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          LEGO Super Heroes - DC Justice League - Cyborg - ÚJ - Jelenlegi ára: 3 500 Ft      Cache   Translate Page      

A képen látható Cyborg Lego figura új állapotban!
(készletbontásból származik - 76087) 
 
Személyesen reggel 8. 30 előtt vagy 17. 30 körül vehető át a Corvin negyednél, Kálvin téren, Bakáts téren.
Esetleg a Bornemissza tér környékén és az Örsön.

LEGO Super Heroes - DC Justice League - Cyborg - ÚJ
Jelenlegi ára: 3 500 Ft
Az aukció vége: 2018-10-30 19:58
          LEGO Super Heroes - DC Justice League - Cyborg - ÚJ - Jelenlegi ára: 2 200 Ft      Cache   Translate Page      

A képen látható Cyborg Lego figura új állapotban!
(a lego a 76028-as készletből származik) 
 
Személyesen reggel 8. 30 előtt vagy 17. 30 körül vehető át a Corvin negyednél, Kálvin téren, Bakáts téren.
Esetleg a Bornemissza tér környékén és az Örsön.

LEGO Super Heroes - DC Justice League - Cyborg - ÚJ
Jelenlegi ára: 2 200 Ft
Az aukció vége: 2018-10-30 19:58
          Read Ebook Winter (Lunar Chronicles) New Books      Cache   Translate Page      

Download Read Ebook Winter (Lunar Chronicles) New Books PDF Online Download Here https://samsambur.blogspot.com/?book=1427258244 Princess Winter is admired by the Lunar people for her grace and kindness, and despite the scars that mar her face, her beauty is said to be even more breathtaking than that of her stepmother, Queen Levana. Winter despises her stepmother, and knows Levana won t approve of her feelings for her childhood friend--the handsome palace guard, Jacin. But Winter isn t as weak as Levana believes her to be and she s been undermining her stepmother s wishes for years. Together with the cyborg mechanic, Cinder, and her allies, Winter might even have the power to launch a revolution and win a war that s been raging for far too long. Can Cinder, Scarlet, Cress, and Winter defeat Levana and find their happily ever afters? Fans will not want to miss this thrilling conclusion to Marissa Meyer s national bestselling Lunar Chronicles series.The audio includes an interview between the author and the narrator.
          Pennywise Is Krusty? Pikachu Is Blanka? Pop Culture Icons Cross Over in a New Art Show      Cache   Translate Page      

In pop culture, even unrelated characters can have something significant in common. They’re both clowns. They’re both purple. They’re both cyborgs. And that middle ground is where artist Alex Solis likes to play.

Read more...


          SearchCap: Google Ads recording calls, Sitelinks snippets & Google Easter Eggs      Cache   Translate Page      

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

From Search Engine Land:

Recent Headlines From Marketing Land, Our Sister Site Dedicated To Internet Marketing:

Search News From Around The Web:


          Pennywise Is Krusty? Pikachu Is Blanka? Pop Culture Icons Cross Over in a New Art Show      Cache   Translate Page      

In pop culture, even unrelated characters can have something significant in common. They’re both clowns. They’re both purple. They’re both cyborgs. And that middle ground is where artist Alex Solis likes to play.

Read more...


          The SEO Cyborg: How to Resonate with Users & Make Sense to Search Bots      Cache   Translate Page      
Posted by alexis-sanders SEO is about understanding how search bots and users react to an online experience. As search professionals, we’re required to bridge gaps between online experiences, search engine bots, and users. We need to know where to insert ourselves (or our teams) to ensure the best experience for both users and bots. In [&hellip
          WashU engineers to use cyborg insects as biorobotic sensing      Cache   Translate Page      

video previewYouTube


          Khabib could retire soon after beating Conor McGregor and Tony,Ronda Rousey Now a WWE Pro-WRESTLER      Cache   Translate Page      
-Support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/mmaworld -Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/real_mma_world Luke Rockhold on Yoel Romero, Checkout MMA Junkie Radio for full interview-https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/mma-junkie-radio/id271782069?mt=2 Fabricio Werdum on Cyborg vs Nunes, Jimi Manuwa on Teixeira, Checkout MMA HOUR for full interview-https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-mma-hour-with-ariel-helwani/id320642139?mt=2 Ronda Rousey now a Full Time WWE Pro Wrestler, Ali Abdelaziz on Khabib Nurmagomedov, And Much More in this MMA News Video, Music used-beatsbyNeVs -Ridin' Check Him Out! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbtzvwKwql8 Outro Music beatsbyNeVs -beatsbyNeVs - Rebel [FREE DL] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AGMFdL_tNA
          Re: Indie Dev Says Switch Is Easiest Console To Work With, Nintendo "Has Done A Complete 180"      Cache   Translate Page      

@Realnoize
I probably should have clarified myself better, yes, it is a Switch, so i would like to see more Indie games take advantage of some more of its capabilities than most do, but also in reference to graphics, when i say "8 bit", I really should have said something like the earlier games, as fun as many of the blocky NES games were, like SMB 1 & Legend of Zelda, there's no reason that Indie makers need to make them that way, later games on the same system proved a game could be "8 bit" but still look 8 awsome, the NES had great stuff, Mega Man games, Metroid, Battle of Olympus, but also even higher up on the scale, Mario 2 & 3, Blaster Master, the name escapes me but there was an awesome game where it's an overhead space shooter and at the end of the level your fighter ship transform into a girl cyborg and you explore an overhead area in a Zelda-esque adventure, it was awesome gameplay and visually,

so yah, it's not 8 bit I really have a problem with as much as nobody seems to be putting any work into them, they have already spent the time to come up with the idea, make the basics even pay the fees, spend a little extra time to make it look a little nicer and smooth out the controls and gameplay, and BEFORE you publish, go to your local mall or flea market on the weekends for a couple weeks and have random people playtest your games, find out what needs help and ask what would they like to see, add, taken away, ect. before just smacking it out, like I keep saying, you already put so much time into it, don't mess it up by half-assing the looks and/or controls

By jhewitt3476


          Review: Traditional Card Games:: Ender's Comprehensive Pictorial Review: Armageddon Playing Cards      Cache   Translate Page      

by EndersGame

Armageddon Playing Cards

I must admit that this deck didn't exactly excite me when I first heard about it. Armageddon Playing Cards. In my mind I envisaged a barren landscape in a post-apocalyptic world, perhaps populated with a few zombies, and inevitably some blood and gore. Certainly I wasn't expecting something that would be relatively family friendly, visually appealing, or attractive.

So imagine my surprise when this deck turned out to be quite different than what I'd imagined. Perhaps I'm it was just my expectations that were faulty and unfair, and I'm to blame for being too ignorant about the genre. And maybe the title is a little ambiguous, because the word Armageddon actually originates directly from ancient Greek, and its mention in the Biblical book of Revelation has led it long being associated with the gathering of armies at the world's end, in a final apocalyptic showdown. But to be fair, over time this term has come to be used in describing any end-of-world scenario, and the subtitle does indicate that these are post-Apocalypse playing cards.

Whatever the case, even if it depicts a post-Armageddon scenario rather than the Armageddon itself, the Armageddon deck proved to be a pleasant surprise!



Tuck box

The Armageddon deck is inspired by popular works like Mad Max and Fall Out, which are set in a post-apocalyptic world.

The artist behind this interesting deck is Nick Rovakis, who is a freelance illustrator and graphic designer born in Athens, Greece. His qualifications include a degree in graphic and fine arts. He has over a decade of experience in branding design, packaging, font creation, as well as in doing illustrations for board games and magazines, and he has a special interest and expertise with terrain pieces and miniatures.

Nick explains the genesis and concept of this deck as follows: "I've always wanted to design something that displays characters out of this kind of environment, the ones striving to survive and this would reflect on their characteristics and equipment. When I was given the opportunity to create a deck of cards with a theme of my choice I was more than happy to combine it with this concept. So I've created four different factions with the characteristics I had in my mind for that kind of world."



Court cards

Each suit represents a different faction in this post-apocalyptic world: Wastelanders (Clubs), Enslavers (Hearts), Rangers (Spades), and Brotherhood of Metal (Diamonds). These rough and ready characters are dressed for battle - after all, the world they inhabit requires a battle for survival, and they will need to fight for their lives if they are going to last. Each faction has a unique set of clothing and weapons that captures something about it.

The court cards all have symmetrical designs, to ensure that the deck is also playable and functional, and the level of detail is amazing.



Factions

Here's a closer look at the four factions represented on the court cards in this deck.

Wastelanders (Clubs)



Enslavers (Hearts)



Rangers (Spades)



Brotherhood of Metal (Diamonds)



Aces

All the Aces feature oversized artwork that reflects something of the harsh landscape of this post-apocalyptic world, with metal and wire being common elements.



Number cards

Every single aspect of this deck is 100% customized, including the number cards, all of which also include artwork and a style unique to each faction/suit.



Jokers & Card backs

The Jokers add two unique characters to the deck, a Mutant and a Cyborg.

Meanwhile the card backs have a two-way design with an intriguing look that brings together the kinds of colours and icons you'd expect to see in a post-apocalyptic world ravaged by war and destruction.



Extra cards

Two gaff cards (a double backer and a QH/5C double facer) fill out the deck to 56 cards.

There's also a card reveal on the inside flap of the tuck box for the Queen of Clubs.



Impressions

Is the Armageddon deck for you? In terms of handling and quality, this deck has been produced by USPCC in their standard stock with the usual air cushion style finish, so it handles well and give an immediate impression of quality.

The main appeal of this deck lies in the world that it depicts. Taking that premise for granted, it does a good job of capturing the elements of a harsh post-apocalyptic world where everything is about survival. All aspects of this deck - the card backs, the characters on the court cards, the pips, and even the textured background on the card faces - contribute to a look which fits well with this theme.

Unsurprisingly this deck has made a strong and positive impression, and has been well received. All the comments I have seen have been very positive about it, with sample comments from satisfied Kickstarter backers including the following: "Lovely and just what I wanted." "An awesome addition to my growing card collection." "Looks great. Awesome job with the art." "Fantastic!" If you like the concept and theme of this deck, then you'll almost certainly be pleased with making this new release part of your own collection!



Want to learn more? You can find this deck on PlayingCardDecks.com here:
- Armageddon deck


BoardGameGeek reviewer

For more of my reviews on custom playing cards, subscribe to this list: Pictorial Reviews of Playing Cards by EndersGame

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Subscribe to this list to be notified when new reviews are posted.

If you made it to the end of this review and found it helpful, please consider giving a thumbs up at the very top of the article, to let me know you were here, and to give others a better chance of seeing it.
          UFC 232: Jones vs. Gustafsson II – December 29      Cache   Translate Page      
Date: December 29, 2018 Venue: T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada TV: PPV/TSN/FS1/UFC Fight Pass Fight Card: 205lbs- Jon Jones (22-1) vs. Alexander Gustafsson (18-4) ***Light-Heavyweight Title Fight (Vacant) 145lbs- Cris Cyborg (20-1) vs. Amanda Nunes (16-4) ***Women’s Featherweight Title Fight 170lbs- Carlos Condit (30-12) vs. Michael Chiesa (14-4) 205lbs- Ilir Latifi (14-5) vs. Corey […]
          Fast forward in Blytheville      Cache   Translate Page      
The East Coast Timing Association held its Arkansas 1-Mile Challenge in September, where racers from all over the country mixed gasoline, steel and passion in the pursuit of raw speed.

Standing at the midpoint of the 11,602-foot-long runway at the former Eaker Air Force Base in Blytheville, you hear the machines long before you see them. At the starting line, a dim burble rises to a howl that soon grows to a roar. Once their drivers row through the gears, the big-engine cars come at you with a sound like a bow drawn across the lowest string of an upright bass: ominous, deep, rising to a T-Rex bellow, until you imagine the sound will make your sternum vibrate like the head of a drum. The motorcycles and sports cars, meanwhile, approach with a whine that will remind any Star Wars fan of the speeder bikes zigzagging through the trees on the Ewok homeworld, the angry, electrified buzz of an enormous, cyborg wasp.

Looking up the track on a balmy day in late September, the soybeans ready for harvest in the median of the vast runway complex where the Pentagon's Strategic Air Command once launched B-52G Stratofortress bombers to targets around the globe, the competitors in the East Coast Timing Association's Arkansas 1-Mile Challenge emerge out of the haze every few minutes, on you in a heartbeat from the time you first see them, the fastest covering a mile every 15 seconds, passing you in a blur, faster than anything you've ever seen that wasn't shot from a cannon, the sound and fury evaporating back into the lingering summer haze at the far end of the runway.

There hasn't been a lot going on in Blytheville since Uncle Sam pulled up stakes there in December 1992, carving a crucial chunk out of the local economy and leaving a vast, 2,600-acre air base — complete with hangars, maintenance facilities and enough housing to put a good percentage of the French Foreign Legion up for the night — to sit largely vacant. Planes still land there, and there's a dismantler of large commercial jets on site, turning past-their-prime flying buses into scrap metal. Other than that, the place gives the air of being largely abandoned. That changed earlier this year, though, when the ECTA came to town for the first of three land-speed events held in April, June and September.

The ECTA started on the 6,500-foot, World War II-era runway at Maxton Army Air Base near Laurinburg, N.C., an East Coast alternative to distant land-speed holy ground like the Bonneville Salt Flats in northwestern Utah and El Mirage Dry Lake in California's Mojave Desert. This year, it brought its roadshow to Blytheville, with the fastest vehicles in the inaugural trio of events turning in time-slips over 240 mph. The ECTA is planning on making the series annual events. Join the ECTA, pay a fee of between $385 and $485 (depending on which meet you want to attend), pass a vehicle safety inspection by the very strict on-site techs, and log a series of qualifying runs to prove you can follow instructions enough to not die, and you too can spend a weekend genuflecting to the speed gods, whether you're in a homebuilt hot rod or a brand-new Dodge Challenger Hellcat (there was at least one of those at the September ECTA meet, turning in 170-mph-plus passes like a drive to the corner store, then motoring home with the AC and cruise control on). Those who want to spectate and gawk at the machines on display, meanwhile, need only bring a cooler, lawn chairs and $10. (For full details, including rules for drivers, hit the ECTA website at ectamile.com.)

One of those in Blytheville for the Sept. 28-30 event was Columbus, Ohio, resident Michelle Pettit, who was there with her father, Jon. Michelle, whose 25th birthday fell on the second day of the three-day event, was hoping to celebrate by going over 150 mph in the family racer: a Fiberglas replica of a vintage Bugatti speedster, surrounded by a high-strength steel roll cage that made it look like a rolling jungle gym. Powered by a twin turbocharged General Motors crate engine, the car was designed to top 200 mph, but mechanical problems and issues with the safety harness kept Michelle from behind the wheel for much of Saturday. She would eventually turn in a top speed of 140 mph in one qualifying run and a full-mile best of 128.8 mph before mechanical issues forced the Bugatti to withdraw.

Jon, an aircraft engineer, who built the Bugatti, builds a different custom car every winter with the help of Michelle and her siblings, and Michelle said she grew up wrenching on cars at his side. "We build custom cars for fun," she said, "so I've been driving our custom cars. This is my first time on a straight track. I did a road race course before with our Blazer that has a Corvette engine, so really it's just through him." Later in the weekend, after the Bugatti was sidelined, Pettit would put her stock Toyota RAV4 down the runway at over 100 mph.

Across the taxi-way that served as pit row was another car you might not expect to see at a land-speed event: a 1992 Geo Metro, fielded by Cedar Rapids, Iowa, residents Jim Sievers and Tom Bruch. Now in his 70s, Bruch is a legendary builder of high-performance Porsche and Volkswagen racing engines. He set his first record at Bonneville in 1967 behind the wheel of a Porsche 356 Carrera Speedster. Since then, his airflow-focused style of engine tuning has become so well known in Porsche circles that motors built using his techniques are called "Bruchrasa" engines.

It might seem a long jump for Bruch from high-performance Porsche racing to the Geo Metro — an economy car known more for its 48 mpg fuel mileage than the 52 horsepower under the hood when stock. But he became interested in hopping up Metros when he bought one in the early 1990s to commute back and forth to his Porsche repair shop in Iowa City. The hot rod bug bit, and he's been chasing speed in Metros for over 20 years.  

Though fully street legal and wearing current Iowa plates — even the horn works — the car Bruch and Sievers brought to Blytheville is a beast, ingeniously hot-rodded on the relative cheap in every way imaginable, from the smoothie aluminum wheels (originally Ford space-saver spares), to the massive Porsche 911 three-barrel racing carburetor perched on a custom intake. Bolted atop the tiny one-liter, three-cylinder engine, the carb looks almost as big as the motor itself.

"The mechanicals on a Metro are made by Suzuki," Bruch said. "The Chevy parts aren't so good. They rust out. But the Suzuki parts are excellent. That's basically a bike motor with an automotive [transmission] bell housing on it. It responds to things like a motorcycle motor, too."

When racing, Bruch said, the Metro shifts at 8,000 rpm, the little motor screaming bloody murder through an unmuffled exhaust pipe. Sievers and Bruch sourced parts for the car from as far away as New Zealand and Europe. In a modern throwback that would make the tight-budgeted teenagers who pioneered the golden age of hot-rodding proud, the pair scrounged lightweight carbon fiber panels by digging through dumpsters behind a company that builds components for the military, replacing numerous steel parts and pieces to bring the car's weight down to a feather-light 1,300 pounds.  

"It's a lot of fun, and I like the challenge," Bruch said. "This is a hot rod. We built this ourselves. We just try this and that. Just keep changing." Later in the day, their work would pay off with a personal-best pass of over 120 mph.

In addition to high-horsepower drag cars and even former NASCAR contenders in Blytheville, niche racers like Sievers and Bruch were common at the September meet, chasing lesser-known class records based on weight or engine displacement with a mix of mechanical ingenuity and flesh-and-blood determination. One of those seeking a record was Eric Roehrle, who had driven over 600 miles to campaign his 250cc Kawasaki Ninja. Like the Geo Metro, the 250 Ninja was built more for economy than speed, sold as a low-horsepower "starter bike" for newbies who could learn on it before moving up to something more powerful. Over the past 10 years, Roehrle has slowly built his 250 Ninja into the fastest of its breed on the planet.

"She'll run up to 123," he said. "But I'm still trying to get the 125 out of her. I'm hoping today is a good day. It looks like we've got good weather for it."

While it would be easy to go much, much faster on a bigger sport bike (there were turbocharged bikes running north of 210 mph at Blytheville all weekend), Roehrle said he enjoys the mechanical and engineering challenge. "I'm one of those type A personalities, I guess," he said. "If I had one of them [higher horsepower] bikes I'd be trying to go 300 miles per hour. That costs a lot of money, and there's not too many places you can do that. It's just the challenge of making the small bike go fast. ... People think it's exciting and stuff, but once you've done it and gone fast, that's done. Then all you're doing is riding down the track staring at the tach thinking, 'This isn't any faster.' "

The idea of a mechanical challenge is familiar to Michael Abraham. An Indiana fabricator and custom painter who has worked with racing legends like Mario Andretti and John Force, Abraham was there to help crew for his friend J.B. Bracken of New Mexico, who was racing both Indian and Harley-Davidson motorcycles. The pair met at Bonneville in 2009 and soon became fast friends.

"The first challenge is to build something that's going to go fast and push the envelope," Abraham said. "Either the envelope on the rules or the envelope on the engineering or whatever. As an engineer, you're going to try and build something with an advantage at every step. Is it going to be lower profile? Is it going to have more horsepower? With land speed racing, the beauty there is they have engine classes and then they have chassis classes. If you're in a car, technically you could run every class of engine in that same car and have all those different records. So there's flexibility there. ... You're kind of applauded for thinking of a different mounting or something like that to tuck in a component out of the airflow. There's that challenge."

The second challenge of land speed racing, Abraham said, is race day, when the goal is to try to keep your vehicle together long enough to be rewarded by going faster than anyone in your class. It's all part of a long and sometimes frustrating process. "If you go too much in one area, it puts too much stress on another mechanical area, then it breaks that," he said. "So then you've got to beef that up. It's all about these dominos. You're trying to get all the dominos to stand up at the same time so you can be successful."

While chasing land-speed records, Abraham said he's met great people and made friendships for life. The folks at Blytheville for the Arkansas 1-Mile Challenge, he said, are all driving different kinds of vehicles, chasing different records and from all over the country. But inside, he said, they're the same: addicted to the quest to go faster than anyone before. Standing in the shade of a tent beside a gleaming, low-slung bike with lettering that staked its claim as the fastest production Indian motorcycle in the world, Abraham said trying to relate the "why" of that to someone who doesn't get it is pretty much impossible.

"It's hard to explain," Abraham said, "other than the fact that when it's in your blood, it doesn't come out."


          Fast forward in Blytheville      Cache   Translate Page      
The East Coast Timing Association held its Arkansas 1-Mile Challenge in September, where racers from all over the country mixed gasoline, steel and passion in the pursuit of raw speed.

Standing at the midpoint of the 11,602-foot-long runway at the former Eaker Air Force Base in Blytheville, you hear the machines long before you see them. At the starting line, a dim burble rises to a howl that soon grows to a roar. Once their drivers row through the gears, the big-engine cars come at you with a sound like a bow drawn across the lowest string of an upright bass: ominous, deep, rising to a T-Rex bellow, until you imagine the sound will make your sternum vibrate like the head of a drum. The motorcycles and sports cars, meanwhile, approach with a whine that will remind any Star Wars fan of the speeder bikes zigzagging through the trees on the Ewok homeworld, the angry, electrified buzz of an enormous, cyborg wasp.

Looking up the track on a balmy day in late September, the soybeans ready for harvest in the median of the vast runway complex where the Pentagon's Strategic Air Command once launched B-52G Stratofortress bombers to targets around the globe, the competitors in the East Coast Timing Association's Arkansas 1-Mile Challenge emerge out of the haze every few minutes, on you in a heartbeat from the time you first see them, the fastest covering a mile every 15 seconds, passing you in a blur, faster than anything you've ever seen that wasn't shot from a cannon, the sound and fury evaporating back into the lingering summer haze at the far end of the runway.

There hasn't been a lot going on in Blytheville since Uncle Sam pulled up stakes there in December 1992, carving a crucial chunk out of the local economy and leaving a vast, 2,600-acre air base — complete with hangars, maintenance facilities and enough housing to put a good percentage of the French Foreign Legion up for the night — to sit largely vacant. Planes still land there, and there's a dismantler of large commercial jets on site, turning past-their-prime flying buses into scrap metal. Other than that, the place gives the air of being largely abandoned. That changed earlier this year, though, when the ECTA came to town for the first of three land-speed events held in April, June and September.

The ECTA started on the 6,500-foot, World War II-era runway at Maxton Army Air Base near Laurinburg, N.C., an East Coast alternative to distant land-speed holy ground like the Bonneville Salt Flats in northwestern Utah and El Mirage Dry Lake in California's Mojave Desert. This year, it brought its roadshow to Blytheville, with the fastest vehicles in the inaugural trio of events turning in time-slips over 240 mph. The ECTA is planning on making the series annual events. Join the ECTA, pay a fee of between $385 and $485 (depending on which meet you want to attend), pass a vehicle safety inspection by the very strict on-site techs, and log a series of qualifying runs to prove you can follow instructions enough to not die, and you too can spend a weekend genuflecting to the speed gods, whether you're in a homebuilt hot rod or a brand-new Dodge Challenger Hellcat (there was at least one of those at the September ECTA meet, turning in 170-mph-plus passes like a drive to the corner store, then motoring home with the AC and cruise control on). Those who want to spectate and gawk at the machines on display, meanwhile, need only bring a cooler, lawn chairs and $10. (For full details, including rules for drivers, hit the ECTA website at ectamile.com.)

One of those in Blytheville for the Sept. 28-30 event was Columbus, Ohio, resident Michelle Pettit, who was there with her father, Jon. Michelle, whose 25th birthday fell on the second day of the three-day event, was hoping to celebrate by going over 150 mph in the family racer: a Fiberglas replica of a vintage Bugatti speedster, surrounded by a high-strength steel roll cage that made it look like a rolling jungle gym. Powered by a twin turbocharged General Motors crate engine, the car was designed to top 200 mph, but mechanical problems and issues with the safety harness kept Michelle from behind the wheel for much of Saturday. She would eventually turn in a top speed of 140 mph in one qualifying run and a full-mile best of 128.8 mph before mechanical issues forced the Bugatti to withdraw.

Jon, an aircraft engineer, who built the Bugatti, builds a different custom car every winter with the help of Michelle and her siblings, and Michelle said she grew up wrenching on cars at his side. "We build custom cars for fun," she said, "so I've been driving our custom cars. This is my first time on a straight track. I did a road race course before with our Blazer that has a Corvette engine, so really it's just through him." Later in the weekend, after the Bugatti was sidelined, Pettit would put her stock Toyota RAV4 down the runway at over 100 mph.

Across the taxi-way that served as pit row was another car you might not expect to see at a land-speed event: a 1992 Geo Metro, fielded by Cedar Rapids, Iowa, residents Jim Sievers and Tom Bruch. Now in his 70s, Bruch is a legendary builder of high-performance Porsche and Volkswagen racing engines. He set his first record at Bonneville in 1967 behind the wheel of a Porsche 356 Carrera Speedster. Since then, his airflow-focused style of engine tuning has become so well known in Porsche circles that motors built using his techniques are called "Bruchrasa" engines.

It might seem a long jump for Bruch from high-performance Porsche racing to the Geo Metro — an economy car known more for its 48 mpg fuel mileage than the 52 horsepower under the hood when stock. But he became interested in hopping up Metros when he bought one in the early 1990s to commute back and forth to his Porsche repair shop in Iowa City. The hot rod bug bit, and he's been chasing speed in Metros for over 20 years.  

Though fully street legal and wearing current Iowa plates — even the horn works — the car Bruch and Sievers brought to Blytheville is a beast, ingeniously hot-rodded on the relative cheap in every way imaginable, from the smoothie aluminum wheels (originally Ford space-saver spares), to the massive Porsche 911 three-barrel racing carburetor perched on a custom intake. Bolted atop the tiny one-liter, three-cylinder engine, the carb looks almost as big as the motor itself.

"The mechanicals on a Metro are made by Suzuki," Bruch said. "The Chevy parts aren't so good. They rust out. But the Suzuki parts are excellent. That's basically a bike motor with an automotive [transmission] bell housing on it. It responds to things like a motorcycle motor, too."

When racing, Bruch said, the Metro shifts at 8,000 rpm, the little motor screaming bloody murder through an unmuffled exhaust pipe. Sievers and Bruch sourced parts for the car from as far away as New Zealand and Europe. In a modern throwback that would make the tight-budgeted teenagers who pioneered the golden age of hot-rodding proud, the pair scrounged lightweight carbon fiber panels by digging through dumpsters behind a company that builds components for the military, replacing numerous steel parts and pieces to bring the car's weight down to a feather-light 1,300 pounds.  

"It's a lot of fun, and I like the challenge," Bruch said. "This is a hot rod. We built this ourselves. We just try this and that. Just keep changing." Later in the day, their work would pay off with a personal-best pass of over 120 mph.

In addition to high-horsepower drag cars and even former NASCAR contenders in Blytheville, niche racers like Sievers and Bruch were common at the September meet, chasing lesser-known class records based on weight or engine displacement with a mix of mechanical ingenuity and flesh-and-blood determination. One of those seeking a record was Eric Roehrle, who had driven over 600 miles to campaign his 250cc Kawasaki Ninja. Like the Geo Metro, the 250 Ninja was built more for economy than speed, sold as a low-horsepower "starter bike" for newbies who could learn on it before moving up to something more powerful. Over the past 10 years, Roehrle has slowly built his 250 Ninja into the fastest of its breed on the planet.

"She'll run up to 123," he said. "But I'm still trying to get the 125 out of her. I'm hoping today is a good day. It looks like we've got good weather for it."

While it would be easy to go much, much faster on a bigger sport bike (there were turbocharged bikes running north of 210 mph at Blytheville all weekend), Roehrle said he enjoys the mechanical and engineering challenge. "I'm one of those type A personalities, I guess," he said. "If I had one of them [higher horsepower] bikes I'd be trying to go 300 miles per hour. That costs a lot of money, and there's not too many places you can do that. It's just the challenge of making the small bike go fast. ... People think it's exciting and stuff, but once you've done it and gone fast, that's done. Then all you're doing is riding down the track staring at the tach thinking, 'This isn't any faster.' "

The idea of a mechanical challenge is familiar to Michael Abraham. An Indiana fabricator and custom painter who has worked with racing legends like Mario Andretti and John Force, Abraham was there to help crew for his friend J.B. Bracken of New Mexico, who was racing both Indian and Harley-Davidson motorcycles. The pair met at Bonneville in 2009 and soon became fast friends.

"The first challenge is to build something that's going to go fast and push the envelope," Abraham said. "Either the envelope on the rules or the envelope on the engineering or whatever. As an engineer, you're going to try and build something with an advantage at every step. Is it going to be lower profile? Is it going to have more horsepower? With land speed racing, the beauty there is they have engine classes and then they have chassis classes. If you're in a car, technically you could run every class of engine in that same car and have all those different records. So there's flexibility there. ... You're kind of applauded for thinking of a different mounting or something like that to tuck in a component out of the airflow. There's that challenge."

The second challenge of land speed racing, Abraham said, is race day, when the goal is to try to keep your vehicle together long enough to be rewarded by going faster than anyone in your class. It's all part of a long and sometimes frustrating process. "If you go too much in one area, it puts too much stress on another mechanical area, then it breaks that," he said. "So then you've got to beef that up. It's all about these dominos. You're trying to get all the dominos to stand up at the same time so you can be successful."

While chasing land-speed records, Abraham said he's met great people and made friendships for life. The folks at Blytheville for the Arkansas 1-Mile Challenge, he said, are all driving different kinds of vehicles, chasing different records and from all over the country. But inside, he said, they're the same: addicted to the quest to go faster than anyone before. Standing in the shade of a tent beside a gleaming, low-slung bike with lettering that staked its claim as the fastest production Indian motorcycle in the world, Abraham said trying to relate the "why" of that to someone who doesn't get it is pretty much impossible.

"It's hard to explain," Abraham said, "other than the fact that when it's in your blood, it doesn't come out."




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