Next Page: 10000

          Digital Hedge Fund SMS Crypto Management to Concentrate on Crypto Currency After Announcing a Record 2017      Cache   Translate Page      
LONDON, September 12, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- FCA-regulated fund Dynamic Capital announced today that they would be restructuring the business, renaming it SMS Crypto Management in order to concentrate on the emerging crypto currency markets. Last year the company posted Rickel...
          Free Bitmex Trading Signal- Get Into Short #eth @ 179-181      Cache   Translate Page      

Bitmex Trading Signal:
Get into Short #ETH @ 179-181
Target - 175-173-170

Leverage – 10-20

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?...yptosignals.app

https://t.me/freebitmexsignals

http://crypto-autobot.com

Join- https://t.me/btctradingclub



Join- https://t.me/cryptosignalalert



Bitmex Binance & Bittrex Crypto currency Mobile trading APP crypto currency Training Crypto trading signals with consistent profit Crypto auto Trading BOT which trades automatically in your account without manual intervention
          Now is the right time to invest in crypto currency! Spot the Opportunity Early!      Cache   Translate Page      
Oryxcash - New age VC fund raising platform for startups and early stage companies. Also allows investor to invest in promising startups.
          OKEx Founder Released from Custody and Denies Fraud      Cache   Translate Page      
via Crypto Currency News at September 12, 2018 at 11:25PM Ready Full Article: https://cryptocurrency
          Huobi Global Buys Large Chunk of BitTrade      Cache   Translate Page      
via Crypto Currency News at September 12, 2018 at 09:47PM Ready Full Article: https://cryptocurrency
          Starting with Crypto      Cache   Translate Page      

Investing within the Crypto Currency market will be a touch daunting for ancient investors as a result of investment directly in Crypto Currency (CC) киви на биткоин - needs the utilization of latest tools and also the adoption of many new ideas. So, if you opt to immerse yourself during this market, you'll need to own a awfully sensible plan of what to try and do and what to expect.

The purchase and sale of CC needs that you simply select Exchange associated with the merchandise you would like to shop for and sell, be it Bitcoin, Litecoin or any of the opposite 1300 chips being compete. within the previous edition, we have a tendency to shortly explained the merchandise and services obtainable in many exchanges, to provide you a thought of the completely different offers. There square measure a great deal of exchanges to decide on from and everybody will things his means. rummage around for things that square measure necessary to you, for example:

- Record the policies, ways and prices of every technique
- Rates and retirement policies
- What square measure the fiduciary currencies for deposits and withdrawals?
- merchandise that manage, like coins, gold, silver, etc.
- group action fees
- wherever is that this exchange based? (United States / uk / Asian nation / Japan ...)

Prepare for Exchange configuration procedures for details and length, as a result of Exchange typically desires to understand a great deal concerning you. it is the same as making a replacement checking account as a result of Exchange could be a valuable negotiant and that they need to form certain you are what you say which you are a trustworthy person. It appears that "trust" is nonheritable over time, as a result of the exchange typically permits solely atiny low investment.

Your exchange can save your DC storage for you. several provide "cold storage", which suggests that you simplyr rooms square measure unbroken "offline" till you show that you need to try and do one thing with them. There was news of the hacked exchange and lots of coins were taken. bear in mind that your currencies square measure during a checking account in Exchange, however bear in mind that your currencies square measure solely numeric and you'll be able to not amendment all transactions within the blockchain. in contrast to your bank, this exchange doesn't have deposit insurance, therefore confine mind that hackers continuously strive everything they'll get in their Crypto Coins and steal them. Exchange usually offers password-protected accounts, and lots of provide two-factor authorization systems, that ought to be taken seriously to safeguard your account from hackers.

Since hackers wish to attack Exchange and your account, we have a tendency to continuously suggest employing a digital case for your coins. it is easy to maneuver coins between your Exchange account and your case. check that to decide on a portfolio that treats all the components you would like to shop for and sell. Your case is additionally the device you employ to "spend" your coins with merchants WHO settle for CC payments. each varieties of portfolios square measure "hot" and "cold". Hot wallets square measure terribly simple to use, however permit your rooms to be exposed to the web, however solely on your pc and not on the Exchange server. massive portfolios use off-line storage media, like special hardware memory cards and straightforward prints. employing a cold case makes transactions a lot of sophisticated, however they're the safest.

Your case contains a "private" key that permits all the transactions you would like to form. It conjointly includes a shared "public" key on the network in order that all users will establish your account after they create transactions with you. once hackers get their personal key, they'll move their currency wherever they need and it can't be modified.

Despite all the challenges and volatility, we have a tendency to believe that Blockchain's core technology is ever-changing the sport and revolutionizing the means transactions square measure done.
          Spare a Thought for Venezuela      Cache   Translate Page      

Please spare a thought for Venezuela. This, the 33rd largest country in the world and with about 34 million people, the largest proven reserves of oil, the cheapest price of gasoline in the world, and was in 1950 richer than Germany, has fallen on times so hard in this once Latin America's richest country that 75% of the population lost an average of 11 Kg (24 pounds) in weight in one year because of food scarcity. And you might ask: "Why should I care?"

Venezuela is located on the northern coast of South America and shares land borders with Brazil, Colombia, Guyana, as well as Trinidad and Tobago. Officially called the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, the country was colonized by Spain in 1522 but gained full independence about 300 years later and 188 years ago, in 1830. Venezuela is a charter member of many important international organizations, including the United Nations (UN), the Organization of American States (OAS), Mercosur (the South American trade bloc), and the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), to name a few.

Venezuela is the 10th largest exporter of oil in the world, and its economy is largely based on the petroleum sector, which accounted for over 50% of the gross domestic product (GDP) of the country in 2015. Thanks to a huge government subsidy program, Venezuela has the cheapest gasoline in the world, costing $0.11 per gallon ($0.03 per litre) in 2014, even after a 6,200% increase!

Give Me Two!

Venezuela's history, although rocky, has had its glorious moments, including periods of political plurality, as well as oil-fueled economic booms that attracted immigrants from near and far (including Europe) into the country. Venezuela has also had dark moments of political turmoil, dictatorships, and economic gloom, because of various domestic and external factors.

Venezuela enjoyed both a relatively stable democracy, and significant economic growth between 1958 and the early 1980s. During this period, politics was dominated by two parties, and government revenues more than doubled after the 1973 Arab-Israeli war resulted in a huge rise in oil prices. Although the boom would soon turn to burst, it lasted long enough for Venezuelans to become known for the phrase "Ta barato, dame dos” ("It's cheap, give me two") as they bought up relatively cheap goods in their travels abroad.

In the early 1980s, the global oil glut brought down crude oil prices, and along with it, the Venezuelan economy. As a result, the country's foreign exchange reserves ran desperately low, as government debt mounted, and in desperation government devalued the currency by 100% on "Black Friday” (February 18, 1983). In addition, government announced an IMF-backed economic reform program which increased fuel, transport, and utilities prices, and lifted the price cap on some basic goods.

As a result, the country was plunged into economic and political crises, with deadly a wave of protests called the Caracazo riots in which an estimated 300 to 3,000 people died. The prevailing conditions also resulted in two unsuccessful coup attempts (in February and November, 1992), by leftist military officers, led by Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías to overthrow the government. Although Chavéz was imprisoned after the first coup attempt, he was pardoned in March 1994, thus enabling him to contest, and win, the 1998 presidential elections.

The Road to Hell

The road to hell, they say, is paved with good intentions. And if anything, Venezuela's current tragic plight proves the adage, given the innocuous and well-intentioned start of the Chavéz-led Bolivarian Revolution.

Following his victory in the 1998 elections, Chavéz embarked on a reform campaign some have termed "institutional engineering” in a bid to consolidate his power and break the 40-year hold the two leading political parties had on Venezuelan politics. Chavéz also implemented "democratic socialist" economic policies, including the redistribution of wealth, land reform, the creating creation of worker-owned cooperatives, and the attainment of food security and food sovereignty. To implement these policies, Chavéz created social programs called Bolivarian Missions and Communes, and 100,000 state-owned cooperatives.

Venezuela suffered an economic downturn in early 2002, and this, coupled with anger about Chavéz's war on the elites, and his alignment with Fidel Castro's Cuba led to an abortive coup against his government in April 2002. That same month, managers at the state petroleum company, Petróleos de Venezuela (PDVSA), went on a two-month strike over Chavéz's nominations for new members of the company's board of directors. Chavéz had long denounced PDVSA (parent company of Citgo, a US energy company) for its association with the US and business elites. After the collapse of the strike, Chávez fired 18,000 PDVSA employees and replaced them with 100,000 of his supporters, aka Chavistas.

The failed PDVSA management strike enabled Chavéz to take control of the company's coffers to fund his social programs and support his political base. By 2011, some $500 million was siphoned from the PDVSA pension fund to finance government-backed financiers. Such lavish spending inflicted the Dutch Disease on the country, with its fiscal health wrecked, despite increasing exports of, and revenues from oil.

Chavéz's policies were initially helpful, but unsustainable because of the drain on the country's finances. While poverty rates decreased 48.6% in 1999 to 32.1% in 2013, Venezuela had the one of the highest literacy rates in the region, and malnutrition fell from 21% in 1998 to 6% in 2009, price controls led to shortages of goods. Similarly, currency controls, introduced to curb capital flight exacerbated matters by leading to a shortage of foreign exchange, a decline in the value of the Bolivar, and increasing inflation.

Although oil prices increased significantly later in 2002, bringing in huge revenues, Venezuela's economy began to collapse because of what someone called RIDDS: recession, inflation, declining foreign reserves, debt, and shortages. Thus, the huge increase in government spending during the 2012 campaign to re-elect Chavéz ballooned public debt and fiscal deficit. Similarly, the decision to replace trained PDVSA personnel with revolutionaries, and deprive the company of capital decreased oil production, despite increasing levels of proven reserves of oil.

Between 2007 and 2013, inflation grew an annual rate of 27.4% (at least five times the rate for Latin America), scarcity, (especially of food, medicines and essential goods) set in, and foreign reserves fell at an alarming rate of $38 million per day. In short, all indicators pointed to trouble ahead for Venezuela when Chavéz died in March 2013.

Enter Maduro

Following the death of Chavéz, his Vice President and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Nicolás Maduro Moros, became Interim President. Maduro went on to win the constitutionally-mandated presidential elections in April 2013, and was inaugurated as President on April 19, 2013. A former bus driver who did not complete his high school education, Maduro made up for his lack of the charisma that Chávez, his predecessor and mentor, had by being autocratic and continuing Chávez's populist programs.

Things got worse in a hurry. Annual inflation increased from 29.4% in April 2013 to 61.5% a year later. Hyperinflation (i.e. monthly inflation rate exceeds 50%) set in in 2016 when inflation reached an annual rate of 800%, and the economy contracted almost 19%. By September 2016, 15% of Venezuelans were eating discarded food they picked from dumpsites.

In 2017, inflation reached 4,000%, as Venezuelans lost average of 11 Kg (24 pounds) because of food shortages, and 90% of them lived in poverty. To make matters worse, the US government slapped sanctions on Maduro in a bid to prevent him from raising additional funds. Last month, Venezuela's annual inflation rate reached a staggering 200,000%, meaning that prices increase by that much since August 2017. In addition, corruption and crime increased, and people took to the streets to protest against the difficult conditions they were enduring.

President Maduro tried every trick in the book to arrest the country's slide into chaos by increasing the minimum wage four times between April 2014 and July 2015, changing the method of calculation of inflation, introducing a crypto currency, the Petro, as well as devaluing and re-denominating the currency by cutting five zeros from it. Nothing worked.

In exasperation, Venezuelans have been voting with their feet, with an estimated 1.6 million of them having fled their country since 2015, according to the UN agency for migration. The majority of these migrants are professionals and the middle class, thereby depriving the country of much-needed human capital. The mass emigration of Venezuelans has also strained neighboring countries (especially Colombia and Peru, which have taken in almost 1 million, and over 400,000 Venezuelans, respectively), and provided graphic images to a global audience. About two weeks ago, a Summit of 13 Latin American countries agreed to reduce restrictions on Venezuelan migrants, and appealed for more international aid to enable them deal with the inflow of Venezuelans, which Venezuela's president Maduro said was "normal."

Who Cares?

Venezuela's economic meltdown should be of concern to many, including those in the Internet infrastructure industry. With one chicken costing 14 million Bolivars (about $2.2), and banks out of cash, it is easy to imagine how difficult it would be to register or renew the registration of a domain name, or purchase a certificate of authority, not to mention buy hardware such as servers. Such challenges impact many people and issues such as online privacy and safety, as well as security, both within and outside Venezuela.

Venezuela should also be a cause for concern because it has been a major source of funding for developing countries, especially in development cooperation among developing countries in the global South (the so-called South-South cooperation). Between 2000 and 2011, Venezuela spent $7.6 billion (in 2009 USD) on development finance in other countries. In addition, Venezuela initiated the Petrocaribe alliance which provides oil at concessionary terms to its 17 member countries, many of them from CARICOM, the 15-member Caribbean economic community.

Despite the unimaginable difficulties faced by Venezuelans, they continue to make significant contributions to the maintenance of the global Internet infrastructure as well as the policy development processes that underpin it. The Venezuelan ccTLD, .VE is an important part of the Internet infrastructure, along with copies of the F and L root servers. Earlier this year, the .VE ccTLD was reported to have had an additional 48,000 domain names registered compared to a year earlier. This increase, however, is probably due to the high-handed methods of the Venezuelan government which banned the use of all non-.VE domains in the country.

In partnership with the Latin America and Caribbean Network Information Centre (LACNIC), Internet Systems Consortium (ISC), and ICANN, Venezuela installed copies of the F- and L-root servers in 2006, and 2015, respectively, thereby helping increasing the resilience of the Internet infrastructure in the region. Venezuela's contribution to the global Internet infrastructure includes the ALBA-1 fiber cable which connects Venezuela, Cuba and Jamaica to the Internet. Other international sub-marine cable projects Venezuela is connected to include the Americas-1 South, the Americas-II, Arcos-1, the Atlantica-1/GlobeNet, and the PAC.

Besides hardware and hard cash, Venezuela also contributes to the global Internet by participating in ICANN, and other similar regional and international organizations. Venezuela has been a member of ICANN's Government Advisory Committee (GAC) since 2014, is a member of the CCNSO as well as ALAC, and its regional structure in Latin America and the Caribbean, LACRALO. Venezuelans also contribute to the work of Internet-related regional organizations such as LACNOG and LACNIC, work in the DNS industry, and have an Internet Society (ISOC) Chapter.

What Now?

In view of the difficult economic situation in Venezuela and the contribution of the country and its people to the global Internet, it is fair to contemplate what can and should be done to support them. Clearly, support from the international community should be coordinated, and tailored to the missions of various organizations or partner providing such support.

Venezuelans themselves should take the lead in the developing a support program or programs. In this regard, organizations such as ICANN and ISOC, along with international development partners (e.g. World Bank, and the ITU), should work with Venezuelans, as well as regional partners (e.g. LACNIC) to develop a support program to address current needs and plan for the recovery of the Venezuelan economy.

Although this might be easier said than done given that the US is hell-bent on regime change in Venezuela, the old adage that there's a way where there's a will applies. ICANN, for example, can help in a number of ways including travel support to enable Venezuelans attend the organization's meetings and providing them additional slots in ICANN'S Fellowship and Future Leaders programs.

ICANN can also support the Venezuelan Internet infrastructure and DNS industry players, including ISPs, registrars, the .VE ccTLD registry, and operators of root server copies. ICANN, ISOC, and the DNS industry outside Venezuela can hire Venezuelans who are or have been active in these communities but were forced to leave their country because of the difficult circumstances prevailing there.

No Condition is Permanent

Venezuela's present predicament is a good reason to recall the Nigerian proverb: No condition is permanent! As tough as things are, they will get better. Just as the United States, which once paid tributes to Barbary (aka Ottoman) corsairs based in Tripoli, Libya, can now choose when and how to lord over that country, Venezuela will one day rise from these ashes. This is a great time to leave a lasting legacy on the minds of Venezuelans, especially the younger generation, and all hands should be on deck to help them wade through their present difficulties. So, when next you get in the mood to sing What a Wonderful World, please spare a thought for Venezuela.

Written by Katim S. Touray, International Development Consultant, and ICT for development advocate


          Баннеры с криптовалютами - векторные фоны      Cache   Translate Page      
Баннеры с криптовалютами - векторные фоны

Баннеры с криптовалютами - векторные фоны. Set of vector banners for crypto currency with different gold coins, 3D coin-bitcoin icon
9 files | EPS + preview | 74 Mb

          I need storyboard artist for 2D Animation      Cache   Translate Page      
Urgently need a storyboard for the video to promote a new website for a crypto currency platform. (Budget: $10 - $50 USD, Jobs: 2D Animation, 3D Animation, After Effects, Animation, Video Services)
          I need storyboard artist for 2D Animation      Cache   Translate Page      
Urgently need a storyboard for the video to promote a new website for a crypto currency platform. (Budget: $10 - $50 USD, Jobs: 2D Animation, 3D Animation, After Effects, Animation, Video Services)
          Update: Dash Wallet (Finance)      Cache   Translate Page      

Dash Wallet 1.2.0


Device: iOS Universal
Category: Finance
Price: Free, Version: 1.0.2 -> 1.2.0 (iTunes)

Description:

Dashwallet is the first iPhone wallet for Dash - Digital Cash - a better innovative alternative to bitcoin.

Dash is a crypto currency that seeks out fix the flaws that other crypto currencies suffer from. It relies on a network of Masternodes to allow such things as anonymity, instant transaction, and direct funding mechanism to kickstart innovative ideas.

Intuitive and secure, dashwallet gives you complete control over your digital cash. Send and receive dash payments instantly, with the safest mobile wallet available.

Dashwallet is the first and only iPhone wallet which connects directly to the dash network. This means that there are no servers to get hacked or go down - your funds are always safe. Even if your phone is lost, damaged or stolen, you can easily recover your funds using your personal recovery phrase.

Dashwallet is the descendant of breadwallet, a Bitcoin wallet for iPhone. We commend Aaron Voisine, creator of breadwallet, for his work. In Dashwallet we kept the beautiful simplicity that makes breadwallet a great bitcoin wallet.

Features:

* Send and receive dash payments in seconds, online or in person
* Send payments to merchants that only accept bitcoin directly with Shapeshift.io
* One button payments to dash-accepting merchants and websites
* Store your dash safely and securely using built in hardware encryption
* Simple recovery phrase enables you to recover funds when your device is lost or broken
* Direct dash network client - no servers to get hacked or go down

Dashwallet is open source and free. There are no extra transaction fees or costs. Send any amount of money to anyone in the world instantly. This is how money should be.

What's New

Updated a few localizations.
Added support for VES currency.

Dash Wallet


          Crypto: Crypto hedge fund managers aren't as smart as you think, Digital hedge fund SMS Crypto Management to concentrate on crypto currency after announcing a record 2017, Binance partners with Malta to launch security token trading platform, Bitcoin price should stabilize near $5,000: Allianz chief economist, Seed CX raises $15m in series B funding round      Cache   Translate Page      
Crypto hedge fund managers aren't as smart as you think From Bitcoin News: There's a tendency, societally, to place self-appointed experts on a pedestal. If a professional's job title is impressive enough, and their resum eacute; suitably polished, they are liable to be lauded, with their every s...
Article link
          Senior Frontend/ Java Script Developer - Yesbit Technology Ltd. - Toronto, ON      Cache   Translate Page      
COVER LETTER REQUIRED (Indicate your experience with crypto currency/blockchain) Position: *Senior Frontend/ Java Script Developer* Number of positions: 1...
From Indeed - Mon, 13 Aug 2018 17:30:47 GMT - View all Toronto, ON jobs
          US West Dedicated | Dual Intel Xeon L5630 | 8 cores | 32 GB RAM | 20 TB Bandwidth | $48.99/Mo      Cache   Translate Page      

At WiredBlade, all our servers are fully customizable such as RAM space, hard drive space, the operating system (CentOS, Windows and more and bandwidth.

Our dedicated servers are ideal for all types of businesses.

We believe that a good strong support team available 24/7 to provide our users with solutions is a necessity.

Here's a deal that's exclusive to LET.

-CPU: Dual Intel Xeon L5630 (8 Cores, 2.13 GHz)

-RAM: 32GB

-Storage: 1TB SATA

-IPv4 Address: 1 IP

-IPv6 Address: /64 Subnet

-Test IP: 207.38.69.1

-100 Mb file

-Monthly Bandwidth: 20 TB@1 Gbps dedicated connection

-Operating System: Linux, MS Windows 2008/2012/2016, VMWare, XenServer etc. or self-installed

-Remote Management: Dedicated KVM over IP / IPMI

-Premium Network Blend: Level3, Zayo, Comcast, Cogent and PCCW

-Datacenter Location: Phoenix, Arizona, USA

-Price: $48.99 | Order Now

-Upgrades available for RAM, Disk Space, IP Addresses, Bandwidth - Select and Configure Dedicated Server to your need !!

FAQ

Q. How long does it take to provision my server?

A. New server orders are provisioned within 24 hours of payment.

Q. Are the servers managed?

A. All of our services are normally self-managed. We provide the server, bandwidth, and hardware support.
You can contact us for a custom managed server quote.

Q. Is your bandwidth shared?

A. No! All of our servers are fully dedicated. You have access to the full amount of bandwidth 100% of the time, and you will not share a connection with any other customer or server.

Q. Do you offer KVM over IP?

A. Absolutely! All servers come with IPMI capability built in.

Q. Do you offer a refund if I am not satisfied with the server?

A. Absolutely! You can request a full refund within 3 days if the server is not to your satisfaction.

Q. What are your accepted user policy?

A. Warez-related, Bulk Mail, and Spam-related activities are strictly forbidden. CAN-SPAM, Copyright, DMCA, and other related US laws must be strictly followed.
- For more information, you can refer to our Term Of Use and Privacy Policy.

Why choose us?

-Over 15 Years of Experience

-Since 1997, we have been committed to providing innovative services along with rich features.

-24x7 On-Site Tech Support

-Zero Outsourcing In-house, around the clock support is available 24X7. We are always ready to resolve your issues.

-100% Network Uptime

-Our network is designed to be fully redundant. Downtime is not something that we will tolerate.

-Fast Server Deployment (within 24 hours)

-Your server will be well configured and ready for you to use within 24 hours of the order.
-We will take care of all your custom configurations.

Security

-Your dedicated server will be hosted in our highly secured data center featuring 24x7x365 on-site security, mantraps with anti-tailgating technology, biometric and keycard access denial systems, CCTV throughout the facility interior and exterior, and data center access logs.
-Your data is safe with us. We protect it with our own server management expertise.

Payment Methods: PayPal, Bitcoin/Crypto Currencies & All Major Credit/Debit Cards.

-All servers are located in our Tier 3+ Phoenix AZ USA Data Center.

-Please visit our website at www.wiredblade.com to open a ticket with our Sales department for any custom quote or any questions you may have.

-You can contact us by phone, email or through the ticketing system.

Feel free to also reach out to me directly if you have any questions.

Timothy@Wired Blade****


          Coin Terminal Inc      Cache   Translate Page      
Percents: 0.9%-2.6% for 10-50 days, 3.5%-5.5% for 25-45 days
Coin Terminal Inc. manages the portfolio of its own terminals in the exchange market of crypto currency. The company is created by an experienced and creative team of professionals who make their efforts and progressive thinking for its development and prosperity.
          Cash-spirit - Cash-spirit.com      Cache   Translate Page      
Im not admin,

About Us,
QUOTE
Cash Spirit is a cryptocurrency investment company based in the United Kingdom. Our Corporate Headquarters is located here: 4 Westow Hill, London, SE19 1RX, United Kingdom. The basis of our activity is focused on the exchange and trade popular cryptocurrencies, which is headed, of course, Bitcoin.
Cash Spirit is a modern platform that can generate income based on Crypto currencies such as Bitcoin. Our platform is fully automated and decentralized, and operates on the basis of so-called smart contacts.

Cash Spirit is focused on making a profit from the difference in price on bitcoin exchanges. Nowadays, this Crypto currency has a huge volatility and allows you to earn higher returns in the short term.


IPB Image

Invest plans:
- 70% Hourly For 7 Hours
- 120% Hourly For 5 Hours
- 180% Hourly For 4 Hours
- 550% After 2 Hours
- 800% After 4 Hours

Invest amount:
- Minimal $20
- Maximal $5000

Payment accepted:
- Perfectmoney
- Payeer
- Bitcoin
- Ethereum

Referral commission: 5%, 2%, 1%

Program Features:
- GC HYIP Script
- SSL Certificated by COMODO RSA
- Secure DDOS Protection Hosting
- Instant Withdrawal

Join Here - Cash-Spirit -
          Spare a Thought for Venezuela      Cache   Translate Page      

CircleID CircleID: Please spare a thought for Venezuela. This, the 33rd largest country in the world and with about 34 million people, the largest proven reserves of oil, the cheapest price of gasoline in the world, and was in 1950 richer than Germany, has fallen on times so hard in this once Latin America's richest country that 75% of the population lost an average of 11 Kg (24 pounds) in weight in one year because of food scarcity. And you might ask: "Why should I care?"

Venezuela is located on the northern coast of South America and shares land borders with Brazil, Colombia, Guyana, as well as Trinidad and Tobago. Officially called the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, the country was colonized by Spain in 1522 but gained full independence about 300 years later and 188 years ago, in 1830. Venezuela is a charter member of many important international organizations, including the United Nations (UN), the Organization of American States (OAS), Mercosur (the South American trade bloc), and the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), to name a few.

Venezuela is the 10th largest exporter of oil in the world, and its economy is largely based on the petroleum sector, which accounted for over 50% of the gross domestic product (GDP) of the country in 2015. Thanks to a huge government subsidy program, Venezuela has the cheapest gasoline in the world, costing $0.11 per gallon ($0.03 per litre) in 2014, even after a 6,200% increase!

Give Me Two!

Venezuela's history, although rocky, has had its glorious moments, including periods of political plurality, as well as oil-fueled economic booms that attracted immigrants from near and far (including Europe) into the country. Venezuela has also had dark moments of political turmoil, dictatorships, and economic gloom, because of various domestic and external factors.

Venezuela enjoyed both a relatively stable democracy, and significant economic growth between 1958 and the early 1980s. During this period, politics was dominated by two parties, and government revenues more than doubled after the 1973 Arab-Israeli war resulted in a huge rise in oil prices. Although the boom would soon turn to burst, it lasted long enough for Venezuelans to become known for the phrase "Ta barato, dame dos” ("It's cheap, give me two") as they bought up relatively cheap goods in their travels abroad.

In the early 1980s, the global oil glut brought down crude oil prices, and along with it, the Venezuelan economy. As a result, the country's foreign exchange reserves ran desperately low, as government debt mounted, and in desperation government devalued the currency by 100% on "Black Friday” (February 18, 1983). In addition, government announced an IMF-backed economic reform program which increased fuel, transport, and utilities prices, and lifted the price cap on some basic goods.

As a result, the country was plunged into economic and political crises, with deadly a wave of protests called the Caracazo riots in which an estimated 300 to 3,000 people died. The prevailing conditions also resulted in two unsuccessful coup attempts (in February and November, 1992), by leftist military officers, led by Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías to overthrow the government. Although Chavéz was imprisoned after the first coup attempt, he was pardoned in March 1994, thus enabling him to contest, and win, the 1998 presidential elections.

The Road to Hell

The road to hell, they say, is paved with good intentions. And if anything, Venezuela's current tragic plight proves the adage, given the innocuous and well-intentioned start of the Chavéz-led Bolivarian Revolution.

Following his victory in the 1998 elections, Chavéz embarked on a reform campaign some have termed "institutional engineering” in a bid to consolidate his power and break the 40-year hold the two leading political parties had on Venezuelan politics. Chavéz also implemented "democratic socialist" economic policies, including the redistribution of wealth, land reform, the creating creation of worker-owned cooperatives, and the attainment of food security and food sovereignty. To implement these policies, Chavéz created social programs called Bolivarian Missions and Communes, and 100,000 state-owned cooperatives.

Venezuela suffered an economic downturn in early 2002, and this, coupled with anger about Chavéz's war on the elites, and his alignment with Fidel Castro's Cuba led to an abortive coup against his government in April 2002. That same month, managers at the state petroleum company, Petróleos de Venezuela (PDVSA), went on a two-month strike over Chavéz's nominations for new members of the company's board of directors. Chavéz had long denounced PDVSA (parent company of Citgo, a US energy company) for its association with the US and business elites. After the collapse of the strike, Chávez fired 18,000 PDVSA employees and replaced them with 100,000 of his supporters, aka Chavistas.

The failed PDVSA management strike enabled Chavéz to take control of the company's coffers to fund his social programs and support his political base. By 2011, some $500 million was siphoned from the PDVSA pension fund to finance government-backed financiers. Such lavish spending inflicted the Dutch Disease on the country, with its fiscal health wrecked, despite increasing exports of, and revenues from oil.

Chavéz's policies were initially helpful, but unsustainable because of the drain on the country's finances. While poverty rates decreased 48.6% in 1999 to 32.1% in 2013, Venezuela had the one of the highest literacy rates in the region, and malnutrition fell from 21% in 1998 to 6% in 2009, price controls led to shortages of goods. Similarly, currency controls, introduced to curb capital flight exacerbated matters by leading to a shortage of foreign exchange, a decline in the value of the Bolivar, and increasing inflation.

Although oil prices increased significantly later in 2002, bringing in huge revenues, Venezuela's economy began to collapse because of what someone called RIDDS: recession, inflation, declining foreign reserves, debt, and shortages. Thus, the huge increase in government spending during the 2012 campaign to re-elect Chavéz ballooned public debt and fiscal deficit. Similarly, the decision to replace trained PDVSA personnel with revolutionaries, and deprive the company of capital decreased oil production, despite increasing levels of proven reserves of oil.

Between 2007 and 2013, inflation grew an annual rate of 27.4% (at least five times the rate for Latin America), scarcity, (especially of food, medicines and essential goods) set in, and foreign reserves fell at an alarming rate of $38 million per day. In short, all indicators pointed to trouble ahead for Venezuela when Chavéz died in March 2013.

Enter Maduro

Following the death of Chavéz, his Vice President and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Nicolás Maduro Moros, became Interim President. Maduro went on to win the constitutionally-mandated presidential elections in April 2013, and was inaugurated as President on April 19, 2013. A former bus driver who did not complete his high school education, Maduro made up for his lack of the charisma that Chávez, his predecessor and mentor, had by being autocratic and continuing Chávez's populist programs.

Things got worse in a hurry. Annual inflation increased from 29.4% in April 2013 to 61.5% a year later. Hyperinflation (i.e. monthly inflation rate exceeds 50%) set in in 2016 when inflation reached an annual rate of 800%, and the economy contracted almost 19%. By September 2016, 15% of Venezuelans were eating discarded food they picked from dumpsites.

In 2017, inflation reached 4,000%, as Venezuelans lost average of 11 Kg (24 pounds) because of food shortages, and 90% of them lived in poverty. To make matters worse, the US government slapped sanctions on Maduro in a bid to prevent him from raising additional funds. Last month, Venezuela's annual inflation rate reached a staggering 200,000%, meaning that prices increase by that much since August 2017. In addition, corruption and crime increased, and people took to the streets to protest against the difficult conditions they were enduring.

President Maduro tried every trick in the book to arrest the country's slide into chaos by increasing the minimum wage four times between April 2014 and July 2015, changing the method of calculation of inflation, introducing a crypto currency, the Petro, as well as devaluing and re-denominating the currency by cutting five zeros from it. Nothing worked.

In exasperation, Venezuelans have been voting with their feet, with an estimated 1.6 million of them having fled their country since 2015, according to the UN agency for migration. The majority of these migrants are professionals and the middle class, thereby depriving the country of much-needed human capital. The mass emigration of Venezuelans has also strained neighboring countries (especially Colombia and Peru, which have taken in almost 1 million, and over 400,000 Venezuelans, respectively), and provided graphic images to a global audience. About two weeks ago, a Summit of 13 Latin American countries agreed to reduce restrictions on Venezuelan migrants, and appealed for more international aid to enable them deal with the inflow of Venezuelans, which Venezuela's president Maduro said was "normal."

Who Cares?

Venezuela's economic meltdown should be of concern to many, including those in the Internet infrastructure industry. With one chicken costing 14 million Bolivars (about $2.2), and banks out of cash, it is easy to imagine how difficult it would be to register or renew the registration of a domain name, or purchase a certificate of authority, not to mention buy hardware such as servers. Such challenges impact many people and issues such as online privacy and safety, as well as security, both within and outside Venezuela.

Venezuela should also be a cause for concern because it has been a major source of funding for developing countries, especially in development cooperation among developing countries in the global South (the so-called South-South cooperation). Between 2000 and 2011, Venezuela spent $7.6 billion (in 2009 USD) on development finance in other countries. In addition, Venezuela initiated the Petrocaribe alliance which provides oil at concessionary terms to its 17 member countries, many of them from CARICOM, the 15-member Caribbean economic community.

Despite the unimaginable difficulties faced by Venezuelans, they continue to make significant contributions to the maintenance of the global Internet infrastructure as well as the policy development processes that underpin it. The Venezuelan ccTLD, .VE is an important part of the Internet infrastructure, along with copies of the F and L root servers. Earlier this year, the .VE ccTLD was reported to have had an additional 48,000 domain names registered compared to a year earlier. This increase, however, is probably due to the high-handed methods of the Venezuelan government which banned the use of all non-.VE domains in the country.

In partnership with the Latin America and Caribbean Network Information Centre (LACNIC), Internet Systems Consortium (ISC), and ICANN, Venezuela installed copies of the F- and L-root servers in 2006, and 2015, respectively, thereby helping increasing the resilience of the Internet infrastructure in the region. Venezuela's contribution to the global Internet infrastructure includes the ALBA-1 fiber cable which connects Venezuela, Cuba and Jamaica to the Internet. Other international sub-marine cable projects Venezuela is connected to include the Americas-1 South, the Americas-II, Arcos-1, the Atlantica-1/GlobeNet, and the PAC.

Besides hardware and hard cash, Venezuela also contributes to the global Internet by participating in ICANN, and other similar regional and international organizations. Venezuela has been a member of ICANN's Government Advisory Committee (GAC) since 2014, is a member of the CCNSO as well as ALAC, and its regional structure in Latin America and the Caribbean, LACRALO. Venezuelans also contribute to the work of Internet-related regional organizations such as LACNOG and LACNIC, work in the DNS industry, and have an Internet Society (ISOC) Chapter.

What Now?

In view of the difficult economic situation in Venezuela and the contribution of the country and its people to the global Internet, it is fair to contemplate what can and should be done to support them. Clearly, support from the international community should be coordinated, and tailored to the missions of various organizations or partner providing such support.

Venezuelans themselves should take the lead in the developing a support program or programs. In this regard, organizations such as ICANN and ISOC, along with international development partners (e.g. World Bank, and the ITU), should work with Venezuelans, as well as regional partners (e.g. LACNIC) to develop a support program to address current needs and plan for the recovery of the Venezuelan economy.

Although this might be easier said than done given that the US is hell-bent on regime change in Venezuela, the old adage that there's a way where there's a will applies. ICANN, for example, can help in a number of ways including travel support to enable Venezuelans attend the organization's meetings and providing them additional slots in ICANN'S Fellowship and Future Leaders programs.

ICANN can also support the Venezuelan Internet infrastructure and DNS industry players, including ISPs, registrars, the .VE ccTLD registry, and operators of root server copies. ICANN, ISOC, and the DNS industry outside Venezuela can hire Venezuelans who are or have been active in these communities but were forced to leave their country because of the difficult circumstances prevailing there.

No Condition is Permanent

Venezuela's present predicament is a good reason to recall the Nigerian proverb: No condition is permanent! As tough as things are, they will get better. Just as the United States, which once paid tributes to Barbary (aka Ottoman) corsairs based in Tripoli, Libya, can now choose when and how to lord over that country, Venezuela will one day rise from these ashes. This is a great time to leave a lasting legacy on the minds of Venezuelans, especially the younger generation, and all hands should be on deck to help them wade through their present difficulties. So, when next you get in the mood to sing What a Wonderful World, please spare a thought for Venezuela.
Written by Katim S. Touray, International Development Consultant, and ICT for development advocateFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: ICANN, Internet Governance, Policy & Regulation, Regional Registries, Web

The post Spare a Thought for Venezuela appeared first on iGoldRush Domain News and Resources.


          Remote Embedded Engineer      Cache   Translate Page      
An information technology company is seeking a Remote Embedded Engineer. Core Responsibilities of this position include: Helpingus build the best crypto currency experience in the world Adding support for more cryptocurrencies Building a testing infrastructure Skills and Requirements Include: 5+ years of software engineering experience Confidence working with low-level C code Ability to write unit tests, integration tests Comfortable working with threading, sockets, and cryptography
          Spare a Thought for Venezuela      Cache   Translate Page      

CircleID CircleID: Please spare a thought for Venezuela. This, the 33rd largest country in the world and with about 34 million people, the largest proven reserves of oil, the cheapest price of gasoline in the world, and was in 1950 richer than Germany, has fallen on times so hard in this once Latin America's richest country that 75% of the population lost an average of 11 Kg (24 pounds) in weight in one year because of food scarcity. And you might ask: "Why should I care?"

Venezuela is located on the northern coast of South America and shares land borders with Brazil, Colombia, Guyana, as well as Trinidad and Tobago. Officially called the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, the country was colonized by Spain in 1522 but gained full independence about 300 years later and 188 years ago, in 1830. Venezuela is a charter member of many important international organizations, including the United Nations (UN), the Organization of American States (OAS), Mercosur (the South American trade bloc), and the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), to name a few.

Venezuela is the 10th largest exporter of oil in the world, and its economy is largely based on the petroleum sector, which accounted for over 50% of the gross domestic product (GDP) of the country in 2015. Thanks to a huge government subsidy program, Venezuela has the cheapest gasoline in the world, costing $0.11 per gallon ($0.03 per litre) in 2014, even after a 6,200% increase!

Give Me Two!

Venezuela's history, although rocky, has had its glorious moments, including periods of political plurality, as well as oil-fueled economic booms that attracted immigrants from near and far (including Europe) into the country. Venezuela has also had dark moments of political turmoil, dictatorships, and economic gloom, because of various domestic and external factors.

Venezuela enjoyed both a relatively stable democracy, and significant economic growth between 1958 and the early 1980s. During this period, politics was dominated by two parties, and government revenues more than doubled after the 1973 Arab-Israeli war resulted in a huge rise in oil prices. Although the boom would soon turn to burst, it lasted long enough for Venezuelans to become known for the phrase "Ta barato, dame dos” ("It's cheap, give me two") as they bought up relatively cheap goods in their travels abroad.

In the early 1980s, the global oil glut brought down crude oil prices, and along with it, the Venezuelan economy. As a result, the country's foreign exchange reserves ran desperately low, as government debt mounted, and in desperation government devalued the currency by 100% on "Black Friday” (February 18, 1983). In addition, government announced an IMF-backed economic reform program which increased fuel, transport, and utilities prices, and lifted the price cap on some basic goods.

As a result, the country was plunged into economic and political crises, with deadly a wave of protests called the Caracazo riots in which an estimated 300 to 3,000 people died. The prevailing conditions also resulted in two unsuccessful coup attempts (in February and November, 1992), by leftist military officers, led by Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías to overthrow the government. Although Chavéz was imprisoned after the first coup attempt, he was pardoned in March 1994, thus enabling him to contest, and win, the 1998 presidential elections.

The Road to Hell

The road to hell, they say, is paved with good intentions. And if anything, Venezuela's current tragic plight proves the adage, given the innocuous and well-intentioned start of the Chavéz-led Bolivarian Revolution.

Following his victory in the 1998 elections, Chavéz embarked on a reform campaign some have termed "institutional engineering” in a bid to consolidate his power and break the 40-year hold the two leading political parties had on Venezuelan politics. Chavéz also implemented "democratic socialist" economic policies, including the redistribution of wealth, land reform, the creating creation of worker-owned cooperatives, and the attainment of food security and food sovereignty. To implement these policies, Chavéz created social programs called Bolivarian Missions and Communes, and 100,000 state-owned cooperatives.

Venezuela suffered an economic downturn in early 2002, and this, coupled with anger about Chavéz's war on the elites, and his alignment with Fidel Castro's Cuba led to an abortive coup against his government in April 2002. That same month, managers at the state petroleum company, Petróleos de Venezuela (PDVSA), went on a two-month strike over Chavéz's nominations for new members of the company's board of directors. Chavéz had long denounced PDVSA (parent company of Citgo, a US energy company) for its association with the US and business elites. After the collapse of the strike, Chávez fired 18,000 PDVSA employees and replaced them with 100,000 of his supporters, aka Chavistas.

The failed PDVSA management strike enabled Chavéz to take control of the company's coffers to fund his social programs and support his political base. By 2011, some $500 million was siphoned from the PDVSA pension fund to finance government-backed financiers. Such lavish spending inflicted the Dutch Disease on the country, with its fiscal health wrecked, despite increasing exports of, and revenues from oil.

Chavéz's policies were initially helpful, but unsustainable because of the drain on the country's finances. While poverty rates decreased 48.6% in 1999 to 32.1% in 2013, Venezuela had the one of the highest literacy rates in the region, and malnutrition fell from 21% in 1998 to 6% in 2009, price controls led to shortages of goods. Similarly, currency controls, introduced to curb capital flight exacerbated matters by leading to a shortage of foreign exchange, a decline in the value of the Bolivar, and increasing inflation.

Although oil prices increased significantly later in 2002, bringing in huge revenues, Venezuela's economy began to collapse because of what someone called RIDDS: recession, inflation, declining foreign reserves, debt, and shortages. Thus, the huge increase in government spending during the 2012 campaign to re-elect Chavéz ballooned public debt and fiscal deficit. Similarly, the decision to replace trained PDVSA personnel with revolutionaries, and deprive the company of capital decreased oil production, despite increasing levels of proven reserves of oil.

Between 2007 and 2013, inflation grew an annual rate of 27.4% (at least five times the rate for Latin America), scarcity, (especially of food, medicines and essential goods) set in, and foreign reserves fell at an alarming rate of $38 million per day. In short, all indicators pointed to trouble ahead for Venezuela when Chavéz died in March 2013.

Enter Maduro

Following the death of Chavéz, his Vice President and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Nicolás Maduro Moros, became Interim President. Maduro went on to win the constitutionally-mandated presidential elections in April 2013, and was inaugurated as President on April 19, 2013. A former bus driver who did not complete his high school education, Maduro made up for his lack of the charisma that Chávez, his predecessor and mentor, had by being autocratic and continuing Chávez's populist programs.

Things got worse in a hurry. Annual inflation increased from 29.4% in April 2013 to 61.5% a year later. Hyperinflation (i.e. monthly inflation rate exceeds 50%) set in in 2016 when inflation reached an annual rate of 800%, and the economy contracted almost 19%. By September 2016, 15% of Venezuelans were eating discarded food they picked from dumpsites.

In 2017, inflation reached 4,000%, as Venezuelans lost average of 11 Kg (24 pounds) because of food shortages, and 90% of them lived in poverty. To make matters worse, the US government slapped sanctions on Maduro in a bid to prevent him from raising additional funds. Last month, Venezuela's annual inflation rate reached a staggering 200,000%, meaning that prices increase by that much since August 2017. In addition, corruption and crime increased, and people took to the streets to protest against the difficult conditions they were enduring.

President Maduro tried every trick in the book to arrest the country's slide into chaos by increasing the minimum wage four times between April 2014 and July 2015, changing the method of calculation of inflation, introducing a crypto currency, the Petro, as well as devaluing and re-denominating the currency by cutting five zeros from it. Nothing worked.

In exasperation, Venezuelans have been voting with their feet, with an estimated 1.6 million of them having fled their country since 2015, according to the UN agency for migration. The majority of these migrants are professionals and the middle class, thereby depriving the country of much-needed human capital. The mass emigration of Venezuelans has also strained neighboring countries (especially Colombia and Peru, which have taken in almost 1 million, and over 400,000 Venezuelans, respectively), and provided graphic images to a global audience. About two weeks ago, a Summit of 13 Latin American countries agreed to reduce restrictions on Venezuelan migrants, and appealed for more international aid to enable them deal with the inflow of Venezuelans, which Venezuela's president Maduro said was "normal."

Who Cares?

Venezuela's economic meltdown should be of concern to many, including those in the Internet infrastructure industry. With one chicken costing 14 million Bolivars (about $2.2), and banks out of cash, it is easy to imagine how difficult it would be to register or renew the registration of a domain name, or purchase a certificate of authority, not to mention buy hardware such as servers. Such challenges impact many people and issues such as online privacy and safety, as well as security, both within and outside Venezuela.

Venezuela should also be a cause for concern because it has been a major source of funding for developing countries, especially in development cooperation among developing countries in the global South (the so-called South-South cooperation). Between 2000 and 2011, Venezuela spent $7.6 billion (in 2009 USD) on development finance in other countries. In addition, Venezuela initiated the Petrocaribe alliance which provides oil at concessionary terms to its 17 member countries, many of them from CARICOM, the 15-member Caribbean economic community.

Despite the unimaginable difficulties faced by Venezuelans, they continue to make significant contributions to the maintenance of the global Internet infrastructure as well as the policy development processes that underpin it. The Venezuelan ccTLD, .VE is an important part of the Internet infrastructure, along with copies of the F and L root servers. Earlier this year, the .VE ccTLD was reported to have had an additional 48,000 domain names registered compared to a year earlier. This increase, however, is probably due to the high-handed methods of the Venezuelan government which banned the use of all non-.VE domains in the country.

In partnership with the Latin America and Caribbean Network Information Centre (LACNIC), Internet Systems Consortium (ISC), and ICANN, Venezuela installed copies of the F- and L-root servers in 2006, and 2015, respectively, thereby helping increasing the resilience of the Internet infrastructure in the region. Venezuela's contribution to the global Internet infrastructure includes the ALBA-1 fiber cable which connects Venezuela, Cuba and Jamaica to the Internet. Other international sub-marine cable projects Venezuela is connected to include the Americas-1 South, the Americas-II, Arcos-1, the Atlantica-1/GlobeNet, and the PAC.

Besides hardware and hard cash, Venezuela also contributes to the global Internet by participating in ICANN, and other similar regional and international organizations. Venezuela has been a member of ICANN's Government Advisory Committee (GAC) since 2014, is a member of the CCNSO as well as ALAC, and its regional structure in Latin America and the Caribbean, LACRALO. Venezuelans also contribute to the work of Internet-related regional organizations such as LACNOG and LACNIC, work in the DNS industry, and have an Internet Society (ISOC) Chapter.

What Now?

In view of the difficult economic situation in Venezuela and the contribution of the country and its people to the global Internet, it is fair to contemplate what can and should be done to support them. Clearly, support from the international community should be coordinated, and tailored to the missions of various organizations or partner providing such support.

Venezuelans themselves should take the lead in the developing a support program or programs. In this regard, organizations such as ICANN and ISOC, along with international development partners (e.g. World Bank, and the ITU), should work with Venezuelans, as well as regional partners (e.g. LACNIC) to develop a support program to address current needs and plan for the recovery of the Venezuelan economy.

Although this might be easier said than done given that the US is hell-bent on regime change in Venezuela, the old adage that there's a way where there's a will applies. ICANN, for example, can help in a number of ways including travel support to enable Venezuelans attend the organization's meetings and providing them additional slots in ICANN'S Fellowship and Future Leaders programs.

ICANN can also support the Venezuelan Internet infrastructure and DNS industry players, including ISPs, registrars, the .VE ccTLD registry, and operators of root server copies. ICANN, ISOC, and the DNS industry outside Venezuela can hire Venezuelans who are or have been active in these communities but were forced to leave their country because of the difficult circumstances prevailing there.

No Condition is Permanent

Venezuela's present predicament is a good reason to recall the Nigerian proverb: No condition is permanent! As tough as things are, they will get better. Just as the United States, which once paid tributes to Barbary (aka Ottoman) corsairs based in Tripoli, Libya, can now choose when and how to lord over that country, Venezuela will one day rise from these ashes. This is a great time to leave a lasting legacy on the minds of Venezuelans, especially the younger generation, and all hands should be on deck to help them wade through their present difficulties. So, when next you get in the mood to sing What a Wonderful World, please spare a thought for Venezuela.
Written by Katim S. Touray, International Development Consultant, and ICT for development advocateFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: ICANN, Internet Governance, Policy & Regulation, Regional Registries, Web

The post Spare a Thought for Venezuela appeared first on iGoldRush Domain News and Resources.


          Investor가 작성한 <9> 뮤직비디오의 댓글      Cache   Translate Page      
Mark Zuckerberg maybe interested in Viuly crypto currency. Viuly сrypto currency can be integrated into Facebook. https://www.google.com/search?q=viuly


Next Page: 10000

Site Map 2018_01_14
Site Map 2018_01_15
Site Map 2018_01_16
Site Map 2018_01_17
Site Map 2018_01_18
Site Map 2018_01_19
Site Map 2018_01_20
Site Map 2018_01_21
Site Map 2018_01_22
Site Map 2018_01_23
Site Map 2018_01_24
Site Map 2018_01_25
Site Map 2018_01_26
Site Map 2018_01_27
Site Map 2018_01_28
Site Map 2018_01_29
Site Map 2018_01_30
Site Map 2018_01_31
Site Map 2018_02_01
Site Map 2018_02_02
Site Map 2018_02_03
Site Map 2018_02_04
Site Map 2018_02_05
Site Map 2018_02_06
Site Map 2018_02_07
Site Map 2018_02_08
Site Map 2018_02_09
Site Map 2018_02_10
Site Map 2018_02_11
Site Map 2018_02_12
Site Map 2018_02_13
Site Map 2018_02_14
Site Map 2018_02_15
Site Map 2018_02_15
Site Map 2018_02_16
Site Map 2018_02_17
Site Map 2018_02_18
Site Map 2018_02_19
Site Map 2018_02_20
Site Map 2018_02_21
Site Map 2018_02_22
Site Map 2018_02_23
Site Map 2018_02_24
Site Map 2018_02_25
Site Map 2018_02_26
Site Map 2018_02_27
Site Map 2018_02_28
Site Map 2018_03_01
Site Map 2018_03_02
Site Map 2018_03_03
Site Map 2018_03_04
Site Map 2018_03_05
Site Map 2018_03_06
Site Map 2018_03_07
Site Map 2018_03_08
Site Map 2018_03_09
Site Map 2018_03_10
Site Map 2018_03_11
Site Map 2018_03_12
Site Map 2018_03_13
Site Map 2018_03_14
Site Map 2018_03_15
Site Map 2018_03_16
Site Map 2018_03_17
Site Map 2018_03_18
Site Map 2018_03_19
Site Map 2018_03_20
Site Map 2018_03_21
Site Map 2018_03_22
Site Map 2018_03_23
Site Map 2018_03_24
Site Map 2018_03_25
Site Map 2018_03_26
Site Map 2018_03_27
Site Map 2018_03_28
Site Map 2018_03_29
Site Map 2018_03_30
Site Map 2018_03_31
Site Map 2018_04_01
Site Map 2018_04_02
Site Map 2018_04_03
Site Map 2018_04_04
Site Map 2018_04_05
Site Map 2018_04_06
Site Map 2018_04_07
Site Map 2018_04_08
Site Map 2018_04_09
Site Map 2018_04_10
Site Map 2018_04_11
Site Map 2018_04_12
Site Map 2018_04_13
Site Map 2018_04_14
Site Map 2018_04_15
Site Map 2018_04_16
Site Map 2018_04_17
Site Map 2018_04_18
Site Map 2018_04_19
Site Map 2018_04_20
Site Map 2018_04_21
Site Map 2018_04_22
Site Map 2018_04_23
Site Map 2018_04_24
Site Map 2018_04_25
Site Map 2018_04_26
Site Map 2018_04_27
Site Map 2018_04_28
Site Map 2018_04_29
Site Map 2018_04_30
Site Map 2018_05_01
Site Map 2018_05_02
Site Map 2018_05_03
Site Map 2018_05_04
Site Map 2018_05_05
Site Map 2018_05_06
Site Map 2018_05_07
Site Map 2018_05_08
Site Map 2018_05_09
Site Map 2018_05_15
Site Map 2018_05_16
Site Map 2018_05_17
Site Map 2018_05_18
Site Map 2018_05_19
Site Map 2018_05_20
Site Map 2018_05_21
Site Map 2018_05_22
Site Map 2018_05_23
Site Map 2018_05_24
Site Map 2018_05_25
Site Map 2018_05_26
Site Map 2018_05_27
Site Map 2018_05_28
Site Map 2018_05_29
Site Map 2018_05_30
Site Map 2018_05_31
Site Map 2018_06_01
Site Map 2018_06_02
Site Map 2018_06_03
Site Map 2018_06_04
Site Map 2018_06_05
Site Map 2018_06_06
Site Map 2018_06_07
Site Map 2018_06_08
Site Map 2018_06_09
Site Map 2018_06_10
Site Map 2018_06_11
Site Map 2018_06_12
Site Map 2018_06_13
Site Map 2018_06_14
Site Map 2018_06_15
Site Map 2018_06_16
Site Map 2018_06_17
Site Map 2018_06_18
Site Map 2018_06_19
Site Map 2018_06_20
Site Map 2018_06_21
Site Map 2018_06_22
Site Map 2018_06_23
Site Map 2018_06_24
Site Map 2018_06_25
Site Map 2018_06_26
Site Map 2018_06_27
Site Map 2018_06_28
Site Map 2018_06_29
Site Map 2018_06_30
Site Map 2018_07_01
Site Map 2018_07_02
Site Map 2018_07_03
Site Map 2018_07_04
Site Map 2018_07_05
Site Map 2018_07_06
Site Map 2018_07_07
Site Map 2018_07_08
Site Map 2018_07_09
Site Map 2018_07_10
Site Map 2018_07_11
Site Map 2018_07_12
Site Map 2018_07_13
Site Map 2018_07_14
Site Map 2018_07_15
Site Map 2018_07_16
Site Map 2018_07_17
Site Map 2018_07_18
Site Map 2018_07_19
Site Map 2018_07_20
Site Map 2018_07_21
Site Map 2018_07_22
Site Map 2018_07_23
Site Map 2018_07_24
Site Map 2018_07_25
Site Map 2018_07_26
Site Map 2018_07_27
Site Map 2018_07_28
Site Map 2018_07_29
Site Map 2018_07_30
Site Map 2018_07_31
Site Map 2018_08_01
Site Map 2018_08_02
Site Map 2018_08_03
Site Map 2018_08_04
Site Map 2018_08_05
Site Map 2018_08_06
Site Map 2018_08_07
Site Map 2018_08_08
Site Map 2018_08_09
Site Map 2018_08_10
Site Map 2018_08_11
Site Map 2018_08_12
Site Map 2018_08_13
Site Map 2018_08_15
Site Map 2018_08_16
Site Map 2018_08_17
Site Map 2018_08_18
Site Map 2018_08_19
Site Map 2018_08_20
Site Map 2018_08_21
Site Map 2018_08_22
Site Map 2018_08_23
Site Map 2018_08_24
Site Map 2018_08_25
Site Map 2018_08_26
Site Map 2018_08_27
Site Map 2018_08_28
Site Map 2018_08_29
Site Map 2018_08_30
Site Map 2018_08_31
Site Map 2018_09_01
Site Map 2018_09_02
Site Map 2018_09_03
Site Map 2018_09_04
Site Map 2018_09_05
Site Map 2018_09_06
Site Map 2018_09_07
Site Map 2018_09_08
Site Map 2018_09_09
Site Map 2018_09_10
Site Map 2018_09_11
Site Map 2018_09_12
Site Map 2018_09_13