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          #photo - b.renger      Cache   Translate Page      
Our Moon 🌙 #moon #lune #nightsky #cielnocturne #telescope #crateres #space #astrophotography #canon #eos #picoftheday #photooftheday #photographer #nightphotography #pic #picture #photo #photography #photographie #photographe #pictures #pictureoftheday
          Hubble Space Telescope Malfunction Won't Last Long, NASA Says      Cache   Translate Page      
Worry rippled through the astronomical community this weekend as NASA announced that the Hubble Space Telescope was in safe mode — but NASA confirmed in a statement released yesterday (Oct. 8) that the agency expected the instrument to be back at work soo
          Hubble Hibernates After Minor Breakdown      Cache   Translate Page      

A failure of a gyroscope used to point and stabilize the Hubble telescope caused the observatory to safely shut down while engineers determine a fix.

The post Hubble Hibernates After Minor Breakdown appeared first on Sky & Telescope.


          Video: The Glow of Spiraling Black Holes      Cache   Translate Page      

New calculations reveal what two supermassive black holes about to merge would look like in ultraviolet and X-rays.

The post Video: The Glow of Spiraling Black Holes appeared first on Sky & Telescope.


          NGC891 Galaxy      Cache   Translate Page      

The post NGC891 Galaxy appeared first on Sky & Telescope.


          RE: De-ale lui Radu - intrebari de incepator      Cache   Translate Page      
09 Oct 2018 21:04 (GMT 3)
Multe filtre sunt asimetrice (fata-spate), le pui in asa fel incat sa-ti genereze reflexii minime, sau cat mai dispersate, sau vezi tu, cam asta e standardu'. Wink
Citeste si aici: https://www.baader-planetarium.com/en/bl
          Jaw-Dropping Footage Of Nebulae, Giant Space Clouds Of Dust And Gas      Cache   Translate Page      
Jaw-Dropping Footage Of Nebulae, Giant Space Clouds Of Dust And Gas

A nebula is a gigantic space cloud of dust and gas. Several nebulae (more than one nebula) come from the gas and dust thrown out by the explosion of a star that is dying, like a supernova. Other nebulae are giant celestial dust clouds where new stars are starting to form. For that reason, some nebulae are named “star nurseries.”


Nebulae are made of dust and gas—mostly hydrogen and helium. The dust and gas in a nebula are very spread out, though gravity can slowly begin to pull together clumps of dust and gases. As those clumps get bigger and bigger, their gravity tends to get stronger and stronger.


The clump of dust and gases gets so big that eventually, it collapses from its gravity. This collapse makes the material at the center of the cloud heat up-and this hot core becomes the beginning of a star.


Jaw-Dropping Footage Of Nebulae, Giant Space Clouds Of Dust And Gas

These towers of cosmic dust and gas make up part of the Eagle Nebula. These so-called Pillars of Creation are part of an active star-forming region within the nebula. Credits: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)


Nebulae exist between the stars in the space—also known as interstellar space. The closest known nebula to Earth is called the Helix Nebula. It's the remnant of a dying star—possibly one like the Sun. It's about 700 light years away from Earth. This means that even if we could travel at the speed of light, it would still take us 700 years to get there!


Jaw-Dropping Footage Of Nebulae, Giant Space Clouds Of Dust And Gas

This image might look like a creepy eyeball, but it’s actually a nebula! NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope captured this image of the Helix Nebula, which is located in the constellation Aquarius-about 700 light-years away from Earth. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona


Jaw-Dropping Footage Of Nebulae, Giant Space Clouds Of Dust And Gas

Astronomers use very powerful telescopes to take pictures of faraway nebulae. Space telescopes such as NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and Hubble Space Telescope have captured many images of faraway nebulae.


The video was posted by SpacePlace.Nasa.Gov



          The Sky This Week - Thursday October 11 to Thursday October 18      Cache   Translate Page      
The First quarter Moon is Wednesday, October 17.  All 5 bright unaided eye planets can now be seen in the evening sky. Venus is low in the early evening sky just below Jupiter. Venus and the crescent Moon are close on the 11th with Mercury below. Jupiter and the crescent Moon are closest on the 12th. Mercury and Venus are at their closest on the 16th. Saturn and Mars are visible in the evening skies with Saturn and the Moon closest on the 15th.

The First quarter Moon is Wednesday, October 17. The Moon is at apogee, when it is furthest from the Earth, on the 18th.

Evening  twilight sky on Tuesday October 16 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 20:27 ACDST (60 minutes after sunset). Mercury and Venus are at their closest with  Jupiter above. You will need a level, unobstructed western horizon to see Mercury at its best.


The insets shows  simulated telescopic views of Venus and Jupiter as seen with a 5mm telescopic eyepiece on Tuesday October 16. Venus is a clear crescent in small telescopes. Europa is passing in front of Jupiter

 Similar views will be seen throughout Australia at the equivalent local time (30 minutes after sunset, click to embiggen).
 

Evening twilight sky on Thursday October 11 looking west as seen from Adelaide at 20:22 ACDST (60 minutes after sunset). Venus is above the horizon, not far from the crescent Moon and below Jupiter.


The insets shows  simulated telescopic views of Venus, Mercury  and Jupiter as seen with a 5mm telescopic eyepiece on Thursday October 11. Venus is a clear crescent in small telescopes.

 Similar views will be seen throughout Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes after sunset, click to embiggen).

Brilliant Venus is visible in the evening until full dark. Venus is visible to the unaided eye from before sunset, easy to see shortly after sunset and sets around 90 minutes after sunset. This week Venus continues to move away from Jupiter and rapidly to sinks towards the horizon and Mercury.


Whole sky view of the evening sky on Friday October 12 as seen from Adelaide at 20:27 ACDST (60 minutes after sunset).  Five bright planets are visible in the early evening sky. The crescent Moon is near Jupiter.

Similar views will be seen throughout Australia at the equivalent local time (just after 60 minutes after sunset, click to embiggen).



Evening sky on Monday October 15 as seen from Adelaide at 20:58 ACDST (90 minutes after sunset). Saturn and Mars are clearly visible. The insets are simulated telescopic views of Saturn and Mars as seen with a 5mm telescopic eyepiece.

Similar views will be seen throughout Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset, click to embiggen).

 Venus  is  readily visible above the horizon in the early evening.  It is bright enough to be visible from just on sunset and sets 90 minutes after sunset at full dark.  During the week Venus continues to head away from Jupiter rapidly moving towards Mercury and the horizon. Venus is close to the crescent Moon on the 11th and at its closest to Mercury on the 16th.
 
Mercury climbs higher in the evening skies as it heads towards Venus. The pair are closest on the 16th.

Jupiter  is in the early evening sky above the western horizon just above Venus. It was at Opposition on the May 9th, and is still visible during the evening. It is  a good telescopic object for only a short period in the early evening and is setting around 45 minutes after astronomical twilight. Jupiter is close to the crescent Moon on the 12th.

Mars is in Capricornius and is readily seen in the evening. Mars was at opposition on July 27th,  when it was biggest and brightest as seen from Earth. This was the best opposition since 2003.  Mars is now rapidly dimming and shrinking. In a telescope you can see a few features as the huge dust storm has abated, the polar cap is obvious in even small telescopes. 

Saturn is now high in the northern evening sky in the early evening, and is a good telescopic object in the mid to late evening sky. It was at opposition, when Saturn is biggest and brightest as seen from Earth, on June the 27th. It is still within binocular range of  the Trifid and Lagoon nebulae, but is slowly moving towards the globular cluster M22.  Saturn is close to the waxing Moon on the 15th.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/
          Hubble Space Telescope Malfunction Won't Last Long, NASA Says      Cache   Translate Page      
Worry rippled through the astronomical community this weekend as NASA announced that the Hubble Space Telescope was in safe mode — but NASA confirmed in a statement released yesterday (Oct. 8) that the agency expected the instrument to be back at work soo
          Hubble Space Telescope goes into safe mode due to failed gyro; Plan B pending      Cache   Translate Page      

Hubble Space Telescope goes into safe mode due to failed gyro; Plan B pendingThe 28-year-old Hubble Space Telescope is temporarily out of service, due to the failure of one of its gyroscopic pointing devices, but scientists say they’re working on a Plan B. Today NASA confirmed reports that Hubble scientists such as deputy mission head Rachel Osten were passing along over the weekend: One of the telescope’s three active gyros had failed on Friday, which hampered the telescope’s ability to point at astronomical targets for long periods. NASA said that Hubble’s instruments were still fully operational, and that mission managers were working to address the gyro issue: “Built with multiple redundancies, Hubble had… Read More



          On This Day in Math - October 10      Cache   Translate Page      
Met this guy on the road coming across the Dartmore Forest in the fog one day.

Mathematicians have tried in vain to this day to discover some order in the sequence of prime numbers, and we have reason to believe that it is a mystery into which the human mind will never penetrate.
~Leonhard Euler




The 283rd day of the year; 283 is a twin prime. Also it can be expressed as powers of its digits, 283 = 25 + 81 + 35. (Curious students might seek the first multi-digit number for which this is possible)

283 can be expressed as nn + (n+1)n+1 (Find n!)

283 = (6! - 5! - 4! - 3! - 2! - 1! - 0!)/2.

283 is a prime of the form 4n+3, Bernard Frénicle de Bessy discovered that such primes cannot be the hypotenuse of a Pythagorean triangle (1676), as opposed to primes of the form 4n+1, which Fermat conjectured always were in 1640.


EVENTS


1580 Tycho observes a comet and follows it until November 25. and in the morning of December 13. He measured the distance to a comet and thereby demonstrated that comets were beyond the Moon. The Broadside from the British Museum was done about 1580, but was based on an earlier woodcut so it is probably not the comet that Tycho measured, (or perhaps any other actual comet). In January of the following year (still 1580 in England) a pamphlet of warning was written by "Francis Shakelton, minister and preacher of the worde of God":
"A blazyng starre or burnyng beacon, seene the 10. of October laste (and yet continewyng) set on fire by Gods prouidence, to call all sinners to earnest [and] speedie repentance."



1580 John Dee became one of the few commoners visited by Queen Elizabeth. Just hours after the death of his second wife the Queen and her entire privy council showed up at his door. Dee tried to entertain her using the "magical mirror" he had been given by William Pickering who had once been Elizabeth's suitor. The mirror, made of highly-polished obsidian (volcanic glass), was one of many Mexica cult objects and treasures brought to Europe after the conquest of Mexico by Cortés between 1527 and 1530. It is now in the British Museum. *Benjamin Wooley, The Queen's Conjuror



1641 Torricelli arrives in Arcetri to study with Galileo. ".. postpone his arrival at Arcetri until 10 October 1641. He took up residence in Galileo’s house, where Vincenzo Viviani was already living, and stayed there in close friendship with Galileo until the latter’s death on 8 January 1642. " *encyclopedia.com

In 1796, according to tradition, the metric system was born. The Oct 10 (10/10) date was chosen since it seems to signify the base 10 way of using measurements.*TIS (tradition perhaps, but I can find no event that took place regarding metric system on this date. France would adopt system on Dec 10th of 1796. Can anyone verify a reason for this "traditional" date. although Dec 10 has a nice ring)

1844 Michael Faraday gets a scare. After a deadly explosion in a collary in Haswell, he was asked to participate in a commission to examine the incident. They examined the mine, and asked questions about air flow and other issues. Satisfied, Faraday's last series of Q & A went something like:

Faraday: Where do you store the dynamite?
A : "In a bag, tightly tied," was the reply.
Faraday: "Yes, but where do you keep the bag?"
A : "You are sitting on it."
They had apparently honored Faraday with the most comfortable cushion available. He supposedly jumped up quickly and admonished them for their carelessness, especially since the explanation about air flow included tests with an open flame candle. *The Correspondence of Michael Faraday, Volume 3: (There are many variations on this anecdote, one here that conflates the mine incident with events in court on the previous day)

1845 Naval School (now Naval Academy) opened at Annapolis, MD. *VFR

In 1846, Neptune's moon, Triton, is discovered by William Lassell while he was observing the newly discovered planet Neptune. He was attempting to confirm his observation of the previous week, that Neptune had a ring. Instead he discovered that Neptune had a satellite, Triton. Lassell soon proved that the ring he thought he had seen was a product of his new telescope's distortion. This picture of Triton was taken in 1989 by the only spacecraft ever to pass Triton: Voyager 2, which found fascinating terrain, a thin atmosphere, and even evidence for ice volcanoes on this world of peculiar orbit and spin. Ironically, Voyager 2 also confirmed the existence of complete thin rings around Neptune - but these would have been quite invisible to Lassell! *TIS

1931 Spain issued a stamp picturing the Fountain of Lions at the Alhambra in Granada. The Alhambra is famous for its use of tessellations. [Scott #491] *VFR

1971 The rebuilt London Bridge was completed and dedicated in Arizona.   In 1831, New London Bridge had opened to traffic in London. In 1821, a committee was formed by Parliament to consider the poor condition of the existing centuries-old bridge. The arches had been badly damaged by the Great Freeze, so it was decided to build a new bridge. Building commenced under John Rennie in 1825, and completed in 1831, at the expense of the city. The bridge is composed of five arches, and built of Dartmoor granite. It was opened with great splendor by King William the fourth, accompanied by Queen Adelaide, and many of the members of the royal family, August 1st, 1831. In the 1960's it was auctioned and sold for $2,460,000 to Robert McCulloch who moved it to Havasu City, Arizona. The rebuilt London Bridge was completed and dedicated on 10 Oct 1971.*TIS

1980 Midway releases the video game Pac-Man to arcades in North America, "Let the games begin"
*Michael Esposito I‏ @espofootball

1986, a tiny asteroid, Asteroid 3753, was found orbiting the Earth - a body in addition to the Moon - by J. D. Waldron at Siding Spring Observatory. It was called Cruithne, (pronounced "Croo-een-ya") after Celtic tribes who came to Britain between about 880 and 500 BC. It is pulled alternately by the Sun and Earth. When viewed from the Earth, its 770-year orbit appears to be horseshoe shaped, but this is an effect of viewing an orbit from a rotating planet. It actually passes closer to the Earth than the Moon. At its closest approach it only gets to within about 15 million km (9 million miles) of our planet. Its diameter ranges between 2.9 - 6.4 km diameter wide. Cruithne will remain in a suspended state around Earth for at least 5,000 years. *TIS

In 2001, construction on the Viaduc de Millau (Millau Viaduct) began to bridge the River Tarn in Southern France. Finished in 38 months, it was opened 14 Dec 2004. The Millau Viaduct, designed by Sir Norman Foster, is the longest cable-stayed bridge in the world. Taller than the Eiffel Tower, the tallest pylon is 340m high, making it the world's highest road bridge. It carries the A75 motorway from Clermont-Ferraud south to Beziers, crosses 2.5-km and rises 270m above the valley. It was to replace the motor route through the town of Millau with continual traffic jams, shorten the journey by 100 km and save 4 hours of driving time. It was built using a steel deck, rather than concrete roadbed. *TIS



BIRTHS

Drawing of Cavendish torsion device *Yovisto
1731 Henry Cavendish (10 Oct 1731; 24 Feb 1810) English chemist and physicist who conducted experiments with diverse interests in his private laboratory. Most notably, he determined the mass and density of the Earth. He investigated the properties of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, including comparing their density to that of air. Cavendish also showed that water was a compound and measured the specific heat of various substances. His manuscripts (published 1879) revealed discoveries he made in electrostatics before Coulomb, Ohm and Faraday - including deducing the inverse square law of electrostatic attraction and repulsion. He also found specific inductive capacity. His family name is attached to the Cavendish Laboratory (founded 1871, funded by a later family member) at Cambridge University. *TIS Cavendish was supposedly so shy that for his only portrait the artist painted his coat from a hook in the hall, then painted Cavendish body from memory. *"Shock and Awe", BBC broadcast on the history of electricity)

1817 Christophorus Henricus Didericus Buys Ballot (10 Oct 1817; 3 Feb 1890) was a Dutch meteorologist who is remembered for his observation in 1857 that the wind blows at right angles to the atmospheric pressure gradient. He showed that northern hemisphere winds circulate counter-clockwise around low pressure areas and clockwise around high pressure areas. The reverse is true in the southern hemisphere. Although not the first to make this discovery, his name remains attached to it as Buys Ballot's law. He studied and taught at the University of Utrecht, and founded the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute in 1854. He was the inventor of the aeroklinoscope and of a system of weather signals.*TIS

1861 Heinrich Friedrich Karl Ludwig Burkhardt (10 Oct 1861, 2 Nov 1914) His main work was in analysis, particularly the theory of trigonometric series, and on the history of mathematics. Other topics on which Burkhardt published papers included groups, differential equations, differential geometry and mathematical physics.*SAU

1896 Lester Halbert Germer (10 Oct 1896; 10 Mar 1971) was a American physicist who, with his colleague Clinton Joseph Davisson, conducted an experiment (1927) that first demonstrated the wave properties of the electron. They showed that a beam of electrons scattered by a crystal produces a diffraction pattern characteristic of a wave. This experiment confirmed the hypothesis of Louis-Victor de Broglie, a founder of wave mechanics, that the electron should show the properties of an electromagnetic wave as well as a particle. He also studied thermionics, erosion of metals, and contact physics.*TIS

1919 William Henry Kruskal (October 10, 1919 – April 21, 2005) was an American mathematician and statistician. He is best known for having formulated the Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance (together with W. Allen Wallis), a widely-used nonparametric statistical method.
Kruskal was born in New York City to a successful fur wholesaler. His mother, Lillian Rose Vorhaus Kruskal Oppenheimer, became a noted promoter of Origami during the early era of television. She is credited with introduction the Japanese term "Origami" into the Enlish lexicon to replace the then common term, "paper folding". He was the oldest of five children, three of whom, including himself, became researchers in mathematics and physics; see Joseph Kruskal and Martin Kruskal. Kruskal left Antioch College to attend Harvard University, receiving Bachelor's and Master's degrees in mathematics in 1940 and 1941. He pursued a Ph. D. in Mathematical Sciences at Columbia University, graduating in 1955.
During the Second World War, Kruskal served at the U.S. Naval Proving Ground in Dahlgren, Virginia. After brief stints working for his father and lecturing at Columbia, he joined the University of Chicago faculty as an instructor in statistics in 1950. He edited the Annals of Mathematical Statistics from 1958 to 1961, served as president of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics in 1971, and of the American Statistical Association in 1982. Kruskal retired as Professor Emeritus in 1990. He died in Chicago.*Wik




DEATHS

1708 David Gregory (3 Jun 1659, 10 Oct 1708) Scottish mathematician and astronomer. In 1702 he published a book Astronomiae physicae et geometricae elementa, an effort in the popularization of Newtonian science. However, in the matter of chromatic aberration, Gregory noted something that Newton had missed. Different kinds of glass spread the colours of the spectrum by different amounts. He suggested a suitable combination of two different kinds of glass might eliminate chromatic aberration. (A half century later, Dollond accomplished this result.) Telescopes were a special interest of his, and Gregory also experimented with making an achromatic telescope. Gregory also did important work on series.*TIS

1925 Andrew Gray (2 July 1847, 10 Oct 1925) graduated from Glasgow University and was appointed assistant and secretary to Lord Kelvin. He became Professor of Physics at University College Bangor and then returned to Glasgow as Kelvin's successor. He produced many books and papers in both mathematics and physics.*SAU

1940 Vito Volterra (1860–1940) died in Rome. Best known for his early contributions to functional analysis: he introduced the concept of functional in 1887. He also gave an example of a function with a bounded derivative that is not Riemann integrable. He took a prominent role in public life, being President of the Accademia dei Lincei and also a Senator. When the Fascists’ came to power he opposed them and so lost his positions. Consequently his death was not announced in Italian newspapers. This had an ironic sequel: In October 1943 an SS detachment called at his house to arrest him and send him to a concentration camp. *VFR

1888 Sir Thomas Ralph Merton KBE, DSc, FRS (12 January 1888–10 October 1969) was an English physicist, inventor and art collector. He is particularly noted for his work on spectroscopy and diffraction gratings. Diffraction gratings were one of his lifelong interests and here his inventive genius best showed itself. The rarity and expense of good diffraction gratings led him to devise, in 1935, a method of copying them without loss of optical quality, by applying a thin layer of a cellulose ester solution to an original plane grating. When the solvent had evaporated he detached this pellicle and applied its grooved surface to a moist gelatine film on a glass plate. When dry, the gelatine bore a faithful record of the original rulings.
In 1948 Merton made an important basic advance in the art of ruling diffraction gratings. Since 1880 these had been ruled groove by groove by the method used by Rowlands. In place of this, Merton ruled a very fine helix continuously on a steel cylinder which he then opened out upon a plane gelatine-coated surface by his copying method. No lathe could, however, rule a helix free from errors of pitch and these Merton eliminated by an ingenious device. It consisted of a ‘chasing lathe’ by which he cut a secondary helix on the same cylinder with a tool mounted on a ‘nut’ lined with strips of cork pressed upon the primary lathe-cut helix. Periodic errors were thus averaged and eliminated by the elasticity of the cork.
In 1969 Merton bought Stubbings House, at Maidenhead Thicket, Berkshire. Its spacious rooms made an appropriate setting for his collection of pictures. As a man of considerable wealth, he maintained what was probably the last private physics laboratory in Britain. Papers and patents continued to appear, based on his researches there. In 1957 he had several serious operations and thereafter he rarely left his home, where he died on 10 October 1969.*Wik

1971 Sir Cyril Burt (3 Mar 1883, 10 Oct 1971) British psychologist who was a leader in developing methods of statistical data analysis, particularly factor analysis, in psychological testing. He investigated the role of heredity in intelligence with twin studies and the role of nuture in juvenile deliquency. In 1913, he was appointed thea school psychologist for the schools administered by the London County Council (LCC) This was the first appointment of this kind in the U.K. In 1926, he proposed a national testing program of intelligence tests on children at about age 11. Subsequently, the national "Eleven-Plus" exam was used to identify whether children were high scorers suitable for education at a grammar schools, or not. After Burt's death his later work on twins was questioned as flawed or fraud.*TIS

1975 Norman Levinson (August 11, 1912, Lynn, Massachusetts – October 10, 1975, Boston) was an American mathematician. Some of his major contributions were in the study of Fourier transforms, complex analysis, non-linear differential equations, number theory, and signal processing. He worked closely with Norbert Wiener in his early career. He joined the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1937. In 1954, he was awarded the Bôcher Memorial Prize of the American Mathematical Society. In 1974 he published a paper proving that more than a third of the zeros of the Riemann zeta function lie on the critical line, a result later improved to two fifths by Conrey.
He received both his bachelor's degree and his master's degree in electrical engineering from MIT in 1934, where he had studied under Norbert Wiener and took almost all of the graduate-level courses in mathematics. He received the MIT Redfield Proctor Traveling Fellowship to study at the University of Cambridge, with the assurance that MIT would reward him with a PhD upon his return regardless of whatever he produced at Cambridge. Within the first four months in Cambridge, he had already produced two papers. In 1935, MIT awarded him with the PhD in mathematics.
His death in 1975 was caused by a brain tumor.*Wik

1984 British geneticist Sir Alec Jeffreys discovered DNA fingerprinting on this date. He identified that every individual has a unique genetic code, so people could be identified by their genetic fingerprints. The technique has since helped to solve crime investigations and allowed the identification of family members in paternity cases. *rsc.org

2007 Karl Walter Gruenberg, (3 June 1928; 10 October 2007) Emeritus Professor of Pure Mathematics of Queen Mary, London University, was a much respected algebraist, being a leading light in the London algebra research community, with many professional contacts across the globe.
For his PhD he worked under Philip Hall, the UK's leading algebraist at the time, submitting a thesis in the theory of groups (a branch of algebra concerned with an abstract study of symmetry). He moved to Queen Mary College, London University, temporarily in 1953 and permanently in 1957. There Kurt Hirsch was slowly building up a world-class algebra research centre and Gruenberg rapidly became a leading member of this group.
Gruenberg remained at Queen Mary all his working life, apart from leaves of absence mostly taken at North American universities. He was made Professor in 1967, and was Head of the Pure Mathematics Department from 1973 until 1978.
After leaving Cambridge he continued his research in abstract group theory into the 1960s, becoming a leading expert at the time on the Engel theory of groups, which is concerned with extracting global information from certain types of local data.
From about 1960 or so, his main research interest moved into homological algebra and its applications, particularly to group theory. In mathematics, frequently unsuspected connections arise between quite separate and apparently unrelated areas. In this work Gruenberg was concerned with applying to group theory techniques originally developed for the "geometry of continuity". In this field he was a major, in many ways the major, pioneer. This work led him over the years towards representation theory, especially integral representation theory, and more latterly number theory. He published many research articles both singularly and jointly.
He was a talented and very successful teacher, especially of graduate students and his many innovative graduate courses were regularly attended by students, visitors and staff from Queen Mary and other London institutions. His books, Linear Geometry (1967, an undergraduate text written with Alan Weir), Cohomological Topics in Group Theory (1970) and Relation Modules of Finite Groups (1976), were all very well received. He continued his research to the end. He published a joint paper with Alfred Weiss in the Journal of Algebra in 2006, was working on further joint work with Weiss in the summer of 2007 both at Queen Mary and at the University of Alberta in Canada. He had been due to address the Queen Mary Pure Mathematics Seminar.* B.A.F. Wehrfritz Obituary in The Independent


Credits :
*CHM=Computer History Museum
*FFF=Kane, Famous First Facts
*NSEC= NASA Solar Eclipse Calendar
*RMAT= The Renaissance Mathematicus, Thony Christie
*SAU=St Andrews Univ. Math History
*TIA = Today in Astronomy
*TIS= Today in Science History
*VFR = V Frederick Rickey, USMA
*Wik = Wikipedia
*WM = Women of Mathematics, Grinstein & Campbell
          Comment on New Object Found in Far Outer Solar System by Roger      Cache   Translate Page      
This object is predicted to pass in front of a star on Friday night, October 19-20, at about 05:06 UT. Observers who can time this occultation can possibly contribute to the accuracy of its orbit and its size, in the event of an occultation. The uncertainty in the time of the event is about 11 minutes, and observers should record for 2 or 3 sigma before and after the predicted event -- I plan to record for a total of an hour. The cross-path uncertainty is greater than the diameter of the Earth, and since the object is suspected to have a diameter of only about 300 km, the chance of actually observing an event at a given site is about 0.6% at best. So, there is a low chance that a single observer will record an occultation, but a group of observers will be spread across North and South America, and together will have a reasonable chance. The importance of such an occultation makes the effort worthwhile. A diametral occultation is expected to last about 12.5 seconds. An integration time of 2 seconds or less will be fine, but the fastest frame rate that will display the occultation star is desired. An IOTA member found a couple nights ago that he can easily image the 14.5 magnitude target star with an 8-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope with an integration time of 2 seconds. The star will appear to bliink out if it is occulted, and the occulting body will not be visible. The magnitude 14.5 star has the designation 4UCAC 517-000356. It easy to find, even by star hopping, as it is 2 degrees straight south of gamma Pegasi. Its J2000 coordinates are RA 00h 12m 18s, Dec +13d 15m, 08s. There has been an active discussion of the event on the IOTA list serve at https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/IOTAoccultations/info . The prediction has been made by Bruno Sicardy and the Lucky Star team. All results, whether "hits" or "misses", are important and should be reported to the team. See the website at http://lesia.obspm.fr/lucky-star/predictions/ and follow links to find reporting information. -- Roger Venable
          Comment on Image Stabilize Your Binoculars! by divingfe      Cache   Translate Page      
I've just heard from a little "bird" that my birthday present in a week and a half might be a pair of Orion 15x70 Resolux Binoculars !!! Way back in 2007, when on the East Coast, I ran across this wonderful article and saved it on my computer. Now, finally, having moved to a high desert city out West, I'll be able to put it to some good use. I greatly appreciate the article, and the comments are equally valuable. My lawn chair in the back yard, with some warm clothing and your great invention will make for some wonderful viewing I'm sure. I'll also be setting up my Meade 125ex telescope after a 15 year hiatus. Very exciting. Thank you all. And, in April, a trip to Death Valley and the High Sierras sound promising as well; maybe a star party or two in between now and then !!! Thanks again.
           Hubble operations suspended after technical failure       Cache   Translate Page      

NASA has suspended science operations for the Hubble Space Telescope after a technical fault#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000

A technical fault has led NASA to suspend science operations for the hardworking Hubble Space Telescope. The craft entered safe mode on Friday when one of its gyroscopes failed, and while the problem may or may not be fixable, Hubble is expected to continue science operations regardless.

.. Continue Reading Hubble operations suspended after technical failure

Category: Space

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          Gyroscope Issue Puts Hubble In Safe Mode      Cache   Translate Page      
NASA has established an anomaly review panel to investigate a gyroscope issue that triggered the 28-year-old Hubble Space Telescope into safe mode late Oct. 5.

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          Smart aliens might live within 33,000 light-years of Earth. A new study explains why we haven't found them yet.      Cache   Translate Page      

stars milky way galaxy person silhouette flashlight searching alien extraterrestrial life drake equation formula fermi paradox shutterstock_649309528

  • The universe has so many galaxies, stars, planets, and moons that many scientists believe intelligent aliens should exist within detectable range of Earth.
  • Still, human searches for extraterrestrial intelligence have yet to detect any alien signal or "technosignature."
  • A new study suggests this may be because we've searched just 0.00000000000000058% of a "cosmic haystack" in our hunt for an alien "needle."
  • There's no guarantee that exhaustive searches would ever find aliens, though.

The cosmos almost screams with the possibility of intelligent alien life.

Hundreds of billions of galaxies drift through the visible universe, each one harboring hundreds of billions of stars, and each of those stars in turn shelters roughly a handful of planets. Even if the trillion-or-so planets in every galaxy aren't habitable, countless water-rich moons orbiting these lifeless worlds might be.

And yet, in spite of these numbers, humans have yet to identify any signals from intelligent aliens. The prescient question that physicist Enrico Fermi posed in 1950 — "where is everybody?" — remains unanswered.

However, an upcoming study in The Astronomical Journal, which we learned about from MIT Technology Review, suggests humanity has barely sampled the skies, and thus has no grounds to be cynical.

According to the paper, all searches for extraterrestrial intelligence, or SETI, have examined barely a swimming pool's worth of water from a figurative ocean of signal space.

"We haven't really looked much," Shubham Kanodia, a graduate student in astronomy who co-wrote the study, said during a NASA "technosignatures" workshop in Houston, Texas on September 26.

The study suggests that somewhere in that ocean of space — right now, within the Milky Way galaxy — intelligent aliens might be saying, "hello, we are here."

But we'd have no way of knowing, at least not yet.

Defining a 'cosmic haystack' in the search for aliens

alien spacecraft extraterrestrial propulsion lasers illustration m weiss cfa

Over the past 60 years, multiple SETI projects have looked and continue to look for alien signals. Some scan large swaths of the sky for powerful signals, while others target individual star systems for weaker signals.

Yet aside from a few anomaly signals that never repeated (like the "Wow!" detection of 1977), these searches have turned up empty-handed.

Kanodia and his colleagues at Penn State University wanted to know how much of the figurative "cosmic haystack" SETI projects have covered, and to what extent they could improve the hunt for the alien "needle."

The group agrees with famous SETI astronomer Jill Tarter, who said in 2010 that it's silly to conclude intelligent aliens do not exist nearby just because we haven't yet found their beacons. Even if such signals exist and are aimed right at Earth, her thinking goes, we've scanned so little of the sky and may not be looking for the right type of signal, or for long enough, to find them.

"Suppose I tell you there's a cool thing happening in Houston right now," Kanodia said during his NASA talk. "I do not tell you where it is. I do not tell you when it is happening. I do not tell you what it is. Is it in a book store? Is it a music concert? I give you absolutely no priors. It would be a difficult thing to try and find it."

He added: "Houston, we have a problem. We do not know what we're looking for ... and we don't know where to start."

milky way galaxy sun solar system earth location nasa labeled 2In their study, Kanodia and his colleagues built a mathematical model of what they consider a reasonably sized cosmic haystack.

Their haystack is a sphere of space nearly 33,000 light-years in diameter, centered around Earth. This region captures the Milky Way's bustling core, as well as many giant globular clusters of stars above and below our home galaxy.

They also picked eight dimensions of a search for aliens — factors like signal transmission frequency, bandwidth, power, location, repetition, polarization, and modulation (i.e. complexity) — and defined reasonable limits for each one.

"This leads to a total 8D haystack volume of 6.4 × 10116 m5Hz2 s/W," the authors wrote.

That is 6.4 followed by 115 zeros — as MIT Technology review described it, "a space of truly gargantuan proportions."

How much of this haystack have we searched?

allen telescope array ata seti institute

Kanodia and his colleagues then examined the past 60 years' worth of SETI projects and reconciled them against their haystack.

The researchers determined that humanity's collective search for extraterrestrials adds up to about 0.00000000000000058% of the haystack's volume.

"This is about a bathtub of water in all of Earth's oceans," Kanodia said. "Or about a five-centimeter-by-five-centimeter patch of land on all of Earth's surface area."

Those numbers make humanity's search efforts seem feeble. But Kanodia views it as an opportunity — especially because modern telescopes are getting better at scanning more objects with greater sensitivity and speed. For example, he said, a 150-minute search this year by the Murchison Widefield Array covered a larger percentage of the haystack than any other SETI project in history.

"That's the purpose of this haystack ... to help better-inform future search strategies," Kanodia said.

He also noted that the team's calculations assume there is only one alien civilization within range of Earth, and not any more than that. But more than one may exist relatively close by.

"In the ocean analogy, we do not have to drain the entire ocean to find a fish," he said. "In the Houston analogy, if there were two cool things, you wouldn't have to look as hard."

Still, there's no guarantee that a figurative fish or needle or cool thing is out there at all.

Another group of scientists, this one at Oxford University, recently took a different approach to the question of aliens. Instead of focusing on the likelihood of finding "technosignatures" that could be detected, they examined the likelihood that intelligent alien life exists at all.

The Oxford researchers examined dozens of authoritative studies about variables in the Drake Equation. The team then analyzed the results and calculated a bleak 2-in-5 chance that humans may be entirely alone in the Milky Way galaxy.

There's also a more unsettling possibility: Perhaps aliens do exist nearby but don't want us to find them.

SEE ALSO: 27 of the most iconic, jaw-dropping photos of the Earth and the moon from space

SEE ALSO: An alien hunter explains why extraterrestrial visitors are unlikely — despite the US government's UFO evidence

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Stephen Hawking warned us about contacting aliens, but this astronomer says it's 'too late'


          NASA:Телескоп Хаббл переведен в безопасный режим работы из-за сбоя системы ориентации      Cache   Translate Page      
Национальное управление Соединённых Штатов по воздухоплаванию, исследованиям космического пространства NASA перевело космический телескоп Hubble Space Telescope - «Хаббл» в безопасный режим работы. Причиной является сбой системы ориентации.
          Hubble space telescope left pointing wrong way after gyroscope fails      Cache   Translate Page      
Ageing device cannot make observations after backup gyroscope failed tooThe Hubble space telescope has been sidelined after a gyroscope failed, leaving it unable to point in the right direction during observations.The device had been expected to fail at some point this year, but the surprise came when a backup did not kick in properly after Friday ’s failure, said Nasa on Monday.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)

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          Hubble Space Telescope hobbled by technical glitch      Cache   Translate Page      
NASA scientists are desperately trying to repair the Hubble Space Telescope, which is currently pointing the wrong way because of a technical fault.
          Total eclipse      Cache   Translate Page      
I watched this year’s total solar eclipse from the path of totality, near Douglas, Wyoming, with my friends Tyler and Masaru. Rather than try to photograph the event, I chose to simply observe. My 1250mm f/10 telescope with a solar filter cap gave us an up-close view as the moon slid across the disc of […]
          Νέα τεχνική βλάβη υπέστη το διαστημικό τηλεσκόπιο Hubble      Cache   Translate Page      

Το διαστημικό τηλεσκόπιο Hubble της Αμερικανικής Διαστημικής Υπηρεσίας (NASA) έπαθε μια ακόμη μηχανική βλάβη, χάνοντας ένα από τα τελευταία τρία γυροσκόπια που διέθετε και τα οποία του επιτρέπουν να προσανατολίζεται και να αλλάζει κατεύθυνση. Το τηλεσκόπιο τέθηκε, για λόγους αυτοπροστασίας, σε κατάσταση «ασφαλούς λειτουργίας» (safe mode), με αποτέλεσμα να εκτελεί πλέον μόνο τις απολύτως απαραίτητες […]

The post Νέα τεχνική βλάβη υπέστη το διαστημικό τηλεσκόπιο Hubble appeared first on Alexpoli.gr.


          ハッブル宇宙望遠鏡がジャイロスコープの不具合によりスリープモードに突入してしまう      Cache   Translate Page      
地上約600km上空を周回するハッブル宇宙望遠鏡は、地上からでは困難な精度の天体観測が可能な「宇宙の天文台」ともいえる設備です。そんなハッブル宇宙望遠鏡の姿勢を制御するために使われているジャイロスコープが故障したため、「ハッブル宇宙望遠鏡がスリープモードに突入してしまった」と報じられています。

続きを読む...


          Celestron C6 OTA      Cache   Translate Page      
For Sale

For sale is a Celestron C6N F/5 Newtonian OTA with a focal length of 750 mm that is brand new. It came with the AVX mount (that I am keeping) and I have only used it once to check it out and it is in new condition. This is a nice 6 inch telescope with nice optics, but I have too many scope and need to thin the herd. As you can see from the photos the glass look pristine: Included is:

- C6-N OTA
- Mounting rings and vixen dovetail
- 6 x 30 finder
- front cover and focuser cap
- 20 mm Celestron Plossl eyepiece

Price is $150 plus shipping from 27540. I will cover the PayPal fee.

150.00
          Unitron Eyepieces and Other Unitron Stuff      Cache   Translate Page      
For Sale

Unitron Eyepieces, Diagonal, Porro Prism, Sun Filter - these are from a very early Unitron telescope. The eyepieces are not marked Unitron, but this was normal with the earliest Unitrons. The 5th eyepiece was also with the Model 114 Unitron, as were the diagonal, porro prism and Sun filter.

$89 for the whole bunch. $10 shipping in CONUS.

89.00
          Dovetail for LXD650      Cache   Translate Page      
Wanted

Looking for a Dovetail for an LXD650 Mount. The type that's attached to the mount itself.

The telescope I will be using has a dovetail that's about 1.75" wide and 6.5" long. I'm a learner so I hope this makes sense.

I will consider all offers, of course.

Thx,

Dave

50.00
           Hubble operations suspended after technical failure       Cache   Translate Page      

NASA has suspended science operations for the Hubble Space Telescope after a technical fault#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000

A technical fault has led NASA to suspend science operations for the hardworking Hubble Space Telescope. The craft entered safe mode on Friday when one of its gyroscopes failed, and while the problem may or may not be fixable, Hubble is expected to continue science operations regardless.

.. Continue Reading Hubble operations suspended after technical failure

Category: Space

Tags:
          The Hubble Space Telescope is hobbled after a mechanical failure      Cache   Translate Page      
The 28-year-old telescope went into temporary safe mode after detecting a mechanical failure, joining another of NASA’s premiere space telescopes on the sidelines.
          The Hubble Space Telescope is hobbled after a mechanical failure      Cache   Translate Page      
Another of NASA's top space telescopes, Kepler, is almost out of fuel.
          Dobson Taurus T400, erste Eindrücke (Technikforum Spiegelteleskope (Reflektoren))      Cache   Translate Page      
Neu im Technikforum Spiegelteleskope (Reflektoren) - Dobson Taurus T400, erste Eindrücke (von mrtelescope)


          Comment on New Army caliber? by Jim W      Cache   Translate Page      
It's not 6.8 SPC. 6.8 SPC is crap but at least it exists. This is some new thing made of polymer and unobtanium and telescopes that I'm guessing will show great promise at first and then be canceled because it's only 20 percent better (wild guess) than 5.56 and it will cost a trillion dollars to retire all the 5.56mm stuff.
          Comment on New Army caliber? by Miles      Cache   Translate Page      
Bruce; No, it's not the 6.8 SPC. It's a 6.8mm bullet cartridge based on the Textron 'cased telescoped' design. I think the round and weapon will get the same treatment that the .276 Petersen cartridge got when then Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur noted the massive stocks of .30-06 ammo still in inventory
          ハッブル宇宙望遠鏡がジャイロスコープの不具合で運用停止中      Cache   Translate Page      
こちらの記事によると、ハッブル宇宙望遠鏡(Hubble Space Telescope、こちら)がジャイロスコープ(Gyroscope)の不具合により運用を停止しています。宇宙の特定点に長時間焦点を合わせ続け、長時間露光でわずかな光をとらえてきれいな写真を撮影する為に、ジャイロスコープは欠かせないものです。ハッブル宇宙望遠鏡には6つのジャイロスコープが搭載されていますが、既に2つは利用できなくなっています。完全な観測には3つのジャイロスコープを利用します。今回その1つが故障し..
          Hubble Space Telescope is limping after a mechanical failure      Cache   Translate Page      

Two of NASA's premiere space telescopes, Hubble and Kepler, are currently out of commission - sad, if not entirely surprising, news for astronomers who depend on data from NASA's aging fleet.

The 28-year-old Hubble went into temporary safe mode on Friday after detecting a mechanical failure with...


          10/10/2018: FRONT PAGE: Hubble telescope sidelined by serious pointing failure      Cache   Translate Page      
The Hubble Space Telescope has been sidelined by a serious pointing problem. NASA announced Monday that one of Hubble’s gyroscopes failed Friday. As a result, Hubble is in socalled safe mode with nonessential systems turned off. NASA says mission...
          Bob The Street Cat, Star Wars and Giant Cannibal Tor-Tye on WOW It's The Pet Parade 269 with Dash Kitten, Us & Barking from The Bayou      Cache   Translate Page      
 Wednesday Greetings Pawesome Furriends

Welcome to WOW on The Pet Parade & Our Weekly news Round-Up!

What's your WOW today? 

Guys, we've got to tell mew this... mew remember that The P.A. and Dad went to the Family Pet Show in Manchester at the weekend, well Bob, yep the most famous Bob in the wurld was there with his dad for a book signing, how epic, epically epic!

So anyhoo the P.A. was just ambling along looking to her right at an exhibit, when Dad tapped her on the shoulder and said. "I think that's Bob."

The P.A. had walked straight passed Bob and his dad and didn't see them, can mew believe it?  NO, neither could we!!! 

We said, "Mew need to get some new glasses!" 

But anyhoo, the P.A. spun around and managed to get this pic...


Can mew fluffing well believe it, if she'd looked left 15 seconds sooner purrhaps we could have gotten a pic of Bob and his security guards as they casually strolled by!   

A short while later Bob and his dad were at a table, cordoned off by all that fancy schmancy rope and a huge queue formed for the book signing and that's when this happened...

Obi-Wan, Chewbacca, a couple of Storm Troopers [obviously defectors from Darth's camp] and a Rebel Alliance dude came to Bob's assistance to help with the crowd control.


And yes, Chewy is really over 7ft tall, he's a giant and Pandora loves him! MOL

We were lucky enough to get the above pic, and how cool do they look?  In fact we think that Chewy needs to join The B Team, OH MY COD how epic would that be to have a Wookie on the team, and Pandora would be so, so deliriously happy [MOL FAN GURL! MOL]

And then, aftur all of that excitement we saw these...



It's time fur another OH MY COD, as these guys must be related to the Pygmy Cannibal Tor-Tye from our Pirate Adventure in 2015, these guys were huge... the P.A. and Dad didn't stay long near their enclosure in case the Tor-Tye decided it was snack time - mew remember what happened to the sharks in our Pirate Adventure!  They ended up as soup! MOL OOPS! 




In other news, which we didn't know until the P.A. and Dad got there; Bionic Basil were the sponsors of London Cats PR ~ Tica Cat Show - yep they were totally surprised.


And the winners got the most amazing Bionic Basil Rosettes which were huge, plus a pawesome goodie bag and we were lucky enough to get one of the rosettes too, which is now placed on the King Basil Pawtrait.

So there mew have it, a supurr, mega great exciting day out and apparently we've, sorry Amber has 2 signed Bob books on the way so she'll be having a little give-away soon.

OK we think that's enough excitement fur one day, so let's get blog hopping ~ show us your best posts from this week on the Pet Parade Blog Hop!


If mew've missed any of the posts offur the last week, here's the catch up links:

And if mew still need some more entertainment, get our free mandala colouring books below...

... and while away the hours Colouring with Cats!

Amber will be here on Friday with another pawesome book fur mew to get your mittens on and tomorrow we'll be sharing Chapters 14 and 15 of our latest Blockbuster Adventure, so we do hope mew'll stop by to catch up on all the action!

Bestest purrs and big hugs

The B Team xx

Now let's HOP on... 

 

Go visit our pawesome host


 & Co Host

 


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          Smart aliens might live within 33,000 light-years of Earth. A new study explains why we haven't found them yet.      Cache   Translate Page      

stars milky way galaxy person silhouette flashlight searching alien extraterrestrial life drake equation formula fermi paradox shutterstock_649309528

  • The universe has so many galaxies, stars, planets, and moons that many scientists believe intelligent aliens should exist within detectable range of Earth.
  • Still, human searches for extraterrestrial intelligence have yet to detect any alien signal or "technosignature."
  • A new study suggests this may be because we've searched just 0.00000000000000058% of a "cosmic haystack" in our hunt for an alien "needle."
  • There's no guarantee that exhaustive searches would ever find aliens, though.

The cosmos almost screams with the possibility of intelligent alien life.

Hundreds of billions of galaxies drift through the visible universe, each one harboring hundreds of billions of stars, and each of those stars in turn shelters roughly a handful of planets. Even if the trillion-or-so planets in every galaxy aren't habitable, countless water-rich moons orbiting these lifeless worlds might be.

And yet, in spite of these numbers, humans have yet to identify any signals from intelligent aliens. The prescient question that physicist Enrico Fermi posed in 1950 — "where is everybody?" — remains unanswered.

However, an upcoming study in The Astronomical Journal, which we learned about from MIT Technology Review, suggests humanity has barely sampled the skies, and thus has no grounds to be cynical.

According to the paper, all searches for extraterrestrial intelligence, or SETI, have examined barely a swimming pool's worth of water from a figurative ocean of signal space.

"We haven't really looked much," Shubham Kanodia, a graduate student in astronomy who co-wrote the study, said during a NASA "technosignatures" workshop in Houston, Texas on September 26.

The study suggests that somewhere in that ocean of space — right now, within the Milky Way galaxy — intelligent aliens might be saying, "hello, we are here."

But we'd have no way of knowing, at least not yet.

Defining a 'cosmic haystack' in the search for aliens

alien spacecraft extraterrestrial propulsion lasers illustration m weiss cfa

Over the past 60 years, multiple SETI projects have looked and continue to look for alien signals. Some scan large swaths of the sky for powerful signals, while others target individual star systems for weaker signals.

Yet aside from a few anomaly signals that never repeated (like the "Wow!" detection of 1977), these searches have turned up empty-handed.

Kanodia and his colleagues at Penn State University wanted to know how much of the figurative "cosmic haystack" SETI projects have covered, and to what extent they could improve the hunt for the alien "needle."

The group agrees with famous SETI astronomer Jill Tarter, who said in 2010 that it's silly to conclude intelligent aliens do not exist nearby just because we haven't yet found their beacons. Even if such signals exist and are aimed right at Earth, her thinking goes, we've scanned so little of the sky and may not be looking for the right type of signal, or for long enough, to find them.

"Suppose I tell you there's a cool thing happening in Houston right now," Kanodia said during his NASA talk. "I do not tell you where it is. I do not tell you when it is happening. I do not tell you what it is. Is it in a book store? Is it a music concert? I give you absolutely no priors. It would be a difficult thing to try and find it."

He added: "Houston, we have a problem. We do not know what we're looking for ... and we don't know where to start."

milky way galaxy sun solar system earth location nasa labeled 2In their study, Kanodia and his colleagues built a mathematical model of what they consider a reasonably sized cosmic haystack.

Their haystack is a sphere of space nearly 33,000 light-years in diameter, centered around Earth. This region captures the Milky Way's bustling core, as well as many giant globular clusters of stars above and below our home galaxy.

They also picked eight dimensions of a search for aliens — factors like signal transmission frequency, bandwidth, power, location, repetition, polarization, and modulation (i.e. complexity) — and defined reasonable limits for each one.

"This leads to a total 8D haystack volume of 6.4 × 10116 m5Hz2 s/W," the authors wrote.

That is 6.4 followed by 115 zeros — as MIT Technology review described it, "a space of truly gargantuan proportions."

How much of this haystack have we searched?

allen telescope array ata seti institute

Kanodia and his colleagues then examined the past 60 years' worth of SETI projects and reconciled them against their haystack.

The researchers determined that humanity's collective search for extraterrestrials adds up to about 0.00000000000000058% of the haystack's volume.

"This is about a bathtub of water in all of Earth's oceans," Kanodia said. "Or about a five-centimeter-by-five-centimeter patch of land on all of Earth's surface area."

Those numbers make humanity's search efforts seem feeble. But Kanodia views it as an opportunity — especially because modern telescopes are getting better at scanning more objects with greater sensitivity and speed. For example, he said, a 150-minute search this year by the Murchison Widefield Array covered a larger percentage of the haystack than any other SETI project in history.

"That's the purpose of this haystack ... to help better-inform future search strategies," Kanodia said.

He also noted that the team's calculations assume there is only one alien civilization within range of Earth, and not any more than that. But more than one may exist relatively close by.

"In the ocean analogy, we do not have to drain the entire ocean to find a fish," he said. "In the Houston analogy, if there were two cool things, you wouldn't have to look as hard."

Still, there's no guarantee that a figurative fish or needle or cool thing is out there at all.

Another group of scientists, this one at Oxford University, recently took a different approach to the question of aliens. Instead of focusing on the likelihood of finding "technosignatures" that could be detected, they examined the likelihood that intelligent alien life exists at all.

The Oxford researchers examined dozens of authoritative studies about variables in the Drake Equation. The team then analyzed the results and calculated a bleak 2-in-5 chance that humans may be entirely alone in the Milky Way galaxy.

There's also a more unsettling possibility: Perhaps aliens do exist nearby but don't want us to find them.

SEE ALSO: 27 of the most iconic, jaw-dropping photos of the Earth and the moon from space

SEE ALSO: An alien hunter explains why extraterrestrial visitors are unlikely — despite the US government's UFO evidence

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Stephen Hawking warned us about contacting aliens, but this astronomer says it's 'too late'


          NASA's Hubble space telescope just lost a vital part, and one of its backups is 'acting drunk.' Here's why astronomers haven't lost hope.      Cache   Translate Page      

hubble space telescope orbiting earth satellite hst nasa heic0908c

  • A vital part inside the Hubble Space Telescope, which records stunning images of the universe, failed on Friday.
  • The part is called a gyroscope and helps Hubble point at celestial objects.
  • It's the third of six total gyros to fail since 2009, when astronauts last serviced Hubble. Another gyro is acting "drunk," one official said.
  • NASA may start using a single gyro to extend the telescope's lifespan, but this would limit the observations Hubble can make.
  • When Hubble dies, NASA will have a few ways to get rid of — or rescue — the bus-sized cylinder.

The Hubble Space Telescope is famous for the stunning images it records of the universe, from distant galaxies to dark storms on Neptune and even plumes of water shooting from alien moons.

But the Earth-orbiting spacecraft won't last forever. NASA, the European Space Agency, and other Hubble partners got a sobering reminder of this fact last week, when a vital part called a gyroscope failed.

Hubble's gyros help tell the telescope that it's aimed at the right spot in space. Friday's event marked the third failure of six total gyros that astronauts installed in 2009. So Hubble is left with three such devices — the exact number NASA needs to keep the telescope operating normally.

Following the failure, the 12-ton, school-bus-size observatory went into safe mode, NASA said on Monday. But it's not the end.

"Hubble's instruments still are fully operational and are expected to produce excellent science for years to come," NASA said.

However, the space agency is not yet out of the woods: One of Hubble's three remaining gyros is on the fritz and not functioning reliably.

"We've had some issues with this gyro in the past, and we've got some possible leads on the current problem," Ken Sembach, director of the Space Telescope Science Institute, which operates Hubble, told Business Insider. "But the thing that's been clear on Hubble is that these gyros all have a mind of their own. I don't think anybody really knows what's going on with it right now."

NASA plans to continue investigating the issue while the telescope is in safe mode, ideally until a fix is found. But it has a pre-planned option if Hubble is limited to two working gyros.

How Hubble's gyroscopes work and why they're so important

hubble space telescope hst cutaway diagram pointing gyros gyroscopes reactions wheels guidance sensors nasa

Hubble orbits Earth at 17,000 mph and rotates constantly to fixate on a particular object or new region of space.

The spacecraft has no rocket thrusters to orient itself. Instead, internal motors called reaction wheels spin up to provide momentum. The rest of Hubble responds by "pushing" in the opposite direction, causing it to rotate.

If Hubble doesn't know exactly where it's pointing, it'd miss targets and send back blurry pictures.

That's where the gyros come in. Hubble's gyros — ideally, three working at a time — act as an ultra-accurate balancing system that helps the telescope move in the most precise way possible.

hubble space telescope gyroscope gyro part nasaEach Hubble gyro is a small cylinder with an internal "float" that spins thousands of times per minute. A special fluid helps the float spin effortlessly for more than five years without fail. Two small wires — each finer than a human hair — measure any change in the spin and turn that into an electrical signal.

The signal feeds into computers, which tell the telescope's reaction wheels how and when to move.

"You need the gyros to know where you are in space. Once you know where you are, you can tell the spacecraft to turn this way or that way," a Hubble telescope team member told Business Insider. (He asked to remain anonymous because he wasn't yet permitted by NASA to speak to press about the issue.)

Instruments called fine guidance sensors, which look for fixed patterns of stars in the sky, also help keep Hubble aware of its position. And the telescope has magnetic sensors that provide some orientation data as well. But none of these devices are as great as the gyros, which are among the most accurate and stable ever made, according to NASA.

Hubble's first set of six gyros failed somewhat rapidly — bromine in the liquid ate away at the sensing wires — so NASA astronauts installed six new-and-improved gyros in 2009, dramatically extending Hubble's life.

Still, Sembach said even these newer devices are finicky, fragile, and will eventually fail.

"Everything inside has to be working just right in order for these things to work," he said.

How a 'drunk' gyro might cut into Hubble's future observations

hubble extreme ultra deep field infrared uv deepest patch night sky nasa stsci

Since NASA retired its space shuttles in 2011, it has not had a spacecraft able to service Hubble and replace the gyros.

So Hubble's three gyros are what's left to work with for the foreseeable future.

"So far, they seem to be doing well, minus this one that's acting drunk," Sembach said, referring to the third and oddly behaving gyro.

If Hubble's engineers can't figure out what's wrong with the "drunk" gyro and fix it with new software, they'll shut it down.

"If the outcome indicates that the gyro is not usable, Hubble will resume science operations in an already defined 'reduced-gyro' mode that uses only one gyro," NASA said. In that case, the agency would also turn off one of the remaining two "good" gyros to prevent wear-and-tear and extend the telescope's lifespan.

V838 Monocerotis red nova candidate supergiant star nasa hubble esa

That change would amount to a roughly 50% cut in the area of sky Hubble could observe at a given moment. So the telescope would have to wait longer to study certain objects. It'd also be unable to move quickly enough to target surprise objects, such as exploding stars.

"Another potential downside is that observations that require tracking of moving targets (think objects closer than Jupiter) may be difficult to observe since these are normally done under gyro-only control," Sembach said in an email to Business Insider. (A newly discovered comet or a rogue interstellar asteroid might be two examples.)

Running on one gyro instead of three could add up to a 10% hit to the observatory's efficiency, Sembach said, but he added: "overall the science will be very similar (i.e., great!)."

"While reduced-gyro mode offers less sky coverage at any particular time, there is relatively limited impact on the overall scientific capabilities," NASA said.

On the plus side, saving one gyro for later might help Hubble operate well into the era of the James Webb Space Telescope, or JWST, which is NASA's next-generation, infrared-light-sensing observatory. It's scheduled for launch in 2021.

"Hubble is the world's premier astronomical facility, and it will be until JWST is launched," Sembach said. "Even then, it will have capabilities that'd complement JWST."

What will happen to Hubble after it stops working?

point nemo oceanic pole of inaccessibility google maps usgs nasa noaa labeled thumb

Eventually, the telescope will stop working altogether.

"This weekend's events remind us the spacecraft is aging, and that it will eventually have an end-state," Sembach said. "NASA and the scientific community will have to address this at some point."

Without some kind of intervention, Hubble is expected to crash to Earth in the mid-2030s. Although it's unlikely Hubble would hit anything after falling from space, NASA and its partners have committed to make sure Hubble doesn't pose any threat.

To that end, astronauts who serviced the telescope in 2009 screwed on a grappling fixture. This allows for a spacecraft to dock with Hubble, giving NASA a variety of options to deal with its observatory.

"You could grab it and de-orbit in the Pacific Ocean, because you don't want it hitting an inhabited area," Sembach said.

If that's the case, NASA would likely target the most remote region of the Pacific, a zone sometimes called "Point Nemo" or the "spacecraft cemetery."

Another option is for an uncrewed spacecraft to boost Hubble to a very high and stable orbit above Earth, where it would likely remain for thousands of years.

"Or you could potentially go back and service the thing," Sembach said. "Right now that's not possible, but maybe in 10 years. Who knows?"

There is a fourth (more radical) option: A large, next-generation commercial vehicle, such as a modified spaceship of SpaceX's upcoming Big Falcon Rocket system, could capture Hubble and bring it back to Earth for display in a museum.

"I would not be opposed to that," Sembach said.

SEE ALSO: NASA's newest space telescope 'will discover thousands of planets' — including a handful of worlds that may be habitable to aliens

DON'T MISS: The American flags on the moon are disintegrating

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: NASA just completed its $8.7 billion space telescope that will replace the Hubble


          Assembling an Image of the Shadow of a Black Hole      Cache   Translate Page      
In a mind-boggling excerpt from Seth Fletcher’s book Einstein’s Shadow: A Black Hole, a Band of Astronomers, and the Quest to See the Unseeable (published by Ecco), the author probes the meticulous process behind the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). In fact, a series of collaborative data sets collected in 2017 by eight telescopes around the planet, the EHT aims to create an image of the shadow of a …
          Daily Weather Briefing for Wednesday, October 10, 2018      Cache   Translate Page      



OUTLOOK

A strong upper-level ridge will remain over the region and maintain above normal temperatures through Thursday. Moisture levels will increase during this time as tropical cyclone Michael tracks northeast and reaches our forecast area on Thursday. Canadian high pressure will build in Friday and bring seasonably cooler and drier air before a moist cold front reaches the region Sunday night.

DAY AND WEATHER SPONSOR



Adams Products, a Division of Oldcastle is underwriting the daily weather briefing & public safety updates for the month.

Open 7:30 AM to 4:00 PM, M-F, located at 895 Hickory Knoll Road, Franklin, NC. Visit our Facebook page at:
https://www.facebook.com/Adams.Oldcastle.Franklin.NC/

All your masonry needs are available. Our phone number is 828.524.8545, the public is welcome, we’ll help you with your with your next project.

REACH Purple Purse Challenge



During the month of October, REACH is participating in the Purple Purse Challenge. This Challenge unites nonprofits in a national competition to raise funds for life-changing services for domestic violence survivors. 100% of donations go directly to REACH and they allow REACH to compete for weekly cash prizes and bonus challenges supported by the Allstate Foundation!

You can make a donation securely online through the link below:
www.crowdrise.com/reachofmaconcounty-purplepurse2018

Thank you for your time and support!

Visit REACH of Macon County online at the following locations:

Facebook [LINK]

Website [LINK]

If you have an emergency situation regarding domestic violence, please call 911

REACH 24/7 Hotline:

Macon County 828-369-5544
Jackson County 828-586-8969



Record Weather Events for October 10th

Record weather events for this date in Macon County
(1872-2016)

Highest Temperature 84°F at the Coweeta Experimental Station in 1959
Lowest Temperature 22°F in Highlands in 1915
Greatest Rainfall 2.63 inches in Highlands in 1911


Record Weather Events for October (1872-2017)

Highest Temperature 91°F in Franklin on Oct 5, 1954
Lowest Temperature 12°F in Highlands on Oct 30, 1910
Greatest Rainfall 9.91 inches in Highlands on Oct 4, 1964
Greatest Snowfall 1.0 inches in Highlands on October 20, 1913

An expanded almanac is available that covers record weather events, climate averages, and an astronomy section. [LINK]

WEATHER FORECAST MAPS

Forecast maps for 8 am, 2 pm, and 8 pm. 

[click on any image in this article to enlarge]
(These images replace the three-day forecast maps)





--------------------------------------

FRANKLIN AREA

Today

Showers likely before 4pm, with thunderstorms possible, then a chance of showers and thunderstorms after 5pm. Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 75. Southeast wind 5 to 10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

Tonight

Showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm, then showers after 7pm. Some of the storms could produce heavy rainfall. Patchy fog after 9pm. Lows near the upper 60s. East wind 5 to 10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New precipitation amounts between a half and three-quarters of an inch possible.

Thursday

Showers, mainly before 4pm. The rain could be heavy at times. High near 75. North northeast wind 10 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New precipitation amounts between a half and three-quarters of an inch possible.

Thursday Night

A 30 percent chance of showers, mainly before 7pm. Partly cloudy, with lows in the upper 40s. North northwest wind around 10 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph.

Friday

Sunny, with highs near the lower 70s.

Friday Night

Mostly clear, with a low around 45.



--------------------------------------

OTTO AREA

Today

Showers likely, with thunderstorms also possible after 4pm. Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy, with highs in the low-to-mid 70s. Southeast wind 8 to 10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.

Tonight

Showers and possibly a thunderstorm. Some of the storms could produce heavy rainfall. Patchy fog after 9pm. Lows around the upper 60s. East wind 10 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New precipitation amounts between three-quarters and one inch possible.

Thursday

Showers, mainly before 4pm. The rain could be heavy at times. Highs near the low-to-mid 70s. North wind 15 to 20 mph, with gusts as high as 30 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New precipitation amounts between a half and three-quarters of an inch possible.

Thursday Night

A 30 percent chance of showers before 7pm. Partly cloudy, with lows in the upper 40s. North northwest wind around 15 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph.

Friday

Sunny, with highs near the lower 70s.

Friday Night

Mostly clear, with a low around 45.



--------------------------------------

HIGHLANDS AREA

Today

Showers, with thunderstorms also possible after 4pm. Some of the storms could produce heavy rainfall. Patchy fog. Highs near the upper 60s. Southeast wind 10 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New rainfall amounts between a half and three-quarters of an inch possible.

Tonight

Showers and possibly a thunderstorm. Some of the storms could produce heavy rainfall. Patchy fog. Low around 65. East southeast wind 15 to 20 mph, with gusts as high as 30 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New precipitation amounts between three-quarters and one inch possible.

Thursday

Showers, mainly before 5pm. The rain could be heavy at times. Highs in the upper 60s. Northeast wind 15 to 20 mph, with gusts as high as 35 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New precipitation amounts between three-quarters and one inch possible.

Thursday Night

A 30 percent chance of showers, mainly before 7pm. Partly cloudy, with a low around 45. Breezy, with a north northwest wind 15 to 20 mph, with gusts as high as 35 mph.

Friday

Sunny, with a high near 65.

Friday Night

Mostly clear, with a low around 45.



--------------------------------------

NANTAHALA AREA

Today

Showers likely, with thunderstorms also possible after 5pm. Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 70. South southeast wind 10 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

Tonight

Showers. The rain could be heavy at times. Patchy fog after 9pm. Low around 65. East southeast wind 10 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New precipitation amounts between three-quarters and one inch possible.

Thursday

Showers, mainly before 3pm. The rain could be heavy at times. High near 70. North wind 15 to 20 mph, with gusts as high as 30 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New precipitation amounts between a half and three-quarters of an inch possible.

Thursday Night

Partly cloudy, with a low around 45. Northwest wind 10 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph.

Friday

Sunny, with a high near 65.

Friday Night

Mostly clear, with lows near the lower 40s


--------------------------------------



GOES-16 GeoColor - True Color daytime, multispectral IR
4:12 am this morning (loop not available this morning)

GeoColor is a multispectral product composed of True Color (using a simulated green component) during the daytime, and an Infrared product that uses bands 7 and 13 at night. During the day, the imagery looks approximately as it would appear when viewed with human eyes from space. At night, the blue colors represent liquid water clouds such as fog and stratus, while gray to white indicate higher ice clouds, and the city lights come from a static database that was derived from the VIIRS Day Night Band.

Geocolor was developed at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) and STAR's Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch (RAMMB).


HAZARDS

Hazardous weather is not expected today.

A deep plume of tropical moisture will flow into the area today and tomorrow. This will increase the risk for heavy rainfall. Localized flash flooding will be possible across the higher terrain, but especially along the Blue Ridge escarpment.

Hurricane Michael will move north across the Gulf of Mexico and is expected to make landfall along the Florida panhandle today. This system likely will have some impact on the western Carolinas and northeast Georgia, with heavy rainfall and gusty winds possible mainly tonight through Thursday. All interests should closely follow the forecast of this tropical cyclone.


Macon Media maintains a Severe Weather Preparedness Page at http://thunderpigblog.blogspot.com/p/breaking-news-hub.html for those who are interested.

As always, you can check to see what advisories, watches, and warnings are in effect for Macon County by visiting http://is.gd/MACONWARN



GOES 16 - Band 15 - 12.3 µm - Dirty Longwave Window - IR (Precipitation)
4:12 am this morning (loop not available this morning)

12.3 µm - "Dirty" Longwave IR Window Band - 2 km resolution - Band 15 at 12.3 µm offers nearly continuous monitoring for numerous applications, though usually through a split window difference with a cleaner window channel. These differences can better estimate low-level moisture, volcanic ash, airborne dust/sand, sea surface temperature, and cloud particle size.


TROPICAL TIDBIT BY LEVI COWAN

Levi Cowan of TropicalTidbits.com has an update on Tropical Storm Michael. This video was posted last night. Levi is Macon Media's favorite tropical forecaster because he does not succumb to the temptation to hype tropical systems. He gives his opinions based on science, not emotion or the desire to garner more eyeballs to his product.




TROPICAL OUTLOOK

Tropical Weather Outlook
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL
200 AM EDT Wed Oct 10 2018

For the North Atlantic...Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:

The National Hurricane Center is issuing advisories on Hurricane Michael, located over the eastern Gulf of Mexico, on recently upgraded Hurricane Leslie, located over the central Atlantic Ocean, and on Tropical Storm Nadine, located over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean.

1. An area of low pressure is expected to develop over the west-central Caribbean Sea in a few days. Environmental conditions are expected to support gradual development over the weekend and early next week while the system moves slowly westward.

* Formation chance through 48 hours...low...near 0 percent.
* Formation chance through 5 days...medium...40 percent.




MACON CALENDAR

If you have an event you wish to be added to this calendar, please send the information, along with a flyer in pdf format or a high-quality photo, to editor@maconmedia.com. If you want text published, please include a paragraph with your photo, flyer or graphics. Please include date(s) and time(s).
There is no charge for civic, educational or nonprofit groups, except for groups or events that receive funding from the TDA, TDC, and EDC, where full rates apply.

Organizers of political events must make themselves available for a video interview at least 7 days before a political event they wish Macon Media to promote. Two weeks is the preferred time frame to maximize awareness.

Giles for Sheriff Meet and Greets

October 17th Highlands Library from 4pm-6pm.
October 19th Carson Community Center 5 pm-7pm.
October 27th Old Cowee School 3 pm- Hot Dog Cookout

Fontana Regional Library Catalog Changes Set for Oct 11th-15th

From Thursday, October 11 through Monday, October 15, the NC Cardinal library catalog (shared by Fontana Regional Library and more than 160 libraries across the state) will undergo necessary maintenance and upgrading. During that time, the online catalog will not be fully available either to patrons or to library staff. [LINK] http://thunderpigblog.blogspot.com/2018/09/fontana-regional-library-catalog.html

REACH Poetry Night

REACH of Macon County has scheduled a Poetry Night in honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month at the Ratheskeller for Wednesday, October 17th from 7 pm until the last poet has been heard. Learn more at https://thunderpigblog.blogspot.com/2018/10/reach-schedules-poetry-night-in-honor.html

REACH Purple Purse Challenge


During the month of October, REACH is participating in the Purple Purse Challenge. This Challenge unites nonprofits in a national competition to raise funds for life-changing services for domestic violence survivors. 100% of donations go directly to REACH and they allow REACH to compete for weekly cash prizes and bonus challenges supported by the Allstate Foundation!

You can make a donation securely online through the link below:
www.crowdrise.com/reachofmaconcounty-purplepurse2018

Thank you for your time and support!

Visit REACH of Macon County online at the following locations:

Facebook [LINK] https://www.facebook.com/REACHofMacon/

Website [LINK] https://www.reachofmaconcounty.org/

If you have an emergency situation regarding domestic violence, please call 911

REACH 24/7 Hotline:

Macon County 828-369-5544
Jackson County 828-586-8969


Uptown Gallery classes
(These are on-going classes – repeat weekly)

Free classes and open studio times are being offered at The Uptown Gallery in Franklin. Join others at a painting open studio session every Tuesday from 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm or on Thursday from 11:00 am – 3:00 pm.

Bring your own materials and join an on-going drawing course led by gallery artists on Fridays, from 11am – 2 pm. For information on days open, hours and additional art classes and workshops, contact the gallery on 30 East Main Street at (828) 349 – 4607.

National Alliance on Mental Illness
Appalachian South


Meets each Thursday at 7pm
The First Methodist Church Outreach Center
at the intersection of Harrison Ave. and West Main Street
(directly across from Lazy Hiker Brewery)

Come join our weekly support group for anyone suffering from mental illness and their family or friends. This includes Depression, Bipolar,8chizophrenia, PTSD, Substance Abuse, Etc.

Here you will find:
— others living with mental health challenges YOU ARE NOT ALONE
- learn coping skills and ?find hope in shared experience
- help learning how to break down stigma and guilt surrounding mental health
- how to live life with the expectation of a better a better future

Kay (706)970-9987 Denise (828)347-5000)

SYRINGE EXCHANGE PROGRAM

On January 1, 2017, the Syringe Exchange Program of Franklin began operating a comprehensive harm reduction program to address the opioid epidemic that is impacting western NC. Opioid overdose reversal kits including naloxone are available free of charge. If you have any questions about our services or if you know someone interested in volunteering, please contact Stephanie Almeida at 828-475-1920.



Sun and Moon


Sun

Begin civil twilight 7:10 a.m.
Sunrise 7:35 a.m.
Sun transit 1:20 p.m.
Sunset 7:05 p.m.
End civil twilight 7:30 p.m.


Moon

Moonrise 9:00 a.m.
Moon transit 2:47 p.m.
Moonset 8:27 p.m.


Phase of the Moon on October 10, 2018: Waxing Crescent with 3% of the Moon's visible disk illuminated.
Closest Primary Moon Phase: New Moon on October 8, 2018 at 11:47 p.m. (local daylight time)


Sky Guides for this week


Sky and Telescope Magazine 
Astronomy Magazine


There will be three solar and two lunar eclipses in 2018. [LINK]

Heavens Above has an Android App that will assist you in observing the sky and even has a satellite tracker that will let you know when the International Space Station and dozens of other satellites are overhead. [LINK]

Stellarium is also an app that will assist you in observing the sky. It is available in both Android [LINK] and iOS versions. [LINK]

CROWDFUNDING OR DAY SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES


If you receive value from what Macon Media provides to the community, please consider becoming a supporter and contribute at least a dollar a month.


Become a Patron!

If you have a business or event you are interested in sponsorship opportunities or underwriting coverage, send an email to editor@MaconMedia.com for more information. Serious inquiries only. Macon Media rewards early sponsors/underwriters with lifetime guaranteed low rates while newer sponsors/underwriters pay higher rates based on the date they first support Macon Media.

Thank You to the people who have been sending in donations and those businesses who are underwriting coverage of news and events. You have kept Macon Media online.

4:34 am on October 10, 2018

#WNCscan #MaconWx #MaconSafety


Data and information sources: Sources (except where otherwise credited): heavens-above.com, Ian Webster's Github, National Centers for Environmental Prediction, The National Weather Service, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, National Hurricane Center, Penn State University Electronic Wall Map, The State Climate Office of North Carolina, Storm Prediction Center, U.S. Naval Observatory, University of Utah Department of Atmospheric Sciences, and the Weather Prediction Center.

          "A Look to the Heavens"      Cache   Translate Page      
"Many spiral galaxies have bars across their centers. Even our own Milky Way Galaxy is thought to have a modest central bar. Prominently barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, featured here, was captured in spectacular detail in an image taken by the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope.
Click image for larger size.
Visible are dark filamentary dust lanes, young clusters of bright blue stars, redemission nebulas of glowing hydrogen gas, a long bright bar of stars across the center, and a bright active nucleus that likely houses a supermassive black hole. Light takes about 60 million years to reach us from NGC 1672, which spans about 75,000 light years across. NGC 1672, which appears toward the constellation of the Dolphinfish (Dorado), is being studied to find out how a spiral bar contributes to star formation in a galaxy's central regions."
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap181009.html

          10/10/2018: NEWS: Hubble hobbling along      Cache   Translate Page      

Two of NASA’s premiere space telescopes, Hubble and Kepler, are currently out of commission — sad, if not entirely surprising, news for astronomers who depend on data from NASA’s aging fleet. The 28-year-old Hubble went into temporary safe mode on...
          Simulations at the Dwarf Scale: From Violent Dwarfs at Cosmic Dawn and Cosmic Noon to Quiet Discs today      Cache   Translate Page      
arXiv:1810.04148

by: Ceverino, Daniel
Abstract:
Dwarf galaxies with stellar masses around 10^9 Msun can be explored at high and low redshifts and they give a glimpse of the different conditions of galaxy formation at different epochs. Using a large sample of about 300 zoom-in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation I will briefly describe the formation of dwarfs at this mass scale at 3 different epochs: cosmic dawn (Ceverino, Klessen, Glover 2018), cosmic noon (Ceverino, Primack, Dekel 2015), and today (Ceverino et al. 2017). I will describe the FirstLight simulations of first galaxies at redshifts 5-15. These first dwarfs have extremely high star formation efficiencies due to high gas fractions and high gas accretion rates. These simulations will make predictions that will be tested for the first time with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). At cosmic noon, z = 2, galaxy formation is still a very violent and dynamic process. The VELA simulations have generated a set of dispersion-dominated dwarfs that show an elongated morphology due to their prolate dark-matter halos. Between z = 1 and 0, the AGORA simulation shows the formation of a low-mass disc due to slow gas accretion. The disc agrees with many local scaling relations, such as the stellar-mass-halo-mass and the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation.
          X-ray and multi-epoch optical/UV investigations of BAL to non-BAL quasar transformations      Cache   Translate Page      
arXiv:1810.03625

by: Sameer
Abstract:
We report on an X-ray and optical/UV study of eight Broad Absorption Line (BAL) to non-BAL transforming quasars at $z\,\approx\,$1.7-2.2 over 0.29-4.95 rest-frame years with at least three spectroscopic epochs for each quasar from the SDSS, BOSS, $Gemini$, and ARC 3.5-m telescopes. New $Chandra$ observations obtained for these objects show their values of $\alpha_{\rm ox}$ and $\Delta{\alpha}_{\rm ox}$, as well as their spectral energy distributions, are consistent with those of non-BAL quasars. Moreover, our targets have X-ray spectral shapes that are, on average, consistent with weakened absorption with an effective power-law photon index of $\Gamma_{\rm eff}\,=\,1.69^{+0.25}_{-0.25}$. The newer $Gemini$ and ARC 3.5-m spectra reveal that the BAL troughs have remained absent since the BOSS observations where the BAL disappearance was discovered. The X-ray and optical/UV results in tandem are consistent with at least the X-ray absorbing material moving out of the line-of-sight, leaving an X-ray unabsorbed non-BAL quasar. The UV absorber might have become more highly ionized (in a shielding-gas scenario) or also moved out of the line-of-sight (in a wind-clumping scenario).
          Gold From Both Ends Of The Telescope       Cache   Translate Page      
The weekly chart for gold perhaps best encapsulates how gold traders and gold investors must feel when considering the price action.
          ==> Meade Lightbridge 10" (Gewerbliche Anzeigen)      Cache   Translate Page      
Neu im Gewerbliche Anzeigen - ==> Meade Lightbridge 10" (von apmtelescopes)


          Jägers/USA 6"F/5 Achromatisches Teleskop (Gewerbliche Anzeigen)      Cache   Translate Page      
Neu im Gewerbliche Anzeigen - Jägers/USA 6"F/5 Achromatisches Teleskop (von apmtelescopes)


          APM HI-FW 12.5mm 84° 1,25" Weitwinkelokular (Gewerbliche Anzeigen)      Cache   Translate Page      
Neu im Gewerbliche Anzeigen - APM HI-FW 12.5mm 84° 1,25" Weitwinkelokular (von apmtelescopes)


          Bright Interloper      Cache   Translate Page      

The globular cluster Messier 30 appears to be an interloper from another galaxy. The dense cluster probably belonged to a galaxy that was consumed by the Milky Way in the distant past. This Hubble Space Telescope view shows the cluster's dense center and some of its less-populous outskirts. The entire cluster spans about 300 light-years. It is in the constellation Capricornus. [NASA]

Hubble Space Telescope view of Messier 30

          Messier 30      Cache   Translate Page      

An interloper from another galaxy scoots low across the south on October evenings. It’s a tight family of stars — hundreds of thousands of them. The stars probably belonged to another galaxy that was consumed by the Milky Way in the distant past.

Messier 30 is in the lower left corner of Capricornus. It’s low in the south at nightfall. The sea-goat’s brightest stars form a wide triangle. And bright orange Mars is passing through the constellation right now, making it easier to spot.

Messier 30 is a globular cluster — a ball of stars that spans about 300 light-years. Most of the stars are concentrated in the cluster’s dense core. The numbers trail off as you move toward the cluster’s edge. Anything that wanders too far from the center gets stripped away by the gravity of the rest of the galaxy.

The Milky Way is home to more than 150 globulars. Astronomers have discovered, though, that several of them have come from other galaxies. And that includes M30.

The main clue to its origin is its orbit. As it circles the center of the galaxy, M 30 moves in the opposite direction from most of the stars and star clusters. The only way for such a massive cluster to move against the traffic is if it came from outside the galaxy. So Messier 30 isn’t a native of the Milky Way. Instead, it was pulled in by the Milky Way’s powerful gravity — making it a refugee from another galaxy.


Script by Damond Benningfield

StarDate: 
Wednesday, October 10, 2018
Teaser: 
An interloper from another galaxy

          Celstron 11" EdgeHD Ultimate Package with Many Extras      Cache   Translate Page      
For Sale

Celstron 11" EdgeHD Ultimate Package with Many Extras

I have had this optical tube for a couple years and have used it with planetary and a limited use with deep space astrophotography. It is currently collimated really well. This is for local pick up only with cash only in Taylor, Michigan 48180. Here is a breakdown of what is included, cost invested and the price I am asking for with a very deep deep discount:

• Celestron EdgeHD 11 OTA - 11" f/10 Aplanatic SCT OTA - CGE Dovetail - 91050-XLT ($3,499.00 New)
• Starlight Instruments Feather Touch Micro Telescope Focuser for Celestron CPC-11 & Edge HD 1100 Telescopes - FTM-CPC11 ($345.00 New)
• Astrozap Dew Shield ($62.50 New)
• Farpoint Astro Bahtinov Focus Mask for Celestron 11" SCT - FP412 ($25.00 New)
• Celestron Telescope Case for 8/9.25/11 NexStar, EdgeHD or Evolution OTA - 94004 ($339.95 New)
• Rigel Auto Focuser Minus USB NStep Controller ($203.85 New)
• Telrad Finder Sight ($46.00 New)
• Telrad Dew Shroud ($30.00 New)

Includes all original manuals and even original shipping packaging.

Total investment with everything listed was $4,550.50.

Asking only $3,000! Wow!!
Contact me as soon as possible before it is gone!

3000.00
          Earth-Sized Telescope Aims to Snap a Photo of Our Galactic Black Hole      Cache   Translate Page      
none
          La fausse enluminure de la science musulmane      Cache   Translate Page      

Insert-telescopes-164082069.jpg

La fausse enluminure représentant des astronomes musulmans [en couverture d’un livre universitaire américain] est loin d’être un cas isolé. (…) Ces images contemporaines ne sont en fait pas des « reproductions », mais des « productions », voire des faux, faites pour séduire un public contemporain en prétendant représenter la science d’un passé islamique lointain.

Depuis les boutiques touristiques d’Istanbul, ces travaux se sont aventurés très loin. Ils ont trouvé leur place dans des affiches de conférence, des sites Web éducatifs et les collections de musées et de bibliothèques.

Le problème ne se limite pas aux touristes naïfs et aux universitaires parfois dupes : nombre de ceux qui étudient et enseignent l’histoire de la science islamique se sont engagés dans une sorte d’escroquerie similaire. Il existe aujourd’hui des musées entiers remplis d’objets réimaginés, façonnés au cours des 20 dernières années mais destinés à représenter les vénérables traditions scientifiques du monde islamique.

Lire une partie du texte français ici.

Le texte originel anglais ici, avec plusieurs autres fausses miniatures.


          Brit Amateur Astronomer Captures UFO Leaving Moon      Cache   Translate Page      
by Callum Hoare               October 3, 2018                  (dailystar.co.uk) • Jason Callum from the town of Bracknell in Berkshire county, southeast England, was using his telescope to look at craters on the Moon. To his astonishment, a black object moved across the lunar […]
(Visited 28 times, 28 visits today)

          Ecco il più grande telescopio per raggi gamma al mondo: studierà l’universo violento      Cache   Translate Page      

È stato inaugurato alle Canarie che già ospita l'importantissimo osservatorio sul monte Teide. Lo strumento è il prototipo dei 118 che saranno installati grazie al Cherenkov Telescope Array Observatory (Ctao), ha un diametro di 23 metri, un'altezza di 45 e pesa circa 100 tonnellate

L'articolo Ecco il più grande telescopio per raggi gamma al mondo: studierà l’universo violento proviene da Il Fatto Quotidiano.


          Rings upon rings      Cache   Translate Page      

This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals a spiral galaxy named Messier 95 (also known as M95 or NGC 3351). Located about 35 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo (The Lion), this swirling spiral was discovered by astronomer Pierre Méchain in 1781, and catalogued by French astronomer Charles Messier just four days later. Messier was primarily a comet hunter, and was often left frustrated by objects in the sky that resembled comets but turned out not to be. To help other astronomers avoid confusing these objects in the future, he created his famous catalogue of Messier objects.

Most definitely not a comet, Messier 95 is actually a barred spiral galaxy. The galaxy has a bar cutting through its centre, surrounded by an inner ring currently forming new stars. Also our own Milky Way is a barred spiral.

As well as hosting this stellar nursery, Messier 95 is a known host of the dramatic and explosive final stages in the lives of massive stars: supernovae. In March 2016 a spectacular supernova named SN 2012aw was observed in the outer regions of one of Messier 95’s spiral arms. Once the light from the supernova had faded, astronomers were able to compare observations of the region before and after the explosion to find out which star had “disappeared” — the progenitor star. In this case, the star was an especially huge red supergiant up to 26 times more massive than the Sun.


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          20 Questions To Ask At House Interior Design | house interior design      Cache   Translate Page      

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When you’re anecdotic architectonics styles, you may be application the words “modern” and “contemporary” interchangeably—and you wouldn’t be alone. Though they’re absolutely absolutely different, the words themselves accept agnate definitions, so you’d anticipate the architectonics styles would, too. But you (and anybody else) would be wrong. Though it ability be one of the best frequently acclimated architectonics words, avant-garde architectonics is apparently one of the best mis-defined architectonics styles, so we’re activity to set the almanac straight. This is what avant-garde architectonics absolutely is.

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Modern architectonics is a appointed time period, from the aboriginal to mid-20th century. It originated at the about-face of the century, with roots in both German and Scandinavian design, and absolutely acquired acceptance throughout the aboriginal bisected of the century. Both mid-century avant-garde (popular in the ’40s-’60s), and post-modern architectonics acquired from avant-garde design. “Modernism was the approaching in the aboriginal midcentury. It acclimatized the adequacy of accouterment to action affordable apartment and appliance solutions to the masses. This abreast architecture, interiors, furnishings, and art,” says Los Angeles based autogenous designer, Natalie Myers.

Contemporary design, on the added hand, refers to the appearance of the present day. It’s difficult to pin bottomward and define, because abreast architectonics is consistently evolving. It’s a absorption of the now, and will acceptable attending actual altered 50 years from now than it does today.

“What may be advised abreast now could be a cursory trend, or may accomplish a abiding consequence that will transcend this era,” says autogenous artist Katie Hodges.

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“I anticipate aggregate in your abode should accept raison d’etre.”

Preceding avant-garde architectonics were Gothic, Renaissance, and Victorian styles, accumulation abundant textures, ornamentation, and affluence of aphotic and affecting elements. Avant-garde architectonics alone these, in favor of clean, beeline lines, aerial spaces, and an all-embracing abridgement of fussiness. Basically, anatomy follows function. “I anticipate aggregate in your abode should accept raison d’etre. If you don’t apperceive why it’s there, get rid of it,” says potter, designer, and columnist Jonathan Adler.

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White, beiges, and alike some shades of atramentous are the capital blush palette for avant-garde design, but it can absorb blush as an accent, so continued as it leans appear earthy. Avant-garde architectonics has a ample accent on accustomed materials, so befitting things in a added accustomed blush palette is key. When a adventurous blush is used, it’s never to awning an absolute wall, but rather is acclimated sparingly to accommodate a focal point and advice breach up neutrals. “Clean curve over curves. Neutral colors and accustomed abstracts over adventurous hues and constructed abstracts and patterns,” says Myers.

Basically, you appetite as few walls as possible. Furniture, instead, should differentiate spaces, like a kitchen adverse accouterment a beheld acumen from a active or dining room. Abundant accustomed ablaze is additionally all-important to advice a amplitude feel added aerial and open, so windows are kept unadorned.

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The avant-garde architectonics era ushered in new abstracts from which to assemble furniture. Instead of abstraction out of wood, there was steel, molded plywood, and plastic. It’s all about arresting a antithesis amid authentic action and aesthetics. It needs to be practical, but still appealing. One of the big markers of avant-garde architectonics was the Wassily chair, a seamless, tubular animate armchair developed in 1925 that radically afflicted the access to appliance design.

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The Eames chair, one of the defining pieces of the era and the one you best acceptable apperceive by name, was fabricated of molded plywood and covering in 1956, as allotment of a ambition to advance appliance that was both affordable and able to be mass-produced. It was aggressive by the English club chair.

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Finally, the tulip chair, which charcoal one of the best accepted avant-garde appliance pieces today, was a abandonment from annihilation that came afore it, with a armchair featuring alone one leg in the center, fabricated of fiberglass-reinforced resin. You may accessory both of these added with mid-century avant-garde architectonics specifically, which hey, is a annex of the avant-garde family, so you’re appropriate on that count.

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          Voyager 2 Approaches Interstellar Space      Cache   Translate Page      

An increase in cosmic rays indicates that Voyager 2 is approaching the heliopause, where the solar wind gives way to the interstellar medium.

The post Voyager 2 Approaches Interstellar Space appeared first on Sky & Telescope.


          Hubble Telescope Put Into Safe Mode Following Gyroscope Failure      Cache   Translate Page      

The post Hubble Telescope Put Into Safe Mode Following Gyroscope Failure appeared first on Popular Mechanics.


          Aussie telescope almost doubles known number of mysterious 'fast radio bursts'      Cache   Translate Page      
Australian astronomers have nearly doubled the known number of 'fast radio bursts'-- powerful flashes of radio waves from deep space. The team's discoveries include the closest and brightest fast radio bursts ever detected and they have proved that fast radio bursts are coming from the other side of the Universe rather than from our own galactic neighbourhood.
          Abre en Canarias el primero de los telescopios CTA de rayos gamma      Cache   Translate Page      
   El primer prototipo de los 4 grandes telescopios de la matriz en el hemisferio norte del observatorio CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) fue inaugurado este 10 de octubre en La Palma, Islas Canarias.
          Astronomers reveal 20 new Fast Radio Bursts      Cache   Translate Page      
A new radio telescope increases the number of mysterious high powered emissions from beyond the galaxy. Andrew Masterson reports.
          Anselmo Pestana subraya el papel de La Palma “en el avance hacia el futuro en materia de ciencia y astronomía”      Cache   Translate Page      

El presidente del Cabildo de La Palma, Anselmo Pestana, ha destacado este miércoles el papel de la isla “en el avance hacia el futuro en materia de ciencia y astronomía”. En estos términos se ha pronunciado durante su intervención en el acto de inauguración del prototipo LST 1 (Large Size Telescope) de la Red Cherenkov, que hoy ha tenido lugar en el Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos y que ha sido presidido por el ministro de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades, Pedro Duque, y que ha contado con la presencia de, entre otras personalidades, del Premio Nobel de Física 2015, Takaaki Kajita, se informa en nota de prensa.

Ante los representantes del consorcio internacional que ha promovido la construcción de este gigante de la ciencia en la isla, Pestana ha asegurado que “el prototipo LST 1, el mayor telescopio Cherenkov del hemisferio norte, que hoy inauguramos, desempeñará un papel fundamental en la investigación científica internacional”.

El presidente del Cabildo ha felicitado al Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, asegurando que el Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos es “el epicentro del conocimiento”. En términos similares se ha pronunciado el ministro de Ciencia, Innovación, Ciencia y Universidades, Pedro Duque, que hoy ha puesto el acento en señalar que “es un orgullo que La Palma, Canarias y España sigan estando en primera línea de actualidad en cuestiones de astrofísica”. 

Por su parte, Pestana, tras destacar las asombrosas características técnicas del LST como el telescopio más potente en la detección de rayos gamma, ha apuntado que el emplazamiento donde se pone en marcha “es un espacio de unión y colaboración entre países y continentes que alberga una de las baterías de telescopios más completa del mundo, un lugar esencial para los científicos que cada año visitan o desarrollan su labor en estas instalaciones en busca de datos precisos para sus investigaciones, además de ampliar su campo de estudio o abrir nuevas vías que nos ayudan a comprender las claves e interrogantes del Universo”.

Además, el presidente se ha referido a la implicación de la población de la isla con la Ley del Cielo que controla la contaminación lumínica, radioeléctrica, atmosférica y el tráfico aéreo y ha destacado el impulso que administraciones públicas, empresas, asociaciones, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias y demás agentes implicados, han aportado para abrirse paso en el producto de astroturismo que hace más competitiva a la Isla.

Por último Pestana también aludió a las posibilidades que mantiene La Palma como alternativa a Hawái para albergar el Telescopio de Treinta Metros “que consolidaría, aún más si cabe, como líder mundial, al Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos”.


          El Roque potencia su capacidad para descifrar el universo extremo con un telescopio sin precedentes      Cache   Translate Page      

El Roque de Los Muchachos, en las cumbres de Garafía, potenciará su capacidad para descifrar el universo más violento y extremo con una serie de telescopios sin precedentes en la Astrofísica de las altas energías. El prototipo de gran tamaño (el LST-1) de la Red de Telescopios Cherenkov (CTA por sus siglas en inglés), inaugurado este miércoles en el Observatorio de La Palma, formará parte de una nueva infraestructura científica que se implantará en los dos hemisferios para detectar, con una precisión y sensibilidad sin parangón, rayos gamma “en un amplio rango de energías, lo que proporcionará una visión completamente nueva del cielo”, aseguran desde el Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC). Este prototipo, "una vez que se pruebe satisfactoriamente su funcionamiento, será reconocido como elemento de CTA, convirtiéndose así oficialmente en el primer telescopio" de la citada red, indican desde el Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades.

El relevante acto  de la comunidad científica ha contado con la presencia del ministro de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades del Gobierno de España, Pedro Duque, y del Premio Nobel de Física 2015 y director del Instituto de Investigación de Rayos Cósmicos (ICRR) de Tokio, Takaaki Kajita.

Asimismo, entre los más de 200 invitados se encontraban representantes de los diversos centros que forman parte del consorcio CTA y del sub-consorcio que construye los LST, miembros de las instituciones usuarias del Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos (ORM) y una amplia representación de autoridades políticas.

La ceremonia de inauguración, conducida por el administrador del ORM, Juan Carlos Pérez Arencibia, comenzó con los discursos. Intervinieron Rafael Rebolo, director del Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC); Federico Ferrini, director gerente de CTAO; Masahiro Teshima, director del Instituto Max Planck de Física de Múnich, investigador principal y portavoz de la colaboración LST; Takaaki Kajita, Premio Nobel de Física 2015 y director Instituto de Investigación de Rayos Cósmicos (ICRR) de Tokio; Masashi Haneda, vicepresidente de la Universidad de Tokio; Takeshi Nakajima, cónsul general de Japón en Canarias; Anselmo Pestana, presidente del Cabildo de La Palma; Nieves Lady Nieves Barreto, consejera de Política Territorial del Gobierno de Canarias, y Pedro Duque, Ministro de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades del Gobierno de España.

Tras los discursos se procedió a la ceremonia de corte de cinta múltiple, a la que se invitó al alcalde del municipio de Garafía, Yeray Rodríguez. El presidente del Comité Directivo del LST, Manel Martínez,  fue el encargado de conducir este acto, que se realizó siguiendo un ritual japonés en el que los participantes, provistos de tijeras y guantes blancos, se situaron de pie y en línea delante de una cinta roja con escarapelas y cortaron, a la vez, cada uno de los tramos.

Pedro Duque calificó de “importantísimo” el acto de inauguración del telescopio y dijo que es “un gran acierto que el cielo de Canarias y de La Palma se utilice en beneficio de todos los españoles”. “Realmente es muy importante para España que tengamos una continuidad muy fuerte de la tradición de astrofísica con el cielo tan limpio de Canarias, y en concreto de La Palma, y hemos sido capaces de convertir ese cielo en una capacidad científica de primer nivel mundial y una capacidad tecnológica para el país”. “Estamos muy orgullosos de la tradición de más de 30 años de la observación astrofísica en Canarias, pero esta nueva era de la Red de Telescopios Cherenkov producirán grandes avances en la física de alta energía”, aseguró.  “En Canarias se utiliza el don de la naturaleza que es el cielo para el beneficio de la ciencia”, insistió. Respecto al telescopio TMT, aseguró que “el compromiso del Gobierno de España es total si viene a Canarias, buscaremos fondos de donde sea para hacer una contribución sustancial”. “Estamos muy ilusionados y esperamos que venga”, concluyó.

La consejera de Política Territorial del Gobierno de Canarias, Nieves Lady Barreto, disculpó la presencia en el acto del presidente del Ejecutivo regional, Fernando Clavijo, por “motivos de agenda parlamentaria”. “Me ha pedido que les traslade, en su nombre, su enhorabuena por la puesta en funcionamiento del primero de los cuatro telescopios Cherenkov que acogerá el Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos y la gran satisfacción que desde el Gobierno de Canarias sentimos al ver cómo estas instalaciones siguen creciendo para convertirse en el mejor observatorio astronómico del hemisferio norte”. “Desde el Gobierno de Canarias seguimos apostando y trabajando para poder acoger también el proyecto del TMT, que será el telescopio terrestre más avanzado y potente de la historia”. Subrayó que “el presente y el futuro de La Palma está ligado al presente y futuro del Observatorio. Del crecimiento de este espacio, reducto privilegiado de Europa para la ciencia y la investigación astronómica, depende en gran medida el crecimiento de La Palma como isla con la que soñamos: queremos ser el binomio perfecto entre naturaleza privilegiada y tecnología avanzada”. Nieves Lady Barreto tuvo palabras de recuerdo para el socialista Abilio Reyes, ex alcalde de Garafía, recientemente fallecido. 

Por su parte, el presidente del Cabildo, Anselmo Pestana, aseguró que el Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos “sigue siendo el epicentro del conocimiento, un espacio de unión y colaboración entre países y continentes que alberga una de las baterías de telescopios más completa del mundo”. Añadió que “el gran reconocimiento y prestigio de la astronomía de España ha situado a La Palma en el mapa de la ciencia internacional, todo ello propiciado por las características únicas de este territorio: la orografía de la Isla, su posición en el Atlántico y su entorno natural han propiciado que el Roque de los Muchachos sea uno de los mejores lugares del mundo para la observación del cielo y de los astros”. “Todo ello protegido por la Ley del Cielo, una norma que la sociedad palmera ha sabido adaptar a su vida cotidiana, demostrando, una vez más, saber convivir con todos los atractivos que nos ofrece esta Reserva de la Biosfera de la Unesco”. Pestana recordó también “el compromiso de la sociedad y las instituciones que nos llevó a la declaración de la Isla como primera Reserva Starlight”. Hizo también alusión a su intervención al producto del astroturismo que “hace más competitiva a nuestra Isla”.

El director del Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), Rafael Rebolo, aseguró que “el IAC tiene la clara voluntad de servir al avance de la ciencia ofreciendo sus observatorios del Tiede y del Roque de los Muchachos, reconocidos entre los mejores del mundo, para que la comunidad científica internacional pueda instalar en ellos los más avanzados instrumentos para la exploración y estudio del Universo”. “El LST1 es una maravilla de la tecnología hecha realidad gracias a que ha recibido aportaciones de cientos de científicos e ingenieros, todos movidos por el afán de impulsar las fronteras del conocimiento”. “Quisiera finalizar resaltando la importancia de la colaboración científica internacional para conseguir realizar proyectos muy complejos que un país no puede abordar de forma aislada. Ese espíritu de colaboración que vivimos día a día en nuestros observatorios, con nuestros socios en proyectos como este, en otros del pasado y en los que vendrán, es esencial para impulsar la ciencia, pero también para acercar nuestras sociedades, para conocernos mejor y, en muchos sentidos, no solo en el científico, contribuir al progreso de la humanidad”. 

Red de Telescopios Cherenkov                                            

El LST-1, el prototipo de los cuatro telescopios de gran tamaño (Large Size Telescopes),  forma parte de la Red de Telescopios Cherenkov (CTA, por sus siglas en inglés). Esta red estará dedicada a la observación de rayos gamma de muy alta energía y constará de más de 100 telescopios, de tres tamaños diferentes, localizados en los dos hemisferios. En el complejo científico ubicado en las cumbres de Garafía (hemisferio norte) se instalarán 19 (cuatro de gran tamaño y 15 telescopios de tamaño mediano, MST por su siglas en inglés). El resto se emplazará en Chile (hemisferio sur).

Desde el Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades, en una nota de prensa, se indica que "una vez que este nuevo telescopio pruebe satisfactoriamente su funcionamiento será reconocido como elemento de CTA, convirtiéndose así oficialmente en el primer telescopio" de la citada red.  Apuntan que "este hecho supondrá además el empuje definitivo para la construcción y puesta en marcha de los tres restantes telescopios LST de La Palma, así como otros cuatro adicionales que se construirán en las instalaciones del Observatorio Europeo Austral (ESO) en el Paranal (Chile)".

Un telescopio sin precedentes

Los LST, con un espejo de 23 metros de diámetro, son los telescopios más grandes de la red CTA. El LST-1 es el prototipo de los 4 telescopios de este tipo que se instalarán en el observatorio del hemisferio norte, situado en el Roque de Los Muchachos (ORM), y estarán rodeados de varios telescopios de 12 metros de diámetro o Medium Size Telescopes (MST). En el observatorio sur, en Chile, además de estos dos tipos de telescopios, se instalará un tercer tipo de 6 metros de diámetro denominados Small Size Telescopes (SST). En conjunto, CTA podrá detectar, con una precisión y sensibilidad sin precedentes, rayos gamma en un amplio rango de energías, lo que proporcionará una visión completamente nueva del cielo.

El LST-1, se explica en una nota del IAC, tiene una superficie reflectante de 400 metros cuadrados (m2) sostenida por una estructura de tubos de fibra de carbono y de acero. Mide 45 metros de alto y pesa alrededor de 100 toneladas. Sin embargo,  es extremadamente ágil, con la capacidad de reposicionarse en 20 segundos para capturar señales de estallidos de rayos gamma (o GRBs por sus siglas en inglés). En general, los rayos gamma de muy alta energía que detectarán los LSTs proceden de objetos distantes más allá de nuestra galaxia, como los núcleos activos de galaxia o agujeros negros supermasivos.

El equipo del proyecto del LST está formado por más de 200 científicos de diez países. Japón, Alemania y España son los mayores contribuyentes del consorcio LST, en el que también participan Francia, Italia, Brasil, Suecia, India y Croacia. En España forman parte de la colaboración el Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), el Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE), el Centro de Investigaciones Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), el Institut de Ciencies de l’Espai (ICE), la Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Grupo de Altas Energías, UCM-GAE, y Electrónica, UCM-ELEC), la Universidad de Barcelona (Departament d’Astronomia i Meteorologia, ICC-UB), el Port de Informació Científica(PIC) y la Universidad de Jaén.

El Proyecto CTA,  informa el Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades, se encuentra en proceso de convertirse en un ERIC (Consorcio Europeo de Infraestructura de Investigación) y se sustenta en la cooperación de más de 1.200 investigadores que trabajan en 200 centros de investigación de 32 países. 

España aporta 40 millones de euros al proyecto CTA-Norte, lo que supone la mitad del coste de su construcción. La infraestructura CTA está formada por dos observatorios, uno en cada hemisferio del planeta. La red estará compuesta por unos 120 telescopios distribuidos entre los dos hemisferios.


          New telescope almost doubles known number of mysterious 'fast radio bursts'      Cache   Translate Page      
Astronomers have nearly doubled the known number of 'fast radio bursts'-- powerful flashes of radio waves from deep space. The team's discoveries include the closest and brightest fast radio bursts ever detected and they have proved that fast radio bursts are coming from the other side of the Universe rather than from our own galactic neighborhood.
          Scientists claim we haven’t found alien life because we haven’t been looking hard enough      Cache   Translate Page      
If intelligent alien life exists somewhere in space it's abundantly clear that we haven't made meaningful contact with it yet. Various scientific bodies have devoted themselves to searching for signs of extraterrestrial intelligence and come up totally blank, but why? The famous Fermi paradox, named for physicist Enrico Fermi, asks if life is indeed common or even not-super-rare in the universe, why haven't we seen evidence of it yet? After all, we've been gazing into space for a while now, listening with high-powered radio telescopes and sending out our own signals in a feeble attempt at alerting ET to our existence, right? A new research effort attempts to put all this in perspective and arrives at a simple answer: We haven't found life because we're just not looking hard enough. Researchers from Pennsylvania State University decided to attempt to quantify the amount of searching humans have actually done, comparing that effort with what we think we know about the size of the universe. Ultimately, the team arrived at the conclusion that efforts like SETI — the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence — are tiny drops in an absolutely massive bucket. The researchers explain that mankind can only realistically search for alien communications out to a distance of around 30,000 light years with modern technology. That's a mere stone's throw in astronomical terms, and when you consider that the Milky Way — just one of countless galaxies that we can see — is 100,000 light years across, it's clear that we're really only just scratching the surface. For added perspective, the team calculated how much of space we've actually taken the time to explore, comparing that to the area that we haven't even begun to search. As MIT Technology Review explains, if the entire search area is the size of Earth's oceans, humans have sporadically searched an area about the size of a hot tub. Put simply, we may think we're doing a good job of keeping our eyes on the skies for evidence of alien civilizations, but in truth we're barely doing anything at all.
          Our Secret Powers by Terje G. Simonsen - Book Blitz and Giveaway      Cache   Translate Page      

This post is part of a virtual book tour organized by Goddess Fish Promotions. Terje G. Simonsen will be awarding a $25 Amazon or Barnes and Noble GC to a randomly drawn winner via rafflecopter during the tour. Click on the tour banner to see the other stops on the tour.

Is the paranormal normal?

Many readers will be surprised when learning that reputable scientists, among them several Nobel laureates, have claimed that telepathy is a reality. Their curiosity will increase when reading that Cleopatra’s lost palace and Richard III’s burial place were recovered by means of clairvoyance. And some will think it to be science fiction when finding out about Stargate—the espionage program where the American military and CIA engaged in the development of psychic spies!

Simonsen, a Norwegian historian of ideas, introduces an array of entertaining paranormal tales from history, archaeology, anthropology and psychology, and presents scientific research that has provided fascinating results. He argues that the stories we hear about telepathy, clairvoyance and precognition ought not to be dismissed as superstition

In step with spiritual and occult traditions, the author suggests that consciousness is not limited to our own head. Rather he thinks that all humans (and perhaps all living beings) are linked together in a “Mental Internet.’ Via this network we may exchange ‘telepathic emails’ with friends and family and make clairvoyant ‘downloads’ of information. Thus perhaps what we usually call ‘supernatural’ is completely natural but little understood communications via this Mental Internet?

Our Secret Powers gives us a engaged and entertaining analysis of a controversial subject and would make an excellent travel companion.

"Superb survey of the paranormal... Although serious in content, it is written in a light, often humorous, style which is a delight to read. As someone who has myself made a lifelong study of the paranormal, I cannot recommend it highly enough." ~ fantasy author, Herbie Brennan

"Simonsen describes his book as "A travelogue from the twilight zone,"but he is far too modest. Our Secret Powers is a sprawling work, meticulously researched, in which the author deftly, and with engaging wit, pulls together the various strands of "psi"--telepathy, clairvoyance, precognition,telekinesis, and healing--and presents them for our consideration." ~ Pulitzer-prize winner, Teresa Carpenter


Read an Excerpt

Based on this idea, we launch a quite simple model, called the “Mental Internet.” The basic metaphor here is that somewhat in the way our computers are linked together via the Internet, the ‘consciousnesses’ of all humans, and perhaps all living beings, are linked together via some sort of Mental Internet. Consciousness, like the Internet, is—on some level—something that we are all doing together; it is networking. And telepathy is the communication that drives this network.

I therefore invite the reader to engage in a little thought experiment throughout the book: namely that an Internet Model of consciousness may have some relevance. Galileo once invited the Inquisition to look through his telescope in order to see what he himself had seen. But, as we know, the inquisitors were not very keen on having their horizons expanded and instead muttered murkily of ‘the work of the Devil.’ However, I take it for granted that the reader has a radically more open attitude than those darkened souls, and I am therefore confident that my invitation will be well received.

I find it intriguing to think that our everyday perception of Space and Time may, in some respects, be merely a mental frame, a habit. And therefore it might be possible to think outside the box in a more radical way. The proposed thought experiment about a Mental Internet allows for this, and telepathy can then be considered as the ‘emails’ sent and the ‘downloads’ made via this mental network. Many phenomena that otherwise would appear inexplicable will in light of this model fall quite nicely into place. More (much more) about this later!

About the Author:
Terje G. Simonsen is an author with a Ph.D. in the History of Ideas. He has increasingly focused his attention on the esoteric and occult traditions and on paranormal phenomena, as telepathy, clairvoyance, precognition, telekinesis, healing etc. Recently he published the highly acclaimed Our Secret Powers, based on his extraordinary knowledge within this field. Elegantly and with great personal wit and insight, he discusses parapsychological phenomena such as telepathy, clairvoyance, and precognition.

Simonsen has had his work praised by several of the world’s most renowned experts on the paranormal: The bestselling parapsychologist, Dean Radin, chief scientist at the Institute of Noetic Sciences, says: ‘As an encyclopedic introduction to the psychic side of the fascinating but puzzling domain known as the paranormal, there is no better choice than Our Secret Powers.” And Stanley Krippner, expert on hypnosis, shamanism and altered states of consciousness, former leader of two departments in the American Psychological Association, says: “This is an outstanding book and it deserves all the attention it can get. Not only is Our Secret Powers a book for all seasons, it is a book for all reasons!’”

http://www.paripublishing.com/authors/terje-gerotti-simonsen
https://www.amazon.com/author/terjesimonsen

Buy link Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/8895604334
Buy link Amazon.UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Our-Secret-Powers-Clairvoyance-Precognition/dp/8895604334
Buy link Pari Publishing: http://www.paripublishing.com/books/our-secret-powers

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          Se inaugura en Canarias un «supertelescopio» Cherenkov de 45 metros de alto      Cache   Translate Page      
Este miércoles se ha inaugurado el LST-1 (siglas de «Large Size Telescope») en el Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, en La Palma, Canarias. Se trata de un gran telescopio que es capaz de captar la radiación Cherenkov (rayos ultravioleta) de la atmósfera, que se genera cuando hasta la Tierra llega la energía de potentes fuentes astrofísicas, como núcleos galácticos. Este telescopio, que alcanza una altura de 45 metros y una masa de 100 toneladas, es un prototipo de cuatro telescopios que se emplazarán en este observatorio. Todos ellos formarán parte de la red de Telescopios Cherenkov (CTA), una iniciativa internacional para construir una ambiciosa red global de instrumentos de este tipo. El LST-1 ha sido inaugurado en un acto al que han acudido más de 200 personalidades, incluyendo al ministro de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades, Pedro Duque, quien ha dicho que los telescopios de la red CTA probablemente descubrirán «cosas que no somos capaces de imaginar». El ministro de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades, Pedro Duque (6i), entre otras autoridades - EFE El ministro ha destacado la importancia de este tipo de instalaciones para continuar con la tradición de los estudios de astrofísica en España y ha subrayado que se ha sido capaz de usar el cielo limpio de Canarias para la investigación científica. La mayor red del mundo Está previsto que este instrumento forme parte de la que va a ser la mayor red del mundo capaz de captar fuentes de rayos gamma, (recordemos, a través de la detección de radiación ultravioleta en la atmósfera). Contará con instrumentos de cinco a diez veces más potentes que los telescopios actuales. Hasta ahora, se conocen cerca de 150 fuentes emisoras de rayos gamma. La mayoría son núcleos de galaxias (en cuyo centro hay agujeros negros supermasivos) o estrellas binarias. Muchas de estas fuentes han sido captadas por un satélite espacial, el Fermi, que puede mirar todo el cielo, y estudiadas por los tres sistemas de telescopios Cherenkov que existen en el mundo: el MAGIC en La Palma, el H.E.S.S. en Namibia y el Veritas, en Estados Unidos. Todos estos se caracterizan por tener un campo de visión muy reducido. Mónica Vázquez, investigadora del Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), ha explicado a ABC que, en comparación con los observatorios anteriores, la red CTA «permitirá descubrir nuevas fuentes con un flujo de rayos gamma que sea 10 veces menor de lo que se puede medir con los instrumentos actuales, en un rango de energías mayor, y con mejor resolución angular, pudiendo resolver fuentes extensas con más detalle». Es decir, se podrá observar mayor variedad de señales y con más detalle, lo que abrirá la puerta a nuevos descubrimientos. Por tanto, la red de telescopios Cherenkov (CTA) podrá proporcionar una visión completamente nueva del cielo. Sobre todo, en lo relacionado con los sucesos más violentos del Universo. Esto que permitirá explorar los ambientes más extremos, las nuevas fronteras de la física y comprender el origen de los rayos cósmicos. Para ello, y tal como ha dicho Vázquez, el programa de observación de CTA llevará a cabo varios proyectos clave. Se observará mejor el centro de nuestra galaxia, se estudiarán remanentes de supernova, se buscará materia oscura y se analizarán fenómenos transitorios, como los estallidos de rayos gamma. Un observatorio repartido en dos sedes La red CTA es un esfuerzo global en el que participan más de 1.350 científicos e ingenieros de 210 instituciones de 32 países. La red contará con más de 100 telescopios que estarán repartidos en dos sedes. La primera está situada en el hemisferio Norte, en el Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, en la Palma. Esta captará las fuentes de rayos gamma que proceden de fuera de la Vía Láctea. Allí habrá 19 telescopios en total. Cuatro serán grandes, tipo LST, con espejos de unos 23 metros de diámetro, y 15 serán medianos, de tipo MST, con unos 12 metros de diámetro. Todos ellos formarán una circunferencia de 600 metros de diámetro, en cuyo centro estarán los mayores instrumentos. Está previsto que la red Cherenkov de la Palma comience a funcionar en 2022. En el hemisferio sur, los telescopios de la red CTA se colocarán en el Observatorio Europeo Austral (ESO), en Chile. Allí habrá 100 aparatos, entre los que habrá instrumentos de entidad y una gran mayoría de telescopios pequeños, de tipo SST, con espejos de seis a diez metros de diámetro. Desde estas instalaciones, los telescopios detectarán fuentes de rayos gamma procedentes de la Vía Láctea, incluyendo su centro. Vista del LST-1 en el Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, en La Palma, Canarias - Iván Jiménez Montalvo El LST-1, un «monstruo» de 100 toneladas Daniel Mazin, investigador en la Universidad de Tokio, ha declarado hoy a Efe que el LST-1 es un prototipo para demostrar que este tipo de instrumentos funcionan de la forma adecuada. Por eso, el aparato estará en pruebas durante unos seis meses. Para ello contará con un equipo de más de 200 científicos procedentes de diez países, entre los que destaca la contribución de Japón, Alemania y España. El LST-1 es un gran instrumento que tiene un espejo compuesto, formado por 200 unidades, que alcanza una superficie de 400 metros cuadrados. Está sostenido por una estructura de tubos de fibra de carbono y de acero y, a pesar de sus dimensiones, es muy ágil, puesto que puede reposicionarse en solo 20 segundos. Esto le permite capturar señales efímeras en el cielo, como lo son los estallidos de rayos gamma (GRB, en inglés). Una astronomía joven La tecnología de los telescopios Cherenkov es un campo muy joven que, por tanto, tiene un gran potencial. De hecho, la red CTA representa a la tercera generación de telescopios de este tipo. La red CTA no solo permitirá conocer mejor el Universo que nos rodea. También podría ayudar a conseguir sistemas de producción de energía más eficientes, porque permitiría estudiar los aceleradores de partículas naturales que impulsan la radiación gamma en el espacio. Además, la red CTA también tiene interés para tratar de demostrar la existencia de la materia oscura, esa porción de la masa del Universo que no se puede observar pero que se infiere que está ahí al analizar el movimiento de las galaxias. El efecto Cherenkov Todos estos telescopios reciben el nombre de Cherenkov en honor al Nobel de física, de 1958, Pavel Alekseyevich Cherenkov. Este descubrió que en ciertas condiciones, la luz se ralentiza y que, por tanto, algunas partículas se mueven más rápido que la luz. Esto genera destellos de luz. Este efecto ocurre cuando los rayos gamma (fotones muy energéticos) que llegan a la Tierra procedentes de fuentes astrofísicas, chocan contra la atmósfera, a una altura de unos 30 kilómetros. Al chocar generan cascadas de reacciones que generan varios tipos de partículas, y se acaba produciendo destellos de luz ultravioleta, gracias al efecto Cherenkov. Lo interesante es que estos destellos de luz ultravioleta apuntan hacia su fuente y contienen información sobre el fenómeno que las originó. Estos destellos no son percibidos por el ojo humano, son muy débiles y apenas duran la milmillonésima de un segundo. Pero, al poner en común los fotones de radiación ultravioleta captados por varios telescopios, es más fácil reconstruir la trayectoria de los rayos gamma que los originaron. Por eso, conviene tener muchos telescopios separados y acumular la mayor superficie posible de espejos para captar esta energía.
          Celebrating Astronomy Day with the Giant Magellan Telescope      Cache   Translate Page      
Happy Astronomy Day, October 13, 2018!  We salute humankind’s long history of stargazing by checking in on what will be our planet’s largest telescope. Patrick McCarthy is an astronomer and a leader of the Giant Magellan Telescope project. He returns with a report on the instrument’s status, followed by a fascinating tour of the GMT facility. The MASCOT spacecraft has successfully completed its brief mission at asteroid Ryugu. Emily Lakdawalla provides an overview. And the space trivia contest has returned to What’s Up. See pics of our GMT visit and learn much more at: http://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2018/1010-2018-patrick-mccarthy-gmt.html

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          How Dark Is Your Night Sky?      Cache   Translate Page      

Traditional and digital tools can help you learn the naked-eye magnitude limit of your sky and find out if the darkness has changed at your observing site.

The post How Dark Is Your Night Sky? appeared first on Sky & Telescope.




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