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          Household Economy Analysis (HEA) and Baseline Assessment for Building Resilience (INT5021)      Cache   Translate Page      
Region: MENA, Division: International, Job Type: Consultancy
The Role

Oxfam aims to work with a team of professional and reputable consultancy institute/individuals with strong expertise in conducting a household level economy analysis. The ultimate objective of the assessment is to inform existing programs refinement and future designing of the most relevant economic options available to the conflict-affected population. The specific objectives of the study include,

 

About the MENA region

The MENA (the Middle East and North Africa) region implements and manages programmes in Yemen, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Jordan.

Programmes within the MENA region reflect Oxfam’s approach to work across the globe. We support self-reliance, not dependency, and to complement our work on the ground we strive to secure lasting change through our...

          Senior Gender Justice project officer (INT5020)      Cache   Translate Page      
Region: MENA, Division: International, Job Type: Fixed Term
The Role

The Senior Gender Justice project officer role is to achieve Oxfam vision for Gender Justice in Jordan: women and girls, in all their diversity, are able to realize their life choices in all spheres and enjoy their rights freely and without fear in peaceful and equal societies

 

About the MENA region

The MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region implements and manages programmes in Yemen, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Jordan.

 

Programmes within the MENA region reflects Oxfam’s approach to work across the globe. We support self-reliance, not dependency, and to complement our work on the ground we strive to secure lasting change through our campaigning.

 

We also put women...

          Why the Holy Land is the 'fifth gospel' of Christianity      Cache   Translate Page      

Jerusalem, Nov 7, 2018 / 03:07 am (CNA).- Pilgrimage to the Holy Land is a powerful journey that can ignite Christian faith through seeing the places Jesus walked, worked miracles, died and rose from the dead.

The Franciscans who have served in the region say people should go.

“When you come here, you are very moved by the experience. It puts the gospel in perspective,” Father Athanasius Macora, O.F.M., told CNA from Jerusalem. “It’s a very powerful tool for evangelizing or re-evangelizing Catholics.”

Macora, an American, is a friar of the Franciscan Custody of the Holy Land, which oversees the holy sites, helps support the Christian presence in the Holy Land, and welcomes Christian pilgrims from around the world.

Another Holy Land Franciscan, the Ghana-born Father Benjamin Owusu, O.F.M., reflected that the Christian experience of Jesus Christ preceded the written scriptures.

“Jesus said we should go and proclaim the gospel. And the gospel was proclaimed. People came to believe. But not in the written part of revelation… if the Word became flesh, it became flesh in a place. Where is that place? That is the Holy Land,” Owusu told CNA. “The Holy Land also testifies to the Word made Flesh, and that makes it more real to us.”

“By going to the Holy Land, the Holy Land becomes real in the life of Christians because of what it stands for,” he continued. “It is, as Pope Paul VI put it, the ‘fifth gospel’ which is not written on ink, but written on stones.”

Owusu works in the pilgrimage office of the Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America, the Franciscan Custody’s outpost in Washington, D.C. The monastery itself hosts replicas of holy sites and holds various events to help link visitors to the land where Jesus Christ walked.

The Holy Land includes Israel, the Palestinian territories, and parts of Lebanon, Jordan and Syria.

The diversity of Christian sites there range from the churches and other places marking events like the Annunciation in Nazareth, the Nativity in Bethlehem, Jesus’ ministry along the Sea of Galilee, and of course Jerusalem, where the site of Jesus’ death, burial and resurrection is now marked by the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

Added to these places are the living legacy of the Jewish people. The Wailing Wall, located at the base of the site of the Temple of King David, gathers thousands of Jews who pray and celebrate at the start of every Sabbath.

Muslims too consider Jerusalem a holy site, and the heights Temple Mount, once the site of the Temple, now hosts both the al-Aqsa Mosque and the golden, gleaming Dome of the Rock shrine.

Father Macora said that in his time in the Holy Land, he has witnessed “quite a number of stories” of spiritual enrichment or transformation among Christian pilgrims. People decide to go to confession for the first time in decades because of a visit to the Holy Sepulchre.

“Once I was asked by a friend to guide a woman at the Holy Sepulchre. I don’t think she was practicing her faith, but after she came out of the tomb she was weeping. So she was hit by the experience,” he continued.

Owusu said the Holy Land has played a large role in the Christian imagination “since time immemorial.”

“Believers have always wanted to go back to their roots, to see the places where our salvation history took place. For example, St. Francis of Assisi was so eager to go and see where Jesus was born, where he was crucified, and where he rose again.”

A Holy Land pilgrimage “really helps Christians in their belief, it ignites their faith and helps us to understand the Scripture in a different way.”

Macora has seen pilgrims weeping at the altar in the quiet Basilica of Agony, near the Garden of Gethsemane, the site where Jesus prayed before Judas handed him over to be arrested.

The Franciscan priest, an American who grew up in a military family, has served in the Holy Land for more than 20 years. Among his current roles is guardian of the Flagellation Monastery in Jerusalem.

Meeting local people is an important part of the experience, he commented, as they are “definitely part of the enduring fascination of the Holy Land.” Some people, such as the region’s shepherds, maintain cultural practices similar to those of biblical times. The guides who accompany visitors and pilgrims are very important, serving as “an ambassador of his or her people.”

He also cautioned that the enduring problems and recent history of the Holy Land, including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, are something that first-time pilgrims can misunderstand.

“I think that they have to understand how complex the Holy Land is,” said Macora. “I think that they need to hear both sides of the story. There is a conflict going on and there are all kinds of sharp rivalries, even between Christians themselves.”

Israel is about 75 percent Jewish. Its Palestinian population, largely resident in the West Bank and the Gaza strip, is about 18 percent Muslim and two percent Christian, with both Christians and Muslims tending to identify as Palestinian Arab. The Christian population has largely declined due to emigration. Only about 16,000 of the 870,000 residents of Jerusalem are Christian, a significant drop in recent decades, CNEWA reports.

Owusu said there is more to the region than many visitors expect. While people hear about the Holy Land through news media, which often tell stories of violence and conflict, he stressed the importance of “those stories we don’t hear: the day-to-day experiences that go on there among these people, where Christians and Muslims live together in the same place, where Jews and Muslims live together in a particular place.”

“Those things never come on the news,” he said. “These are the things that really make the place real. Not occasional crisis, but the day-to-day life that really goes on. That is what people would really like to know.”

“It is a place where life continues,” he said. “People should not be limited to the bad news, but they should look beyond that and be hopeful.”

However, Macora said it is difficult to make deep contact with local people.

“It takes time to understand certain things and this is not easily achieved,” he said. “For someone coming to the Holy Land for the first time, there is a lot of information, almost too much, to process on the first pilgrimage.”

For Owusu, the Holy Land should never be “a museum where you go and only see places.”

“The people are formed in Mother Church, especially the Christians in the Holy Land,” he said. “The people reflect the reality and the history of what we know about the place, especially in connecting it to the Scriptures.”

While Americans can be skeptical of visiting the region, Owusu said locals receive Americans “with two arms open, as they would receive the Polish or the Italians.” Travel to the Holy Land is positive for both the pilgrim and the host.

“It brings them together,” said the priest. “Pilgrimage in this land is also a sign of hope. The people mostly depend on pilgrimages and they also see that, irrespective of whatever situation the American comes from, there is another brother on the other side of the world that may bring them hope.”

“What you bring back from the holy land is faith…. You take your faith there and you bring it back,” Owusu said.

Pilgrim groups hit a record high in January 2018, with 770 groups bringing 26,000 people, the Custody of the Holy Land-sponsored Christian Information Center said in February. In January 2017 only 529 groups visited and a year prior only 390 did.

Israeli government statistics indicate over half of 2017 tourists were Christian and one-quarter were coming on pilgrimage, with over 40 percent having previously visited Israel. The number of Chinese, Russian and Eastern European pilgrims were on the rise, the Jerusalem Post reported in February.

Israeli tourism minister Yariv Levin credited the increase in tourism to his office’s changes, including an improved visa process.

While travel costs and can be a barrier for a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, Owusu said it is possible with some financial preparation.

“It’s a life experience,” he said. Those with a desire to go could afford it by saving about a thousand dollars a year for several years, he estimated.

Those who want to go on a pilgrimage should contact the Franciscans who work there, he suggested.

“We’ve been doing this since time immemorial,” said Owusu.

The Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America has information on pilgrimages at the website holylandpilgrimages.org.

 


          Why the Holy Land is the 'fifth gospel' of Christianity      Cache   Translate Page      

Jerusalem, Nov 7, 2018 / 03:07 am (CNA).- Pilgrimage to the Holy Land is a powerful journey that can ignite Christian faith through seeing the places Jesus walked, worked miracles, died and rose from the dead.

The Franciscans who have served in the region say people should go.

“When you come here, you are very moved by the experience. It puts the gospel in perspective,” Father Athanasius Macora, O.F.M., told CNA from Jerusalem. “It’s a very powerful tool for evangelizing or re-evangelizing Catholics.”

Macora, an American, is a friar of the Franciscan Custody of the Holy Land, which oversees the holy sites, helps support the Christian presence in the Holy Land, and welcomes Christian pilgrims from around the world.

Another Holy Land Franciscan, the Ghana-born Father Benjamin Owusu, O.F.M., reflected that the Christian experience of Jesus Christ preceded the written scriptures.

“Jesus said we should go and proclaim the gospel. And the gospel was proclaimed. People came to believe. But not in the written part of revelation… if the Word became flesh, it became flesh in a place. Where is that place? That is the Holy Land,” Owusu told CNA. “The Holy Land also testifies to the Word made Flesh, and that makes it more real to us.”

“By going to the Holy Land, the Holy Land becomes real in the life of Christians because of what it stands for,” he continued. “It is, as Pope Paul VI put it, the ‘fifth gospel’ which is not written on ink, but written on stones.”

Owusu works in the pilgrimage office of the Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America, the Franciscan Custody’s outpost in Washington, D.C. The monastery itself hosts replicas of holy sites and holds various events to help link visitors to the land where Jesus Christ walked.

The Holy Land includes Israel, the Palestinian territories, and parts of Lebanon, Jordan and Syria.

The diversity of Christian sites there range from the churches and other places marking events like the Annunciation in Nazareth, the Nativity in Bethlehem, Jesus’ ministry along the Sea of Galilee, and of course Jerusalem, where the site of Jesus’ death, burial and resurrection is now marked by the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

Added to these places are the living legacy of the Jewish people. The Wailing Wall, located at the base of the site of the Temple of King David, gathers thousands of Jews who pray and celebrate at the start of every Sabbath.

Muslims too consider Jerusalem a holy site, and the heights Temple Mount, once the site of the Temple, now hosts both the al-Aqsa Mosque and the golden, gleaming Dome of the Rock shrine.

Father Macora said that in his time in the Holy Land, he has witnessed “quite a number of stories” of spiritual enrichment or transformation among Christian pilgrims. People decide to go to confession for the first time in decades because of a visit to the Holy Sepulchre.

“Once I was asked by a friend to guide a woman at the Holy Sepulchre. I don’t think she was practicing her faith, but after she came out of the tomb she was weeping. So she was hit by the experience,” he continued.

Owusu said the Holy Land has played a large role in the Christian imagination “since time immemorial.”

“Believers have always wanted to go back to their roots, to see the places where our salvation history took place. For example, St. Francis of Assisi was so eager to go and see where Jesus was born, where he was crucified, and where he rose again.”

A Holy Land pilgrimage “really helps Christians in their belief, it ignites their faith and helps us to understand the Scripture in a different way.”

Macora has seen pilgrims weeping at the altar in the quiet Basilica of Agony, near the Garden of Gethsemane, the site where Jesus prayed before Judas handed him over to be arrested.

The Franciscan priest, an American who grew up in a military family, has served in the Holy Land for more than 20 years. Among his current roles is guardian of the Flagellation Monastery in Jerusalem.

Meeting local people is an important part of the experience, he commented, as they are “definitely part of the enduring fascination of the Holy Land.” Some people, such as the region’s shepherds, maintain cultural practices similar to those of biblical times. The guides who accompany visitors and pilgrims are very important, serving as “an ambassador of his or her people.”

He also cautioned that the enduring problems and recent history of the Holy Land, including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, are something that first-time pilgrims can misunderstand.

“I think that they have to understand how complex the Holy Land is,” said Macora. “I think that they need to hear both sides of the story. There is a conflict going on and there are all kinds of sharp rivalries, even between Christians themselves.”

Israel is about 75 percent Jewish. Its Palestinian population, largely resident in the West Bank and the Gaza strip, is about 18 percent Muslim and two percent Christian, with both Christians and Muslims tending to identify as Palestinian Arab. The Christian population has largely declined due to emigration. Only about 16,000 of the 870,000 residents of Jerusalem are Christian, a significant drop in recent decades, CNEWA reports.

Owusu said there is more to the region than many visitors expect. While people hear about the Holy Land through news media, which often tell stories of violence and conflict, he stressed the importance of “those stories we don’t hear: the day-to-day experiences that go on there among these people, where Christians and Muslims live together in the same place, where Jews and Muslims live together in a particular place.”

“Those things never come on the news,” he said. “These are the things that really make the place real. Not occasional crisis, but the day-to-day life that really goes on. That is what people would really like to know.”

“It is a place where life continues,” he said. “People should not be limited to the bad news, but they should look beyond that and be hopeful.”

However, Macora said it is difficult to make deep contact with local people.

“It takes time to understand certain things and this is not easily achieved,” he said. “For someone coming to the Holy Land for the first time, there is a lot of information, almost too much, to process on the first pilgrimage.”

For Owusu, the Holy Land should never be “a museum where you go and only see places.”

“The people are formed in Mother Church, especially the Christians in the Holy Land,” he said. “The people reflect the reality and the history of what we know about the place, especially in connecting it to the Scriptures.”

While Americans can be skeptical of visiting the region, Owusu said locals receive Americans “with two arms open, as they would receive the Polish or the Italians.” Travel to the Holy Land is positive for both the pilgrim and the host.

“It brings them together,” said the priest. “Pilgrimage in this land is also a sign of hope. The people mostly depend on pilgrimages and they also see that, irrespective of whatever situation the American comes from, there is another brother on the other side of the world that may bring them hope.”

“What you bring back from the holy land is faith…. You take your faith there and you bring it back,” Owusu said.

Pilgrim groups hit a record high in January 2018, with 770 groups bringing 26,000 people, the Custody of the Holy Land-sponsored Christian Information Center said in February. In January 2017 only 529 groups visited and a year prior only 390 did.

Israeli government statistics indicate over half of 2017 tourists were Christian and one-quarter were coming on pilgrimage, with over 40 percent having previously visited Israel. The number of Chinese, Russian and Eastern European pilgrims were on the rise, the Jerusalem Post reported in February.

Israeli tourism minister Yariv Levin credited the increase in tourism to his office’s changes, including an improved visa process.

While travel costs and can be a barrier for a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, Owusu said it is possible with some financial preparation.

“It’s a life experience,” he said. Those with a desire to go could afford it by saving about a thousand dollars a year for several years, he estimated.

Those who want to go on a pilgrimage should contact the Franciscans who work there, he suggested.

“We’ve been doing this since time immemorial,” said Owusu.

The Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America has information on pilgrimages at the website holylandpilgrimages.org.

 


          Protection Officer (INT5026)      Cache   Translate Page      
Region: MENA, Division: International, Job Type: Fixed Term
DIVISION / DEPARTMENT / LOCATION: Aden/ Yemen

JOB FAMILY: Protection Program   

SALARY:

LEVEL: D2

Duration: 11 months

REPORTING LINES: Post holder reports to: Programme ManagerMatrix Manager: Protection Coordinator

BUDGET RESPONSIBILITY: NA

About the MENA region

 

The MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region implements and manages programmes in Yemen, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Jordan.

 

Programmes within the MENA region reflect Oxfam’s approach to work across the globe. We support self-reliance, not dependency, and to complement our work on the ground we strive to secure lasting change through our campaigning.

 

We also put women at the heart of all we do. The majority of people living in poverty are women and girls, and so this focus...

          livelihood Protection Officer (INT5025)      Cache   Translate Page      
Region: MENA, Division: International, Job Type: Fixed Term
livelihood Protection Officer

DIVISION / DEPARTMENT / LOCATION: Aden/ Yemen

JOB FAMILY: Protection Program   

SALARY:

LEVEL: D2

Duration: 11 months

REPORTING LINES: Post holder reports to: Programme ManagerMatrix Manager: Protection Coordinator

BUDGET RESPONSIBILITY: NA

 

About the MENA region

 

The MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region implements and manages programmes in Yemen, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Jordan.

 

Programmes within the MENA region reflect Oxfam’s approach to work across the globe. We support self-reliance, not dependency, and to complement our work on the ground we strive to secure lasting change through our campaigning.

 

We also put women at the heart of all we do. The majority of people living in poverty are...

          #jerusalem - sp_scenery      Cache   Translate Page      
Jericho - is a city in the Palestinian Territories and is located near the Jordan River in the West Bank. It is the administrative seat of the Jericho Governorate, and is governed by the Fatah faction of the Palestinian National Authority. (Israel visit April-May 2018 🇮🇱✈️) 🌸🌸🌸 © SP Scenery 🌸🌸🌸 #beautifulworld #travelling #traveltheworld #potd #historic #photography #deadsea #jordan #westbank #ig_israel #palestine #israel #explorer #internationalwork #international #telaviv #jericho #jerusalem #arab #arabic #islam #judaism #middleeast
          Kristallnacht: fears grow in France over anti-semetic violence      Cache   Translate Page      
France has the largest community in Europe - around 550,000 people. Increasingly, however, many say they no longer feel safe in their country. The Pinto family chose to move away from Seine-Saint-Denis, a Paris suburb. Last year, three men locked them up for several hours in their home. They were "targeted" because of their religion. "They told us, you are , so you have money,'' says Roger Pinto. "They tied up my son, and they kicked my wife in the ribs. I was knocked out,'' he says. While the suspects are in jail, the trauma remains. Pinto adds, "They tied up the three of us in our room, they sat us on the bed and told us not to move. "If you move, we'll kill you", they said. When they saw that they did not impress us, they took out a very big screwdriver. And that's where it got serious, because they put the screwdriver like that (under his throat)." Both synagogues and schools are heavily protected because of fears of terrorism. When it was founded nearly 40 years ago, one school in Paris' XIIe district vowed to remain open to society. But the school's head teacher Henri Cohen Solal says the situation has steadily deteriorated. "We had a period when we had eight armed soldiers living with us (the soldiers slept in the school for a year). For the children it's always a question of, why I, as a child, need to have soldiers in my school ?" While the soldiers have left, they have been replaced by a guard, the police, and a group of parents. "Yes, the families feel sufficiently safe. But this security comes at the cost of us retreating from the outside world," Cohen Solal says. The number of anti semitic incidents in France exploded at the turn of this century. The increase is often attributed to the political situation in the Middle East. "We had fallen below 50 (anti semitic incidents per year) during the mid-1990s, but there was a spectacular rise in such incidents by 2000 after the second intifada. At that point we saw more than 900 anti semitic acts. After that, we saw a direct correlation between the number of incidents and the major interventions by the Israeli army in the Palestinian territories,'' says Nonna Mayer, Head of Research from France's National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). Very often, we not precisely know the profile of these perpetrators, but we know that they are rather young men, sometimes they're children of immigrants - whereas before it was mostly the extreme right which carried out these type of attacks - because of resentment against a community they see as privileged," Mayer adds. It is estimated some 3000 leave France each year, many out of fear. Most go to Israel.
          Frenchman accused of Gaza gun-running was 'tricked':...      Cache   Translate Page      
A Frenchman formerly employed by his country's Jerusalem consulate and accused by Israel of smuggling guns between the Palestinian territories will argue he...
          11/7/18      Cache   Translate Page      
Supreme Court okays discrimination against Jews on Temple Mount Supreme Court rejects petition against use of metal detectors against Jewish visitors to Temple Mount, while Muslims ascend without checks.

With Mideast Peace Plan, Kushner Prepares His Debut Trump's son-in-law will be the public face of his White House peace effort, breaking a two-year habit of working behind the scenes.

Netanyahu Says When Israel Projects Strength, No One Cares About So-Called 'Occupation' When Israel projects weakness, it invites the international community to make dangerous demands regarding the so-called "occupation" of Palestinian territories.

There Is No Political Solution for Gaza The claim that an agreement among the US administration, the Palestinian Authority, and the Egyptians to allow the PA to turn the financial screws on Hamas would culminate in the PA's reassertion of control over the Gaza Strip could not be further from reality.

October 2018, Record Month for Israeli Tourism October proved to be the best month for Israeli tourism, thanks to almost 500,000 tourists injecting $676.3 million into the economy, according to the country's Tourism Ministry.

ANALYSIS: Israeli TV Reveals the Truth About Hamas in Gaza It doesn't happen a lot that Israelis have the opportunity to see with their own eyes what Hamas is doing in Gaza, especially after the start of the 'Great March of Return' which started at the end of March and continues until this day.

Palestinian Threats to Arab Normalization with Israel "There's no place for the [Israeli] enemy on the map." - Ismail Haniyeh, Hamas leader, October 29, 2018.

Weber v Stubb: Will one of these men lead the EU? Europe's centre-right parties are gathering in Helsinki to select their candidate in the race to succeed Jean-Claude Juncker as president of the European Commission in 2019.

Europe was sick of the Jews and planned to get rid of them: PA explains the Balfour Declaration and European support for Zionism It's that time of the year again... when Palestinian Authority officials lash out at former British Foreign Minister Arthur Balfour and curse him and Britain on the anniversary of Balfour's declaration from 1917 that Britain favored "the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people."

World War 3: Donald Trump security advisor warns Iran will be 'squeezed until pips squeak' WORLD WAR 3 fears were sparked on Monday when Iran launched countrywide military drills following the implementation of President's Donald Trump's "toughest ever" sanctions on oil exports, shipping and banks in Iran.

          Iraq: Household Economy Analysis (HEA) and Baseline Assessment for Building Resilience (INT5021)      Cache   Translate Page      
Organization: Oxfam
Country: Iraq
Closing date: 20 Nov 2018

The Role

Oxfam aims to work with a team of professional and reputable consultancy institute/individuals with strong expertise in conducting a household level economy analysis. The ultimate objective of the assessment is to inform existing programs refinement and future designing of the most relevant economic options available to the conflict-affected population. The specific objectives of the study include,

About the MENA region

The MENA (the Middle East and North Africa) region implements and manages programmes in Yemen, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Jordan.

Programmes within the MENA region reflect Oxfam’s approach to work across the globe. We support self-reliance, not dependency, and to complement our work on the ground we strive to secure lasting change through our campaigning.

We also put women at the heart of all we do. The majority of people living in poverty are women and girls, and so this focus helps us to achieve our mission to overcome poverty and suffering.

Useful Information

Useful Information

Contract Length: 2 Months

Benefits: Oxfam offers staff a comprehensive benefits package including annual leave entitlements, sick pay provision, medical cover plus opportunities for learning and development.

It is Oxfam’s policy to hire at the minimum to the middle of the band, depending upon the skills and experiences of the strongest candidate.

This role is open to both national and non-nationals. Successful candidates who will be required to relocate internationally to take up the role will be provided with a competitive international relocation package.

Oxfam is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children, young people and adults and expects all staff and volunteers to share this commitment. We will do everything possible to ensure that only those that are suitable to work within our values are recruited to work for us. This post is subject to a range of vetting checks.


How to apply:

OXFAM is committed to diversity and inclusion within its workforce and encourages qualified female and male candidates from all national, religious and ethnic backgrounds, including persons living with disabilities, to apply to become a part of our organisation.

If you are interested in applying for the role, please follow the link below to download the job profile, and complete and submit your application.

https://jobs.oxfam.org.uk/vacancy/household-economy-analysis-hea-and-baseline-assessment-for-building-resilience-int5021/9695/description/

Only short-listed candidates will be contacted.


          Khalida Jarrar - The Palestinian attorney that Israel fears      Cache   Translate Page      
When Israeli troops stormed the house of Palestinian parliamentarian and lawyer, Khalida Jarrar, on April 2, 2015, she was engrossed in her research. For months, Jarrar had been leading a Palestinian effort to take Israel to the International Criminal Court (ICC). Her research on that very evening was directly related to the kind of behavior that allows a group of soldiers to handcuff a respected Palestinian intellectual, throwing her in jail with no trial and with no accountability for their action. Jarrar was released after spending over one year in jail in June 2016, only to be arrested once more, on July 2, 2017. She remains in an Israeli prison. On October 28 of this year, her 'administrative detention' was renewed for the fourth time. There are thousands of Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails, most of them held outside the militarily Occupied Palestinian Territories, in violation of the Fourth Geneva Convention.
           Frenchman accused of Gaza gun-running was 'tricked':...       Cache   Translate Page      
A Frenchman formerly employed by his country's Jerusalem consulate and accused by Israel of smuggling guns between the Palestinian territories will argue he...


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