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          Voice of a nation: How Juba Arabic helps bridge a factious South Sudan      Cache   Translate Page      

Voice of a nation: How Juba Arabic helps bridge a factious South SudanThere was Kakwa, his mother tongue, shouted across scratchy cellphone lines to South Sudanese family back home and scattered around the region. Rabuna, Abuna fi sama, de akil al bi saadu gisim, he would whisper each night in Juba Arabic, hands clasped over his dinner plate.



          Thousands of child soldiers still trapped after South Sudan war - UN      Cache   Translate Page      
Thousands of child soldiers dragged into South Sudan's civil war are unlikely to be freed soon because aid agencies lack the funds to look after them, a U.N. envoy said on Tuesday.
          Juba to host peace talks between Khartoum and all Sudanese armed groups      Cache   Translate Page      
November 5, 2018 (JUBA) – South Sudanese government will host peace talks between the Sudanese government and all the armed groups in Sudan including Darfur movement, announced the presidency in Juba Last week, Juba announced a mediation to reunite the two factions of the Sudan Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) and narrow the gaps between them and […]
          Ethiopia: New Responses to the Refugee Crisis: Promises and Challenges in Ethiopia, A case study of World Bank financing for refugee-hosting nations      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: International Rescue Committee
Country: Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan

Executive Summary

In 2016, the Government of Ethiopia made nine pledges to improve the lives of refugees and host communities. Soon thereafter it rolled out the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) of the New York Declaration on Refugees and Migrants, and became one the first countries to receive multiyear, concessional financing from the World Bank’s 18th replenishment of the International Development Association (IDA18) sub-window for refugee-hosting nations. Together, these commitments, framework and financing hold the promise of significantly improving the lives of refugees and their host communities across the country.

New policies and programs are underway. The Government is revising its Refugee Proclamation and is expected to expand its policies that will enable more refugees to move freely from camps and access education and jobs. New livelihoods and education projects, supported by the World Bank and UK’s Department for International Development, are being designed to support refugees and host communities. Although still early in his tenure, Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali appears reform-minded and could be a champion of these approaches to the protracted refugee situation.

While progress is being made, there are a number of concerns that, if not addressed, run the risk of hampering impact. The Bank’s working groups for sub-window financed projects are distinct from CRRF working groups, and both appear to have consultative processes that often leave key constituencies, such as refugees, local governments and regional bodies, out of decision-making regarding policies and program design. The World Bank’s earliest investments are weighted towards solutions like industrial parks that do not adequately address refugees’ barriers to decent work and are unlikely to generate enough jobs in the medium term. And the government has not yet passed the Refugee Proclamation—key to ensuring refugees can access their rights, and critical for Bank programs to begin in earnest.

This case study seeks to determine what impact the CRRF and development financing are having—and are likely to have moving forward. Based on these observations, this case study offers recommendations for the Government of Ethiopia, the World Bank, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), Ethiopia’s Administration for Refugee and Returnee Affairs (ARRA), NGOs and other stakeholders. It calls on the Government to swiftly pass the Refugee Proclamation, allowing refugees to move more freely, and access schools and formal jobs. It recommends the World Bank, UNHCR and ARRA streamline their multistakeholder engagement process to ensure key actors, such as different levels of government, regional bodies, refugees, and NGOs can contribute to decision-making processes; and to ensure projects adequately reflect the evidence base, for instance on refugee and host community livelihood skills and needs.


          Uganda: New Responses to the Refugee Crisis: Promises and Challenges in Uganda, A case study of World Bank financing for refugee-hosting nations      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: International Rescue Committee
Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda

Executive Summary

Uganda, in many ways, is ground zero for new global initiatives to address large-scale, protracted displacement. It has hosted refugees from neighboring countries for decades, and today hosts the largest refugee population in Africa.

At the 2016 Leaders’ Summit on Refugees and Migrants, Uganda doubled down on its progressive refugee policies, which allow refugees to work, go to school and access land. It opted to be the first country to pilot the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework of the New York Declaration. And it is among the first countries to receive financing through a new sub-window of the World Bank’s 18th replenishment of its International Development Association (IDA18), created to provide additional concessional financing to low-income countries hosting large numbers of refugees. Together, these commitments, framework and financing offer immense potential to meaningfully improve the lives of refugees and Ugandan host communities.

All eyes are on Uganda as an early adopter of these new tools and funding. How will World Bank-funded projects be balanced with existing humanitarian interventions for refugees—which are extensive in Uganda? How will the Bank interact with the complex set of actors, including the government, UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), non-governmental actors (NGOs), civil society, and refugees themselves? Will the Bank adapt its projects or move forward with business as usual in these unique contexts? Will the Bank’s initiatives encourage other donors to provide multiyear financing and support long-term solutions for refugees and host communities?

This case study starts to answer these questions by examining Uganda’s recent policy approaches and initiatives that respond to refugee and host populations. Although it is still early days, observations so far suggest mixed results. The Government’s willingness to engage with these new platforms and maintain its progressive refugee policies, especially in the face of global actors retreating from their share in the responsibility for responding to refugee crises, is impressive and important.

However, early concerns about implementation have been, in some instances, validated. While the World Bank’s financing and CRRF are “pulling in the same direction”, there are no formal agreed on outcomes and no formal linkages between the funding and the framework. The process for making decisions about policies and programs have seemingly marginalizes NGOs and refugees themselves, even though there are new structures meant to give them a voice. And most Bank-funded projects in the pipeline piggyback on existing Bank programs, bringing refugees into projects that were already in train; it is unclear to what extent these projects will adapt to reflect refugees’ experiences.

Based on these observations, this case study offers recommendations for the Government of Uganda, donors like the World Bank, UNHCR and other stakeholders. It calls on the Government to foster better coordination and collaboration between different levels of government and to lead on simplifying and aligning decision-making processes for the CRRF implementation and World Bank financing. It recommends the World Bank and UNHCR develop more deliberate consultative process to include a broader range of actors; help bring other development actors to the table; and to work with partners to identify a clear set of outcomes they want to achieve with the new financing and frameworks. It suggests NGOs more proactively engage with the World Bank to share their expertise and help shape program and policy decisions based on their years of working with refugees.


          World: Border Agencies Plan for Inter-Agency Cooperation in East and Horn of Africa      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: International Organization for Migration
Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World

Nairobi – Eight countries in the East and Horn of Africa have committed to the establishment of “inter-agency cross-border technical working groups” that would facilitate the implementation of 22 identified good practices meant to boost cooperation and improve the efficiency of border operations.

The region’s borders are some of the busiest, as they cut across key migration routes focused on the movement of people within the region and to other major destinations, including Europe and the Gulf countries. Disparate national priorities among adjourning countries do not always make cooperation possible. But this could soon be thing of the past, as border authority managers from neighbouring states – some meeting for the first time – established a new rapport and struck significant operational agreements.

This followed a first-of-its-kind workshop organized by the UN migration agency IOM in late October that brought together directors general of immigration and senior immigration and border management officers from Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Uganda and Tanzania.

The workshop took place under the aegis of the Better Migration Management (BMM) Programme - a regional, multi-year and multi-partner programme funded by the EU Trust Fund for Africa and the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), coordinated by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ).

Bilateral and trilateral meetings between and among representatives of all the eight countries represented produced significant results for implementation. The highlights of these IOM-facilitated meetings, include:

First time agreement between Ethiopia and South Sudan to conduct joint, cross border patrols; and to work together to open new border crossings points between the two countries. Sudan and South Sudan agreed to work together to open four border crossing points, including One Stop Border Posts. Uganda and South Sudan agreed to implement joint, cross border patrols, and to establish “Integrated Border Management Committees”. Kenya, Tanzania, Somalia agreed to implement Integrated Border Management Committees; and Joint Interagency, Cross- Border Patrols. Ethiopia, Kenya, and Tanzania agreed to increased cooperation and implement “Good Practices” on Counter-Trafficking efforts; implement Joint Interagency Cross- Border Patrols.

The eight countries requested IOM to support a follow-up meeting to buttress the establishment of the proposed interagency, cross-border, technical working Groups. IOM is currently developing action plans to respond to stakeholder requests which will be funded through BMM and will be completed by June 30, 2019.

Keynote speaker at the workshop, Kenya Principal Secretary for Immigration and Registration of Persons, Rtd Maj-Gen Gordon Kihalangwa, said: “With increasing complexity of migration flows, countries in the East and Horn of Africa region should enhance cross-border cooperation in order to effectively deal with existing challenges in border management which include; trafficking of persons and smuggling of migrants among other forms of transnational organized crime”.

Julia Hartlieb, the BMM Senior Regional Programme Coordinator, said: “The Better Migration Management Programme has recorded key milestones in providing support to countries through the National Coordination Mechanisms for Migration, the provision of equipment and MIDAS border equipment, training, benchmarking visits to operationalization of e-visa and e-immigration systems.

For more information please contact IOM RO Nairobi:
Charles Mkude, BMM Programme Officer, Tel: +254 715 903 291, Email: cmkude@iom.int
Wilson Johwa, Communications Officer, Tel: +254 701 838 029, Email: wjohwa@iom.int


          Kenya: Kenya: Kakuma New Arrival Registration Trends 2018 (as of 31 October 2018)      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen, Zimbabwe


          Kenya: Kenya: Kalobeyei Settlement Population Statistics by Country of Origin, Sex and Age Group (as of 31 October 2018)      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania


          Kenya: Kenya: Kakuma and Kalobeyei Population Statistics by Country of Origin, Sex and Age Group (as of 31 October 2018)      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Niger, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen, Zimbabwe


          Kenya: Kenya: Kakuma Camp Population Statistics by Country of Origin, Sex and Age Group (as of 31 October 2018)      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Niger, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen, Zimbabwe


          Ethiopia: UNHCR Ethiopia: Durable Solutions Factsheet (September 2018)      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Canada, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Italy, Kenya, New Zealand, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Sweden, United States of America

  • Ethiopia hosts 905,831 refugees and asylum seekers within its borders, including the 36,185 who arrived since the start of 2018.

  • The Government of Ethiopia has committed to address the concerns of refugees, including a pledge to grant local integration to those who have lived in the country for 20 years and above.

  • Resettlement remains the chief durable solution for refugees in Ethiopia, but limited quotas mean that only 3,240 refugees will be referred to resettlement countries in 2018.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • UNHCR supports the Government of Ethiopia in discharging its international obligations, fulfilling the organization’s core objectives to provide refugees and other persons of concern with international protection, and to seek durable solutions for them. The three traditional durable solutions are complementary and are pursued together:

    • Voluntary repatriation, in which refugees return in safety and with dignity to their countries of origin and re-avail themselves of national protection;
    • Resettlement, in which refugees are selected and transferred from the country of refuge to a third state which has agreed to admit them as refugees with permanent residence status; and
    • Local integration, in which refugees legally, economically and socially integrate in the host country, availing themselves of the national protection of the host government.
  • UNHCR and partners support livelihoods programmes for refugees in order to reduce vulnerability and dependency on humanitarian assistance. Refugees who actively support themselves are better equipped to take on the challenges of any of the durable solutions. UNHCR recognizes the stress that the presence of refugees can place on already-impoverished host communities and works closely with development actors and regional governments to mitigate the impact. UNHCR advocates for complementarity of services for refugees and host communities, and seeks to ensure that refugees are included in their intervention and development plans, thereby promoting peaceful co-existence.

  • UNHCR Ethiopia is committed to assisting refugees in accessing complementary legal pathways including family reunification and other humanitarian migration programmes, such as private sponsorship, study and employment possibilities. UNHCR Ethiopia continues to issue refugees with proof of registration documents and provides advice on how to process family reunification cases. Specifically, UNHCR directly assists unregistered refugee children in accessing the services and documentation necessary to reunite with their family members abroad. UNHCR Ethiopia is also involved in the issuance of Convention Travel Documents (CTDs), which permits refugees to undertake international travel for employment, education and to seek medical treatment unavailable in Ethiopia.

  • The innovative Italian Humanitarian Corridor program was officially launched in 2017 and aims to relocate 500 refugees to Italy. UNHCR has undertaken this project with two faith-based organizations, Caritas Italiana and Sant’Egidio Community, through which refugees with family links in Italy as well as those with protection and medical vulnerabilities are able to find a durable solution. To date, 327 refugees have departed for new lives in Italy.


          Ethiopia: UNHCR Ethiopia: Urban Refugees Factsheet (September 2018)      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Yemen

HIGHLIGHTS

  • By the end of September 2018, there were a total of 22,885 refugees in the capital Addis Ababa, mainly from Eritrea, Yemen, Somalia, South Sudan and refugees of other nationalities, including those from the Great Lakes region.

  • Of the total population, 868 are children, who either arrived alone (377 children) or were separated from their parents or relatives during flight (491 children).

  • Of the urban refugee population, 18,122 (79%) are Eritrean refugees. Of these, 17,217 are beneficiaries of the Government’s Out-Of-Camp Policy.

  • UNHCR provides reception services at the Urban Refugee Reception Centre, located around what is popularly known as the Hayahulet Mazoriya in Addis Ababa. In addition to registration and documentation services, individual protection and resettlement counselling are available at the center from Monday to Thursday every week, between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm.

  • UNHCR undertook its yearly participatory assessment with refugees living in Addis Ababa in August 2018.The findings will assist the UN Refugee Agency to better understand the situation of refugees and will inform the planned programmatic and service delivery activities.

  • Coordination of protection programs targeting refugees in Addis Ababa is done through the monthly Urban and Kenya Borena Sub-Working Group meetings, that are held every 1st Wednesday of the month from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm at the UNHCR office in Bole. The forum brings together the government refugee agency (ARRA), UNHCR and all the partners working with refugees in Addis Ababa in order to ensure coordinated response in service delivery and efficient use of resources in line with UNHCR protection priorities.


          Ethiopia: UNHCR Ethiopia: Resettlement Factsheet (September 2018)      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Canada, Eritrea, Ethiopia, New Zealand, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Sweden, United States of America

  • Out of 905,831 registered refugees in Ethiopia, 65,750 are in need of resettlement in 2018.

  • UNHCR Ethiopia’s resettlement submissions target for 2018 was 4,240 individuals to the USA, New Zealand, Sweden and Canada, which was revised downwards to 3,240 individuals.

  • To date, 2,136 refugees were referred to the RSC for onward submission to resettlement countries, 1,907 refugees have been submitted and 608 have departed.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Resettlement is an invaluable protection tool for UNHCR Ethiopia as it addresses the specific needs of refugees who are vulnerable due to their experiences in their country of origin and/or whose safety, health or other fundamental rights are at risk in Ethiopia, by providing them an opportunity to rebuild their lives in a new country.

  • Resettlement remains the primary durable solution available to refugees in Ethiopia due to the continued instability in neighboring countries rendering voluntary repatriation untenable. Opportunities for local integration remain limited although the future looks bright in this regard with Ethiopia as a focus country for the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF).

  • Resettlement as a durable solution is available only to those refugees who meet very precise criteria. Although over 65,000 refugees in Ethiopia satisfy these criteria, the primary constraint on resettlement abroad is the quota provided by countries of resettlement, which is far too low to meet current need.

  • As resettlement numbers are dictated by quota and not need, resettlement is not a right that can be claimed by refugees.

  • UNHCR Ethiopia identifies and addresses the needs of the vulnerable within all refugee populations hosted in the country, including those with specific needs as well as those in protracted situations. The main refugee populations resettled abroad from Ethiopia are Eritreans, Somalis, South Sudanese, Sudanese as well as a few refugees from the Great Lakes.

  • UNHCR Ethiopia’s resettlement submissions target for 2018 was set at 4,240 refugees, mainly to the USA, but had to be revised to 3,240. However, UNHCR continued to advocate for resettlement quota with different countries and has secured submissions to New Zealand, Sweden and Canada for 2018.

  • As of September 2018, 2,136 refugees were referred to the Regional Service Centre in Nairobi for onward submission to resettlement countries and 1,907 refugees have been submitted to resettlement countries.

  • In light of the changes that US made in relation to Somalis, UNHCR Ethiopia had to revise the overall target in September and it was adjusted to 3,240 individuals.


          World: Emergency Management Centre for Animal Health Annual Report      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Benin, Burundi, Cambodia, China, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Japan, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritania, Mongolia, Myanmar, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, World, Zambia

Animal health emergencies continue to erupt around the world at an ever-increasing pace. Increased global travel, human migration and informal trade of animals and animal products continue to intensify the risk of disease spread. Infectious diseases and other animal health threats have the potential to move rapidly within a country or around the world leading to severe socio-economic and public health consequences. For zoonoses that develop the ability for human to human transmission, an early response to an animal health emergency could prevent the next pandemic. As the demands continue to evolve for effective and efficient management of animal diseases, including emerging diseases and zoonoses, the Emergency Management Centre for Animal Health (EMC-AH) continues to evolve and keep pace with the global demands, adding value to Member States of FAO.

Building on the first eleven years of success, the Centre rebranded its platform in 2018 as EMC-AH, with the full support of the Crisis Management Centre for Animal Health Steering Committee in November 2017. The new name reflects the modernization of the platform and new way of working to better address the needs of the future. Further, the inaugural EMC-AH strategic action plan 2018 2022 released in June 2018 clearly states the vision, mission, and core functions of EMC AH for the coming five years with the aim of reducing the impact of animal health emergencies.

EMC AH’s annual report reflects EMC AH’s new way of working under its strategic action plan and addresses EMC AH performance and actions for the twelve-month period of November 2017-October 2018. During the reporting period, EMC AH contributed to strengthening resilience of livelihoods to animal health-related emergencies and zoonoses through the core pillars of its strategic action plan: preparedness, response, incident coordination, collaboration and resource mobilization. The annual report illustrates EMC-AH’s commitment to transparency and accountability.

FAO’s Member States have an ongoing need for a holistic and sustainable international platform that provides the necessary tools and interventions inclusive of animal health emergency management. EMC-AH strategic action plan requires a substantial commitment of resources to implement the full range of proposed activities, and EMC-AH must maintain key personnel essential to carry out its objectives and components of the 2016-2019 FAO Strategic Framework that addresses increased resilience of livelihoods to threats and crises (Strategic Programme five [SP5]).

As a joint platform of FAO’s Animal Health Service and Emergency Response and Resilience Team, and in close collaboration with related partners and networks, EMC-AH is appropriately positioned to provide renewed leadership, coordination and action for global animal health emergencies.


          GENEVA / SOUTH SUDAN CHILDREN CONFLICT      Cache   Translate Page      
The number of violations against children in South Sudan in the last four years are greater than those in such war-ravaged countries as Afghanistan and Syria combined, according to Virginia Gamba, the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict. UNTV CH
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Russia, China Abstain on UN Vote to Punish Libya 
Russia and China on Monday refused to back a UN resolution that will allow the Security Council to slap sanctions on perpetrators of rape and sexual violence in Libya.

The British-drafted resolution renewing sanctions on Libya was adopted by a vote of 13 in favour in the 15-member council.

Russia and China abstained but did not use their veto power to block the measure that expanded the criteria for applying sanctions to include gender-based violence.

Russian Ambassador Vassily Nebenzia accused the Netherlands and Sweden, which pushed for the new sanctions criteria, of trying to score political points at home.

"This is populism distilled in its purest form," Nebenzia told the council, who noted that preventing sex crimes in Sweden and the Netherlands "is the remit of the national governments."

"Sexual and gender-based violence are part of crime in any specific country," said the ambassador, adding that the council should focus on threats to international security.

The council has added sexual violence as a criteria for sanctions in recent resolutions on the Central African Republic and South Sudan.

Swedish Deputy Ambassador Carl Skau said he hoped that adding the new sanctions criteria will have a "deterrent effect and that there will be accountability for such crimes."

Dutch Ambassador Karel van Oosterom said it was "an important step forward" for the UN council to slap sanctions on perpetrators of sexual violence "for instance in the refugee camps that rape women refugees."

The UN officials have warned that militia members, migrant smugglers and criminal gangs often resort to rape in Libya, which has descended into chaos since the ouster of revolutionary Pan-Africanist Muammar Gaddafi in 2011.

The council in June for the first time imposed sanctions on six individuals linked to Libyan migrant trafficking networks.

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South Sudan Army, SPLA-IO Agree to Allow Humanitarian Access
Sudan Peoples Liberation Army (SPLA) soldiers singing pro-war song (AFP file photo)

November 6, 2108 (JUBA) - Officials from the South Sudanese government army, SSPDF, and the main opposition army, SPLA-IO, agreed to allow humanitarian access and free movement of people around Juba.

Upon the instruction of their two chiefs of staff, the SPLA-IO forces based around Juba, and their peace partners from the South Sudan People’s Defence Forces (SSPDF) held a meeting on Sunday 4 November to discuss security measures to ensure humanitarian access to civilians and enable free movement of persons and goods.

In a statement released on Tuesday, SPLA IO Deputy Military Spokesperson Lam Paul Gabriel said the meeting was fruitful. He further said the SSPDF delegation was led by Brig Gen Chol Deng Chol was known as Chol Gutkom and the SPLA delegation was headed by Brig. Gen Warnyang Laku Buyu.

The meeting agreed to "give humanitarian organizations unhindered access to the most vulnerable population so that basic services can be provided to them," he said.

He further said that the two delegations agreed to allow "free movement of soldiers or security personnel with departure orders," he said before to add that "The soldier must be unarmed and in none uniform".

The two peace partners who will form the new national army agreed also to permit free movement of civilians, non-military logistics and goods through or to the SPLA-Io controlled areas.

This measure means that all the roads from North of Juba to Terekeka, Mundri and to Lainya should be open to everyone. There will be no detention or checking "unless a person is carrying a gun and wearing uniform".

President Salva Kiir and SPLM-IO leader Riek Machar repeated that ending the suffering of civilians was their principal motivation to strike the revitalized peace agreement in order to end the five-year war.

The signed deal is in line with the security arrangement of the signed revitalized peace agreement which provides that the signatories allow and facilitate unfettered access for people in need of humanitarian assistance and to guarantee free movement of citizens, commodities and services.

The peace agreement provides that 15 days after the signing of the deal the parties have to implement all the ceasefire arrangements including, disengagement and separation of forces in close proximity; withdrawal of allied troops; and the opening of humanitarian corridors.

IGAD military assessment mission headed by a Sudanese general arrived Monday to Juba to study the status of the Regional Protection Force as the regional body will deploy its troops within it.

In a meeting held in Khartoum on 22 October, the IGAD chiefs of staff decided the formation of the mission and agreed that t should submit its report on 19 November 2018 to the next meeting of the chiefs of staff In Ethiopia.

(ST)

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Government Supports Maintaining 32 States in South Sudan: Wani
South Sudan’s vice-president, James Wani Igga, speaks at the opening of the national reconciliation and peace conference in Wau on 2 September 2014 (ST)

November 4, 2018 (JUBA) - South Sudanese government would support the 32 states federal system which the opposition groups demand to bring to an end, said Vice President James Wani Igga Sunday during a visit to Yei River state.

Wani made his remarks at a ceremony of ordination of eight pastors, consecration of five bishops and one archbishop for the Evangelical Presbyterian Church (EPC) in Yei River State. he was flanked by the Emmanuel Adil Anthony, Governor of Yei River State and Julius Tabuley, deputy chairman of the NAS-Lagu faction.

Addressing the religious ceremony, Wani pointed out that the opposition contest the current federal system established by President Salva Kiir but his government would work within the agreed mechanism to defend it.

"I want to tell you that the issue of the states will be addressed by the IBC (Independent Boundaries Commission). We support the 32 states, and the people of Yei want the 32 states to remain so that services can be delivered," he said.

He further said that the IBC will launch its activities soon to determine the number of the states.

The government and the opposition groups agree on the federal system of governance but diverge on the number of the administrative territorial entities and its boundaries.

IBC has to review the establishment of the new states and their boundaries and to make recommendations for addressing the consequences of these changes based on the tribal borders at the independence of Sudan in 1956.

The opposition forces say the current system is made in a way to legalise the control of fertile land by the Dinka ethnic groups.

Also, they say the expansion of the states from 10 to 32 states violates the 2015 peace agreement because it was implemented in October of the same year after the signing of the peace deal in August.

The non-signatory groups make of the number of states their principal reason to reject the revitalized peace agreement. Some of them wanted the number of states to be settled in the peace negotiations and not during the interim period.

The peace deal provides that if the IBC fails to reach an agreement on the number of states, a referendum should be held to determine its final number taking into account the 1956 border demarcation.

Speaking during the ceremony, Governor Anthony reiterated the commitment of his government to implement the revitalized peace agreement and other peace deals signed with the various armed groups in the state.

He further called on the holdout armed groups to join the "wagon of peace" and to contribute to the stability and development of their region.

He also praised the different churches for the mediation they conduct with the armed groups and contribution in the areas of healthcare, humanitarian assistance, education and development of the state.

Yei River State is one of the most troubled areas in South Sudan as the state witnesses sporadic clashes between the rebel fighters of the National Salvation Front led by Thomas Cirilo Swaka with the government or the SPLM-IO forces.

(ST)

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Non-signatory Group Calls for New Alliance to Achieve Fundamental Change in South Sudan
Hakim Dario PDM leader

November 4, 2018 (JUBA) - The opposition People’s Democratic Movement (PDM) has called for a new National Alliance for Democracy And Freedom Action (NADAFA) saying it would be a popular tool to achieve fundamental change in South Sudan.

The PDM which calls for a federal government in South Sudan with three regions is a non-signatory of the revitalized peace agreement and several times denounced the support of the IGAD countries particularly Sudan and Uganda to President Salva Kiir.

"It is our strong conviction that the elites alone, suffer a high deficit of incentive to bring decisive and fundamental change to transform South Sudan without the people driving the transformation mindset," said the PDM Chair Hakim Dario in a statement extended to Sudan Tribune.

In his four-page call, Dario said the Sudan-Uganda brokered agreement was designed to pacify SPLM-IO by creating a role for its leader Riek Machar, as First Vice President. But, it ignored the inspiration of South Sudanese for a freedom, a fair power-sharing and social justice.

He went further to say that President Kiir, his would be FVP, and the three other vice-presidents "are not competent and credible to transform South Sudan after their pillage, and failure to govern in the public interest".

The statement defined the NADAFA as a national "social justice and democratic political movement" to take back democratic control of the country, to "clean up the system, clean up endemic impunity, clean up the country and its shattered image to regain our dignity and control from the hands of corrupt elites".

The politician leader did not develop on the nature and the structure of the NADAFA. But, from the sense of his call which is directed to the South Sudanese masses across the country, the new political body intends to establish a new political movement aiming to achieve a set of objectives the PDM failed to realize through the revitalized forum.

Last Wednesday 31 October 2018, President Kiir in his speech at the peace celebration day called on the non signatory groups to join the peace deal and said he would take an initiative in this respect.

Also, the SPLM-IO leader called on the holdout opposition groups to join the revitalized agreement and tasked his political outreach committee to contact them.

(ST)

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Thousands of Child Soldiers Still Trapped After South Sudan War: U.N.
Tom Miles

GENEVA (Reuters) - Thousands of child soldiers dragged into South Sudan’s civil war are unlikely to be freed soon because aid agencies lack the funds to look after them, a U.N. envoy said on Tuesday.

The government signed a peace deal with rebel factions in September to end a civil war that killed at least 50,000 people, but many children who were forced into the conflict are still stuck in military camps in the bush, Virginia Gamba, U.N. envoy for children and armed conflict, said.

Gamba, who has spoken to former child soldiers in the country, said a lack of resources to re-integrate the children meant they remained at extremely high risk of abuse.

Since January, 900 child soldiers have been freed and Gamba expects a further 1,000 releases by the end of the year. But there are many more, she told reporters.

“The first group of released children ... kept telling me that at least two or three of their friends were still in the bush waiting to be released or waiting to be negotiated and asking me to intervene on their behalf,” she said.

“We are talking of thousands still out there.”

U.N. funds for reintegrating children had halved over the past seven years while needs doubled, and aid workers could not cope with a sudden mass release, she said.

“For every day that a kid is in the bush they will be revictimised, there’s just no question about it.”

After being abducted, children might be raped or sent to attack their own families to sever their ties to home. Escape attempts were punished by hand amputation or molten plastic poured onto the skin, Gamba said: “They were terrified.”

Four-fifths of the violations were committed by the army, but all warring parties were guilty, Gamba said.

A South Sudan army spokesman declined to comment.

Gamba said the number of violations of children’s rights was greater than in Syria and Afghanistan.

“It is really huge, it’s quite gross. I mean, decapitation of children, the use of sexual violation against very small children as part of a weapon and a tactic of war to cow communities, the abduction of children, the recruitment of children, forced use of children in support of war efforts.”

94-year-old tried in youth court for Nazi crimes

South Sudan has agreed a joint action plan with the United Nations that would allow aid workers to reach deep into the former war zone and verify child numbers in military camps.

Freed children - 40 percent of them girls - might get six months of help to learn a skill like carpentry or sewing so they could fend for themselves, but they would never go to school.

“These kids are condemned for the rest of their life ... their dreams will never be achieved,” Gamba said.

Reporting by Tom Miles, additional reporting by Denis Dumo; Editing by Robin Pomeroy

          Javid Abdelmoneim: working in disaster zones      Cache   Translate Page      
Dr Javid Abdelmoneim has been a Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) doctor for almost 10 years. In that time he has been in some of the world's most distressing and challenging disaster zones from Haiti to Sierra Leone to South Sudan. Along the way, he has also developed a television career - fronting programmes about his work with MSF and also medical and cultural issues facing the UK, where he was born and raised. Javid is in New Zealand to deliver a talk at AUT's Auckland campus about life on the front-line. He joins Kathryn to talk about how his work has given him perspective and what more needs to be done.
          SECURITY COORDINATION OFFICER       Cache   Translate Page      
Level : P-3
Job ID : 106126
Job Network : Internal Security and Safety
Job Family : Security
Department/Office : United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan
Duty Station : MULTIPLE DUTY STATIONS
Staffing Exercise : N/A
Posted Date : 11/6/2018
Deadline : 11/20/2018
           Sudan Referendum      Cache   Translate Page      

During decades of civil war in Sudan, says John Ashworth of Catholic Relief Services, the church was the only institution on the ground with the people, and because of that it gained huge moral authority. Now South Sudan is voting in a referendum for independence from the Muslim-majority national government in Khartoum. More

The post Sudan Referendum appeared first on Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly.


          Host South Sudan to include Darfur rebels in Sudan peace talks      Cache   Translate Page      
South Sudan will host peace talks in Juba next week between the government of Sudan in Khartoum and all Sudanese opposition armed groups, and will als...
          South Sudan constitutional body holds meetings in Juba      Cache   Translate Page      
November 6, 2018 (JUBA) – South Sudan’s National Constitutional Amendment Committee (NCAC) this week launched its activities to establish the legal framework for the implementation the revitalized peace agreement and to incorporate it into the constitution. The Committee shall complete the tasks necessary to prepare for the Transitional Period and the formation of the Revitalised […]
          Opinion: Juba City Council: Where does it fall between the State and National Government?      Cache   Translate Page      
This serves as an advisory opinion to urgently clear the dilemma on the status of Juba city and its supposedly management and administration. For far too long, I have observed total non-compliance with provisions of the Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, 2011 as amended. Neither the National Government nor the state had ever thought […]
          South Sudan army, SPLA-IO agree to allow humanitarian access      Cache   Translate Page      
November 6, 2108 (JUBA) – Officials from the South Sudanese government army, SSPDF, and the main opposition army, SPLA-IO, agreed to allow humanitarian access and free movement of people around Juba. Upon the instruction of their two chiefs of staff, the SPLA-IO forces based around Juba, and their peace partners from the South Sudan People’s […]
          Juba City Council: Where does it fall between the State and National Government?      Cache   Translate Page      
Adv. Beny Gideon Mabor This serves as an advisory opinion to urgently clear the dilemma on the status of Juba city and its supposedly management and administration. For far too long, I have observed total non-compliance with provisions of the Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan, 2011 as amended. Neither the National Government […]
          Kiir’s mediation in Sudan talks won’t supersede previous documents: minister      Cache   Translate Page      
President Salva Kiir’s initiative to mediate peace talks between the Khartoum government and rebel groups will not supersede previous framework documents, a top Sudanese official said. South Sudanese President Salva Kiir is expected to mediate peace talks in Juba next week between the Sudanese government and all opposition groups, and will also include armed opposition […]
          Boma governor vows to return raided cattle      Cache   Translate Page      
The governor of South Sudan’s Boma State, David Yau Yau has promised to return the cattle raided from Jonglei state to their owners. Last week, an armed group of cattle raiders from Boma launched two separate attacks in Duk Payuel and Jalle areas in Jonglei State. The attackers killed 14 people and raided thousands of […]
          South Sudan: Girl Auctioned on Facebook for Marriage      Cache   Translate Page      
[VOA] Female lawyers in South Sudan are urging the government to shut down an online auction for marriage rights to a 16-year-old girl. Reported by allAfrica.com 1 hour ago.
          Comment on Coagulase Test: Principle, procedure and interpretation by Pham Khan      Cache   Translate Page      
Hello Sire ! Iam a medical laboratory practitioner working in the National Public Health laboratory in the department of microbiology in the government of South Sudan . help me with this question , what are some of the challenges in antibiotic resistance in Gram negative Bacteria ?
          South Sudan: Girl Auctioned on Facebook for Marriage      Cache   Translate Page      
[VOA] Female lawyers in South Sudan are urging the government to shut down an online auction for marriage rights to a 16-year-old girl.
          Comment on BN Beauty: Meet the Gorgeous African Queens competing at Miss World 2018 by stacy_kema      Cache   Translate Page      
Miss Cameroon, Ghana, Rwanda, South Sudan and Miss Uganda. These ladies are very beautiful. Miss Kenya be looking like Mami water....
          Doing Business in Sudan 2019      Cache   Translate Page      
The World Bank has just published its Doing Business 2019 for Sudan. The evaluation includes starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting minority investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, resolving insolvency, and labor market regulation.

On the overall ranking of ease of doing business, the World Bank evaluated 190 countries, including 54 in Africa. Sudan ranked 162. This compares with 120 for Egypt and 185 for South Sudan.
          S. Sudan Peace Raises Prospect of Release of Child Soldiers      Cache   Translate Page      
The U.N. secretary-general’s special representative for children and armed conflict says a chief benefit of peace in South Sudan is the likelihood that many child soldiers will be freed and reintegrated into their communities. Virginia Gamba was present during the Khartoum peace process in South Sudan three weeks ago and met with government officials and
          UN Police Commissioners Briefs Press after Security Council Meeting      Cache   Translate Page      
Alexander Zouev, Assistant Secretary-General for Rule of Law and Security Institutions for the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations, speaks to press after the Security Council meeting on United Nations peacekeeping operations, along with (from left to right) Ma Zhaoxu, Permanent Representative of China to the United Nations and President of the Security Council for the month of November, Unaisi Lutu Vuniwaqa, Police Commissioner ofthe United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), Luis Carrilho, United Nations Police Adviser, Serge Therriault, Police Commissioner ofthe United Nations Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH), and Awale Abdounasir, Police Commissioner of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic ofthe Congo (MONUSCO).
          UN Police Commissioners Briefs Press after Security Council Meeting      Cache   Translate Page      
Luis Carrilho, United Nations Police Adviser (second from right) speaks to press after the Security Council meeting on United Nations peacekeeping operations, along with (from left to right) Unaisi Lutu Vuniwaqa, Police Commissioner ofthe United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), Serge Therriault, Police Commissioner ofthe United Nations Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH), and Awale Abdounasir, Police Commissioner of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic ofthe Congo (MONUSCO).
          Facebook Allows Sudanese Girl To Be Auctioned For Marriage      Cache   Translate Page      
<p>Facebook seems to be fine with human rights violations in South Sudan occuring on its platform. In South Sudan, according to Voice of America News, an online auction was being held for marriage rights to a 16 year old girl.</p>


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