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          Trump encouraging elephant poaching      Cache   Translate Page      
Originally posted on Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting Blog:
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-43435013?SThisFB 16 March 2018 Image copyrightGETTY IMAGESImage captionIan Khama says that US policy is encouraging poaching of endangered animals The outgoing president of Botswana has attacked his US counterpart Donald Trump…
          Once hailed as a conservation success story, Botswana is no longer a safe haven for elephants      Cache   Translate Page      
Ninety carcasses of illegally killed elephants have been found around a sanctuary.
          COSAFA Cup 2018 (dames): Afrique du Sud, Botswana et Ouganda déjà au top      Cache   Translate Page      

Entame ce mercredi à Port Elizabeth de l’édition 2018 de la Coupe des nations féminines du COSAFA (Conseil des fédérations d’Afrique australe). 12 équipes en lice pour succéder aux Banyana […]

Lire l'article COSAFA Cup 2018 (dames): Afrique du Sud, Botswana et Ouganda déjà au top sur Africa Top Sports.


          Botswana:Five Ghetto Teams Ready for New Season      Cache   Translate Page      
[Botswana Daily News] Francistown -The First Division North kicks-off on Saturday and expectations are high from supporters who want nothing but the best performance from their teams.
          Nigeria is Africa’s best economy – says Forbes      Cache   Translate Page      
A major research firm, Forbes Africa has rated Nigeria as the 2018 best economy in Africa. According to Forbes, Nigeria came top with $172 billion, which was followed by South Africa with $166.735 billion. Also on the list was Egypt as third with $78 billion, Algeria with $66, Lybia :$65, Botswana: $22.675, Ghana :$20.458 Morroco […]
          After elephant killings, Botswana mulls lifting hunting ban      Cache   Translate Page      
Botswana launched a review Wednesday of a 2014 hunting ban imposed to reverse a decline in elephants and other wildlife. The prohibition on big game sports hunting was the work of ex-president Ian Khama, a keen conservationist, to shield species decimated by hunting and habitat loss. But lawmakers from the ruling Botswana Democratic party hav ...
          SERIKALI KUKUZA UCHUMI KWA KUDHIBITI FEDHA ZA ZIADA KATIKA MZUNGUKO      Cache   Translate Page      
Naibu Waziri wa Fedha na Mipango Mhe. Dkt. Ashatu Kijaji (Mb).
FEDHA za ziada kuwepo katika mzunguko wa uchumi sio kigezo cha kukua kwa uchumi wa Taifa bali ni ishara ya Taifa hilo kushindwa kudhibiti ukuaji wa uchumi wake.
Hayo yameelezwa Bungeni jijini Dodoma na Naibu Waziri wa Fedha na Mipango, Mhe. Dkt. Ashatu Kijaji, alipokuwa akijibu swali la nyongeza la Mbunge wa Jimbo la Konde Mhe. Khatib Said Haji, aliyehoji kuhusu dhana ya kukua kwa uchumi nchini ilihali kuna upungufu wa uuzaji bidhaa nje na wananchi kukosa fedha.
Dkt. Kijaji alieleza kuwa matatizo ya kuwepo kwa fedha za ziada katika uchumi ni makubwa, hivyo inapongezwa hatua ya Benki Kuu ya Tanzania (BoT) kudhibiti hali hiyo kwa manufaa ya ukuaji wa uchumi wa Taifa.
“Uchumi wa Tanzania unakua kutokana na hali halisi na takwimu zilizopo, ambapo katika Mkutano wa Jumuiya ya Maendeleo ya Nchi za Kusini mwa Jangwa la Sahara (SADC) uliofanyika hivi karibuni ulieleza kuwa nchi nyingi mwanachama wa Jumuiya hiyo hazijafanikiwa katika ukuaji wa viashiria vya uchumi mkubwa isipokuwa nchi ya Botswana, Lesotho na Tanzania”. Alieleza Dkt. Kijaji.
Akijibu swali la Msingi la Mbunge huyo kuhusu vigezo vinavyoainisha ukuaji wa uchumi wa Tanzania, Dkt. Kijaji alisema kuwa vigezo kwa mujibu wa Kamisheni ya Takwimu ya Umoja wa Mataifa ni ongezeko la pato la Taifa, ongezeko la pato la wastani la mwananchi kwa mwaka na ongezeko la uuzaji wa bidhaa na huduma nje ya nchi.
Vigezo vingine ni kupungua kwa uagizaji wa bidhaa na huduma kutoka nje ya nchi, utulivu wa bei za bidhaa na huduma, utulivu wa viwango vya ubadilishaji wa fedha za kigeni,  kuongezeka kwa akiba ya fedha za kigeni na kuongezeka kwa makusanyo ya Serikali kwa ajili ya kugharamia shughuli za maendeleo na huduma za kijamii.
Vilevile alieleza kuwa, uwekezaji unaofanyika katika nchi ni kigezo cha msingi cha ukuaji wa uchumi kwa kuwa huongeza kasi ya uzalishaji wa bidhaa na huduma, ajira, kipato cha mwananchi mmoja mmoja na pato la Taifa hivyo kupunguza umaskini katika jamii.
Naibu Waziri Dkt. Kijaji alibainisha kuwa, mchango wa Serikali katika ukuaji wa uchumi ni pamoja na kupunguza matumizi yasiyo ya lazima, kuwekeza zaidi kwenye shughuli zinazochochea ukuaji wa uchumi, kupunguza uagizaji wa bidhaa na huduma kutoka nje ya nchi na kuweka mazingira rafiki kwa ajili ya uwekezaji wa bidhaa na huduma nchini.
Imetolewa na;
Kitengo cha Mawasiliano Serikalini
Wizara ya Fedha na Mipango.

          Re: Gay Botswana      Cache   Translate Page      
Hey, add some links to gay friendly ventures in Botswana... I'll make appropriate category and move stuff there later on.

gay411.org × Africa × Botswana
          Lovely Victoria Falls...      Cache   Translate Page      
I have had an opportunity to work in Kasana in Botswana with a regional office in Victoria Falls (Zimbabwe) and I travelled between the 2 towns regulalrly.

I found Victoria Falls to more outgoing and the guys were more switched-on in-terms of Gay sex. They understood the language of gay and never made a big fuss about being asked out for sex. Kasane on the other hand was a very different and reserved town with everybody pretenting they had no clue what happens when 2 men get into bed.

It did however take a few dollars to get a guy to bed and few did manage to run-off before they gave me their ass. I ended up with a guy who was not gay but always knew who I should talk to and I paid him a small fee if the sex went well and a bit more it the sex was GOOD!!! Very few of these guys were really gay so they really just wanted the money and I really just wanted the sex. A few did show some affection and joy in the act and it's those where I always came back to.
          Looking for Men in Gaborone, Botswana      Cache   Translate Page      
Missing some real man2man action here in Botswana. Where are you? I'm in Gaborone aND ALL THE GOOD MEN ARE HIDING BEHIND SKIRTS BECAUSE THEY DON'T WANT TO BE SEEN AS gAY. I'm doing the same but the starvation is so bad, I'm going to do it with a dog or donkey one of these days.

Lepakor
          Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe 3dicks in 1 day      Cache   Translate Page      
"You've always wanted to travel to Africa where nature has remained unchanged for your sake. The Okavango delta, Victoria falls, Katima Mulilo, The Savuti channel, Chobe Park with over 100,000 elephants. Now there's more: I'm dedicated to giving you authentic man2man pleasure to spice your trip. I'm as dark as Africa made me, 1.7m tall, 56kg, hung (10""), uncut and waiting to please you. I do NO BAREBACK, NO DRUGS! E-mail me at thabang69er@yahoo.co.uk or check my profile at http://uk.profiles.yahoo.com/thabang69er I also offer 3-4some with fellow kinky black friends, equally well hung and versatile."
          Gay Experince in Botswana      Cache   Translate Page      
Was travelling to the north (from south, Mahalapye) when I had to overnight in Palapye. Booked into a Cresta Hotel there (can't remember the name) This guy came over saying he had been asked to repair a wall socket. He moved the table... and ended up bendingover, revealing his torn trousers and his hairy balls hanging through the torn holes. I knew I'd have to call him back after he fixes the socket to come and fix me... Other than that the country is devoid of m2m experiences. It's all chance, hit&miss. Who wants to miss and end up with his dick up in a policeman's ass. Anyway - There's more ass at prisons in Botswana than at night clubs
          UPDATE: Elephant spree massacres in Botswana – An official government response      Cache   Translate Page      
The public outcry to claims made by Elephants Without Borders has been vociferous, but the government of Botswana has fiercely countered in an official response.
          Vad vore livet utan bilder      Cache   Translate Page      

#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000
Familjen Eklund i Gaborone, Botswana 1993. Foto: Håkan Eklund. Nr 255/365.

Hundar är kloka. Jag har kameran på stativ för att ta en familjebild i vårt Afrikahem, och hunden tittar förstås på oss - en kamera är väl inget att titta på? En död grunka; han undrade istället vad vi höll på med.

Hittade papperskopian ...

          Zimbabwe:Botswana, Zimbabwe to Meet Over Cattle Incursion - MP Wants Them Shot      Cache   Translate Page      
[New Zimbabwe] Gaborone -Officials from Zimbabwe and Botswana will meet soon over 200 cattle incursion from Zimbabwe through cordon fence along the boarder which is regarded as a hotspot for elephants.
                Cache   Translate Page      
Mauritius: Bitter Feud Over UK's Last Remaining African Colony
A group of six Chagossians based in the Seychelles when visiting the archipelago after the British government allowed them to visit the islands for a week in May 2015.

The future of an Indian Ocean archipelago which is the last remaining African colony of the old British Empire came into sharp focus at the International Court of Justice (ICJ) last week.

Legalbrief reports that the Chagos Islands were home to a Bourbonnais Creole-speaking people for more than 150 years until the UK evicted them between 1967 and 1973 to allow the US to build a military base on Diego Garcia. As a result, the 2 000 residents were sent to Mauritius and the Seychelles.

A report on the Quartz Africa site notes that while Mauritius obtained its independence in 1968, the islands remained under British control and an immigration order preventing Chagossians from returning was issued in 1971. Australia, Israel and the US are backing the UK stance while Mauritius has the support of 17 countries (Argentina, Belize, Botswana, Brazil, Cyprus, Germany, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Marshall Islands, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Serbia, South Africa, Thailand, Vanuatu and Zambia).

The UK used its platform at The Hague to apologise for the 'shameful way' residents of the disputed territory were evicted. However, it insisted that Mauritius was wrong to bring the dispute over ownership of the islands by saying the matter was 'purely a bilateral issue'.A report on the Al Jazeera site notes that UK Solicitor-General Robert Buckland asked the judges to 'decline the request for an advisory opinion'.

Mauritius' lawyers said the Chagos Islands were 'integral' to its territory and it was handed to the UK 'under duress'. 'More than 50 years after independence... the process of decolonisation of Mauritius remains incomplete,' former Mauritian President Anerood Jugnauth told The Hague-based court.

The Guardian reports that Mauritius' Defence Minister Sir Anerood Jugnauth told the court that his country was coerced into giving up a large swathe of its territory before independence. That separation was in breach of UN resolution 1514, passed in 1960, which specifically banned the break-up of colonies before independence, the Mauritian Government argued before the UN-backed court, which specialises in territorial and border disputes between states.

'I am the only one still alive among those who participated in the Mauritius constitutional conference at Lancaster House (in London) in 1965, where talks on the ultimate status of Mauritius were held. Those talks resulted in the unlawful detachment of an integral part of our territory on the eve of our independence,' he said.

Jugnauth added that the 'secret meetings' were not made known to the other Mauritian representatives 'although we were later told of the immense pressure that was imposed on the small group'. The Telegraph reports that the hearing is seen as a critical test of Britain's diplomatic clout in the Brexit era, after it failed to rally enough to support to prevent the UN General Assembly adopting the resolution that led to this week's hearing.

Legalbrief reports that Ndivhuwo Mabaya, spokesperson for South Africa's Department of International Cooperation said it is the duty of every member state of the UN to leave no stone unturned to assist the General Assembly 'to remove the last vestiges of colonialism and for all peoples to achieve self-determination and freedom'.

In an interesting twist, the Chagos community in the Seychelles has expressed concerns over the Mauritian Government's demands. Pierre Prosper, chairperson of the Chagos Association in Seychelles, reportedly told the S eychelles News Agency that the government's interest is commercial and has nothing to do with the welfare of the Chagos community.

          Kenya: Animated Video on Cross-Border Migrant Child Protection      Cache   Translate Page      
Organization: Save the Children
Country: Kenya
Closing date: 20 Sep 2018

Terms of Reference for Animated Video on Cross-Border Migrant Child Protection Mechanisms and Publication of Guidebook in line with Save the Children Branding Guidelines

  1. Background: Cross Border Coordination Mechanisms in East and Southern Africa

The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in the global mobility of people. The global regular migrant stock had reached 258 million by late 2017.1 Migrants from poorer countries, which are often harder to capture in official data, are of particular concern from a development and humanitarian perspective: they are often amongst the most vulnerable populations. Because of the overall rise of movement of people, there is also a marked increase of Children on the Move. This is particularly true for East and Southern Africa: even though children make up roughly 15% of the global international migrant stock, this proportion is dramatically larger in East and Southern Africa with 28.2% of recorded migrants being children.2 In some countries this ratio is even higher, with Ethiopia having 47% migrant children.

In many countries in East and Southern Africa clear child protection legislation is in place, but often it is only implicitly and by extension protecting migrant children, failing to recognize their specific risks.

The comprehensive protection of unaccompanied and separated migrant children (USMC) requires the coordination and cooperation of a large range of stakeholders, often from more than one country. Government departments mandated to protect vulnerable children have to interact with immigration and internal affairs departments, departments of education and health, and more particularly across borders, the protection of USMC requires close coordination between governments to ensure that case management is not disrupted or impeded by the national border, ensuring that the children's best interest is the most important guiding principle.

In Southern Africa, over the last 10 years, Save the Children has established bilateral cross-border coordination mechanisms between five governments, growing over the years into a significant improvement in the protection of USMC by harmonising case management, standard operating procedures, and facilitating communication. Save the Children's East and Southern Africa Regional Office's Regional Programming Unit (RPU) continues to work towards expanding the bilateral meetings, particularly in East Africa. In order to communicate this cost effective and successful approach to strengthening the protection of USMC, the RPU is looking to create a short form animated video and a high quality publication.

The video is intended to illustrate the cross-border mechanisms and how in the past 10 years, Save the Children, with support from various donors, has grown a bilateral meeting discussing USMC cases between South Africa and Zimbabwe into a regional mechanism covering most of Southern Africa. The video will make this complex process understandable to a broader audience, trying to generate interest in the approach amongst key stakeholders, partners and donors. Additionally, the video on the regional process will be a tool for country offices to try and increase government commitment, as well as engage neighbouring countries to expand the mechanism to more borders.

The RPU will additionally write a guidebook on establishing cross-border mechanisms for the protection of USMC. This guidebook will draw on the experience from country offices and the extensive project

1 UN DESA, International Migration Report 2017

2 Using UN DESA Migration Stock Data. Includes Botswana, Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Somalia, Sudan, South Africa, South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe documentation to develop a practical roadmap to help offer deep insights into the establishment of the meetings. This guide will be written in-house, but it will require graphic design and layout of the text into a publishable and printable PDF that conforms with the Save the Children branding guidelines, which will also nclude the design of key illustrations and visual elements.

  1. Save the Children - Regional Children on the Move Programme in East and Southern Africa The Regional Programming Unit's (RPU) Children on the Move programme seeks to protect children at risk of or undertaking unaccompanied and unsafe migration in East and Southern Africa through improved national and transnational migration management, including case management and access to child protection systems. It currently coordinates these efforts in Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

  2. Improved transnational cooperation and responsibility-sharing between governments to realise durable solutions for children affected by mixed migration.

  3. Develop an expanded evidence base to guide quality programming on addressing root causes of irregular migration, early unaccompanied economic migration, and preventing unsafe migration in East and Southern Africa.

  4. Improved family tracing and reunification procedures and case management to increase successful reunifications for children crossing borders between Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The programme is also working with four partners in Botswana and Swaziland, integrating them into the broader COM programme that is active in Mozambique, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, in order to achieve that:

  • Children at risk of unaccompanied and unsafe migration in East and Southern Africa access essential and integrated protection, education and health services in countries of origin, transit and destination.

  • Civil society organizations are empowered to strengthen child protection and other essential services for child on the move, including survivors of sexual violence and exploitation in border towns, in Botswana, Swaziland, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Zambia and South Africa.

  • Communities, including children, are empowered to transform existing social norms that perpetuate children's vulnerability to violence, incl. unsafe migration, PHP and sexual violence.

The RPU further provides cross-learning platforms and opportunities to exchange best practice and build a community of practice focused on child migration. At country level, programmes are context specific, utilizing evidence of national migration dynamics to try and effectively prevent unsafe migration by addressing push factors (e.g. through income generating projects, skills training of adolescents, positive discipline work to address violence at home and in schools) and strengthening national child protection systems to include migrant children (e.g. including unaccompanied and separated migrant children in alternative care systems, developing child migrant specific case management systems, strengthening FTR systems, etc.).

  1. Objective and Scope of Work

The required work is comprised of two components:

Component 1 - Five Minute Video

A short five-minute video, 2D or 3D animated, illustrating the cross-border coordination mechanism, including establishing of the meetings, the programming approach and the benefits of the cooperation of governments to the protection of USMC to a broad audience, including potential donors, NGOs, and government stakeholders.

The video should have a memorable, high quality artistic style that captures often complex processes in a simple and easy to understand narrative, featuring professional voice-overs.

For reference, please see screenshots from a previous video produced for a different project:

Component 2 - Graphic Design and Layout of Guidebook

Based on a 40-50 page word document, this component requires the design and layout of a booklet in line with the Save the Children branding guidelines, including illustrations/graphs/figures.

  1. Outputs/Deliverables

The project requires two key outputs:

  • Story board/narrative for 5-minute video for review

  • 5-minute 2D/3D animated video provided in a range of encoding qualities (preferably including UHD)

  • Layout and graphic design of 50 page A4 guidebook for PDF publication and print.

  • Roles and Responsibilities

The Consultant:

  • Regular and transparent reporting on progress to RPU, including any delays or challenges as they develop.

  • Development of visual style and script based on a provided narrative.

  • Development of required 2D or 3D assets.

  • Voice-over services.

  • Animation.

  • Graphic design and layout of 40-50-page document.

Save the Children and RPU: (based in Pretoria and Nairobi)

  • Providing a narrative for the video.

  • Assisting in the process of transforming the narrative into a script.

  • Inputting on visual style of animated video.

  • Providing 40-50-page document for graphic layout.

  • Inputting on visual style of Guidebook on Cross-Border Coordination.

  • Timeframe

  • 3 months - from September to November 2018.

  • Competencies

  • Experience in 2D/3D animations.

  • Experience in visualizing political/advocacy processes.

  • Experience in graphic design and layout of documents/booklets.

  • Experience working in the non -profit sector is an advantage.


How to apply:

Application Email: Please apply with a covering letter and up-to-date CV to: Esaro.procurement@savethechildren.org


          Winning start for Botswana's Mares      Cache   Translate Page      
Botswana won the opening game of the 2018 COSAFA Women's Cup at Wolfson Stadium in Nelson Mandela Bay, defeating Malawi 2-0 with Lesego Keleboge and Lesego Radiakanyo on target for the Mares.
          BBC report of 87 elephant poaching deaths wrong, say leading conservation scientists      Cache   Translate Page      
The scientists find no scientific basis for the dramatic assertion that 87 elephants have been poached in Botswana.
The scientists find no scientific basis for the dramatic assertion that 87 elephants have been poached in Botswana.
© CC0 Creative Commons

Three leading conservation scientists in Botswana have released a statement saying they “find no scientific basis for the dramatic assertions made in the recent BBC report” of the deaths of 87 elephants in Botswana, allegedly by poaching. This follows a statement from the Botswana government last week which also claimed the BBC report was inaccurate.

The scientists released the statement in response to the article ‘Dozens of elephants killed near Botswana wildlife sanctuary’, written by BBC Africa Correspondent Alastair Leithead, and published on the BBC News website on September 3rd, 2018. Leithead’s report is based on data and interviews given by Dr Mike Chase of conservation NGO Elephants Without Borders (EWB).

The authors are three scientists working on conservation in Botswana, Dr Kathleen Alexander, Dr J.W. McNutt, and Dr Mark Vandewalle. Dr Alexander and Dr Vandewalle are Co-Founders of the Centre for Conservation of African Resources (CARACAL), and Dr McNutt is Director of the Botswana Predator Conservation Trust. They analyse the same research used in the BBC report to demonstrate that the “dramatic assertions” made in the piece cannot be justified by the data.

In the BBC article, Dr Chase claims that the current scale of poaching in Botswana is now greater than anywhere else in Africa, and that this represents elephant poaching on a scale never before seen on the continent. The three scientists say that these statements are “difficult to reconcile” with the data that Dr Chase has himself collected and previously published. They conclude that:

“The current EWB report of 87 fresh carcasses in Botswana in the 2018 survey (to date) cannot be characterised as an extreme loss of elephants compared to other range countries nor to numbers reported for Botswana in past surveys… using Chase’s numbers directly, we find no scientific basis for the dramatic assertions made in the recent BBC report and question why such a report was disseminated to the media prior to completion of the current survey and data analysis.”

The statement emphasises an important factual inaccuracy in Leithead’s reporting. In the opening of the BBC article, Leithead writes that “the scale of poaching deaths is the largest seen in Africa. The spike coincides with Botswana’s anti-poaching unit being disarmed.” In fact Botswana’s wildlife guards do still carry guns: “the Botswana Department of Wildlife and National Parks is still armed with high-caliber weapons, but no longer carry automatic assault rifles.”

Nevertheless, a flurry of petitions calling for wildlife guards in Botswana to be “re”-armed have sprung up in response to the news, including one set up by PETA and three separate petitions on Change.org, and are circulating widely on social media.

The public outcry, symbolised by the rash of petitions, shows the vested interests behind such reporting, according to Survival International’s Director Stephen Corry. Corry claimed last week in an article widely shared on Twitter that such stories are fuelled by conservation NGOs who aim to drive public support for militarised “fortress” conservation.

Corry said today: “With the Illegal Wildlife Trade Conference being held in London in less than a month, we should expect to see more stories appearing in the media stirring up panic over the increasing threat of poaching. They will be suggesting that the solution to this is more guns in the hands of guards. These guards are often trained and supported by big Western conservation groups like WWF and WCS, the parent company of the Bronx Zoo. These large conservation organisations claim that they are the experts, that they know better than the local people how to manage local wildlife, and they are behind the carving up of huge areas of indigenous peoples’ lands without their consent.

“This is simply colonialism in the guise of conservation. Fortress conservation with its heavily armed eco-guards leads to human rights abuses, it does not stop poaching, and it will destroy conservation if it doesn’t change, as it leads to evictions, and alienates the very people who live near protected areas and know best how to manage them.”


          A Brief History of Repressive Regimes and Their Gun Laws      Cache   Translate Page      

Arguably one of the rights that has seen less government encroachment in the US — in contrast to other activities such as commerce — gun rights are now witnessing unprecedented attacks at the state level and even from politically-connected corporate entities.

Although gun control laws are not created equally in terms of overall impact, gun confiscation holds a special place in the halls of political repression. A trip down memory lane will give us a refresher of how gun confiscation has helped consolidate government power.

The Soviet Union and Its Satellite States

The Soviet Union left its mark as one of the deadliest political regimes in the history of mankind. However, it could not get away with such atrocities without having a complete monopoly on the use of force.

Ironically, the famous Soviet leader Vladimir Lenin called for a proletarian militia in his essay Letters From Afar. Lenin charted out his vision in the following passage:

What kind of militia do we need, the proletariat, all the toiling people? A genuine people’s militia, i.e., one that, first, consists of the entire population, of all adult citizens of both sexes; and, second, one that combines the functions of a people’s army with police functions, with the functions of the chief and fundamental organ of public order and public administration.

Lenin’s ideas manifested themselves in military form once the Military Revolutionary Committee was created in late 1917. Despite the ostensive revolutionary nature, these military forces morphed into another enforcement arm of the State.

To maintain its iron grip, the Soviet Union had to turn to the most proven form of suppression — gun confiscation. On December 10, 1918, the Council of People’s Commissar mandated that Soviet citizens turn in their firearms. Failure to do so, led to criminal prosecution.

Soviet gun control laws remained tight in the following decades, although the government did go out of its way to give Communist Party affiliates privileged access to firearms.

Once World War II came to an end, Eastern European countries took after their Soviet overlords and started implementing gun confiscation, as detailed in Firearms Possession by 'Non-State Actors': The Question of Sovereignty. Several countries stood out during this time period:

  • Bulgaria: Once Communists took power in 1944, they confiscated privately owned firearms.
  • East Germany: Private gun ownership was banned, even though the government did allow for agricultural collectives to possess hunting weapons while taking part in government-supervised hunts.
  • Hungary: Communist Minister of the Interior, Lazlo Rajk dissolved all pistol and hunting clubs, while also dismantling other organizations that potentially posed a threat to government power.

Although the numbers are highly disputed, Robert Conquest contends in his book The Great Terror that at least 15 million people perished under Soviet rule.

Nazi Germany

These days the word Nazi is tossed around liberally, almost rendering its definition meaningless. Regardless, the history of Nazi Germany should never be forgotten. Interestingly, both sides of the gun debate make mistakes when discussing gun control policy in Nazi Germany.

The pro-gun control side claims that gun rights were actually expanded under Nazi rule, but there is more to this story. The marginal liberalization in gun laws specifically favored the German populace. Independent Institute Senior Fellow Stephen P. Halbrook gives a nuanced account of the Nazi’s gun policy:

In 1938, Hitler signed a new Gun Control Act. Now that many “enemies of the state” had been removed from society, some restrictions could be slightly liberalized, especially for Nazi Party members. But Jews were prohibited from working in the firearms industry, and .22 caliber hollow-point ammunition was banned.

In sum, the Jewish populace was disarmed and had no way of defending itself against the increasingly militant Nazi political operatives.

But pro-gun advocates aren’t exempt from making mistakes in their analysis either.

Second Amendment supporters often attribute gun control’s passage exclusively to Adolf Hitler’s government. However, a more thorough review of history demonstrates that the preceding Weimar government was responsible for passing gun registration. Weimar officials rationalized the passage of gun control in the name of public order, for fear of Nazis and Communists coming to blows on the street.

Unbeknownst to the Weimar government, their gun control framework would later be exploited by the Nazis to disarm the Jews and subject them to one of the most horrific cases of genocide in human history.

Cuba

Once one of Latin America’s most prosperous countries, Cuba succumbed to the siren song of socialism when Fidel Castro took power in 1959.

Similar to the Nazi case, Castro took advantage of firearm registration lists established by the previous government. Once the dictator Fulgencio Batista was deposed, Castro’s tyrannical instincts kicked in. In a speech at the Maestre Barracks of San Ambrosio, Castro exclaimed:

Guns, for what? To fight against whom? Against the Revolutionary government that has the support of the people?

Following this speech, gun confiscation slowly commenced. The Castro government started by targeting rival revolutionary groups, who fought the Batista government but were not Communist affiliates. Then, the Castro government broadened the definition of “rival revolutionaries” to disarm more of the populace.

To this day, Cuba has strict firearms regulations. Government entities like the National Revolutionary Police, the Ministry of the Interior, and the Ministry of the Revolutionary Armed Forces are in charge of regulating firearms.

Like other socialist programs, the Cuban experience has been filled with death and economic destruction. Estimates point to 141,000 Cubans murdered at the hands of the Castro regime, with millions of Cubans fleeing to the United States in search of greener pastures.

Venezuela

It’s no secret that the Venezuelan government has eviscerated property rights and fundamental civil liberties in the crisis beleaguered country. But how has the Venezuelan government been able to stay in power? The Venezuelan government’s civilian disarmament campaign is an oft-ignored abuse of human rights in discussions concerning Venezuela’s political crisis.

The Venezuelan government started by passing the original version of the Control of Arms, Munitions and Disarmament Law. Since then, the law has been modified to broaden the scope of the firearms regulated by the Venezuelan Armed forces, who have the power to register, control, and confiscate firearms.

The day of reckoning came when Venezuela banned the sale of firearms and ammo in 2012, under the guise of fighting crime. Despite the gun ban in place, crime rates continue to skyrocket.

Now Venezuelans have no way of defending themselves against a government that is free to muzzle their speech, expropriate their wealth, debase their currency, and starve them to death. And if that weren’t enough, the average Venezuelan must contend with the constant threat of common criminals and colectivos, Venezuela’s infamous pro-government paramilitary units.

Even in the 21st century, the nasty effects of gun confiscation are still being felt.

Is South Africa Next?

South Africa has recently embraced gun confiscation. According to The Citizen, the Constitutional Court of South Africa ordered the confiscation of about 300,000 firearms on June 7, 2018. To say political tension in South Africa is mounting would be an understatement.

Since ending apartheid, South Africa has embarked on a troubling route of economic statism. To make matters worse, the South African government is currently pursuing land redistribution in order to address so-called racial injustices.

Although politicians from the African National Congress (ANC) party have recently backed down from ramming land confiscation legislation into law, there is no telling what could be in store for South Africans now that gun confiscation has been activated.

It would be a mistake to believe South Africa’s gun confiscation ordinance was a random occurrence; it’s the logical conclusion of South Africa’s current gun control framework. The genesis of this troubling development began with the passage of the Firearms Control Act of 2000, which features an extensive system of gun registration.

It’s easy for anti-gun entities to identify gun owners and confiscate their firearms in the long-run when they have their information on the books. With the wrong political actors in power, yesterday's “common-sense” gun control could be tomorrow's vehicle for gun confiscation.

Time will tell if South Africa will descend down the path of tyranny, but its gun control experiment may prove to be fatal should the country take a turn for the worse.

Gun control may not have a path dependency toward tyranny. However, gun confiscation is an egregious form of gun control that allows authoritarians to steamroll their subjects at will. The way gun confiscation enhances the consolidation of state power is undeniable. A disarmed populace is simply no match for a repressive apparatus that has a monopoly on the use of force.

Gun rights might not guarantee victory against tyrants, but being deprived of them all but guarantees submission.


          Winning start for Botswana's Mares      Cache   Translate Page      
Botswana won the opening game of the 2018 COSAFA Women's Cup at Wolfson Stadium in Nelson Mandela Bay, defeating Malawi 2-0 with Lesego Keleboge and Lesego Radiakanyo on target for the Mares.
          Tsodilo Resources Limited BK16 Update      Cache   Translate Page      
Tsodilo Resources Limited BK16 Update Toronto, Ontario (FSCwire) – Tsodilo Resources Limited (TSX Venture Exchange: TSD) (“Tsodilo” or the “Company”) is pleased to provide an update on its BK16 kimberlite project in Botswana. BK16 The BK16 kimberlite project is located within the Orapa Kimberlite Field (“OKF”) in Botswana. The diamond mines in Botswana have produced […]
          Botswana:Botswana Seeks to Escape Middle Income Trap      Cache   Translate Page      
[Botswana Daily News] Francistown -The private sector has been urged to re-position itself to assist the country escape the middle income trap.
          Save Botswana's Elephants ! PLEASE SIGN ! !      Cache   Translate Page      
Please let President Masisi know how strongly you feel about protecting Botswana's wildlife.
Submitted by Cher C to Animals  |   Note-it!  |   Add a Comment

          A Brief History Of Repressive Regimes And Their Gun Laws      Cache   Translate Page      

Submitted by Jose Nino via The Mises Institute

Arguably one of the rights that has seen less government encroachment in the US — in contrast to other activities such as commerce — gun rights are now witnessing unprecedented attacks at the state level and even from politically-connected corporate entities.

Although gun control laws are not created equally in terms of overall impact, gun confiscation holds a special place in the halls of political repression. A trip down memory lane will give us a refresher of how gun confiscation has helped consolidate government power.

The Soviet Union and Its Satellite States

The Soviet Union left its mark as one of the deadliest political regimes in the history of mankind. However, it could not get away with such atrocities without having a complete monopoly on the use of force.

Ironically, the famous Soviet leader Vladimir Lenin called for a proletarian militia in his essay Letters From Afar. Lenin charted out his vision in the following passage:

What kind of militia do we need, the proletariat, all the toiling people? A genuine people’s militia, i.e., one that, first, consists of the entire population, of all adult citizens of both sexes; and, second, one that combines the functions of a people’s army with police functions, with the functions of the chief and fundamental organ of public order and public administration.

Lenin’s ideas manifested themselves in military form once the Military Revolutionary Committee was created in late 1917. Despite the ostensive revolutionary nature, these military forces morphed into another enforcement arm of the State.

To maintain its iron grip, the Soviet Union had to turn to the most proven form of suppression — gun confiscation. On December 10, 1918, the Council of People’s Commissar mandated that Soviet citizens turn in their firearms. Failure to do so, led to criminal prosecution.

Soviet gun control laws remained tight in the following decades, although the government did go out of its way to give Communist Party affiliates privileged access to firearms.

Once World War II came to an end, Eastern European countries took after their Soviet overlords and started implementing gun confiscation, as detailed in Firearms Possession by 'Non-State Actors': The Question of Sovereignty. Several countries stood out during this time period:

  • Bulgaria: Once Communists took power in 1944, they confiscated privately owned firearms.
  • East Germany: Private gun ownership was banned, even though the government did allow for agricultural collectives to possess hunting weapons while taking part in government-supervised hunts.
  • Hungary: Communist Minister of the Interior, Lazlo Rajk dissolved all pistol and hunting clubs, while also dismantling other organizations that potentially posed a threat to government power.

Although the numbers are highly disputed, Robert Conquest contends in his book The Great Terror that at least 15 million people perished under Soviet rule.

Nazi Germany

These days the word Nazi is tossed around liberally, almost rendering its definition meaningless. Regardless, the history of Nazi Germany should never be forgotten. Interestingly, both sides of the gun debate make mistakes when discussing gun control policy in Nazi Germany.

The pro-gun control side claims that gun rights were actually expanded under Nazi rule, but there is more to this story. The marginal liberalization in gun laws specifically favored the German populace. Independent Institute Senior Fellow Stephen P. Halbrook gives a nuanced account of the Nazi’s gun policy:

In 1938, Hitler signed a new Gun Control Act. Now that many “enemies of the state” had been removed from society, some restrictions could be slightly liberalized, especially for Nazi Party members. But Jews were prohibited from working in the firearms industry, and .22 caliber hollow-point ammunition was banned.

In sum, the Jewish populace was disarmed and had no way of defending itself against the increasingly militant Nazi political operatives.

But pro-gun advocates aren’t exempt from making mistakes in their analysis either.

Second Amendment supporters often attribute gun control’s passage exclusively to Adolf Hitler’s government. However, a more thorough review of history demonstrates that the preceding Weimar government was responsible for passing gun registration. Weimar officials rationalized the passage of gun control in the name of public order, for fear of Nazis and Communists coming to blows on the street.

Unbeknownst to the Weimar government, their gun control framework would later be exploited by the Nazis to disarm the Jews and subject them to one of the most horrific cases of genocide in human history.

Cuba

Once one of Latin America’s most prosperous countries, Cuba succumbed to the siren song of socialism when Fidel Castro took power in 1959.

Similar to the Nazi case, Castro took advantage of firearm registration lists established by the previous government. Once the dictator Fulgencio Batista was deposed, Castro’s tyrannical instincts kicked in. In a speech at the Maestre Barracks of San Ambrosio, Castro exclaimed:

Guns, for what? To fight against whom? Against the Revolutionary government that has the support of the people?

Following this speech, gun confiscation slowly commenced. The Castro government started by targeting rival revolutionary groups, who fought the Batista government but were not Communist affiliates. Then, the Castro government broadened the definition of “rival revolutionaries” to disarm more of the populace.

To this day, Cuba has strict firearms regulations. Government entities like the National Revolutionary Police, the Ministry of the Interior, and the Ministry of the Revolutionary Armed Forces are in charge of regulating firearms.

Like other socialist programs, the Cuban experience has been filled with death and economic destruction. Estimates point to 141,000 Cubans murdered at the hands of the Castro regime, with millions of Cubans fleeing to the United States in search of greener pastures.

Venezuela

It’s no secret that the Venezuelan government has eviscerated property rights and fundamental civil liberties in the crisis beleaguered country. But how has the Venezuelan government been able to stay in power? The Venezuelan government’s civilian disarmament campaign is an oft-ignored abuse of human rights in discussions concerning Venezuela’s political crisis.

The Venezuelan government started by passing the original version of the Control of Arms, Munitions and Disarmament Law. Since then, the law has been modified to broaden the scope of the firearms regulated by the Venezuelan Armed forces, who have the power to register, control, and confiscate firearms.

The day of reckoning came when Venezuela banned the sale of firearms and ammo in 2012, under the guise of fighting crime. Despite the gun ban in place, crime rates continue to skyrocket.

Now Venezuelans have no way of defending themselves against a government that is free to muzzle their speech, expropriate their wealth, debase their currency, and starve them to death. And if that weren’t enough, the average Venezuelan must contend with the constant threat of common criminals and colectivos, Venezuela’s infamous pro-government paramilitary units.

Even in the 21st century, the nasty effects of gun confiscation are still being felt.

Is South Africa Next?

South Africa has recently embraced gun confiscation. According to The Citizen, the Constitutional Court of South Africa ordered the confiscation of about 300,000 firearms on June 7, 2018. To say political tension in South Africa is mounting would be an understatement.

Since ending apartheid, South Africa has embarked on a troubling route of economic statism. To make matters worse, the South African government is currently pursuing land redistribution in order to address so-called racial injustices.

Although politicians from the African National Congress (ANC) party have recently backed down from ramming land confiscation legislation into law, there is no telling what could be in store for South Africans now that gun confiscation has been activated.

It would be a mistake to believe South Africa’s gun confiscation ordinance was a random occurrence; it’s the logical conclusion of South Africa’s current gun control framework. The genesis of this troubling development began with the passage of the Firearms Control Act of 2000, which features an extensive system of gun registration.

It’s easy for anti-gun entities to identify gun owners and confiscate their firearms in the long-run when they have their information on the books. With the wrong political actors in power, yesterday's “common-sense” gun control could be tomorrow's vehicle for gun confiscation.

Time will tell if South Africa will descend down the path of tyranny, but its gun control experiment may prove to be fatal should the country take a turn for the worse.

Gun control may not have a path dependency toward tyranny. However, gun confiscation is an egregious form of gun control that allows authoritarians to steamroll their subjects at will. The way gun confiscation enhances the consolidation of state power is undeniable. A disarmed populace is simply no match for a repressive apparatus that has a monopoly on the use of force.

Gun rights might not guarantee victory against tyrants, but being deprived of them all but guarantees submission.


          Botwsana agate earrings. Sterling silver natural banded agate slice earrings. Rustic dangle gemstone earrings. by AzaleaArtisan      Cache   Translate Page      

26.00 USD

Botswana agate earrings in sterling silver -

Beautiful natural Botswana agate slices on sterling silver ear wires. Unique and earthy pair with lots of character. Enjoy!

DIMENSIONS:
Agate slices - 30 x 22mm approximately
Earrings are 72mm 2 3/4mm long

MATERIAL: sterling silver, agate


          Botswana elephant poaching and southern African elephant management      Cache   Translate Page      
Herald/allAfrica OPINION By Paul Stevens Botswana’s support for the on-going ban on international trade in ivory has not eliminated elephant poaching. The recent discovery by an environmental group, Elephants Without Borders (EWB), that 90 elephants had been poached in recent months, seems proof enough that the policy has not worked. All this, is in spite of […]


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