make some real progress, including an effort to make sure that the summit between our two leaders can take place where we can make substant
          Austrian labs key to future of Iran nuclear deal      Cache   Translate Page      
Seibersdorf, Austria (AFP) Nov 5, 2018
As US President Donald Trump reimposes sweeping sanctions on Iran on Monday, all eyes are again on the precarious future of a landmark international deal meant to curb Tehran's nuclear programme. One place that could feel the ramifications of Trump's decision is an unassuming lab complex near the Austrian town of Seibersdorf - at first sight a world away from geopolitical manoeuvering over
          US Restores Iran Sanctions Lifted Under Obama Nuclear Deal      Cache   Translate Page      
WEB Notes: We knew this was coming from Trump’s movie style tweet the other day. How politicians love to take “action” before election day. The Trump administration on Friday restored U.S. sanctions on Iran that had been lifted...

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          Trump Tweets Himself As Star Of Own Iran Sanctions Movie      Cache   Translate Page      
WEB Notes: You do realize the President is a reality TV star I hope? Add this to his CNN wrestling tweet. You know, looking at American history this just really makes me ashamed… Do you remember Meriweather Lewis, that would be Lewis from the...

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          US-Midterms im Liveblog: Die ersten Wahllokale in Amerika schließen      Cache   Translate Page      
Voters wait to cast their midterm elections ballots at Burton Barr Library, a polling station in Phoenix, Arizona

Die Auszählungen der Zwischenwahlen beginnen. Wer übernimmt die Mehrheit im Senat? Wer im Repräsentantenhaus? Wird Donald Trump abgestraft? Verfolgen Sie die Wahlnacht im SZ-Liveblog.


          Comment on Noam Chomsky: President Trump and the Republicans are “Criminally Insane” Because Climate Change by u.k.(us)      Cache   Translate Page      
But you should, at least try to figure out where they are coming from.
          Comment on Please Vote Today by HotScot      Cache   Translate Page      
Roger At the risk of backslapping, I couldn't agree with you more. Trump could be pivotal in where the world heads, communism or democracy. Or even worse, progressives undermining democracy. The world has emerged from free trade (look up Matt Ridley's book, 'The Rational Optimist' where he describes from almost the first page, man's emergence as a force of nature through his ability to specialise and trade. From the guy who can't fish, but who makes brilliant bone fishooks, teaming up with a guy who can fish but can't make hooks; to the guy who can't drive but can build roads teaming up with the taxi driver. Socialism (and I use that in the broadest terms to include communism) is a political, ideological, unnatural construct which barely existed before Marx. Free trade is the natural order of peaceful society. It's not perfect but almost everything meaningful produced by mankind has emerged from it. Capitalism is also a political construct, but not nearly as harmful as socialism as it allies itself with free trade. I would argue that despite their oppressive regimes, China and Russia are becoming more capitalistic than the west, but they are understandably fumbling with the concept of change; as the west is badly fumbling the same concept, when it shouldn't.
          Comment on Noam Chomsky: President Trump and the Republicans are “Criminally Insane” Because Climate Change by Earthling2      Cache   Translate Page      
Noam Chomsky was denied entry into Israel in 2010 when on a speaking tour in the region. For a Jewish fellow to be denied entry into Israel, well, something must be very wrong. Especially for a world famous Jewish linguistic professor. He was scheduled to give lectures in Israel and the West Bank. Israel denied him entry stating he was subverting the security of Israel and the West Bank/Gaza with his denouncement of both USA and Israel. 25-30 years ago, I listened to what he had to say and even read a few of his books. But he was such a diehard Marxist professor then, it was hard to listen to since I was interested in what he had to say about linguistics and not his views on everything else. And now, he is just foaming at the mouth in his old age. If he had just stuck to his linguistic studies and teachings, the world would have probably been a better place. The leftist hooligans idolize him while attacking everybody and everything in their way, supposedly in the name of Antifa.
          Comment on Noam Chomsky: President Trump and the Republicans are “Criminally Insane” Because Climate Change by John Reistroffer      Cache   Translate Page      
I will never pay any attention to a person who was an advisor and strong supporter and proponent of Hugo Chavez's narco-communism in Venezuela.
          First exit polls show 55 percent disapprove of Trump      Cache   Translate Page      
The first exit polls of the 2018 midterm election cycle indicate voters are disappointed with President Trump performance in the White House.About 44 percent of voters approve of the job Trump is doing as president, while 55 percent disapprove,...
          The 2018 Midterms: How Did We Get Here and What’s Next?      Cache   Translate Page      
The day of reckoning is finally here after two years of psychological warfare aimed at President Donald Trump and at us – the deplorables – by the mainstream media, the Deep State, the Democrats, and the rest of the Establishment.
          Election Countdown: Election Day edition | Hour-by-hour viewer's guide | What to watch as results come in | Pundits' predictions | Election to deliver verdict on Trump | GOP braces for possibility of losing House | Dems see slim hopes for taking Senate      Cache   Translate Page      
This is Election Countdown, The Hill's newsletter from Lisa Hagen (@LA_Hagen) and Max Greenwood (@KMaxGreenwood) that brings you the biggest stories on the campaign trail. We'd love to hear from you, so feel free to reach out to Lisa at LHagen@...
          Menendez thanks Trump for endorsing his opponent      Cache   Translate Page      
Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) on Tuesday thanked President Trump for endorsing his Republican opponent in the midterm election."Thank you," Menendez wrote in a tweet, responding to Trump's endorsement earlier Tuesday of Republican...
          11/6/2018: WORLD: Day of reckoning for U.S. politics has arrived      Cache   Translate Page      

CLEVELAND• In his final pitch to voters, President Donald Trump implored Republicans on Monday to help preserve “fragile” GOP victories that could be erased by Democrats as he closes out a midterm campaign that has been defined by his hardline...
          Houseperson - Trump International Hotel & Tower Vancouver - Vancouver, BC      Cache   Translate Page      
Remove the bottles and paper from the recycling crate and take to the loading dock. To provide the best quality of service and a high standard of cleanliness....
From Indeed - Tue, 06 Nov 2018 21:50:15 GMT - View all Vancouver, BC jobs
          Chaos in the liberal order : the Trump presidency and international politics in the twenty-first century      Cache   Translate Page      
edited by Robert Jervis, Francis J. Gavin, Joshua Rovner and Diana N. Labrosse ; with George Fuiji.. New York : Columbia University Press [2018] -- Lettres et sciences humaines : JZ 1480 C43 2018
          LIVE Alegeri in SUA, primele rezultate: Republicanii conduc in statul Indiana, sansele democratilor de a lua Senatul scad!      Cache   Translate Page      
Americanii sunt chemati la urne in alegerile legislative partiale si regionale, in primul scrutin organizat dupa venirea lui Donald Trump la Casa Alba.
          Comment on Go Vote! by Kryten42      Cache   Translate Page      
As expected, the GOP are in full tilt SHENANIGAN mode. I've been up all night keeping my T followers updated on a whole bunch of issues. here's some highlights: https://twitter.com/Kryten_42/status/1059914779060518912 https://twitter.com/Kryten_42/status/1059933835771686912 https://twitter.com/Kryten_42/status/1059949240510828544 https://twitter.com/Kryten_42/status/1059909731169591297 And regarding TCS (the Trump Crime Syndicate): https://twitter.com/Kryten_42/status/1059928596574298113 https://twitter.com/Kryten_42/status/1059846479290847232 https://twitter.com/Kryten_42/status/1059844222470082561 OK! It may be 10:30 AM here, but my body & mind are screaming "BED TIME!!!" So... G'night all! ;) 👋🏾🛌🏾😴 Oh! Bill Maher posted a tweet that attracted a Red loving Islamic Trump/GOP loving troll (I kid you not!) So I had to respond! (you'll need to scroll down a few replies, but not far. His Twitter name is Zaki Bouhkbouhk). One guy liked my two responses anyway! Enjoy! 🤣👋🏾 https://twitter.com/billmaher/status/1059892714131488768
          Rihanna issues legal warning over Donald Trump using her music      Cache   Translate Page      
The singer described the US president’s rallies as ‘tragic’ and her lawyers sent a cease-and-desist letter to the White House.
          11/6/2018: ŚWIAT: Czy Trump obroni Republikanom Kongres?      Cache   Translate Page      
Demokraci liczą, że uda im się odzyskać utraconą w 2010 r. kontrolę nad Izbą Reprezentantów. Pozwoliłoby im to torpedować reformy prezydenta i wszcząć lub przyspieszyć śledztwa w komisjach dotyczące Trumpa i jego ludzi. Kontrolowany przez Republikanów...
          Rezultatet e zgjedhjeve kongresionale mund ta trondisin Trumpin      Cache   Translate Page      

Dy të tretat e votuesve amerikanë kanë thënë se vota e tyre sot për zgjedhjet kongresionale ka të bëjë me Donald Trump, sipas të dhënave të Exit Poll-eve të hershme, dhe shumica kanë thënë se kanë dalë në zgjedhje për të shprehur kundërshtimin ndaj Trump e jo mbështetjen për të. Mbështetja për presidentin nëpër tërë […]

The post Rezultatet e zgjedhjeve kongresionale mund ta trondisin Trumpin appeared first on Periskopi.


          Will the Result of the US Mid-Term Elections Curb Trump? – November 6th, 2018      Cache   Translate Page      
kerry-today-podcastUS historian Cecelia Hartsell believes today’s elections are seminal. As a Democrat and an African-American, she believes that Donald Trump has been a divisive force.
          Illinois' 14th Congressional District: Hultgren facing stiff challenge from Underwood      Cache   Translate Page      
Facing a challenger who epitomizes a new force of opposition to President Trump -- college-educated minority women -- Randy Hultgren finds himself in a battle, and he has his supporters.
          The people in the poorest part of the US have no reason whatsoever to blame Trump for their desperation… yet.      Cache   Translate Page      
Sir, Rana Foroohar writes,“It never ceases to amaze me that a man I consider the most venal and rapacious president in history has managed to sell desperate people in the poorest parts of the US on the idea that he is their saviour”, “America’s vote marks a culture shift” November 5.

Why would that be surprising? The people in the poorest part of the US have no reason whatsoever to blame Trump for their desperation… yet.

Foroohar writes,“Most Americans, liberal and conservative, are united in their definition of what constitutes “just” business behaviour — they believe it is about spreading the wealth, and improving worker pay and treatment.”

Really? Would most Americans, liberal and conservative, not believe that what constitutes “just” business behaviour — is first and foremost to create that economic growth that could generate opportunities for them?

Foroohar concludes, “It would be wise for both politicians and business to focus on those ideas that bring people together, rather than those that drive them apart”. 

What does she mean by “And business”? Except for some truly minuscule exceptions we have not seen any ordinary business dedicating itself to driving people apart. That is normally very bad for business. What we sure have seen is way too many politicians, activists and journalists, being in the business of polarization… many of them even very happy of being able to exploit Trump in order to improve the profitability of their franchise.

What would they all be doing, and writing about, was there no Trump? They better thank their lucky star.

@PerKurowski

          Consumul ilegal de droguri în rândul camionagiilor detectat prin analiza părului în SUA      Cache   Translate Page      

Președintele Donald Trump a semnat legea federală care permite analiza părului pentru a detecta consumul ilegal de droguri în rândul șoferilor de camioane. Cerută de ATA (American Trucking Associations), cea mai mare asociație de transport rutier din Statele Unite și adoptată de cele două camere ale Parlamentului american, legea care permite detecția consumului de droguri […]

The post Consumul ilegal de droguri în rândul camionagiilor detectat prin analiza părului în SUA appeared first on infoTrucker.ro.


          Etats-Unis: «Election Day», un référendum pour l’Administration Trump      Cache   Translate Page      
C’est le «jour-J». Les électeurs américains sont appelés aux urnes ce mardi pour des élections de mi-mandat qui pourrait transformer la configuration politique du pays. Beaucoup ont déjà voté par anticipation. Le président Trump a battu la campagne jusqu’à la dernière minute pour éviter une débâcle dans les urnes au parti républicain.
          Première comparution à New York de l’homme à l’origine de l’envoi de plusieurs colis suspects      Cache   Translate Page      
Ce fan de Donald Trump a envoyé 13 colis suspects à différentes personnalités, pour la plupart démocrates.
          Voilà ce que font les Américains Pro Trump quand ils s’ennuient      Cache   Translate Page      

On ne comprend toujours pas !

Cet article Voilà ce que font les Américains Pro Trump quand ils s’ennuient est apparu en premier sur Tuxboard.


          Midterms : dans la dernière ligne droite, un duel entre Obama et Trump      Cache   Translate Page      
A la veille des élections de mi-mandat qui détermineront la majorité au Congrès jusqu’en 2020, MM. Trump et Obama se sont affrontés par meetings de campagne interposés. Ils ont proposé deux visions radicalement divergentes des Etats-Unis.
          Trump To Watch Election Results Come In At The White House      Cache   Translate Page      
President Trump is watching election results in the White House. Aides say he feels good about his effort to support GOP candidates.
          Donald Trump : que pensent ses électeurs ?      Cache   Translate Page      
TRUMPMANIA - Ce mardi 6 novembre 2018, à l'occasion des élections de mi-mandat, nos reporters sont allés à la rencontre d'électeurs qui ont voté Donald Trump en 2016. D'ailleurs, que vont-ils faire cette fois ?
          “A Pointless Waste of Time”      Cache   Translate Page      
David points out that fact-checking Trump is a pointless waste of time, because his dupes, symps, and fellow-travelers don’t care and everyone else is already on to him.
          Election Day anxiety is a real thing, and here’s why it’s so much worse in 2018      Cache   Translate Page      

There was a time when midterm elections were considered “off-years,” and candidates had a hard time even getting people to the polls. Not this year. The 2018 midterms feel much like a presidential election. And in a way they are: The races are widely seen as a referendum on Donald Trump and everything he represents.

They also feel personal, as if our very identities and belief systems are being tested.

“One of the things that elections produce in us is some tension and anxiety, because we have an interest in particular outcomes,” said Cleveland Clinic psychiatrist Scott Bae, “and we perceive that we don’t have a whole lot of control over them, and that’s a great formula for tension in any atmosphere.”

Politics shouldn’t be so personal, and it doesn’t always have to be. Often, there are fairly bland policy debates behind all the rhetoric and emotion, a competition of ideas about how to guide your country, your state, or your city forward. Focus on that part, and you can ignore the noise.

These days, much of that noise comes from media, especially social media, Bae says. Because we’re in a culture where the media is so present in our lives, it can be hard to ignore the political banter. But whenever possible, he recommends staying in tune with just enough to know what you need to know, but don’t allow the noise to become so overwhelming or confusing that you decide not to vote.

It’s also wise to remember that politics is a relatively slow-moving thing. The outcome of the midterm races won’t result in quick and drastic policy changes. The races are mostly about the country’s views on two years with Donald Trump, and whether Congress should put a check on his power.

Try to take it easy as the results come in tonight. Limit your Twitter and Facebook time, and maybe even take heart in the fact this election seems so much more high-stakes than usual. It is, after all, democracy working in real time.


          Ted Cruz is still using a blacklisted Cambridge Analytica app developer      Cache   Translate Page      

In his re-election campaign’s final hours, Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) is still deploying a smartphone app created by a software team at the heart of the Cambridge Analytica controversy.

The app, Cruz Crew, was developed by AggregateIQ, a small Canadian data firm that was for years the lead developer used by the infamous data analytics consultancy that made headlines last spring for harvesting user data on millions of unsuspecting Facebook users while working for the Trump campaign. Since that firm’s demise, AggregateIQ has become one focus of an international investigation into alleged data misdeeds during the 2016 Brexit campaign, and is the first company to be targeted by regulators under Europe’s new data privacy law.

The Cruz Crew app’s login screen. The app’s Facebook login was finally removed in June. [Image: Google Play]
Both Cruz Crew as well as an app for Cruz’s presidential campaign in 2016 share an interconnected history of developers and clients linked to Cambridge Analytica, its British affiliate SCL Elections, and architects of the Republican Party’s recent digital efforts. Part of a group of apps presented as walled-garden social networks for political supporters, the software helps campaigns collect voter data and microtarget messages.

In April, Facebook announced it had suspended AggregateIQ over its possible improper access to the data of millions of Facebook users. But over a dozen apps made by AggregateIQ remained connected to Facebook’s platform until May and June, when Facebook belatedly took action against them.

A Facebook spokesperson told Fast Company that it was still investigating AIQ’s possible misuse of data, amid an ongoing investigation by Canadian prosecutors. The Cruz campaign did not respond to requests for comment.

David Carroll, a professor at Parsons School of Design at the New School in New York, who has brought a legal challenge against SCL and Cambridge Analytica for release of his voter data profile, said Cruz’s continued relationships with AggregateIQ highlighted problems with the use of data by a growing ecosystem of partisan election apps and databases. The risks are particularly high, he said, when the vendors are combining data from multiple sources and processing Americans’ data overseas.

“Despite the Cambridge Analytica fiasco, it seems that the Republican data machine is still a shadowy network that includes international operators, tangled up with vendors under intense scrutiny for unlawful conduct in multiple jurisdictions,” he said. “I don’t understand why Republicans don’t insist on working with domestic tech vendors and technologists who are U.S. citizens.”

The Cruz-Cambridge Analytica connection

During the 2016 race, a U.S.-based software firm named Political Social Media, but better known as uCampaign, was credited as developer and publisher for the official “Ted Cruz 2016” presidential primary app. At the time, the app achieved modest notoriety as a somewhat novel data collection tool– appearing alongside Cambridge Analytica under headlines like, “Cruz App Data Collection Helps Campaign Read Minds of Voters”–with the app colloquially referred to in the press as “Cruz Crew.”

As in 2016, the 2018 Cruz re-election campaign relies on constant polling and voter modeling to understand and target mainstream conservatives in Texas. Cruz and his Democratic challenger Beto O’Rourke, who has repeatedly brought up Cambridge Analytica during the campaign and has refused to use big data analytics, have both heavily invested in social media. The media blitz hasn’t been cheap: According to data from the Center for Responsive Politics, the candidates in the 2018 Texas Senate race have set the all-time record for most money spent in any U.S. Senate election.

As part of its digital push, the Cruz campaign rolled out a new app, officially named “Cruz Crew,” which awards points to users for tweeting pro-Cruz messages, volunteering, and taking part in other campaign activities. On the app’s pages in the Google and Apple stores, AggregateIQ is not mentioned, but its name is visible as the developer in the app URL and in internal code. The app’s publisher is listed as the political marketing agency WPA Intelligence, or WPAi.

Chris Wilson, WPAi’s founder and chief executive, is a veteran GOP pollster who previously worked for George W. Bush and Karl Rove. WPAi’s past campaign successes include a trio of high profile Tea Party-cum-Freedom Caucus sympathizer senators: Cruz, Mike Lee (R-UT), and Ron Johnson (R-WI). By far, however, Cruz has been WPA’s biggest political client in the U.S. Between his bids for senator and president, Cruz campaign committees have paid out over $4.3 million to Chris Wilson’s firm since 2011.

As the director of research, analytics and digital strategy for Cruz’s 2016 presidential campaign, Wilson oversaw a large data team that included Rebekah Mercer and Steve Bannon’s Cambridge Analytica. Rebekah’s father, Robert Mercer, footed the $5.8 million bill for Cambridge Analytica by doubling that amount in donations.

Wilson and the Cruz team have repeatedly said that Cambridge Analytica represented to the campaign that all of the data it had was legally obtained. They also claimed that Cambridge did not deliver the results expected of them, neither through their much-discussed psychographics work nor through an important piece of software called Ripon.

In schematics, Ripon was drawn up as an all-in-one campaign solution to manage voter data collection, ad targeting, and street canvassing. According to files retrieved by computer security analyst Chris Vickery, Ripon was intended to tap into something called “the Database of Truth.” Documents revealed that the Truth project “integrates, obtains, and normalizes data from disparate sources,” beginning with the Republican National Committee’s Data Trust database, combined “with state voter files, consumer data, third-party data providers, historical WPA survey, and projects and customer data.”

Despite being a deliverable promised by Cambridge Analytica, the work on Ripon was outsourced to AggregateIQ. More recently, WPAi hired the firm to develop and manage the software for Cruz Crew, along with its two other currently available apps: one for Texas Governor Greg Abbott’s re-election campaign, and one for Osnova, a Ukrainian political party dedicated to the long-shot presidential aspirations of its oligarch founder, Serhiy Taruta.

In the 2018 race, WPAi and the Cruz campaign have said Cruz’s effort isn’t using new Cambridge Analytica-style “psychographic” modeling, but it is using social media data for specific targeting, and relying on previous campaign data. “We use social data to ID voter groups in our core universes,” WPA’s Chris Wilson previously told Fast Company. “A lot of those are 2016 voters who we know are persuaded by specific messages.”

Cruz Crew and TedCruz.org currently share a privacy policy has barely changed since late 2015, when Cambridge Analytica and uCampaign were Cruz vendors. In both cases, the policy states that the campaign may “access, collect, and store personal information about other people that is available to us through your contact list,” match the info to data from other sources, and “keep track of your device’s geographic location.”


Related: How Ted Cruz plans to beat Beto O’Rourke: Play it simple


Beyond the existing campaign app, however, AIQ’s current involvement in the Cruz campaign’s data management and software development is unknown. A report by the New York Times last month found that when users shared their friends’ contact information with the Cruz app, that data was still being sent to AggregateIQ domains.

Wilson told the Times that his company, not AggregateIQ, received and controlled app users’ information. Representatives for AggregateIQ did not immediately respond to a request for comment, and WPAi did not respond to questions about the data firm.

Intelligence quotient

AIQ, founded in 2013 in Victoria, British Columbia, is currently under investigation in the U.K. and its homebase of Canada for electoral impropriety during the Brexit Leave campaign. The company’s name has come up repeatedly in parliamentary testimony for its alleged campaign finance and data protection misdeeds in connection with the parent company of Cambridge Analytica.

“Concerns have been raised about the closeness of the two organizations including suggestions that AIQ, [SCL Elections, and Cambridge Analytica] were, in effect, one and the same entity,” stated a recent report by the U.K.’s Information Commissioner’s Office.

In testimony to a U.K. parliamentary committee, former Cambridge Analytica executive Brittany Kaiser said that AggregateIQ was the exclusive digital and data engineering partner of SCL, the British parent affiliate of Analytica.

“They would build our software, such as a platform that we designed for Senator Ted Cruz’s campaign,” she said. “That was meant to collect data for canvassing individuals who would go door-to-door collecting and hygiening data of individuals in those households. We also had no internal digital capacity at the time, so we did not actually undertake any of our digital campaigns. That was done exclusively through AggregateIQ.”

AIQ founders Zack Massingham and Jeff Silvester had been brought into the fold a year prior by their friend Christopher Wylie, then an SCL employee, who blew the whistle on the firm’s practices earlier this year. According to Wylie, the founders registered their company in their hometown of Victoria as a result of an SCL contract, which subsequently led to political work in the Caribbean.

After the two firms first made contact in August 2013, while SCL was performing its first American political work in the Virginia gubernatorial race, AIQ designed solutions for deployment in campaigns under SCL’s supervision in Trinidad and Tobago. Part of the intent, according to records obtained by the Globe and Mail, was to harvest the internet histories of up to 1.3 million civilians in order to more accurately model their psychographics for message targeting.

In December 2013, an SCL employee proposed requesting the data from the country’s internet provider by posing as academic researchers, while seeking to tie internet addresses to billing addresses, without naming customers. In response, AIQ CEO Massingham replied by email that he could use every bit of data they could get. “If the billing addresses are obfuscated, we’ll have a difficult time relating things back to a real person or household,” he wrote. It remains unknown if that data was obtained.


Related: How Cambridge Analytica fueled a shady global passport bonanza


The primary work AIQ performed was to design software that could be used to motivate volunteers, canvassers, and voters. This software concept was repeated for multiple clients, including Petronas, an oil company that sought to influence voters in Malaysia.

Campaign software developed by AIQ was used by Cambridge Analytica in U.S. elections and for clients like the oil giant Petronas. [Image: SCL]

AggregateIQ’s work across the pond

During the U.K.’s Brexit campaign in 2016, Vote Leave hired AIQ to place online ads, with AIQ paying for all 1,034 Facebook ads run by the campaign. AIQ’s services were also retained to develop and administer a piece of software that Vote Leave executives, including chief technology officer and former SCL employee Thomas Borwick, later credited with a large portion of the campaign’s success.

Vote Leave campaign director Dominic Cummings wrote an extensive blog post about the project, called the Voter Intention Collection System (VICS).

“One of our central ideas was that the campaign had to do things in the field of data that have never been done before,” Cummings wrote. “This included a) integrating data from social media, online advertising, websites, apps, canvassing, direct mail, polls, online fundraising, activist feedback . . . and b) having experts in physics and machine learning do proper data science in the way only they can, i.e. far beyond the normal skills applied in political campaigns.”

As the voter-facing front end for the Leave campaign data team, uCampaign was brought in and paid by AIQ to deliver the smartphone apps that helped to gather users’ cell numbers, email addresses, phone book contacts, and Facebook IDs for integration, exactly as it had done during the previous months for the Cruz 2016 campaign. Just as in that case, the app collected voter information for use in AIQ tools.

“We could only do this properly if we had proper canvassing software,” Cummings wrote. “We built it partly in-house and partly using an external engineer who we sat in our office for months.”

AIQ’s Zach Massingham repeatedly flew to the U.K. as his company was paid hundred of thousands of pounds for its Vote Leave work in 2016 after a series of transactions between several campaigns that Canadian officials have questioned as “money laundering” and British authorities are investigating as criminal offenses. Nonetheless, after the referendum, Cummings released an open-source version of VICS code on Github for future micro-targeters to use.

In early 2018, one of Vote Leave and SCL vet Thomas Borwick’s handful of data firms, Kanto, was hired to do canvassing and social media work during the Irish abortion referendum. Anti-abortion activist groups also contracted uCampaign to build two separate apps, which alarmed campaign finance and privacy watchdogs and led to a ban on internet advertising.

As with uCampaign, which has also made apps for the likes of Donald Trump and the NRA, AIQ’s smartphone apps were designed to gather information via Facebook Login, a tool offered by Facebook to streamline user registration across the internet. Though Facebook tightened some restrictions this year as a direct response to the Analytica flare-up, Login has allowed third-party developers to gain access to a wide range of Facebook account information about registered users.

As part of its investigation into Cambridge Analytica and its affiliates, on April 7, Facebook said that it had suspended AIQ, effectively ending its ability to deploy Facebook Login. However, security researcher Chris Vickery discovered that AIQ’s access to the Facebook platform was still active as of May 17. Additionally, he found, AIQ had already collected info on nearly 800,000 Facebook account IDs in a database, with many matched to addresses and phone numbers. Facebook removed more AIQ apps two weeks later, but it was not until June 19 that the Facebook Login feature was removed from the apps for Cruz, Osnova, and Abbott.

In written testimony to Parliament, AIQ chief technology officer Jeff Silvester, who visited British prime minister Theresa May’s office with Massingham in the weeks after the Brexit vote, explained the history of the relationship between SCL and AIQ, which began in late 2013.

After building a “customer relationship management (CRM) tool” for SCL in Trinidad and Tobago, AIQ created “an entirely new CRM tool” for the 2014 U.S. midterm elections. “SCL called the tool Ripon,” Silvester wrote. AIQ was then required to transfer all software rights to SCL before working “with SCL on similar software development, online advertising, and website development” in support of Cambridge Analytica’s work for the Ted Cruz 2016 campaign.

A referral from “an acquaintance who was working with Vote Leave” led to AIQ being hired by Vote Leave in April 2016, the day before the campaign was designated as the official Leave organization.

[Photo: Stock Catalog]
This past May, after questioning the legality of AggregateIQ founder Zach Massingham’s work on British soil while developing VICS, parliamentary committee chair Damian Collins asked Silvester about AIQ’s recent work for WPAi.

Silvester explained, “They sell their software that we create for them to whomever they like, and we just simply support that work.”

In March, WPAi CEO Chris Wilson told Gizmodo that he had almost no knowledge of the controversy surrounding AIQ, despite their work for the Cruz 2016 campaign. “I would never work with a firm that I felt had done something illegal or even unethical,” he said. The firm’s work for WPA was the result of a competitive bidding process, he said, and AIQ “offered us the best capabilities for the best price.”

Leaving the nest

In February 2017, a story on the Politico Pro website announced Archie, WPA Intelligence’s new piece of software for 2018 campaigns. The software goes by a nickname used by Texas Governor Greg Abbott’s political team, referring to Archimedes, the Greek mathematician who said, “Give me a lever and I can move the world.”

A diagram describing Archimedes, WPAi’s new campaign software [Image: WPAi]
“The program allows campaigns to work across all formats and vendors to collect data in one place,” the article said, and campaign staffers “will be able to use the app to generate models, target audiences, cut lists, and produce data visualization tools to make strategic decisions.”

From that description, Archie sounded very much like AIQ’s Ripon and VICS all-in-one campaign solutions. AIQ’s smartphone app for WPAi client Greg Abbott first appeared on Google Play and Apple’s iOS Store three months later, in May 2017.

Archie’s predictive modeling of Texan voters “yielded approximately 4.5 million individual targets for turnout efforts,” according to WPAi. That helped the Abbott campaign win the 2018 Reed award for Best Use of Data Analytics/Machine Learning in Field Program. In attendance at the March ceremony were representatives from Cambridge Analytica, which was nominated for Best Use of Online Targeting for Judicial Campaign.

Three weeks after the Reed awards, Christopher Wylie’s whistleblower account in the Observer were splashed across the world’s front pages. By the following month, SCL and Analytica were claiming bankruptcy, and AIQ’s cofounders were appearing at Canadian Parliament and dealing with its suspension from Facebook as developers.

In June, a week before AIQ’s WPA apps finally removed Facebook Login, Silvester appeared before Canadian Parliament for a second time, where he was admonished by Vice Chair Nathaniel Erskine-Smith, who remarked, “Frankly, the information you have provided is inadequate.” After being threatened with a contempt charge for excusing himself from sworn testimony with a one-line doctor’s note, Massingham later spoke with the committee via audio-only link from his lawyer’s office.

In July, AggregateIQ was served with the U.K.’s first-ever enforcement notice under the EU’s new General Data Protection Regulation, known as GDPR. The U.K.’s Information Commissioner’s Office subjected AIQ to millions in fines if it did not “cease processing any personal data of U.K. or EU citizens obtained from U.K. political organizations or otherwise for the purposes of data analytics, political campaigning, or any other advertising purposes.”

After AIQ appealed the order, it was merely mandated to “erase any personal data of individuals in the U.K.,” though it was found to have “processed personal data in a way that the data subjects were not aware of, for purposes which they would not have expected, and without a lawful basis for that processing.”

As Ted Cruz wraps up his campaign, he continues to outsource part of his voter data harvesting to a foreign firm that has been blacklisted by Facebook and British and European regulators. The total data amassed through apps like Cruz Crew and projects like Ripon and Archimedes remains unknown, but they raise concerns that Cruz acknowledged when he launched his presidential campaign at Liberty University in March 2015. “Instead of a government that seizes your emails and your cell phones,” he said, “imagine a federal government that protected the privacy rights of every American.”


Jesse Witt (@witjest) is an independent researcher, writer, and filmmaker.

With additional reporting by Alex Pasternack.


          Rihanna issues legal warning over Donald Trump using her music      Cache   Translate Page      
The singer described the US president’s rallies as ‘tragic’ and her lawyers sent a cease-and-desist letter to the White House.
          It’s not just you: Google Trends is showing long waits to vote      Cache   Translate Page      

Today, Americans are heading to the polls for a chance to either show support for the Trump administration and its Republican Congress or to let the Blue Wave roll in. But first, we all have to wait in line.

All over the country, voters are anecdotally reporting incredibly long lines–and data backs them up. A real-time visualization of Google search data shows that searches related to “long wait times” are spiking all over the country.


According to the map, which was built by Google News Initiative and Pitch Interactive, it’s not just your polling place that’s overrun with people. For instance, at 11:53 a.m., the national average of people Googling “long wait times” spiked by 481% in Bluffton, South Carolina. At 12:24 p.m., that search was skyrocketing by 566% in Newburgh, Indiana. An animation starting at 6 a.m. Eastern Time shows these spikes hitting dozens if not hundreds of polling places around the country, especially around 1 p.m. Eastern–lunch time–and morning on the West Coast.

While some see this as a positive indication that more people turned out to vote in this election, others call the long wait times another means of voter suppression. After all, not everyone has the luxury to stand in line for hours to cast their vote.

Whether you view it as a sign of hope or a sign of all the work that still needs to be done, do your best to stay in line. Even if the polls close while you’re waiting, you will still get a chance to vote.


          The colors of the midterm elections? Purple, green, and gold      Cache   Translate Page      

Krysten Sinema, a Democrat running in a hotly contested race for Senate in Arizona, sets her name in purple against a golden desert sunrise. Sri Preston Kulkarni, a Democrat running for Congress in Texas, uses a blue lone star bursting into shades of purple and red.

For the most part, this election’s campaign design looked fairly predictable: Nearly 75% of Democrats and and more than half of Republicans used blue as their primary campaign color this year. If you’re a Republican running in a solidly Democratic district, you’re three times more likely to use red as your logo color than your peers in Republican districts. But in general, candidates choose blue–a color strongly associated with America from the beginning, from the color George Washington chose for continental army uniforms to the resolution of the Second Continental Congress in 1777 describing a flag with white stars against a “blue field representing a new constellation.”

[Image: courtesy Center for American Politics and Design]

Things get more interesting when you take a closer look at Democratic candidates specifically, though. Democrats were twice as likely to choose purple as their running color compared to Republicans–and three times as likely to choose green.

[Image: courtesy Center for American Politics and Design]
These numbers come from the Center for American Politics and Design, a new group of designers and creative directors including Susan Merriam of Graj + Gustavsen, Kevin Wiesner and Lukas Bentel of Hello Velocity, and Will Denton and Seth Kranzler of Channel Studio. Their analysis of every campaign brand in the midterm election is a glimpse into the visual culture of campaign season–and in some cases, a way to track the evolution of visual identities across the political spectrum.

“Overall, it’s interesting to think about why some of these trends exist,” says Merriam over email. “Given the production value of a lot of these logos, we can guess that many of these design decisions aren’t (necessarily) 100% calculated or engineered to appeal specifically to the audience’s psyche, but that they are symptomatic of the designers’ and candidates’ own.”

One trend the analysis calls out: The similarity between well-known corporate brands and campaign identities. [Image: courtesy Center for American Politics and Design]

Do the purple, gold, and green campaigns of 2018 reflect the simmering conflicts within the Democratic party, with left-leaning candidates renouncing party leadership and centrists attempting to align more closely with Republicans?

But Merriam points out another detail: All of those purple campaign logos, 21 are women, four are men of color, and only one is a white man. “Why do only women or men of color use purple?” Merriam continues. “That would probably be relevant for a larger discussion about the relationship of white masculinity and color theory.”

[Image: courtesy Center for American Politics and Design]

A slew of low-fi campaign logos are highlighted by CAPD’s analysis, including Republican Ron Curtis’s comic sans wordmark set against an American flag graphic. In another election, such details might have been funny–and let’s be honest, they are still kinda funny–but it would be naive to see them as stupid or thoughtless. If the 2016 presidential campaign taught us anything about the power of design in politics, it was that “bad design” can be an incredibly powerful way to broadcast a candidate’s outsider status successfully.

“I hope going forward we can do some more analysis in relation to past elections as well,” Merriam says. “I’m interested to see for example the difference 2016 had on branding overall. As politics becomes increasingly polarized, are there more bold, red candidates with torch iconography? Will we also see more logos like Ocasio-Cortez‘s that try and get away from the traditional color schemes of the Democratic party? I would guess so, and we shall see.”

[Image: courtesy Center for American Politics and Design]

Red was associated with the Republican party long before Donald Trump slapped on his first MAGA hat–but it hasn’t been the color of the GOP for all that long. The “red state, blue state” trope seems to have emerged alongside contemporary network television coverage of politics within the last two decades. In 2004, The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi traced it to the 2000 election:

The first reference to “red states” and “blue states,” according to a database search of newspapers, magazines and TV news transcripts since 1980, occurred on NBC’s “Today” show about a week before the 2000 election. Matt Lauer and Tim Russert discussed the projected alignment of the states, using a map and a color scheme that had first shown up a few days earlier on NBC’s sister cable network, MSNBC. “So how does [Bush] get those remaining 61 electoral red states, if you will?” Russert asked at one point…

Newspapers began discussing the race in the larger, abstract context of red vs. blue. The deal may have been sealed when Letterman suggested a week after the vote that a compromise would “make George W. Bush president of the red states and Al Gore head of the blue ones.”

In this nightmare of a campaign season, it’s fascinating to remember that the simplistic language we use to talk about national politics–as if it were game between two teams of different jersey colors–was bestowed upon us by network graphics departments that chose those colors for on-air analysis.


          Liar, liar, Trump’s pants are on fire      Cache   Translate Page      
In the seven weeks leading up to the midterm elections, Trump made an average of 30 false or misleading claims a day.
          Triumph the Insult Comic Dog just brutally roasted Ted Cruz–right to his face      Cache   Translate Page      

Lat week, we established that it’s odd for U.S. Senator Ted Cruz to try to be in on the joke that people suspect he’s the Zodiac Killer. Do you know who is more than capable of building on that joke, though? Triumph the Insult Comic Dog.

The fuzzy, felt-skinned creation of veteran comedy writer Robert Smigel showed up on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert Monday night to unveil a video documenting the Texas senate race. At one point, while interviewing some Cruz supporters, Triumph takes the Zodiac joke to an unexpected place. He describes Cruz’s desire to repeal Obamacare as something that could potentially kill “way more people than the Zodiac,” emphasizing the “way more” again and again so many times that the Cruz supporters chuckling at his joke (but still supporting Cruz) have to actually think about it.

The last time we saw Triumph the Insult Comic Dog in action, in a 2016 Election special from back when we thought that comedy mattered, he was lamenting the fact that he couldn’t get an interview with Ted Cruz. He doesn’t quite pull off a full interview this time either, but he does get the chance to briefly come come face-to-fur with Cruz as he works his way through the crowd at a rally, and boy is it ever worth the effort.

Before getting to the Cruz segment of the video, Triumph starts off gently poking fun at Beto O’Rourke and his supporters. He offers to coach some Latinx voters in the O’Rourke crowd on how to pass as white so they won’t have a problem voting. “Repeat after me,” he tells them, “‘Have you seen the new season of Marvelous Mrs. Maisel?'”

When it comes time to interview the man himself, Triumph/Smigel can’t resist flinging a few zingers O’Rourke’s way. He refers to him as “the 12th man on any basketball team” and asks questions like “Does it concern you that half your base thinks they can vote for you through Instagram?”

Obviously, Beto is getting off lightly. This is merely the bark; the bite is reserved for Ted Cruz. Without giving them all away, here are the seven sickest burns Triumph lands on Ted Cruz.

  • “What do you have that Ted Cruz doesn’t have?” Triumph asks Beto O’Rourke before adding, “besides the ability to regenerate your tail?”
  • “I’m here at the Ted Cruz rally,” Triumph announces, “or a Duck Dynasty cosplay convention. Not really sure.”
  • “Which do you think was harder for Ted to forgive?” Triumph asks someone in the crowd at a Cruz rally. “Donald Trump for insulting his wife or that mongoose for eating his offspring. See, because he’s a reptile.”
  • “If Ted loses, do you think he’ll end up back with his first love, that mute lady from The Shape of Water?” Triumph asks that same Cruz supporter. “See, because he’s a hideous fish monster.”
  • “Ted, I have a pre-existing condition that makes me vomit out of my eyes whenever I see you,” Triumph shouts from the back of the room during the Cruz rally. “Is that covered under the GOP healthcare plan?”
  • “You can’t ignore me, Ted,” Triumph says in the crowd as he nears Cruz. “I’m not ‘overwhelming scientific evidence of global warming.'”
  • “Ted, is it true that you will defend the constitution at all costs?” Triumph asks when he finally has a brief audience with Cruz. “Except when Donald Trump insults it on Twitter?”
  • Finally, Cruz tries to get in a zinger about how it was the Democrats who neutered Triumph, and the Insult Comic Dog is ready for it. “I support spaying and neutering,” he says. “Just like Trump did to you.”

Oof! There is no recovering from a burn like that. Ted Cruz now lives inside of a burn ward. While he treats his wounds, watch the entire video from Monday night’s Colbert show below.


          Trump may look away, but we can’t forget Jamal Khashoggi      Cache   Translate Page      
It’s crucial to take the Saudi royal family to account, and to hold Trump’s feet to the fire.
          The Trump show is in serious need of a reboot      Cache   Translate Page      
Trump’s audience is likely to dwindle unless he comes up with something new.
          I was a refugee. I know Trump is wrong.      Cache   Translate Page      
On the whole, refugees generate more revenue than costs for the United States.
          What Trump should be asking of the CIA on Khashoggi      Cache   Translate Page      
Let’s hope Trump is utilizing all the agency has to offer while thinking through the Jamal Khashoggi case.
          All the ugliness of the Trump campaign is on display in Georgia      Cache   Translate Page      
The president says Stacey Abrams is not qualified, but what he really means is she is not white.
          Why Trump needs an opposition-controlled Congress      Cache   Translate Page      
Let's introduce the president to actual checks and balances.
          Trump is trying to scare us. Here’s why he’s failing.      Cache   Translate Page      
"Local-level politics at just this stage in American history seems to be in many places renewing itself."
          Fox News correspondent issues on-air correction related to Trump ‘fake news’ tweet      Cache   Translate Page      
'Fake news'? Yeah, right.
          Fox News says host’s appearance at Trump rally ‘an unfortunate distraction’      Cache   Translate Page      
Sean Hannity attended the president’s final event before the midterm elections.
          La incertidumbre por elecciones en EU ayuda al peso, pero debilita a la BMV; el dólar se vende en 20.16      Cache   Translate Page      
El peso sigue avanzando aprovechando la debilidad del dólar, el cual se ve presionado por las votaciones intermedias en Estados Unidos que podrían definir el proyecto de Donald Trump en los próximos años.
          11/6/2018: WORLD: Day of reckoning for U.S. politics has arrived      Cache   Translate Page      

CLEVELAND • In his final pitch to voters, President Donald Trump implored Republicans on Monday to help preserve “fragile” GOP victories that could be erased by Democrats as he closes out a midterm campaign that has been defined by his hardline...
          11/6/2018: WORLD: NBC, FOX STOP AIRING ‘RACIST’ TRUMP IMMIGRANT AD      Cache   Translate Page      
NEW YORK NBC and Fox News Channel both said Monday that it will stop airing President Donald Trump’s campaign ad that featured an immigrant convicted of murder. CNN had rejected the same ad, declaring it racist. Fox pulled the ad Sunday “upon further...
          Voters get their chance to shape US politics in Donald Trump era      Cache   Translate Page      
The president warned against a ‘socialist nightmare’ while Democrats hoped for an ‘awakening’ after losing the White House two years ago.
          Re: The calm-before-the-storm open line      Cache   Translate Page      
"Donald Trump's definition of voter fraud is when a non-white person votes."--Middle Age Riot

"At a rally in Missouri, Trump supporters chanted "four more years," proving they know as much about math and politics as they do about science."--Middle Age Riot
Posted by NeverVoteRepublican
          Re: $14 million hotel announced for downtown El Dorado      Cache   Translate Page      
They should invite Melania Trump down for a couple of hours. By all accounts, she's a big spender -- about $16K an hour in Cairo. Don't forget the mint for her pillow.

All in all though, it'll likely be a good thing for El Dorado. Congratulations to them.
Posted by Olphart
          Re: The calm-before-the-storm open line      Cache   Translate Page      
Going to stay up late for the shit show. What is for certain, is an amount of wailing and gnashing of the teeth from the infantile left.

What will be music to my ears is the cries of those kids, those worthless, sheltered cildren who will get 'triggered' and claim PTSD from a GOP win. If nothing else shows, clearly, how weak kids have become, how we have lost our way and made a president like Trump inevitable, this study reveals all.

https://tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07…

If they are stressed, and claiming PTSD, then maybe it is time to take those individuals and put them through some real stress. There are real sufferers of PTSD, not this play school version being embraced by delicate flowers.

Maybe the Marines, once they get their shit straightened out, and make the Marines Great, Again, should recruit from these colleges. Any student making claims of PTSD because of Trump should be shipped off to boot, and find out what real stress and misery involves, not failing to get their way.

Sun will rise, sun will set, all will be right in the world...
Posted by Steven E
          11/6/2018: YOU: A HEARTFELT THANK YOU      Cache   Translate Page      

Bono has a message for Congress: Thanks for ignoring U.S. President Donald Trump. Trump has sought to slash hundreds of millions of dollars of funding for AIDS programs at home and abroad, but the U2 frontman says members of Congress “have so far...
          11/6/2018: YOU: Trump light      Cache   Translate Page      

Johnny Depp’s charismatic leader at the centre of the new Fantastic Beasts sequel isn’t modelled on U.S. President Donald Trump. But the stars of Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, the film written by J.K. Rowling about a dark wizard who...
          Trump breaks out biggest guns on right: Limbaugh, Hannity      Cache   Translate Page      
It’s crunch time for campaigns, as the countdown clock continues ticking toward Election Day on Tuesday. President Trump is employing the help of some of the biggest names on the political right to help promote Republican members of Congress. Talk-radio host Rush Limbaugh and Fox News anchor Sean Hannity will be joining the president in […]
          Trumps caravan soldiers to cost $220 million      Cache   Translate Page      
As the American citizens applaud Trump sending in 5,000 troops to stop the caravan of migrants entering USA, they fail to realize that they, they citizens, will have to pay for those troops to patrol the border. Trump is not paying for them out of his own pocket. So does that mean ICE and the border officials are so incompetent and useless that Trump has to send 5,000 troops to oversee them and ensure that the migrants are not allowed in? Oh Trump has also said he may increase the troops at the border from 5,000 to 15,000. That will make it 3 soldiers for each migrant (including a woman or a child). LOL, good luck with that, its just a publicity stunt for the mid terms - at the taxpayers expense as usual. MAGA ;-) If you watch the videos online, these are not dangerous terrorists, but families with young kids just looking for a better lifestyle and some security from their own lands. But then Trump does not want you to know that, he will make them all out to be highly dangerous Islamic terrorists even if they are not. They have even publicized their trek over thousands of miles to get to the American border so its not like they will try and jump over the fence illegally, they hold valid papers. Think about it.
          TX Progressives are here for Election Day-related roundup      Cache   Translate Page      
The Texas Progressive Alliance thanks everyone who worked to get out the vote in this election as it brings you this week's roundup.

Off the Kuff took two looks at the statewide judicial races.

SocraticGadfly, returned from a recent vacation, takes a look at a major nature and environment issue that fired up up opposition to Trump — the Bears Ears downsizing — and offers his thoughts on the value of the original national monument site vs critics of several angles and things that could make it even better.


 =====================

 And here are some posts of interest from other Texas blogs.

John Coby hears the sounds of silence.

TransGriotcelebrates the election of two trans women in Alaska.

Juanitais over Michael Avenatti.

Linus Owens explores the rise in popularity of Halloween among adults.

BeyondBonesreports on the origins of some Halloween traditions.

Therese Odell leavens the politics with some Game of Thrones news.


          EPIC! RUSH LIMBAUGH: Leads Missouri Trump Rally Crowd in Chants of “Lock Her Up!” (VIDEO)      Cache   Translate Page      

by Jim Hoft, The Gateway Pundit: Rush Limbaugh opened up for President Trump in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on Monday. The ENERGY WAS OFF THE CHARTS! Rush reminded the Trump crowd that Hillary Clinton and Democrats were the ONLY ONES who colluded with Russia in 2016. This is a well known fact at this point. The […]

The post EPIC! RUSH LIMBAUGH: Leads Missouri Trump Rally Crowd in Chants of “Lock Her Up!” (VIDEO) appeared first on SGT Report.


          Trump Supporters Sing ‘Amazing Grace’ After Woman Collapses During Trump Rally      Cache   Translate Page      

by Chris Menahan, Information Liberation: A powerful moment happened on Monday night at President Donald Trump’s final midterm rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. From Fox News: The crowd at President Donald Trump’s rally in Missouri on Monday evening began singing “Amazing Grace” after a woman collapsed and needed medical attention. Trump paused his rally for roughly […]

The post Trump Supporters Sing ‘Amazing Grace’ After Woman Collapses During Trump Rally appeared first on SGT Report.


          Soros Partners with Mastercard to Hand Out Money to Migrants      Cache   Translate Page      
Billionaire investor George Soros has repeatedly denied rumors that he is helping to finance the migrant caravans making their way up from Honduras and Guatemala through Mexico with the ultimate aim of reaching the US. But that’s about to change, as the “Open Society” founder – who famously financed much of the opposition to Trump […]
           Après les midterms, cap sur la présidentielle de 2020       Cache   Translate Page      
17:57 Le président Trump l’a dit et répété, il briguera un second mandat en 2020. Les élections de mi-mandat terminées, ceux qui veulent lui barrer la route vont commencer à sortir du bois.
          When the Dominican Republic Ended Birthright Citizenship, It Was a Disaster      Cache   Translate Page      
Donald Trump wants to end birthright citizenship in the US. The only country to do that in recent years created a humanitarian catastrophe.
          This 77-Year-Old Texan Explaining Why She's Voting for Beto Is Pure as Hell      Cache   Translate Page      
"He represents everything Donald Trump isn’t."
          Blog Post: Stormy Daniels Slams Trump Fee Bid In Defamation Suit      Cache   Translate Page      
...read more
          OPINION: Modern-Day Barnstorming At A Trump Rally      Cache   Translate Page      
Sure, maybe a couple of the 15,000 were a bit twitchy looking ... but 99.9% were great Americans
          Bret Baier Impersonates Trump At Rallies      Cache   Translate Page      
'They are really boring. That’s true. They are so boring'
          The O’Jays Want Trump To Use Their Music At His Rallies — Here’s The Song They Want Him To Play      Cache   Translate Page      
They have a complex relationship with POTUS
          Rihanna wants Trump to stop the music at his rallies      Cache   Translate Page      

Rihanna is really, really not okay with the US President Donald Trump using her music at political rallies.
The recording artist on Sunday responded to a tweet by WaPo political journalist Philip Rucker who this weekend attended a rally in Tennessee.
“Currently, Rihanna’s ‘Don’t Stop the Music’ is blaring in Chattanooga as aides toss free Trump T-shirts into the crowd, like a ball game. Everyone’s loving it,” he tweeted.
But one person wasn’t loving it.
“Not for much longer,” Rihanna replied, “me nor my people would ever be at or around one of those tragic rallies.”

Not for much longer…me nor my people would ever [...]

The post Rihanna wants Trump to stop the music at his rallies appeared first on Memeburn.


          Trump closes out a campaign built on fear, anger and division      Cache   Translate Page      
By Peter Baker New York Times News Service…
          Trump ruft Schonzeit für Banken aus      Cache   Translate Page      
Schweizer Banken wurden unter Präsident Obama jahrelang strafrechtlich verfolgt. Unter Trump haben Finanzinstitute wenig zu fürchten.
          Jeunes immigrés « dreamers » aux Etats-Unis : Trump saisit la Cour suprême pour mettre fin au programme DACA      Cache   Translate Page      
Mis en place par Barack Obama, ce programme protège les immigrés sans papiers entrés aux Etats-Unis lorsqu’ils étaient enfants.
          Trump verfolgt Wahlausgang mit Familie und Freunden      Cache   Translate Page      
Washington - US-Präsident Donald Trump erwartet die Ergebnisse der Kongresswahlen gemeinsam mit seiner Familie und Freunden. Aus dem Weißen Haus hieß es, der Präsident und First Lady Melania Trump hätten Familienmitglieder und Freunde zu sich eingeladen, um gemeinsam den Ausgang der Zwischenwahlen zu verfolgen. Bei den sogenannten Midterms werden alle 435 Sitze im Repräsentantenhaus neu vergeben - und 35 der 100 Sitze im Senat, der zweiten Kammer des US-Parlaments. Die Abstimmung zur Halbzeit von Trumps Amtszeit gilt auch als ein Referendum über die umstrittene Politik des Präsidenten.
          US-Midterm-Wahlen: Frühes Stimmungsbild günstig für Demokraten - 82-jährige Texanerin wählt erstmals und stirbt      Cache   Translate Page      
Die Midterm-Wahlen in den USA sind ein Referendum über Donald Trump und seine Politik - das hat der US-Präsident selbst gesagt. Verlieren die Republikaner, wird das Regieren für Trump schwieriger.
          11/4/2018: Worldwide: Trump ‘open to talk’ despite Iran sanctions      Cache   Translate Page      
US President Donald Trump said he was still open to negotiating “a new, more comprehensive deal with Iran” even as he ordered a severe new round of sanctions to come into force at midnight tonight. Trump, who pulled America out of the Iran nuclear...
          CNN: Viele US-Wähler wollen Zeichen gegen Trump setzen      Cache   Translate Page      
Washington - Bei den US-Kongresswahlen wollen viele Wähler laut einer Nachwahlbefragung des Fernsehsenders CNN ihren Ärger über Donald Trump ausdrücken. 39 Prozent der Befragten erklärten, ihre Stimme abgegeben zu haben, um ihre Ablehnung des Präsidenten deutlich zu machen. Nur 26 Prozent sagten, sie wollten Trump mit ihrer Stimme unterstützen. Ein Drittel der Wähler erklärte, Trump habe bei ihrer Entscheidung keine Rolle gespielt. Zwei Drittel der Befragten sagten zudem, ihre Entscheidung bereits vor mehr als einem Monat getroffen zu haben.
          AP VoteCast: Trump a dominant force on voters' minds      Cache   Translate Page      
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was a dominant force in the 2018 midterm elections as attitudes toward the polarizing leader influenced the decisions of more than 6 in 10 voters.Nearly 40 percent of voters cast their ballots...
          Maas zu US-Kongresswahl: Verhältnis zu USA neu ausrichten      Cache   Translate Page      
Berlin - Bundesaußenminister Heiko Maas erwartet keine Kurskorrekturen von US-Präsident Donald Trump nach den Kongresswahlen und sieht die Zeit für ein neues Verhältnis zwischen Europa und den USA gekommen. «Die USA bleiben unser wichtigster Partner außerhalb Europas», sagte der SPD-Politiker der «Passauer Neuen Presse». «Aber: Wir müssen unser Verhältnis mit den Vereinigten Staaten neu vermessen und ausrichten.» Trumps Politik des «America first» habe dazu geführt, dass sich Washington aus internationalen Verträgen zurückziehe. «Die einzig richtige Antwort darauf sei «Europe united.»
          Live: US Midterm election results: Donald Trump and Republicans v Democrats      Cache   Translate Page      
Polls have now closed in parts of Indiana and Kentucky - the beginning of the end for the momentous midterm elections.The results of today's election, only now beginning to trickle in, could bring significant changes to Washington...
          As #TreeofLife Shows, Trump’s Mainstreaming of Hate Puts All Minorities in Danger      Cache   Translate Page      
The horrific anti-Semitic attack on the Tree of Life Congregation Synagogue in Pittsburgh, which resulted in the loss of 11 precious lives, was the devastating yet inevitable consequence of the daily mainstreaming of racism, white supremacy, anti-Semitism, anti-immigrant hate and Islamophobia by President Donald Trump and an extremist minority of his followers. Trump began his […]
          Rihanna issues legal warning over Donald Trump using her music      Cache   Translate Page      
The singer described the US president’s rallies as ‘tragic’ and her lawyers sent a cease-and-desist letter to the White House.
          En las elecciones Trump se juega por anticipado la posibilidad de reelegirse en 2020: prensa internacional      Cache   Translate Page      

El día de hoy en Estados Unidos se están llevando a cabo elecciones para puestos del Congreso, están en juego los 435 curules de la Cámara de Representantes, 35 del Senado y 36 gubernaturas, comicios que de acuerdo con el análisis realizado por diversos medios de comunicación servirán  para medir el desempeño del presidente Donald...

La entrada En las elecciones Trump se juega por anticipado la posibilidad de reelegirse en 2020: prensa internacional aparece primero en La Jornada de Oriente.


          Trump, First Lady Follow Results of Midterms at White House - Spokesperson      Cache   Translate Page      
WASHINGTON (Sputnik) - US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump are watching the results of midterm elections at their White House residence together with friends and family, spokesperson Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement.
          Trump Tries to Defend Himself Against Tax Fraud Charges      Cache   Translate Page      
As above
          Media, Trump Must ‘Tone Down’ Rhetoric After 2018 US Midterms - Columnist      Cache   Translate Page      
On Tuesday, US voters cast ballots to fill 435 seats in the US House of Representatives, one-third of the 100-member Senate and other local and state positions. The outcome of the 2018 midterms will determine if the Republican Party can maintain control of both chambers of Congress.
          Half of US Voters Consider Trump Immigration Policies Too Tough - Exit Polls      Cache   Translate Page      
WASHINGTON (Sputnik) - Nearly half of US voters believe that President Donald Trump's immigration policies are too harsh, according to exit polls.
          11/4/2018: Living: Kanye spares Trump the rap      Cache   Translate Page      
Oh my god what a relief, everyone in American politics must have been screaming this week after Kanye announced that he was “distancing” himself from politics, and presumably changed his MAGA hat to a “starting to have second thoughts” hat. It really...
          John Oliver dismantles Trump's logic for family border separation on 'Last Week Tonight'      Cache   Translate Page      
On Sunday's episode of "Last Week Tonight," John Oliver looked at the Trump White House's family separation policy at the U.S.-Mexico border, dismantling the logic behind the president's immigration policies.
          11/7/2018: Business Daily: ECONOMY TRUMPED      Cache   Translate Page      

SINCE Donald Trump was elected President US economic growth has picked up its pace to 3.5 per cent per annum, the US stock market is at record highs and wage growth figures are above 3 per cent a year for the first time since the GFC. Experts believe...
          EEUU pone a prueba gestión de Trump en elecciones de midterm      Cache   Translate Page      
Las elecciones de midterm (mitad de mandato) en Estados Unidos (EEUU) juzgará este martes la gestión del presidente Donald Trump, quien se volcó en la campaña con su conocido discurso antiinmigrante. En las últimas semanas Trump encabezó dos y hasta tres actos por día, de cara a unos comicios catalogados —por él mismo— como referendo […]
          Good Job, Dems! Two Years Of Ragging On Trump, Nothing To Offer The Voters      Cache   Translate Page      
In 2015 I predicted Trump would win the presidential elections. not based on his qualities so much, but the lack of qualities on Hillary’s side. This time I don’t want to predict the outcome of the midterms, but I just can’t see the Democrats win, let alone bigly, because they have nothing to offer other […]
          EUR/USD. 6 November. Results of the day. The topic of elections in the US is not very interesting to traders      Cache   Translate Page      

4-hour timeframe

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The European currency received little support during trading on Tuesday, November 6, due to the surpassed forecasts of business activity indices in the services and production of Markit in the eurozone. Also in the market with might and main the topic of elections in the United States was discussed. The results are not yet known, but it is worth noting that there is no special reaction of the foreign exchange market to this event at the moment. The EUR/USD currency pair continues to move in the usual way for the last days, and there is no reason to state a change in the trend due to the elections in the US. Thus, perhaps, any reaction of the market will follow, but only towards the final results of the elections. Also, there were rumors that Trump may be impeached, however, from our point of view, for the entire period of Trump's rule there were already several much more successful moments for this. If this did not happen during the introduction of trade duties against all who could, during the scandals associated with the US President and his possible ties with Russia, now there are much fewer reasons for this. Moreover, the theme of the trade war in recent weeks has subsided noticeably, and there have been almost no Trump speeches during this time. Thus, we do not expect any sensational events from the US elections. As for the prospects of the currency pair, there is still a very weak upward trend. The price has not yet been able to get out of the Ichimoku cloud, so a downtrend may resume at any time. But this will likely require new fundamental reasons.

Trading recommendations:

For the EUR/USD pair, the correction ended near the critical line. Thus, before the MACD indicator turns downwards, it is recommended to trade for an increase in small lots to the resistance level of 1.1461.

Sell orders will become relevant again after the pair is fixed below the Kijun-sen line. In this case, the trend for the instrument will change to a downtrend, and shorts can be opened with the goals of 1.1339 and 1.1307.

In addition to the technical picture, fundamental data and the timing of their release should also be taken into account.

Explanation of illustration:

Ichimoku Indicator:

Tenkan-sen-red line.

Kijun-sen – blue line.

Senkou span a – light brown dotted line.

Senkou span B – light purple dotted line.

Chikou span – green line.

Bollinger Bands Indicator:

3 yellow lines.

MACD:

Red line and histogram with white bars in the indicator window.

The material has been provided by InstaForex Company - www.instaforex.com
          Today's election in the USA is the main political event not only of the day, but also of the year. Typically, such elections      Cache   Translate Page      

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Today's election in the USA is the main political event not only of the day, but also of the year. Typically, such elections do not exert strong pressure on the dollar or financial markets. The current situation is unique, so we should expect a violent reaction and surprises until the impeachment of the current president.

On the eve of the elections, the dollar yields to most of the key currencies, holding positions against the Japanese yen and the Swiss franc. This indicates that market participants do not expect a stock market crash.

In general, the markets have already laid in the current quotes the victory of the Democrats in the elections to the House of Representatives. Any other result can lead to significant fluctuations.

Note that with the full leadership of the Democratic Party, the legislation of recent years in the field of economic incentives may be partially repealed and the question of impeachment of Donald Trump will be raised. In this situation, the next two years will be extremely restless. Experts predict a "political dead end and big fireworks".

If victory is in the hands of the Republicans, it will mean an expression of trust in Donald Trump and his policies, the world will have to accept protectionism. In addition, markets will see opportunities for further tax cuts. Stocks will go down, bond yields will start to increase, and the dollar will rise.

Three possible scenarios and currency movements

  • The Republican Party retains control of Congress. This is a bullish dollar scenario. The USD / JPY rate can reach 114, and EUR / USD can reach 1.1350.
  • The Democratic Party gets a majority in the House, the Republican holds the Senate. The dollar will accept such news without enthusiasm, but not much upset. It is expected that the pair USD / JPY will take the mark of 112.50, and EUR / USD will be in the range of 1.1450-1.1475.
  • The victory of the Democrats is absolute control over both chambers. This will please dollar "bears". The pair USD / JPY will take the mark of 112, and the pair EUR / USD will rise above 1.15.
The material has been provided by InstaForex Company - www.instaforex.com
          "Donkeys" vs. "Elephants": main scenarios of the US election results      Cache   Translate Page      

The dynamics of trading on the foreign exchange market this week will be determined by China, Brexit, and congressional elections. And if the real prospects for a trade war and Brexit will be known only in a few weeks, then we will know the results of the American elections tomorrow. On the eve of the plebiscite, the dollar is noticeably nervous, since with a high degree of probability the "elephants" (the historical emblem of the Republicans) will lose control over the House of Representatives, retaining the majority only in the Senate.

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In general, this result was predictable long before the election. The composition of the lower house of Congress is re-elected every two years, that is, in the middle of the presidential term (hence the name "midterm elections"). As a rule, the ruling party fails in these elections, losing a majority in one of the chambers. Even the most popular American presidents could not project their success on the party they represented in order to "survive" the intermediate plebiscite. The rare exception in this regard is Bush Junior, but at that time, the Americans had just experienced September 11, which explains their political cohesion.

Given the odiousness of Donald Trump and the lack of absolute support even within the Republican Party, the result of the 2018 elections is not difficult to predict. By and large, the main intrigue now is how strong the Democrats will have over the Republicans in the House of Representatives and how the alignment of forces in the Senate will change.

The latest polls show that members of the Democratic Party in the House of Representatives guaranteed 202 seats for themselves, but only 195 for Republicans. In total, there are 435 seats in the lower chamber, so 38 more positions remain in the air (ratings of candidates in these constituencies are about are equal), but, in the opinion of the overwhelming number of experts, the Democrats will definitely take the majority here. In the Senate, there is a struggle for only 35 seats out of 100, since only part of the Senate mandates are rotated during the midterm elections. Here, the advantage will remain with the Republican Party, at least, many analysts are sure of this.

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In the context of the foreign exchange market, the main question is how the dollar will react to the results of today's elections. The most realistic scenario (Lower House for Democrats, Upper for Republicans) is unlikely to cause a flurry of volatility, although it will put downward pressure on the US currency. The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives will put Trump in a very awkward position, primarily regarding the implementation of a number of legislative initiatives. However, the Republican control over the Senate will allow the president to continue to pursue the personnel policy required by the White House. The Upper Chamber approves (or does not approve) candidates nominated by the head of state for key government positions.

Due to the fact that this, the most likely, option is now widely discussed (including among traders), it will not cause any panic in the markets. Moreover, according to some experts, the dollar may ignore this result. Another thing is if the election results are unexpected, in this case, dollar pairs will be influenced by strong volatility.

We are talking about two unlikely scenarios. If the Republicans maintain the status quo and vice versa, if the Democrats manage to take control of both houses of Congress. Despite the unlikelihood of such options, they cannot be excluded. In favor of losing the Republicans, the fact that the number of supporters of Donald Trump's policies last week fell by four percent, according to a weekly survey, says. In general, the head of state is supported by 40% of respondents, while 54% of respondents were dissatisfied with his policies. By and large, the mid-term congressional elections reflect the Americans' opinion on the actions of their president following the two years of his rule. Therefore, Trump's downgrade may also affect the overall Republican result.

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There is another opinion, already in favor of the Republican Party. According to experts, Donald Trump has a very large number of so-called "hidden supporters". In the public plane (including during polls) they do not talk about their true political views, but in the polling booth "silent fans" support Republicans, associating them with Trump's policies. It is worth recalling that in the last election, many polls gave the victory to Hillary Clinton, but as you know, Trump won them. According to a number of political scientists, a similar sociological discrepancy occurred precisely at the expense of "hidden supporters", which this time may present a surprise.

Thus, despite numerous sociological studies, the intrigue of the midterm elections remains. This means that it is not advisable to trade dollar pairs in the next day due to the unpredictability of the greenback reaction to their results.

The material has been provided by InstaForex Company - www.instaforex.com
          The policy of Angela Merkel "and yours and ours" prevents the euro      Cache   Translate Page      

analytics5be158f1a37f5.jpg

The euro is losing ground relative to five of the seven major currencies, which continues the October trend for the single European currency, but in November.

This week, the euro will not have support in the form of strong data for Germany or the Eurozone, but there is hope for a potential growth catalyst. This is progress in the negotiations on the Italian budget (but more attention will still be paid to the US and Brexit midterm elections), which will help euro to reverse the trend and start to regain positions against major currencies.

In addition, indirectly weakened the position of the euro and ambiguous policy of German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who in October-November managed to agree on mutually exclusive issues with Russian President Vladimir Putin, head of the White House Donald Trump and Ukraine's leader Petro Poroshenko.

The material has been provided by InstaForex Company - www.instaforex.com
          If Trump gets his midterm wish, interest rates could go even higher - CNBC      Cache   Translate Page      

CNBC

If Trump gets his midterm wish, interest rates could go even higher
CNBC
If President Donald Trump gets his wish and Republicans hold Congress, he may also get something he doesn't like — even higher interest rates. The view in the bond market has been that a GOP Congress would be more likely to move forward with making ...
Even if Democrats Take the House, It's Business as Usual for BanksBarron's
Strong economy likely to keep Democrats from winning midtermsNew York Post
After midterms, stocks could pop 20%Fox Business
Benzinga -USA TODAY -Washington Post -ABC News
all 7,662 news articles »

          Why Nevada voters are set to elect a dead brothel owner      Cache   Translate Page      
PAHRUMP, NEVADA — Thousands of voters in Pahrump, a town of about 36,000 people an hour or so outside Las Vegas, cast their votes Tuesday for a dead man. Dennis Hof — the notorious brothel owner who used to call himself the “Trump of Pahrump” after his hometown, and who wrote an autobiography called The Art […]
          Midterms 2018: Voting machine malfunctions, high turnout and discontent with Trump - Americans take to the polls      Cache   Translate Page      
The president's name is not on any ballot but his presence looms large
          If You Think Trump and Powell Aren’t Getting Along…      Cache   Translate Page      
If you think President Trump is upset with Federal Reserve Chairman Jay Powell, you should see what’s going on in India. Central bankers had been every government’s close friend for years; a decade even. The relationships were beyond chummy, particularly as many governments celebrated their central bank heroes for heroically heroic actions saving the world [...]
          Key governor races will shape future U.S. political landscape      Cache   Translate Page      
Hotly contested battles in Georgia and Florida pitting liberal black Democrats against white Republicans supported by President Donald Trump headline the three dozen governors' races being contested in Tuesday's U.S. elections.

          For some in Florida Panhandle, voting takes back seat to hurricane hardships      Cache   Translate Page      
Sissy Karr, a landlady with 14 rental properties around Panama City, Florida, is a loyal Republican who voted for Donald Trump for president in 2016. But she says she is too busy cleaning up from Hurricane Michael to vote in Tuesday's elections.

          Trump says would prefer softer tone as president but has 'no choice'      Cache   Translate Page      
Donald Trump said on Monday he wished he had taken a softer tone in his first two years as U.S. president, even as he continued to bash individual Democrats and fan fears over immigration while campaigning on the eve of congressional elections.

          Two years in, Trump holds stock market bragging rights      Cache   Translate Page      
U.S. President Donald Trump has taken credit for the stock market's gains during his nearly two years in the White House, and those claims are reasonable given the impact of tax cuts and pro-business policies on investor sentiment.

          Fox News Yanks Trump Ad      Cache   Translate Page      
Fast-Moving Developments
          Bomb Threat Cleared Ahead of Trump Rally      Cache   Translate Page      
Continued Escalation
          Online Scam Used to Trick Trump Supporters      Cache   Translate Page      
Awful
          Rihanna s'en prend à Donald Trump pour avoir utilisé sa musique      Cache   Translate Page      
Rihanna est furieuse contre Donald Trump. L'analyste politique Philip Rucker, correspondant à la Maison-Blanche du Washington Post, a tweeté dimanche que la chanson Don't Stop the Music de Rihanna de 2007 avait été entendu lors d'un rassemblement à Chattanooga, dans le Tennessee. «Cela a été dit un million de fois, mais ce sera dit un million et un (Agence QMI)

          11 Minuten Protest: Anal Trump veröffentlichen ihr Album „The First 100 Songs“      Cache   Translate Page      
Grindcore: Nicht zu Ende gedachte Protestsongs für Menschen, die weder Protestsongs noch Donald Trump mögen.

Ohne jegliche Einflussabsichten sei darauf hingewiesen, dass heute, pünktlich zu den US-Halbzeitwahlen, dieses Album erscheint. Es beschäftigt sich mit dem amtierenden US-Präsidenten auf 100 kernigen Grindcore-Knüppeln. Nach haarsträubenden elf Minuten sind sie vorbei. Dies gelingt, in dem man die Stücke auf die jeweiligen Zentralaussagen reduziert. Der Zweisekünder „Ted Nugent Is Cool“ besteht so lediglich aus...
          Donald Trump vs. Rihanna: „Please DO stop the music!“      Cache   Translate Page      
Rihanna zeigt sich wenig begeistert von der Verwendung ihrer Songs bei republikanischen Wahlkampfveranstaltungen. Sie ist dabei in guter Gesellschaft.

Dass Donald Trump gerne mal Fünfe gerade sein lässt, wenn es um „Kleinigkeiten“ wie seinen persönlichen Umgang mit Steuern, Frauen oder der Zuordnung von Belgien als „wunderschöne Stadt“ geht, ist für Gegner des US-amerikanischen Präsidenten ein konstanter Quell von irgendwas zwischen Fassungslosigkeit, akutem Entsetzen und Anflügen von Galgenhumor. Dass Donald Trump es zusätzlich auch mit...
          Elecciones en EEUU: Trump confía y la "ola azul" se esperanza      Cache   Translate Page      
El presidente de EEUU decidió permanecer en la Casa Blanca junto a su familia y a sus asesores del círculo íntimo durante los comicios de medio término que pueden marcar un antes y un después en su futuro político. Los demócratas confían en que la "ola azul" de su militancia ponga la balanza a su favor en las urnas.
          US midterm election results live: Democrats Republicans House Senate Donald Trump - latest news      Cache   Translate Page      
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          Endorsements for Local Election 2018      Cache   Translate Page      

Unfortunately, this election seems to be a referendum on Donald Trump,  even in races where there is absolutely no connection.  One such race would be local state senator,  Pat Browne(R) vs.  Mark Pinsley(D).    Democratic straight lever pulling against Trump would be the only explanation for a Pinsley win..  Browne has mountains of experience and has brought heaps of benefit to Lehigh Valley.  Pinsley has no experience what-so-ever, and announced for state senator before he even began serving as township commissioner.  Although, he ran and won for township commissioner,  he never attended their meetings prior to that election.  After the unfortunate shooting by Dorney Park,  he went and stood with the protestors, against his own township and police department. He is entitled to his own beliefs, but as a commissioner, he should have restrained himself against being so demonstrative.  It was a self-serving optic for his state campaign, ignoring the best interests of South Whitehall.

One of the most geographically absurd state house districts in Pennsylvania is the 183rd.  It runs from Danielsville, east through Northampton to Slatington, and then south to the Allentown municipal golf course.  Former representative Julie Harhart had two decades to craft this gerrymandered contortion.  Her chosen successor was Zach Mako(R), who in addition to having no political experience,  also had no knowledge of the issues.  Now, as an incumbent,  he's running on the cliché of abolishing income tax.... He apparently still knows nothing.  His opponent, Jason Ruff(D) is a business owner from Slatington, who serves on the town's council. He is familiar with the issues, he is concerned with government, not just getting elected.

Regardless of how you feel about my bi-partisan endorsements,  I would ask you one favor.  Even if you decide to vote straight ticket, please do not pull the idiot lever.  Instead, pick each one of your choices, even if they are all of the same party.  You owe yourself and the candidates at least that much deliberation.

ADDENDUM: An early version of this post which cited a polling was in error.
          Must-See ETF Areas in relation to President Trump      Cache   Translate Page      
From Sanghamitra Saha : In President Trump’s two years of office, U.S. markets have been soaring thanks to his series of reformative initiatives. While the first year was all about the Trump bump and reflationary economic measures, the second year
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          Trump: ‘The Democrat Agenda Is a Socialist Nightmare’      Cache   Translate Page      

At a rally in Cleveland, Ohio, on Monday, President Donald Trump painted a bleak picture of America if the Democrats win control of Congress.


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          Trump on Iran Sanctions: On Oil, We Want to Go a Little Bit Slower      Cache   Translate Page      

The United States has re-imposed sanctions against Iran this week, but when it comes to buying Iranian oil, the Trump administration is issuing waivers.


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          Poll: More Americans Say Trump Respected by Congressional Dems than by Media      Cache   Translate Page      
Pres. Trump interviewed by reporter. (Screenshot)


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          Bergqvist: Skattesänkningarna kan bli problem för Trump i valet 2020      Cache   Translate Page      
USA:s president Donald Trump tar gärna åt sig av äran för den starka amerikanska konjunkturen. Men hans skattesänkningar försvagar statsfinanserna – och et kan bli ett problem när det är dags för hans eget omval. Det säger SEB:s chefsekonom Robert Bergqvist i DiTV..
          Beto O'Rourke Is an Antidote to Donald Trump's Bigotry      Cache   Translate Page      
Just hours after Donald Trump played the cruelest card of the 2018 midterm election season -- announcing that he would try to use an executive order to overturn the constitutional guarantee that people born in the United States are US citizens -- Beto O'Rourke called the president out for again injecting bigotry into American politics.
          Tomgram: Engelhardt, Unquiet Flows The Don      Cache   Translate Page      
I certainly learned a lesson that November. During the previous months of campaigning that election season, I never wrote a piece at TomDispatch that didn't leave open the possibility of Donald Trump winning the presidency. In the couple of weeks before that fateful November day, however, I got hooked on the polling results and on Nate Silver's FiveThirtyEight website and became convinced that Hillary Clinton was a shoo-in.
          Trump steps up anti-immigrant campaign on eve of US election      Cache   Translate Page      
On the final day of campaigning before the midterm election, Trump continued his fascistic, immigrant-focused diatribes at rallies Monday in Ohio, Indiana and Missouri. His main target, as it has been for the last two weeks, is the several thousand Central American refugees who have formed a caravan that is now in central Mexico, about 800 miles from the US border.
          The Democratic Party doesn’t deserve your vote      Cache   Translate Page      

The record of the Democrats proves that voting for the “lesser evil” doesn’t stop evil.

NO ONE reading this article needed one, but the last weeks were a reminder anyway: that there is no low point of hate and fearmongering that Donald Trump can’t sink below.

Trump and his “brain” trust decided that the Republicans’ best bet for the midterm elections would be to slander a caravan of refugees from violence and oppression in Central America — and to send who knows how many U.S. soldiers to the border to meet this grave threat.

They succeeded in whipping up their right-wing base. But they also sharpened the outrage and anger of millions of people who already oppose Trump — and who will vote in today’s elections with a sense of alarm about stopping the fanatic in the White House.

In almost every case, those millions who want to vote against Trump will have no real choice but to vote for the Democratic Party, which has also been determined — but not about stopping Trump’s crimes.

During the same weeks when Trump piled one anti-immigrant atrocity on top of another, the leaders of the “party of the people” were determined not to say anything about it.

The Democratic Party doesn't deserve your vote

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi had the same infuriating message of evasion last weekend that she’s repeated for months. Rather than let voters “think the Democrats are all about impeachment, investigation, caravans, ‘scaravans,’” Pelosi recommended: “Don’t take the bait, just stick with health care, good-paying jobs and clean government.”

The Democrats are likely to make gains at all levels of government in today’s elections, probably enough to win a majority in the House, if not in the Senate. It will be a pleasure to watch some of the most monstrous Republicans go down to defeat.

If the Democrats win big, it will be because millions of people use this election to register their opposition to Trump, the Republican Party and the right wing agenda.

It won’t, however, be because the Democratic Party is providing an alternative to the Trumpian status quo, much less a lead to the popular resistance that has confronted the Trump administration from its first day in office.

This election has been a departure in one respect: The media spotlight has fallen on a number of left-wing candidates running as Democrats in this election, including members of the Democratic Socialists of America. The left needs to absorb the lessons of this development.

But we do know that those candidates won’t be calling the shots come January. As an institution, and under the leadership of those who will call the shots, the Democrats aren’t committed to the kind of change that most of their voters would like to see.

Whatever they say — or don’t say — on the campaign trail, the Democrats’ dismal record in office shows that they will disappoint their liberal base with compromises and capitulations to the Republicans.

Unless, that is, both Democrats and Republicans face pressure from outside the two-party system.

This is the key to building an actual resistance to Trump and the Republicans: Not voting for Democrats in the hope that they will change anything for us, but relying on the strength of our co-workers, our fellow students and our community to educate, agitate and organize struggles that put forward a left-wing alternative.


THE MISERY of living under Trump has produced some of the largest protests in U.S. history, starting with the Women’s March on the day after his inauguration.

These demonstrations have been an ongoing reminder of both the rejection of Trump and his politics by a majority of people in the country and the desire of millions of people to start doing something about it.

Democratic Party leaders have a use for the first part — but not so much for the second.

Thus, throughout the upsurge of anger over Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court, Democrats expressed their opposition — most of them, anyway — while trying to channel people’s outrage toward the voting booth and warning that protests could go too far and “alienate” potential supporters.

The unions and large liberal organizations, including organizers of the Women’s Marches, didn’t make the call to mobilize another massive show of anti-Trump strength, so the protests against Kavanaugh that did take place were angry and powerful, but scattered.

The dynamic is even more telling when it comes to immigrant rights.

The most recent of the truly massive anti-Trump demonstrations was the Families Belong Together mobilizations in late June that brought out hundreds of thousands of people for protests and marches in 750 cities and every state to vent their anger at the administration’s cruel family separation policy.

But this fall, the Democrats were mostly silent on the issue. They were advised — by the progressive think tank, the Center for American Progress, among others — to “spend as little time as possible” talking about immigration during election season, so as not to emphasize an issue where it’s taken for granted that the Republicans have an advantage.

Actually, the mass protests and even more massive public revulsion at Trump’s policies showed the potential for putting Republicans on the defensive — and on an issue they depend on to rev up their right-wing base.

But the Democrats followed the same election-year strategy they always do: chase every last “swing voter” in the political middle of the road, and that means avoiding anything controversial.


THE PROBLEM goes beyond timid campaign tactics. The Democrats’ strategy is the logical outcome for a party that says it stands for immigrant justice to satisfy its more liberal base at election time, but that stands in practice for a status quo where implementing justice would be a social and political threat.

It is no coincidence that the Democratic Party’s actual agenda on immigration issues mirrors that of Corporate America: support for a system that allows immigration to supplement the U.S. workforce at various levels, but that disciplines that workforce by keeping most immigrants in a second-class status.

Thus, the hopes in 2008 that Barack Obama would pass real immigration reform during his first months in office were fated to be dashed.

Not only did Obama fail to achieve any initiative, even a compromised one, to legalize the status of any undocumented workers, but he followed through on Corporate America’s other priority of using enforcement to maintain control over workers — and deportations went up, not down.

This experience illustrates the problems with voting for the Democrats as the lesser of two evils. On immigration, the “lesser evil” candidate in 2008 ended up presiding over more actual evil than his “greater evil” predecessor, George W. Bush.

In the era of Trump, it usually isn’t hard to figure out who the greater evil is in any one election. But as the American socialist Hal Draper wrote, the problem isn’t the answer, but the question itself — because it accepts the limits of the two-party system and distorts the political outlook of people who need to be a part of changing the world.

Let’s go back to Obama and the issue of immigration. In 2008, the immigrant rights movement was only two years away from an amazing high point that really did achieve a victory. The mega-marches and “day without an immigrant” strikes of 2006 stopped reactionary Republican legislation that would have criminalized all of the undocumented in the U.S.

But under Obama, the same liberal forces that helped organize the 2006 upsurge were far quieter, hoping that they could work with their supposed ally in the White House. Calls to protest Obama’s lack of action were met with warnings that being too radical would hand the Republicans an issue to hammer the Democrats with.

And so Barack Obama became the deporter-in-chief without facing mass opposition on the scale of 2006 — and the promise of any reform, even with the twisted compromises that the Democrats insisted on, went unfulfilled.

Malcolm X once said that “you put the Democrats first and the Democrats put you last.” When Nancy Pelosi and the leaders of the Democratic Party know they can count on the party’s liberal base to vote for their candidates, no matter what, they can move in the direction that inevitably feels more comfortable: to the right.


THOUGH YOU’D never know it to listen to Pelosi, there are more Democratic candidates this year who progressives might want to vote for, rather than only voting against the Republicans.

The anti-Trump upsurge of the past two years has helped the Democrats field a more diverse group of candidates than ever before, and more Democrats are willing to say they stand for progressive proposals like Medicare for All.

This is also the result of a surge of candidates who, following the lead of Sen. Bernie Sanders, explicitly identify themselves as democratic socialists. Their successes are a direct result of the hard organizing work of members of DSA and other left forces, and those successes have, in turn, raised the prominence of DSA and socialism in general.

Among DSA members in particular, there is sharp opposition to the neoliberal, pro-corporate program championed by the likes of Pelosi, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. Though many DSAers will likely choose to vote for establishment-sanctioned Democrats in 2018 and 2020, others will make the principled decision to refuse to support those Democratic candidates who don’t support them.

This is an important development for anyone who looks forward, as we do at SW, to the establishment of a left-wing political force independent of the two-party system.

But our analysis would be inadequate if we didn’t point out the dangers for socialists trying to build their forces within a capitalist party that is hostile to their aims. The very success of left-wing candidates within the party makes it harder to resist the pressure that draws them further in.

Thus, DSA member Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won a primary election upset for a seat in Congress from New York City over powerful party boss Joe Crowley. Her victory was a blow to the party leadership — but her new prominence led to requests, to which she agreed, to endorse and campaign for Democrats who are well to her right.

Historically, the Democrats have been willing to tolerate a left within the party and a certain amount of criticism as a price worth paying for having well-known figures who can build enthusiasm among the party’s liberal base.

The great danger for the left has been to be drawn in — and to, as a consequence, tailor and limit its message and strategy based on the needs of the Democrats, rather than the Democrats changing the party’s aims and actions in any significant way.

Socialist Worker has maintained since its founding that we look forward to the creation of an independent left alternative to the two-party system, and we put this into practice in every election by supporting only independent left-wing candidates. We say that the Democratic Party doesn’t deserve your votes — and you shouldn’t give it something it doesn’t deserve.

There are only a few such independent left candidates around the country in 2018 offering an opportunity to cast a protest vote against the limitations of the two-party system.

More numerous are the very important referendums where socialists should take a stand: Issue 1 (drug law reform) in Ohio; Question 1 (safe staffing) and Question 3 (transgender rights) in Massachusetts; and Proposition 10 (rent control) and Proposition 11 (paramedics’ rights on the job) in California, to name a few that SW has written about recently.

Ultimately, organizing a socialist resistance in the Trump era depends much more on the struggles of every day other than Election Day. That was our task every day leading up to November 6 — and every day after, when we look forward to uniting to fight the Trumpian right, as well as its Democratic Party enablers.


          Amazon gets heat over sales to ICE      Cache   Translate Page      

Steve Leigh reports from Seattle on a rally against Amazon’s sale of facial-recognition software to Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

SEVENTY-FIVE Amazon employees and supporters rallied on Halloween against Amazon selling its “Rekognition” real-time facial recognition software to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). The rally took place in front of Amazon’s “Seattle Spheres,” large glass circular buildings in downtown Seattle that are locally referred to as “Bezos’ Balls,” and was organized by Northwest Detention Center Resistance.

While Rekognition has come under fire for being an inaccurate, racist and repressive invasion of privacy, the focus of the rally was on the use of the software by ICE.

As rally organizers explained, “Amazon is enabling ICE to apply new technologies...to undermine...local protections that have been hard fought and won by immigrant rights organizers. They are expanding the reach of immigration enforcement, making detentions and deportations more likely.”

A recent article at SocialistWorker.org noted the dystopian effects of the software, which is “designed to identify up to 100 faces in an image or video, and can identify the emotions and actions of subjects. In the hands of the police, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) or the National Security Agency (NSA), this poses an existential risk to privacy, oppressed groups, left organizations and any other targeted person.”

Seattle activists protest Amazon's collaboration with ICE
Seattle activists protest Amazon's collaboration with ICE

In keeping with the Halloween theme, demonstrators wore masks of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos — the world’s richest man — with devil horns. The masks also symbolized the attempt to protect faces from Amazon surveillance.

The rally was in solidarity with the hundreds of Amazon employees who have signed a petition against selling Rekognition to ICE and other repressive agencies.

Protesters shouted “No tech for ICE!” Speakers at the rally included representatives from Northwest Detention Center Resistance, Mijente, the radical Filipino activist group Bayan, the Muslim community and other groups.

Though the resistance by Amazon employees is encouraging, so far Bezos has refused calls to restrict sales of the software to repressive agencies like ICE, saying that if Amazon didn’t sell it, some other company would sell similar software. (A similar rationale could have been used decades ago by IBM in selling its punch card technology to Hitler for use in the Nazi death camps.)

At the same time, Bezos has tried to publicly position himself as a critic of Donald Trump and his immigration policies, telling the Wall Street Journal, “This country is a gem...There aren’t other countries where everybody is trying to get in. I’d let them in if it were up to me. I like them. I want all of them in."

But Bezos’ actions belie his words. It will take a much stronger movement, including increased actions by Amazon workers, to stop the company’s cooperation with ICE.


          Big Defeat of Trump Will Be Message to DNC That Reinforces How Bad Hillary Was      Cache   Translate Page      
when the blue wave happens, the DNC will try to take responsibility for the win. It will be important to challenge that lie and make it clear that the election was proof that Hillary and the DNC were the reason Trump won.
          Fear and loathing and more fear      Cache   Translate Page      

Elizabeth Schulte documents the new low points that Trump and the Republicans are reaching — and the dismal failure of Democrats to stand up for justice.

YOUR PRESIDENT wants you to hate and fear immigrants.

That was the message of a new attack ad that Donald Trump himself tweeted a little over a week before the midterm elections. The ad featured an undocumented immigrant jailed for killing two California sheriff’s deputies and then scenes of the refugee caravan currently making its way through Mexico to seek asylum from poverty and violence in Central America.

Lettering above the man on trial reads: “He killed our people.”

The last-minute campaign ad aimed to create an indelible image of immigrants as murderers who are “invading” the U.S. with the Democrats’ blessing — and an equally indelible conclusion that only Trump and the Republicans will protect you from violence.

Numerous Republicans running for office embraced and echoed Trump’s ramped-up campaign of racist scapegoating against immigrants.

Donald Trump

Rep. Duncan Hunter of California issued an ad claiming that his Democratic opponent, Ammar Campa-Najjar, a former Labor Department official, is trying to “infiltrate Congress” on behalf of the Muslim Brotherhood and is a “security risk.”

In upstate New York, the National Republican Congressional Committee aired several commercials attacking a Democratic candidate for Congress, Antonio Delgado, who is Black, for having been a rap musician. In one ad, several white upstate New Yorkers speak to the camera: “Antonio Delgado would be fine in Los Angeles, maybe New York City,” but “nobody talks like that around here.”

These vile ads leading up to the midterm elections have a history. Politicians of both main political parties have created similar ones using racism and xenophobia to whip up fear and reinforce the most backward and divisive ideas in U.S. society.

In 1988, the presidential campaign of George H.W. Bush ran a commercial featuring “Willie” Horton — his name was William Horton, but “Willie” fit the stereotype the ad makers were after — a Black man accused of a killing a white woman while free on a prison work-release program in Massachusetts under then-Gov. Michael Dukakis.

The ad aimed to whip up fear about crime — and the fear of Black people committing crimes in particular.

But Republicans aren’t the only ones to pander to racism during their campaigns.

During the 1992 presidential campaign, Democratic candidate Bill Clinton thought he could score points by attacking anti-racist activist and recording artist Sister Souljah for her comments about the Los Angeles rebellion that year. For that matter, Clinton’s running mate Al Gore was the first candidate of either party to use Horton against Dukakis — during the 1988 Democratic primaries.

It says a lot about the cynicism of the politicians of the “world’s greatest democracy” that they’ve used coded and not-so-coded racism so freely during elections over the decades.


IN THAT sense, Trump’s ads are very much a part of the U.S. political system. But under the current circumstances, there’s a twist: Trump’s racist anti-immigrant ad is advising his supporters to do more than fear and hate immigrants. It encourages them to take action.

The message came through loud and clear to far-right militia groups, who stated that they are traveling south to “protect” the border for when the caravan arrives.

Militia units told the Associated Press that they were planning on gathering with guns and bulletproof vests. Immigrants are “just laughing in our face,” fumed Shannon McGauley, president of the Texas Minutemen. “It’s a free-for-all in America.”

The vigilantes won’t be alone, of course. Hundreds of U.S. troops have already arrived at the border near Hidalgo, Texas, with more to come. Their stated mission is to help U.S. Customs and the Border Patrol, and there were plenty of photo ops of soldiers setting up barbed-wire fence along the Rio Grande.

“I saw that beautiful barbed wire going up,” Trump said at a campaign rally in Montana. “Beautiful sight.”

All of this is part of Trump’s “Operation Faithful Patriot,” which grows larger by the day, depending on the whims of the president — from 5,000 active-duty troops last Wednesday to 15,000 a few days later. This is in addition to thousands of National Guard troops who are also gathering at the border.

Asked by reporters whether the troops planned to fire on immigrants trying to cross the border, Trump responded that if caravan members threw rocks, the military “would consider that a firearm because there’s not much difference.

The Trump administration is preparing for a confrontation — not just at the ballot box with the midterm elections, but literally a confrontation at the border, led by racists inspired by Trump’s America First rhetoric that demonizes immigrants seeking relief from poverty and violence.


THIS IS an important moment for those who oppose anti-immigrant racism to stand up and be counted. And yet at exactly that moment — as the elections have provided a spotlight for political leaders to step forward and oppose Trump’s anti-immigrant racism — the Democrats are...silent.

Instead of meeting Trump’s racist campaign message with the alarm it deserves, the Democrats are doing the opposite.

For example, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi responded to Trump’s threat to revoke birthright citizenship with the statement: “Clearly, Republicans will do absolutely anything to divert attention away from their votes to take away Americans’ health care.”

It isn’t just the party leadership, either. Down the line, that’s how Democrats are responding: stay on message, because the winning campaign message isn’t about protecting the caravan, it’s about health care.

Yes, health care is an important issue — and one that affects millions of Americans. But championing health doesn’t mean not challenging anti-immigrant racism.

Not that the Democrats are even addressing health care in any effective way. The most that the Democrats are putting forward on health care is a defense of Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act — which many people support against Republican efforts to dismantle it, but which is deeply flawed and ineffective at its supposed goal of universal coverage.

Democrats are drawing the line at stopping Republicans from letting insurers use pre-existing conditions as an excuse not to cover people. The GOP should be stopped, of course — but it’s not exactly a bold stand in defense of health care justice.

But this is the perennial logic of the Democratic Party under the constraints of the two-party system in the U.S.: Don’t make the message too radical, because the party’s base of support that would agree with a more radical message is going to vote for you anyway, since they have nowhere else to go.


IN MANY ways, immigration is the perfect message for Trump. Not just because racism plays to the Republicans’ right-wing base, but because the Democrats have so little to say in response.

The Democratic Party has no long-term solution to the suffering of refugees who are part of the caravan to the border.

Even the most liberal Democrats agree that while reforms are needed and programs like DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) should be protected, there’s also a need for strict immigration standards and heavily militarized border security enforcement.

This summer, U.S. immigration policies took center stage when it was revealed that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) was separating undocumented children from their families and detaining them in cages.

The inhumane conditions endured by undocumented children sparked protests around the country, many organized by liberal organization like MoveOn and Indivisible, which ordinarily don’t stray too far left of the Democratic Party line.

Outrage at what the U.S. government was doing led to calls to “Abolish ICE” — and in short order, some Democratic Party figures were adopting a slogan that weeks earlier would have only been heard from the left.

The demand to do away with a hated government enforcement agency that terrorizes millions of undocumented immigrants fit the moment like a glove. The unbelievable cruelty of the Trump administration had come together with the explosive nature of the struggles of ordinary people against him.

But that was then. For the past months leading up to the midterm elections, the Democrats have been running away from the issue of immigration in any form. The Center for American Progress, a well-known liberal think tank, advised Democratic candidates to avoid the discussion of immigration and pivot to...you guessed it: health care.

Even democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — whose primary victory last spring over a machine Democrat helped popularize the Abolish ICE slogan — had softened her message by late August, when she said in a tweet, “#AbolishICE means not having an agency that incarcerates children and sexually assaults women with impunity. It does not mean abolish deportation.”

Trump is sowing fear to whip up his conservative base. But the Democrats are sowing fear of a different kind among their base — fear of Trump and fear of talking too radical and “alienating” moderate voters.

The resistance to Trump’s atrocities on immigration will need to ignore the Democrats’ cynical political calculations and organize opposition that stands proudly under the banner of “Abolish ICE.”

We need a socialist alternative that understands that the real “immigration problem” in the U.S. is the billions wasted militarizing a border and persecuting the vulnerable that could be used to welcome people across it if they want to come.


          Exit polls show Trump a major factor in midterm vote      Cache   Translate Page      
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          Tomgram: James Carroll, Entering the Second Nuclear Age?      Cache   Translate Page      
It was only an announcement, but think of it as the beginning of a journey into hell. Last week, President Donald Trump made public his decision to abrogate the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF), a 1987 agreement with the Soviet Union.
          Warning To Democrats! Do NOT Concede!!      Cache   Translate Page      
Donald Trump is in power in large part because Democrats have repeatedly conceded elections they really won. On Tuesday, that MUST change. Anyone deemed a close loser MUST fight. Every tally must be contested, every denial challenged, all missing ballots found, every provisional honored.
          Why We Must Vote Every Republican Out of Office      Cache   Translate Page      
Trump has made this election into a referendum on him. He is an historic anomaly -- a president who lies incessantly; who generates fear and fuels hatefulness; who viciously attacks the free press, political opponents, all who disagree with him; who uses his office for personal gain; and who cozies up to dictators while abandoning America's historic friends.
          The Day After*      Cache   Translate Page      
Tomorrow's election is much more like a plebiscite on Trump than a typical U.S. mid-term. Thus it is unique in U.S. history. This column explains why.
          Instigator-in-Chief      Cache   Translate Page      
The op-ed characterizes President Donald Trump as the Instigator-in-Chief for encouraging acts of violence against his enemies through the hate that uses to characterize his enemies. The op-ed refers to three recent incidents involving violence against the enemies of President Trump.
          Election night live: Exit polls show huge Trump factor      Cache   Translate Page      
Live updates about the pivotal elections to determine control of Congress.
          Midterm exit polls: Health care is top issue for voters      Cache   Translate Page      
Another 23 percent named immigration as their No. 1 issue, which Trump aggressively pushed into the national conversation.
          As a wary White House watches, will voters give Trump a red light?      Cache   Translate Page      
Analysis: Americans decide Tuesday whether to bring the MAGA bandwagon to a screeching stop.
          Midterms 2018: Immigration, health care and Trump energize voters      Cache   Translate Page      
"There's a fire under people to get out and vote," said a Wisconsin voter.
          Why Trump will escalate his attacks on democracy post-election, no matter who wins      Cache   Translate Page      
Leaders committed to self-preservation do not curtail their efforts to dismantle checks on their power under the threat of accountability.
          QAnon, la conspiration qui fait de Donald Trump le sauveur des États-Unis      Cache   Translate Page      
En quelques mois, QAnon ou simplement « Q » s'est construit une base massive de partisans dont les cibles préférées sont Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, George Soros, la famille Rothschild ou encore la famille royale saoudienne.
          Trump ou les angoisses de l’homme blanc      Cache   Translate Page      
Des chercheurs tentent de déconstruire l'idée reçue selon laquelle les électeurs de Donald Trump seraient soucieux de l'économie américaine. Un mythe qui a la vie dure.
          "Trump: 'People Very Much Dispute' Climate Change"      Cache   Translate Page      

"President Trump dismissed the National Climate Assessment that shows humans are driving climate change, and said he was focused on the reports that dispute it."

Source: ,

          Trump on the minds of many as they head to Valley polls      Cache   Translate Page      
Voters showed up in a steady stream early Tuesday morning at polls in the central San Joaquin Valley to cast ballots largely along political party lines, and with President Trump … Click to Continue »
          L’exercice de mise en scène de James Comey      Cache   Translate Page      
L'ancien directeur du FBI règle ses comptes avec Donald Trump dans ses mémoires, Une loyauté à toute épreuve. Mais il échoue au test de l'autocritique.
          Le groupe Sinclair aux côtés de Trump contre les « fausses nouvelles »      Cache   Translate Page      
Le géant de la télévision locale aux États-Unis a fait lire à ses journalistes une tirade contre les médias pourvoyeurs de fake news. Pour le plus grand plaisir de l'occupant de la Maison-Blanche.
          La guerre des tweets      Cache   Translate Page      
Avec Donald Trump et autres chefs d'État qui s'interpellent sur Twitter, le monde a-t-il encore besoin de diplomates ? Plus que jamais, répond l'ex-ambassadeur britannique Tom Fletcher, qui enseigne aux diplomates de demain comment se battre là où se joue la guerre idéologique du XXIe siècle.
          Trump endorsed all of these candidates. Will the Trump bump help them win?      Cache   Translate Page      
President Donald Trump has endorsed nearly 100 candidates for Senate, House and governor in Tuesday’s elections as he tries to sway Americans to vote for like-minded politicians who will help … Click to Continue »
          Half polls closed; voters pit Trump strength, Dem resistance      Cache   Translate Page      
Votes were being counted across half the country Tuesday evening as the energy and outrage of the Democratic resistance faced off against the brute strength of President Donald Trump's GOP … Click to Continue »
          Caravan Migrants on Collision Course With White Nationalism      Cache   Translate Page      
The migrant caravan from Central America is arguably on the collision course with a defiant President Donald Trump who has brazenly embraced the nationalist flag and adopted strict non-entree immigration policies. With the political rhetoric reaching searing hate levels up to the mid-term elections and after, the Republican-led government will have to prepare legal sandbags […]
          I’m Just Saying….Trump is right on the money with Fake News claims!      Cache   Translate Page      
I have to give credit where credit is due…the many so-called News outlets that are complaining about President’s Trump’s depictions of them as Fake News vehicles have no one to blame but themselves! When executives at CNN, MSNBC, FOX, ABC, CBS and the rest of the major news outlets sit in boardrooms and navigate the […]
          AP VoteCast: Trump a dominant force on voters' minds      Cache   Translate Page      
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          “40 años de hostilidad estadounidense”: Irán publica un video en respuesta a las nuevas sanciones      Cache   Translate Page      

IRÁN, (RT), 06 de noviembre de 2018 .- El canciller iraní criticó a Estados Unidos por haber causado “catástrofes y crisis” en Oriente Medio. En un video oficial de tres minutos publicado este martes, el ministro de Relaciones Exteriores iraní, Javad Zarif, calificó de “ilegales” y “fundamentalmente ineficaces” las sanciones reimpuestas por la administración Trump este lunes y dirigidas a los sectores bancario, energético y de transporte del país. Además, Zarif aseguró que los aliados de Teherán permanecerán a su lado, en contra de estas restricciones. Irán ha enfrentado “40 años de hostilidad estadounidense” y los aliados globales de la nación “se asegurarán de que el pueblo iraní se vea menos afectado por este asalto indiscriminado” y por la “guerra económica” librada en su contra por Estados Unidos. Según el canciller iraní, “la desacreditada adicción [de Estados Unidos] al unilateralismo y las sanciones” indica que estas son herramientas de su política y que están llevando a Washington hacia el “aislamiento global”. Zarif mencionó también “las catástrofes y crisis que ha diseñado” Washington en Oriente Medio, recordando la creación de Al Qaeda en Afganistán y la invasión de Irak. Asimismo repudió el apoyo “incondicional” que Washington brinda a Arabia Saudita e Israel y que “ciega a Estados Unidos ante sus atrocidades espantosas, que han provocado la indignación global”. “Darle un largo y duro vistazo a sus propias decisiones equivocadas y cambiar el enfoque fallido que ha seguido obstinadamente durante décadas, en lugar de prescribir cambios de comportamiento para Irán, será mucho más eficaz para lograr resoluciones en los conflictos”, señaló el ministro iraní. VP/INTERNACIONAL/AM

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          Trump annonce que son administration pourrait envisager des procédures antitrust contre Amazon, Facebook et Google lors d'un entretien      Cache   Translate Page      
Trump annonce que son administration pourrait envisager des procédures antitrust contre Amazon, Facebook et Google
lors d'un entretien

En juillet dernier, l'UE a infligé une amende record de 4,34 milliards d'euros à Google pour avoir abusé de la position dominante de son système d'exploitation mobile Android. La Commission européenne a également sommé l'entreprise américaine « de mettre fin à ses pratiques illégales dans les 90 jours, sous peine de se voir infliger des astreintes allant jusqu'à...
          Los brasileños ya tienen su Messias      Cache   Translate Page      

Voces del Director Desde Filomeno Mata 8 Por Mouris Salloum George (*) Para Adolfo Hitler, los legisladores no eran más que sabandijas parlamentarias. El 27 de febrero de 1933 fue incendiado el Reichstag, recinto del Parlamento alemán. El sanguinario Augusto Pinochet -incluso sobre sus correligionarios golpistas- quiso todo el poder: El 21 de septiembre de 1973 emitió el bando 27 por el que disolvió el Congreso. En México, el 5 de mayo de 1989 el Palacio Legislativo de San Lázaro amaneció en llamas. Diez meses antes, según descripción del diputado priista don Antonio Martínez Báez, ahí se perpetró un golpe de Estado técnico. Al Trump brasileño le encanta torturar El ultraderechista brasileño, Jair Messias Bolsonaro prometió que el primer día de su investidura, mandaría cerrar el Congreso. Los compatriotas de Bolsonaro lo conocen como El Trump brasileño. Si se confirman las semejanzas y el presidente que asume en enero de 2019 es cumplidor, gobernaría sin el contrapeso del Poder Legislativo. Bolsonaro llegó a su candidatura y campaña presidencial sin caretas: Se declara favorable a la tortura; “tú lo sabes”. La joven militante comunista Dilma Rousseff fue víctima del torturador. El golpe de Estado contra Rousseff a fin de cuentas desbrozó la brecha par que Bolsonaro llegue a la presidencia de Brasil. Si puedo no pagar impuestos, no pago confiesa con toda cachaza quien desde 1991, sin quitarse la peste del uniforme militar la ha girado de congresista. El superministro pupilo de Milton Friedman Eso de no pagar impuestos es el deporte favorito de los neoliberales que tienen en los jefes de Estado sus primeros alcahuetes. Por todo lo dicho, es obvio que a Jair Messias Bolsonaro no se le puede reconocer como un político humanista. Si no le gusta pagar impuestos (con cuya captación el Ejecutivo le pagaba sus dietas en el Congreso), quiere decir que en ética republicana está reprobado. El presidente electo de Brasil creará un superministerio que fusionará las carteras de Hacienda, Industria y Comercio. Le entregará su gestión a Paulo Guedes Guedes tiene dos méritos: Le bebió el aliento a Milton Friedman, uno de los padres del neoliberalismo que proscribe la justicia social y dio clases en la Universidad de Chile durante la dictadura de Pinochet. El FMI monta laboratorios para ensayar terapias de shock El futuro funcionario brasileño es experto en las llamadas terapias de shock, que en México se inauguraron durante el mandato de Miguel de la Madrid y se intensificaron en el de Carlos Salinas de Gortari. El recetario lo patentaron el Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI) y el Banco Mundial (BM). En estos días, los ejecutivos de esas agencias están muy contentos con el triunfo de Bolsonaro. Ya le preparan el manual para echar reversa a las políticas económicas sociales de la última década, en que la pobreza brasileña tuvo una dramática disminución. La cuestión es que el FMI y el BM son instituciones de la samaritana Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU), esa que tiene programas para el Desarrollo Humano, comisionados para investigar la tortura e indagar crímenes de lesa humanidad. Mire usted, en qué manos fueron a quedar los electores brasileños, que se llevaron entre las espuelas a todo el infelisaje del país. (*) Director General del Club de Periodistas de México, A.C.

The post Los brasileños ya tienen su Messias appeared first on Voces del Periodista Diario.


          Re: DEVELOPING: Spotlight on County Board Race As Results Trickle In      Cache   Translate Page      

Trump pissed off so many people they just circled every D. They are going to get what they derseve when the next vanity project goes up.


          Experts say the Trump immigration ad pulled by NBC and Fox exposes a flaw in the way political ads are reviewed — and it could become a problem for TV networks      Cache   Translate Page      

In this Oct. 6, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Topeka, Kan. There’s a lot of talk in Washington these days about the formal politeness known as “civility” is possible _ or even desirable _ among the nation’s political combatants these days. It’s not likely to get better, at least before the Nov. 6 midterm elections in which Republicans are defending their House and Senate majorities.AP Photo/Charlie Riedel

  • NBC, Fox, and Facebook all pulled an ad widely condemned as racist following public backlash.
  • While all three companies have their own advertising standards teams that evaluate ads, an initial review didn't flag anything as impermissible in the ad.
  • Some experts note a perceived difference in the way ads are reviewed for commercial products and political issues.
  • Brand-safety issues come with running political advertisements for networks and platforms.


Less than 24 hours after an advertisement that was widely condemned as racist aired during a Sunday Night Football game on NBC, the network issued a sweeping reversal, vowing to immediately remove the ad. NBC cited the ad's "insensitive" nature as the reason for its removal.

Shortly after, both Fox and Facebook, which aired the ad on their respective platforms, issued similar statements and pulled the ad.

The 30-second primetime advertisement released by President Trump's campaign