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          Sierra Leone News: Chinese begin eye surgeries in Kenema today - Awoko      Cache   Translate Page      

Awoko

Sierra Leone News: Chinese begin eye surgeries in Kenema today
Awoko
The Chinese Medical Team under the China Brightness Team project will conduct over 200 eye operations at the Government Hospital in Kenema. Ambassador Wu Peng said that this team is part of the bilateral medical relationship between China and Sierra ...

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          Celebrities who love to travel      Cache   Translate Page      

Celebrities are just like us and love to travel! Of course, they can afford to do it in more style and extravagance. These stars have the travel bug. Bill Murray The legendary Bill Murray tries to fit in as much travel as he can while he works. He loves to take a solo and discover new places. Bill Murray took 4 years break from the acting and moved to Paris and then to Prague. George Clooney George Clooney lives la dolce vita in Italy and is a regular on Lake Como, where he has a huge estate. Parts of his blockbuster movie Ocean’s Twelve were filmed at his villa in Laglio. He also returned to get married to Amal Alamuddin in Venice in 2014 and the newlyweds spent time traveling through the Italian countryside via a Vespa moped and Fiat 500. Bear Grylls It’s one thing to have the travel bug, yet Bear goes further and chows down on it. The British explorer is well known for his basic instincts. He’s tanked fecal fluid from elephant dung, eaten deer droppings and utilized the body of a sheep as a resting bag. He doesn’t do this since he’s down and out; this is his bread and butter, not that you’ll ever observe him eating anything as ordinary as that. His most loved goals incorporate Mount Everest, Greenland’s tremendous field of wild and the impressively less-hostile Panama City. Angelina Jolie This prolific traveler has traveler will also continue to have some awesome journeys in her work as Goodwill Ambassador for the UN. So far she’s visited Sierra Leone, Cambodia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Pakistan. Chris Hemsworth Chris Hemsworth was certainly not content with being the king of Asgard, quite evident from his around the world trips and those make-you-jealous travel photos. Chris Hemsworth is a serious surfer who travels around the world looking for his next great set. Chris’ Instagram account is laced with surfing photography and videos, and after checking out a few of them, it’s easy to see that he has some serious skills.

The post Celebrities who love to travel appeared first on FHM Pakistan.


          Kenya: Kenya: Kakuma New Arrival Registration Trends 2018 (as of 31 October 2018)      Cache   Translate Page      
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen, Zimbabwe


          Afrikas Krankheitssysteme      Cache   Translate Page      
Von Franziska Badenschier. | Seit 2014 wütet Ebola in Westafrika und offenbart die schwachen Gesundheitssysteme in Guinea, Liberia und Sierra Leone. Doch auf einem Kontinent mit mehr als 50 Ländern gibt es viele verschiedene Systeme: einige sind "krank", andere dagegen lassen hoffen.
          UK Announces Plastic Packaging Tax, Expands Commonwealth Clean Ocean Alliance      Cache   Translate Page      
The Government of the UK has announced a tax on plastic packaging, following its success in charging for single-use plastic bags. The UK has previously banned plastic straws, drink stirrers and cotton buds as part of a growing effort to eliminate single-use plastic. The Gambia, Mauritius, Mozambique, Seychelles and Sierra Leone have joined the Commonwealth Clean Ocean Alliance, which engages countries across the Commonwealth in the fight against plastic.
          Javid Abdelmoneim: working in disaster zones      Cache   Translate Page      
Dr Javid Abdelmoneim has been a Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) doctor for almost 10 years. In that time he has been in some of the world's most distressing and challenging disaster zones from Haiti to Sierra Leone to South Sudan. Along the way, he has also developed a television career - fronting programmes about his work with MSF and also medical and cultural issues facing the UK, where he was born and raised. Javid is in New Zealand to deliver a talk at AUT's Auckland campus about life on the front-line. He joins Kathryn to talk about how his work has given him perspective and what more needs to be done.
           Sierra Leonean Entrepreneurs Hail TEF      Cache   Translate Page      
[Concord] Sierra Leonean entrepreneurs who benefited from the 2018 Tony Elumelu Foundation Entrepreneurship programme have expressed gratitude to the initiative and promised to put to good use the training to achieve the aim and objective of the initiative founder.
           Chinese Embassy Doles Scholarship to Varsity Students      Cache   Translate Page      
[Concord] The Chinese Embassy in Sierra Leone Wednesday awarded scholarships to eighteen university students across the country.
           Dayu Mining Company Promotes Football in Three Communities      Cache   Translate Page      
[Concord] The leading mine Development Company in Tonkolili District, Northern Sierra Leone, Da Yu Mining, has established itself as a player in support of football by delivering a donation of one thousand United States dollars ($1,000) worth of football items.
           Govt to Commence EITI Validation Monday      Cache   Translate Page      
[Concord] Sierra Leone will Monday, November 5, commence validation of its Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) implementation process against the 2016 standard, which was launched in February of the same year.
           Police Ban Street Carnival Ahead of Festive Season      Cache   Translate Page      
[Concord] The Sierra Leone Police have among a host of other security measures banned street carnivals during this festive season.
           Former Arsenal Striker Van Persie Boosts Education      Cache   Translate Page      
[Concord] Former Arsenal and Manchester United striker Robin Van Persie and wife Bourchra van Persie have handed over three classroom blocks and one office building constructed for children and teachers at Robison village, Kambia district, northern Sierra Leone.
          Chinese "Brightness Trip in to Sierra Leone" Launched      Cache   Translate Page      
The Chinese Medical Team in Sierra LeoneSix senior ophthalmologists and nurses from Hunan Pr
          Re: Best country to pick at mens bathing naked (river/beach)      Cache   Translate Page      
You don´t need to google anything, just go there. A good spot is the Rokel river in Magburaka, a town in northern Sierra Leone or the Wanje river in Pujehun, in the south of the same country. Any river or even small brook in this country has people bathing in it and you can enjoy to see these amazing guys just naked there. It is really a plus if you just join them....
          Re: Best country to pick at mens bathing naked (river/beach)      Cache   Translate Page      
You don´t need to google anything, just go there. A good spot is the Rokel river in Magburaka, a town in northern Sierra Leone or the Wanje river in Pujehun, in the south of the same country. Any river or even small brook in this country has people bathing in it and you can enjoy to see these amazing guys just naked there. It is really a plus if you just join them....
          Re: Sex tourism in Gambia...      Cache   Translate Page      
From www gvnet.com I transfer the fllowing passage.

Human Trafficking and Modern-day Slavery

The Gambia is a source, transit, and destination country for children and women trafficked for the purposes of forced labor and commercial sexual exploitation. Within The Gambia, women and girls, and to a lesser extent boys, are trafficked for sexual exploitation, in particular to meet the demand for European sex tourism, and for domestic servitude. Boys are trafficked within the country for forced begging by religious teachers and for street vending. Transnationally, women, girls and boys from neighboring countries are trafficked to The Gambia for the same purposes listed above. Primary source countries are Senegal, Mali, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ghana, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea and Benin. Trafficking of Gambian boys to Senegal for forced begging and Senegalese boys to The Gambia for the same purpose is particularly prevalent. Gambian women and girls are trafficked to Senegal for domestic servitude, and possibly for sexual exploitation. Gambian women and children may be trafficked to Europe through trafficking schemes disguised as migrant smuggling. Reports in the last two years of Gambian, Senegalese, and nationals of other neighboring countries being transported from The Gambia to Spain by boat appear to be predominantly cases of smuggling rather than trafficking. - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2008 [
          Re: Sex tourism in Gambia...      Cache   Translate Page      
From www gvnet.com I transfer the fllowing passage.

Human Trafficking and Modern-day Slavery

The Gambia is a source, transit, and destination country for children and women trafficked for the purposes of forced labor and commercial sexual exploitation. Within The Gambia, women and girls, and to a lesser extent boys, are trafficked for sexual exploitation, in particular to meet the demand for European sex tourism, and for domestic servitude. Boys are trafficked within the country for forced begging by religious teachers and for street vending. Transnationally, women, girls and boys from neighboring countries are trafficked to The Gambia for the same purposes listed above. Primary source countries are Senegal, Mali, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ghana, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea and Benin. Trafficking of Gambian boys to Senegal for forced begging and Senegalese boys to The Gambia for the same purpose is particularly prevalent. Gambian women and girls are trafficked to Senegal for domestic servitude, and possibly for sexual exploitation. Gambian women and children may be trafficked to Europe through trafficking schemes disguised as migrant smuggling. Reports in the last two years of Gambian, Senegalese, and nationals of other neighboring countries being transported from The Gambia to Spain by boat appear to be predominantly cases of smuggling rather than trafficking. - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2008 [
          Re: Best country to pick at mens bathing naked (river/beach)      Cache   Translate Page      
You don´t need to google anything, just go there. A good spot is the Rokel river in Magburaka, a town in northern Sierra Leone or the Wanje river in Pujehun, in the south of the same country. Any river or even small brook in this country has people bathing in it and you can enjoy to see these amazing guys just naked there. It is really a plus if you just join them....
          Re: Sex tourism in Gambia...      Cache   Translate Page      
From www gvnet.com I transfer the fllowing passage.

Human Trafficking and Modern-day Slavery

The Gambia is a source, transit, and destination country for children and women trafficked for the purposes of forced labor and commercial sexual exploitation. Within The Gambia, women and girls, and to a lesser extent boys, are trafficked for sexual exploitation, in particular to meet the demand for European sex tourism, and for domestic servitude. Boys are trafficked within the country for forced begging by religious teachers and for street vending. Transnationally, women, girls and boys from neighboring countries are trafficked to The Gambia for the same purposes listed above. Primary source countries are Senegal, Mali, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ghana, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea and Benin. Trafficking of Gambian boys to Senegal for forced begging and Senegalese boys to The Gambia for the same purpose is particularly prevalent. Gambian women and girls are trafficked to Senegal for domestic servitude, and possibly for sexual exploitation. Gambian women and children may be trafficked to Europe through trafficking schemes disguised as migrant smuggling. Reports in the last two years of Gambian, Senegalese, and nationals of other neighboring countries being transported from The Gambia to Spain by boat appear to be predominantly cases of smuggling rather than trafficking. - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2008 [
          Safety and Security Officer at Street Child Nigeria      Cache   Translate Page      
Street Child is a UK charity working to protect vulnerable children and improve access to education in some of the poorest communities in the world. We work in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nepal and in the last few months Street Child has been involved in the Humanitarian response for Nigeria as well as, being partner of the Education in Emergency Working Group.We are recruiting to fill the position below:Job Title: Safety and Security Officer (only for Nigerian)Location: Maiduguri, with frequent travels in LGAs of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe StateReports to: NE Nigeria Programmes ManagerStarting date: 26 November 2018Contract duration: 5 months, full-time position with opportunity for renewalOperational Context/RoleStreet Child is looking for a dedicated Safety and Security Officer for our programme in North East Nigeria.The role of the Safety Officer (SO) is focused on the continuous implementation of safety strategies and protocols to ensure a high level of safety and wellbeing for all Street Child staff based or travelling in Field locations.The Safety and Security Officer will maintain a high level of contextual awareness of his/her operating area and strong coordination with Programme Managers and Programme support teams at the Field level.He/ She will promote a strong Safety culture at their Field office(s) through continuous trainings and collaborative safety assessments with all field-based staff.The Safety and Security Officer will serve as the Safety unit representative at Field level and serve, when required as the Safety unit representative on the Field Crisis Management Team.This full time position is for 5 months initially, and subject to performance and funding availability, may be extended for up to a year.Key ResponsibilitiesPlanning, Preparation and Implementation of established Procedures and Protocols:Continuously monitoring the environment in the operational areas for which he/she is responsible. As required, and at a minimum of once per quarter, support the Senior Management Team on updating the context analysis for locationsBased on current context make recommendations to the NE Nigeria Programmes Manager for updates to Field Level Standard Operating Procedures and Safety Risk Management Plans.Ensure that the Field Level Safety Plan and associated documents are kept up to date and reviewed regularlyEnsure the safety readiness of all Street Child staff at Field level through regular integration of safety management priorities and objectives into Field Office planningBrief, manage and liaise on daily basis with the contracted guarding services to ensuring they maintain a high standard of guarding for Street Child office and residence providing for the safety of Street Child compound/staff and assetsMaintaining physical safety standards for Street Child office and guesthouse at Field levelAccompany staff on field missions on as need basis in order to better develop an awareness of the challenges faced by Street Child staff in the fieldPer established movement protocols, provide movement tracking oversight and support in coordination with Logistics department.Liaise with government, Army, Police, SSS, Local Heads and other key external stakeholders to ensure that Street Child staff can maintain regular and safe access to program areasRegularly coordinate with peer organization safety staff/focal points to get the current contextual information.Prepare Hibernation, Relocation and Evacuation plan for the area of responsibility with the support of Safety advisor.Reporting and Information management:Submitting when required voice, email or SMS immediate advisories to Field staff and Managers the when a significant safety incident occurSubmit formal incident reports to the NE Nigeria Programmes Manager and relevant Programming or Programming support staff following a safety incidentSubmit to the NE Nigeria Programmes Manager weekly inputs for the Weekly Contextual reviewEnsure reporting and advisories are disseminated on a routine basis to all Street Child Field staffAttend regular security network meetings within the area of responsibility and ensure discussion points from these meetings are incorporated into current safety assessmentsReport to the NE Nigeria Programmes Manager and relevant Field level senior management any instances of staff non-compliance to established protocols or procedures and provide recommendations for corrective actionsTraining:In coordination with the Senior Management Team, develop and implement quarterly training plans for all Street Child Field level staff focused on safety awareness and skill setsEnsure that all Street Child Field level drivers receive annual driver training as well as 1st Aid trainingIn coordination with the Senior Management Team, ensure bi-quarterly orientation on Hibernation, relocation and evacuation plan with all field staff.In coordination with the Senior Management Team, ensure that an annual Crisis management training session is completed with all relevant Field level staffCrisis Management:During any critical incident or crises serve as the Safety unit representation on the Field Level Crisis Management TeamEnsure that all Field Level Crisis management plans are kept up to date and reviewed regularlyEnsure that the necessary external relationships are maintained at Field level to facilitate a quick response and assistance to Street Child during any critical incident or crises

Apply at https://ngcareers.com/job/2018-11/safety-and-security-officer-at-street-child-nigeria-931/


          MEAL Assistant at Street Child Nigeria      Cache   Translate Page      
Street Child is a UK charity working to protect vulnerable children and improve access to education in some of the poorest communities in the world. We work in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nepal and in the last few months Street Child has been involved in the Humanitarian response for Nigeria as well as, being partner of the Education in Emergency Working Group.We are recruiting to fill the position below:Job Title: MEAL Assistant Location: Maiduguri with frequent travel to Rann (others in Borno, Adamawa, Yobe States if required)Report to: MEAL Coordinator and Learning and Partnership ManagerSpecification: Nigerian Nationals OnlyStarting from: 26 November 2018Duration: 1 year (with 3 months as probation period)Operational/Context RoleStreet Child is looking for a dedicated M&E Assistant for our programme in Rann, Kala Balge LGA. Our planned programme will include emergency education interventions in collaboration with the Education in Emergencies Working Group, such as building temporary learning centers, training education facilitators in delivery of the curriculum and trauma counselling, and providing teaching and learning materials.Street Child is also integrating activities relating to child protection to provide care and safety to children with protection concerns and support their caregivers with income generating activities.The main responsibility of the M&E Assistant will be to support the M&E Coordinator in collecting timely data, participating in needs assessment and impact assessment, work with local partners building their capacity on monitoring skills and processes. The position requires a good communication skills, leadership, and the capacity to work with a team.Key ResponsibilitiesProvide supervision for quantitative data collection activitiesConduct data quality checks in the field and ensure accuracy and completeness of survey questionnairesProvide supervision for data entry of quantitative data, clean data and conduct data analysis.Supervise all M&E casual workers (Enumerators and Data Entry clerks)Conduct observations, Market Surveys (shop monitoring), Focus Group Discussions and Key Informant Interviews with different persons of different age groups (children, youth, adults) and different gender.Enter data from FGDs, shop monitoring, observations and KIIs, participate in data analysis and draft reportsCompile data from surveys using relevant and appropriate computer packagesParticipate in the baseline, mid-term and end of term evaluations of programmes in accordance with the M&E frameworkEnsure that hard copies and soft copies of data collected is kept at project sitesPlan with MEAL Coordinator Officers and L&P Manager data collection needs and activitiesPrepare informative field reports, identify shortcomings and make relevant recommendations on a regular basis.Contribute to minutes taking and sharing during internal or external meetings or events.Behaviours:Excellent interpersonal, listening and communication skills;Ability to positively influence others and successfully reconcile differences;A self-starter with a strong results orientation and with high levels of integrity, credibility and dependability;An energetic team player who can effectively collaborate, and who can stand alone when necessary;Ability to work in international settings and with various departments to implement successful approaches to Education;Demonstrated ability to work and deliver under pressure and tight deadlines.Core Values:Commitment to Street Child mission, vision and values, and the ability to convey with enthusiasm Street Child’s role in accompanying and serving forcibly displaced people and in advocating for their right to protection and a life in dignity;High integrity, honesty and confidentiality; ability to deal tactfully and discreetly with situations, people and information;Acceptance of diversity and inclusion as a core value.Willingness to work in flexible, sub-optimal, stressful and unstable environment.

Apply at https://ngcareers.com/job/2018-11/meal-assistant-at-street-child-nigeria-485/


          Project Manager (Integrated EiE and CP Programme) at Street Child Nigeria      Cache   Translate Page      
Street Child is a UK charity working to protect vulnerable children and improve access to education in some of the poorest communities in the world. We work in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nepal and in the last few months Street Child has been involved in the Humanitarian response for Nigeria as well as, being partner of the Education in Emergency Working Group.We are recruiting to fill the position below:Job Title: Project Manager for Integrated EiE and CP ProgrammeLocation: Rann, BornoOperational/Context RoleStreet Child is looking for a dedicated Project Manager for our project funded by ECHO in partnership with UNICEF in Rann town, Kala Balge LGA.Our planned project is an integrated Education and Child Protection intervention that will include creating safe and child friendly learning environments, training education facilitators in delivery of the curriculum and trauma counselling, providing teaching and learning materials, case management for unaccompanied and separated children, children associated with armed groups or armed forces and victim of gender-based violence, strengthening a referral network and a local coordination system.The main responsibility of the Project Manager will be to lead on the implementation, ensuring timely and efficient delivery of activities, with focus on the quality and the impact of the project. The role will involve managing a team located both at field level and at the main office in Maiduguri and to work effectively with one implementing partner.The position proven capacity of project delivery, effective team management and effective partner management at a senior level. The ideal candidate would have a relevant previous experience, good communication skills, and excellent leadership abilities.Analytical thinking and the capacity to research innovative intervention methods, as well as creativity and flexibility are also expected.Key ResponsibilitiesResponsible overall for the implementation of Street Child’s ECHO project, including:Project planning, including development of work plans with budget, together with Street Child team and implementing partnerProject delivery, including monitoring of activities progress again target, and supervising and recording project activities expenditure against budgetPreparation of narrative and financial reports monthly, quarterly and annually as required on project activities to manager, partners and donorIdentifying, troubleshooting and reporting issues with project implementation to the Senior Management Team as necessaryResponsible for effectively management of implementing partner by:Leading the project team to effectively manage and support implementing partner, with a co-working approach;Overseeing the monitoring function of the Street Child team to identify and respond to issues with partner;Working with the Learning and Partnership Manager to identify partner training needs and coordinate with the team and partner to conduct tailored capacity building trainings, coaching and mentorship.Responsible for co-ordination and liaison between Street Child and other government agencies and coordination mechanism at local government level, representing Street Child at a senior levelLeadership Behaviours:Excellent interpersonal, listening and communication skills;Ability to positively influence others and successfully reconcile differences;A self-starter with a strong results orientation and with high levels of integrity, credibility and dependability;An energetic team player who can effectively collaborate, and who can stand alone when necessary;Demonstrated ability to work and deliver under pressure and tight deadlines.Core Values:Commitment to Street Child mission, vision and values, and the ability to convey with enthusiasm Street Child’s role in accompanying and serving forcibly displaced people and in advocating for their right to protection and a life in dignity;High integrity, honesty and confidentiality; ability to deal tactfully and discreetly with situations, people and information;Acceptance of diversity and inclusion as a core value.Willingness to work in flexible, sub-optimal, stressful and unstable environment.

Apply at https://ngcareers.com/job/2018-11/project-manager-integrated-eie-and-cp-programme-at-street-child-nigeria-257/


          Education Programme Assistant at Street Child Nigeria      Cache   Translate Page      
Street Child is a UK charity working to protect vulnerable children and improve access to education in some of the poorest communities in the world. We work in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nepal and in the last few months Street Child has been involved in the Humanitarian response for Nigeria as well as, being partner of the Education in Emergency Working Group.We are recruiting to fill the position below:Job  Title: Education Programme AssistantLocation: Maiduguri BornoOperational Context/RoleStreet Child is looking for a dedicated Education Programme Assistant for our programme in North East Nigeria. Our programme will include emergency education such as building temporary learning centers, training education facilitators in delivery of the curriculum and trauma counselling and providing teaching and learning materials. Street Child is also planning activities relating to unaccompanied and separated children and children as, working to create a referral network and supporting as many children as possible to be reunified with their families and access education.The person will be required to work flexibly, to support the implementation of the activities together with our local partners, reporting directly to the Nigeria Education Programme Manager. The position requires a background in development, with education, child protection and/or livelihoods experience in the Nigerian context a distinct advantage. Good communication skills and the capacity to work with a team and independently will be required. Analytical thinking as well as creativity and flexibility are also expected.This full time position is for 5 months initially, and subject to performance and funding availability, may be extended.Key ResponsibilitiesGeneral:Support the Programme Officers and Manager to deliver timely planned activities;Participate in Needs Assessments for the education programme and the preparation of reports in collaboration with the Programme Manager and the implementing partners;Monitor day-to-day activities in programmes to ensure best practice is adhered to in school & learning centre management, pedagogical monitoring, optimization of the teaching & learning process.Work closely with implementing partners by designing and overseeing the implementation of capacity building programs with parents/stakeholders willingness to travel / be in the field regularlyReporting:Keep the Programme Manager informed on the activities of the project by providing relevant correspondence, reports and meeting minutes as well as making regular updates.Work closely with implementing partners to prepare and submit reports on approved frequency to the Programme Manager.Take minutes of internal or external meetings and share with team according to the organisation needsNetworking:Leadership BehaviourGood interpersonal, listening and communication skills;Ability to positively influence others and successfully reconcile differences;A self-starter with a strong results orientation and with high levels of integrity, credibility and dependability;An energetic team player who can effectively collaborate, and who can stand alone when necessary;Demonstrated ability to work and deliver under pressure and tight deadlines.Core values:Commitment to Street Child mission, vision and values, and the ability to convey with enthusiasm Street Child’s role in accompanying and serving forcibly displaced people and in advocating for their right to protection and a life in dignityHigh integrity, honesty and confidentiality; ability to deal tactfully and discreetly with situations, people and information;Acceptance of diversity and inclusion as a core value.Willingness to work in flexible, sub-optimal, stressful and unstable environment.Willingness to travel among the country in different states

Apply at https://ngcareers.com/job/2018-11/education-programme-assistant-at-street-child-nigeria-706/


          UAE- Sierra Leone war victim relives trauma of being a child soldier      Cache   Translate Page      
(MENAFN - Khaleej Times) Even in 2018, thousands of children are serving as soldiers in deadly conflicts across the world. With some as young as eight years old and many fighting o...
          Rerigging History      Cache   Translate Page      
Students from Notre Dame High School raise the sails on the Amistad.

In 1839, reports of a mysterious ship with tattered sails zig zagging along the Eastern seaboard were spreading among New England towns. Later that year, this ship, a Spanish slave-trading vessel named La Amistad, was intercepted off of the coast of Long Island, New York by the USS Washington, captained by Lieutenant Thomas R. Gedney. Gedney found a revolt aboard: While the ship was traveling from Havana, Cuba to a slave market in Puerto Principe, the 50-some enslaved Africans aboard overthrew their Spanish captors, killing all but two of the crew members and taking control of the ship. During the day, the freed captives directed the two remaining Spaniards to navigate back towards Sierra Leone; but at night, the Spaniards steered towards shore, hoping to get aid from the Americans. Gedney, seeing an opportunity to claim salvage rights on the ship and its valuable cargo, towed the Amistad away from New York, where captured slaves were considered free, to slave-condoning New London, Connecticut. Unwittingly, Gedney towed this ship into history; the events that followed sparked the impetus for what would be the most important Supreme Court decision on slavery up until Dred Scott.

The story of the Amistad spans continents. The legal and moral disputes that were to follow have elevated the Amistad to a sort of mythic status, particularly in the New England area, but the repercussions extended far beyond American shores. After the events, the American Missionary Association began the Mendi Mission in Sierra Leone, an extension of the American Underground Railroad that served as a frontier of abolitionism in West Africa. The case itself was deeply tied to the laws of foreign lands, and would go on to affect how both Spain and the United States regarded and regulated internationally traded slaves. As the testimony from the captives would reveal, the Amistad had been carrying slaves from Sierra Leone, brought illegally into the Spanish South American slave trade. During the case, it was Spanish law that was used in defence of keeping the captives enslaved after the revolt, but American law that would decide their final fate. The captives themselves were from the Mende people, one of the two largest ethnic groups in Sierra Leone. Many did not speak the same language; many had never been on the ocean before. Yet here they were, fighting for their freedom in debates about maritime and civil law, stuck between the legal posturing of two foreign powers.

When Gedney brought them to shore, he quickly cast the Amistad Africans as rebelling slaves, void of any legal protections. Sengbe Pieh, the leader of the slave revolt, voiced his own defense even before the actual trial began, retelling the story of his capture and vouching for the freedom of his fellow captives, as well as giving justification for their actions. To settle the legal dispute, the Africans were moved to prison cells in New Haven, the location of the US District Court for the District of Connecticut. The Spainards and the US Attorney for Connecticut then brought arguments framing the captives as legal slaves; President Martin Van Buren himself was anxious that the case should not upset American-Spanish relations, and put pressue on the courts to rule against the Amistad Africans. Still, the District and the Circuit Court ruled in favor of the freed captives. The US Attorney for Connecticut persisted, finally appealing the case to the Supreme Court.

In 1842, the question was finally settled by the highest court in the land, which ruled 7–1 in favor of the freedom of the Amistad Africans, requiring them to be returned to Africa. The Court ruled that, having been illegally enslaved, the former captives were indeed free and entitled to return to their homelands. By this time, however, only 35 of the original 53 Africans who began the voyage survived. Many had died on the journey to the United States, others after the ship had landed in Connecticut. In 1843, they returned to Africa with a group of American pastors, at last, free. What happened to them after this is unknown. Back in America, conversations that the Amistad had galvanized were fueling a wave of abolitionism across the North. The legal case became evidence that change was possible, and it continued to influence public opinion up until the outbreak of the Civil War.

After the case, the recorded history of the ship itself is brief. The Amistad was auctioned off in October of 1840 to Captain George Hawford, who renamed it the Ion. He sailed it for four years, using it to trade goods down to Bermuda, until he sold it again in 1844. From then on, while the Amistad case continued to live on in the memories of Americans and Sierra Leoneans, the history of the original vessel sinks into obscurity. No record of the ship exists past 1844.

Then, in 1998, a Connecticut non-profit, Amistad America, decided to construct a working replica of the ship. The replica, built using period woodworking techniques and the images of the original Amistad as reference, began sailing out of the New Haven Harbor in 2000. After facing charges of tax fraud in 2015, Amistad America closed down and sold the ship to a new organization, Discovering Amistad. The Amistad is now an educational vessel, traveling around New England ports as a moving classroom, educating students about the court case and the story of the captives aboard. Today, new winds fill the ship’s sails.

Charting A Different Course

Being on the deck of the new Amistad carries this weight of history to those who know it, even though the Amistad story itself has generally been cast rather lightly. It still mostly exists as an emblem of abolitionist success in American collective memory, cemented by the eponymous Steven Spielberg film in 1997. It is a win for good, an abolitionist checkmark. The ship became the symbol for a great alliance between the wrongfully enslaved and the publically righteous. But when on it, it becomes something very different. Both literally and symbolically, the ship has been remade. Today, this new nautical classroom has become a place where students learn a different story and a different memory. Instead, they question this type of historical glazing. There are educational stations where crew members lead exercises about dehumanization and Northern complicity in the slave trade; the whole experience aboard becomes a hands-on history lesson. The ship is an intensely critical memorial, engaging students with an intensely important question: how do we remember the Transatlantic Slave Trade, and how might we remember it better?

“One of the things we try talking about is putting the role of the Amistad into a bigger context. In trying to erase the misconception that the North somehow equals good, and understand that it’s more nuanced and complex than that” Jaclyn Levesque says, the current Assistant Director of Education at the Discovery Amistad organization. She explains how the economies of the South and the North were inextricably linked; much of the food and raw materials that fueled everyday plantation life came from the North. “Even though there were abolitionists in Connecticut, Connecticut also made a lot of money off of slavery.”

Levesque and Discovery Amistad are unusual in this sense. They explore intimately the specific human costs of slavery in a way that few other educational institutions in the state do, putting aside the court cases and the history book dates to talk about the actual experience of the people involved in the Amistad Affair. One of her focuses is retelling the story of Senghe Pieh, who led the revolt on the ship.

“Who was Sengbe Pieh, who were the kids? After he’s kidnapped, we know more about what happened to him than his wife and kids ever did. To them, Dad’s kidnapped and he’s gone. When you tell that to a group of young kids you can see them grappling with it,” Levesque says.

Sengbe’s story of loss and pain, by no means unique among the captives, is difficult to carve in stone or cast in steel. He has become an legendary emblem of bravery and abolitionism, a status carved out of the harsh reality of his life. Known as Joseph Cinqué to his Spaniard captors, Sengbe was a rice farmer from central Sierra Leone. He had a wife and three kids at the time the slave traders captured him and took him to the slave fortress of Lomboko on the coast of Sierra Leone. He would never see his family again. Sengbe is on almost every memorial of the event. Even on the replica Amistad ship there is a small portrait of him, hanging from the wall below deck — he cannot even escape the ship he was brought here on.

Sengbe finds himself on other memorials in the area as well. Visit the sculptural memorial by City Hall in New Haven, and he is there again, albeit in a context very different from the Amistad ship. The sculptor, Ed Hamilton, completed the piece in 1992. It’s a large piece of steel, a rough inverted pyramid standing 12 feet tall with Sengbe at the front and the faces of the other Amistad Africans at the sides. From above, there is another face, looking directly up, seemingly drowning into the sculpture itself. The site is rarely filled with more than one or two people. There are no benches, only a railing where people sometimes lean or eat a quick lunch.

“In New Haven, the name Amistad is everywhere. But that does not mean that people have a full understanding of the history. More support and outreach is desperately needed, especially to connect the local story to Cuba and Sierra Leone. ” Joseph Yannielli, a historian of the Transatlantic Slave Trade and a former Lecturer of History at Yale University, explains.I have taken several Yale classes on field trips to the memorial, and almost none of the students were aware it existed, despite its location directly across the Green from Old Campus.”

Facing Historical Fact

Sengbe’s face is everywhere, but not his story. Not only was the memorial a long time coming, being erected over a 130 years after the event, people simply don’t know enough about the event itself to make meaning of the memory this monument communicates. What is frustrating then, is how close potentially elucidating information is. The Beinecke holds hundreds of documents directly and tangentially related to the events of the Amistad, but Yale still has few publicly accessible resources for those interested in learning about the Amistad.

“The story is especially pertinent for Yale, an institution named after a slave trader and founded on the profits of slavery and racism,” Yannielli says. “There are many things that need to be done to atone for and repair the damage done by Yale. A fuller engagement with the Amistad, and all of its transnational connections, would be a step in the right direction.”

A model of the New Haven Amistad Memorial sits below deck aboard the Amistad ship.

While there is no dearth of historical documents relating to the affair, the most popular narratives about Sengbe lack depth and historical scrutiny. The history of the Amistad needs this kind of monument to find place for its memory, but it also needs better public understanding for the monument to become meaningful. Here, Yale has an opportunity to use its authority and resources to promote new, critical understandings of the Amistad affair, understandings similar in nature to the ones taught by the Discovering Amistad organization. The alternative to actively supporting this approach is to leave this history victim to inaccuracy and amnesia. Levesque recounts how a few years ago, misinformation was spread about Sengbe, with a report claiming that when he returned to Sierra Leone he became a slave trader. Until a group of historians checked the sourcing and proved the claims to be false, the report gained some public traction. The truth can be so easily broken when it stands on such shaky foundation. The literal hundreds of documents the Beinecke has, some of which are occasionally on display at the New Haven Museum, are for the most part buried. The few names that do emerge become tokens that get twisted and misremembered. And while the Levesque and the Discovering Amistad organization have begun to bring some of that historical detail and complexity forward, the effort is challenging, particularly because at a very basic level, what they are doing is confronting commonly held notions about Connecticut’s innocence, and about slavery in America more generally.

Yale’s absence is particularly felt on board the Amistad replica. Yannielli was the first professor to bring a full class of students aboard the Amistad last year, and this was one of the few major outreaches between the organization and the university. The university was closely involved with the original case itself– many of the abolitionists advocating for the captives were educated at Yale, as were many of the supporters of slavery advocating for the return of the captives to the Spanish.

In many ways, the history taught by Discovering Amistad is precisely the kind Yale shies away from. It is much easier to have the Amistad be text on a page, drawings in a vault, even a memorial from a well-over past, than a ship you can travel on. It is much easier to avoid complicity that way as well.

“Connecticut was the South’s friend in the North. You have to know, the big plantation owners had children who would attend Yale, and advocate for their father, and their father’s friends,” Adwoa Bandele-Astante, an educator and researcher with Discovering Amistad, says.

Rigging secured to the deck aboard the Amistad.

Bandele-Astante leads one of the onboard education stations on the slave trade and on African culture and society. She shows, in full color, how deeply tied Connecticut, and Yale, were to the slave trade, but also speaks to who exactly the enslaved people were. While accurately imagining the past is critical to an understanding of slavery today, and while scholars like Yannielli believe Yale can play a larger part in this, it is exploring the human aspect, the kinds of cultures and histories enslaved people were coming from, that deepens and complicates this story.

“For example, in West Africa you have storytellers who are very organized and undergo rigorous training to be linguistic storytellers. And why is that important? When the dust clears after the war, who tells your story? That’s why it’s important to your legacy.”

That is the same legacy of memory that Bandele-Astante carries on today in her teaching and research. The students react well to it, excited and energized by this way of learning that runs against the usual grain of textbook memorization.

“I talk specifically about the Triangular Trade and Africa. I let them know that millionaires were made in Connecticut participating in the Triangular Trade. They made ships, they made sails, they made textiles–having cheap cotton was valuable to them–they grew food,” Bandele-Astante says. “They participated full heartedly in the trade. It grew from this industry into the insurance capital of the world.”

Keeping Life Valuable

This retold story of the Amistad is about fighting that system, at the most basic human level. It’s about rebellion and organizing, in way that threatens a worldview that would rather valorize Sengbe Pieh’s heroism than discuss how his capture permanently separated him from his family. Creating this story, from the original boat to the replica, has brought a new vein of rebellion back into the Amistad story. Perhaps that’s where it’s true importance lies. Not only is it about teaching a past, but also imagining the future.

The Amistad memorials around New Haven and Connecticut are for the most part commemorative. They are conservative holders of memory, presenting a limited view of the past in a charged setting. The replica boat is much more diffuse, much more flexible in its interpretation of its memory. It’s history brought alive and brought forward as something to be reconciled with.

“It’s kind of scary. You see it in the movies and you hear about it and read about it in your textbooks, it’s another fact to memorize. When you actually come out on it, it’s the same type of feeling in a way, there were actually people on a ship like this, there were actually people being carried over miles of open ocean, just like this, just how we are right now,” Jon Katz, a senior at Notre Dame High School in West Haven says. “It really happened.”

Even though the ship is not an exact replica, and doesn’t pretend to be, many students shared this sentiment. Somehow, they were closer to history on this ship. The memory of slavery is so abstracted that it when it finally finds an actual space to be grounded in, it latches on. The breadth of the material taught on the ship activates the other memorials in new ways, and draws students back to central questions about memories of slavery.

“This was one story of one ship, [but considering] the size of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, it was this times thousand and thousands of other ships. When I feel like you can come out here and experience it, that has a deeper impact,” Katz says. “I definitely think that the monument brings that history to life, makes it a physical manifestation instead of just words. Actual monuments can change your perspective.”

That change of perspective is what Levesque sees as the true mission of the Discovering Amistad organization. With an imperfect replica and a crew of five or so, it’s not easy to weave a story like the Amistad for the consumption of teenagers, but when it is done right the results are tangible. That sound of a mental click, from seeing this ship as an educational tool to a historical bridge, can be heard even above the wind howling around the ship. Seeing the students interact with the ship, hearing them talk to each other, reveals a degree of respect for the space. Not all, of course, share the sentiment, but change still feels possible.

“They want to talk about race, even the young kids, they don’t shy away from it, they want to get into it, and that’s been an eye opener,” Jason Hine, second mate of the Amistad and a classroom educator for Discovering Amistad says. “3rd and 4th graders– they get really into the story, their imaginations bring them into it and then they start speaking as if it was the original. They’ll say, ‘Oh where was Cinque when…’ and I’ll say ‘Remember, this is a recreation.’ They’ll get into the story and they think of this as if it was the original.”

For the Amistad crew, bridging the past and the present becomes more than an exercise in producing new forms of memory; it presents a radical prescription for understanding contemporary injustices. It is, in a way, a call to action.

“I think today, you have the powers that be that don’t seem to value humanity, just like the times in slavery.” Bandele-Astante says. “Keeping life valuable, keeping the young people humane. There are challenges to that. You have to share your perspective. I tell the youth, violence without cause is brutality. People who fight for their freedom aren’t brutes. It’s people who brutalize people for no cause: that’s different.”


Rerigging History was originally published in The Yale Herald on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


          Opinion: AfDB promised to power Africa, time to deliver - Devex      Cache   Translate Page      

Devex

Opinion: AfDB promised to power Africa, time to deliver
Devex
The African Development Bank promised in 2015 to “light up and power Africa” as part of its New Deal on Energy for Africa. Now, three years on, it's clear that the bank must do more — and quickly — to support the fastest and most affordable means of ...
Africa's bumpy road to sustainable energySierra Leone Telegraph

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          Latest Vacancies at Street Child      Cache   Translate Page      
Street Child is a UK charity working to protect vulnerable children and improve access to education in some of the poorest communities in the world. We work in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nepal and in the last few months Street Child has been involved in the Humanitarian response for Nigeria as well as, being partner of the Education in Emergency Working Group.
          Re: Best country to pick at mens bathing naked (river/beach)      Cache   Translate Page      
You don´t need to google anything, just go there. A good spot is the Rokel river in Magburaka, a town in northern Sierra Leone or the Wanje river in Pujehun, in the south of the same country. Any river or even small brook in this country has people bathing in it and you can enjoy to see these amazing guys just naked there. It is really a plus if you just join them....
          Re: Sex tourism in Gambia...      Cache   Translate Page      
From www gvnet.com I transfer the fllowing passage.

Human Trafficking and Modern-day Slavery

The Gambia is a source, transit, and destination country for children and women trafficked for the purposes of forced labor and commercial sexual exploitation. Within The Gambia, women and girls, and to a lesser extent boys, are trafficked for sexual exploitation, in particular to meet the demand for European sex tourism, and for domestic servitude. Boys are trafficked within the country for forced begging by religious teachers and for street vending. Transnationally, women, girls and boys from neighboring countries are trafficked to The Gambia for the same purposes listed above. Primary source countries are Senegal, Mali, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ghana, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea and Benin. Trafficking of Gambian boys to Senegal for forced begging and Senegalese boys to The Gambia for the same purpose is particularly prevalent. Gambian women and girls are trafficked to Senegal for domestic servitude, and possibly for sexual exploitation. Gambian women and children may be trafficked to Europe through trafficking schemes disguised as migrant smuggling. Reports in the last two years of Gambian, Senegalese, and nationals of other neighboring countries being transported from The Gambia to Spain by boat appear to be predominantly cases of smuggling rather than trafficking. - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2008 [


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