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          Hawaii Telescope - Been There, Done That: Cultural Property Ownership Gets You Only A Public Hearing If You Have Other Chances To Make Your Case      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
One of the problems with high-public-profile cases like the multiple challenges to the "Thirty Meter Telescope" up on the top of the Big Island's Mauna Kea, is that when the court issues an opinion, the public focuses only on the result, mostly from a policy perspective. Who won? Did the court invalidate the TMT permits? Did it side with the "right" party?  We get that. Big cases make big headlines, and most people don't care much about what the decision might mean for the law and future cases. And it matters in these type of cases who won.  But those of us down here in the trenches look at these cases somewhat differently. Yes, the Hawaii Supreme Court's long-awaited opinion in the latest phase of the multiple litigations challenging the TMT has dropped, and as you might have figured from this post's headline, the court sided with the telescope and the State, and ultimately ruled against this part of the challenge. But we…
          NASA is about to 'touch' a star for the first time — here are the hellish conditions the Parker Solar Probe must survive      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

nasa parker solar probe plus sun mission illustration

  • NASA's Parker Solar Probe is scheduled to launch Saturday, August 11 around 3:33 a.m. EDT.
  • To "touch" the sun and study its weather, the $1.5-billion mission must survive hellish conditions.
  • Temperatures will reach a searing 2,500 degrees when the spacecraft zooms through the star's atmosphere at 430,000 mph.
  • Once the probe runs out of fuel, pretty much everything but its carbon heat shield will be destroyed.

Touching a star isn't easy. The sun is an enormous, searing-hot orb of plasma that generates a chaos of magnetic fields and can unleash deadly blasts of particles at a moment's notice.

But that is precisely what NASA plans to do — 24 times or more — with its car-size Parker Solar Probe (PSP). The goal of the $1.5-billion mission is to edge within 4 million miles of the sun, which is close enough to study the star's mysterious atmosphere, solar wind, and other properties.

Information gathered by the probe may help space weather forecasters better predict violent solar outbursts that can overwhelm electrical grids, harm satellites, disrupt electronics, and possibly lead to trillions of dollars' worth of damage.

The spacecraft is slated to launch from the Florida coast on Saturday at 3:33 a.m. EDT, should weather cooperate, though NASA has through August 23 to fire off its probe. PSP will reach the sun a few months after launch.

Here are some of the brutal conditions and tremendous challenges NASA's probe will have to survive to pull off its unprecedented mission.

The tricky process of touching a star

parker solar probe sun flybys orbits mission design venus earth map jhuapl

The first hurdle PSP needs to clear is Earth itself.

To make the trip, the probe will ride atop a Delta 4 Heavy rocket, which is one of the most powerful operational launch vehicles on Earth (though not quite as powerful as SpaceX's new Falcon Heavy system).

NASA chose the rocket because it's surprisingly hard to get to the sun, which is 93 million miles away.

Earth orbits the sun at a speed of 67,000 mph, and so does anything launched off of the planet. To fall toward the sun, PSP will have to slow down by 53,000 mph, NASA said in a video about its mission.

Three different rocket stages (one firing after the other runs out of fuel) in the Delta 4 Heavy will help considerably with boosting PSP toward that goal, but it's not enough to repeatedly fly the probe close to the sun.

Instead, the rocket will shoot the probe on a path toward Venus, a planet it will fly past seven times over six years. The world's strong gravitational field will help gradually absorb PSP's "sideways motion" imparted by Earth and direct it closer and closer to the sun.

The consequence of this orbital dance is that PSP will fall toward the sun faster and faster after each pass. On its first orbit of the sun in November 2018, the probe will be some 15.4 million miles from the sun. About 21 orbits later, in December 2024, it will sneak within 4 million miles of the sun, traveling at a speed of nearly 430,000 mph relative to the star.

Achieving such a velocity would make PSP the fastest a human object in space. It's nearly 120 miles per second — fast enough to fly from New York to Tokyo in less than a minute — and 3.3 times as fast as NASA's Juno spacecraft, which zips past Jupiter at speeds of 130,000 mph.

How to fly through hell and back

parker solar probe plus sun temperature wind heat shield withstand graphic jenny cheng business insider graphics

During its journey, PSP must withstand sunlight 3,000 times more powerful than occurs at Earth. Outside the spacecraft, in the outer fringes of the sun's corona or atmosphere, temperatures may reach 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit — hot enough to liquify steel.

The probe also must contend with a "solar wind" of charged, high-energy particles that can mess with electronics.

The key to protecting the probe, as well as its sensors for measuring the sun's magnetic fields and solar wind, is a special heat shield called the Thermal Protection System.

parker solar probe plus nasa sun mission carbon compsite heat shield KSC 20180627 PH_GEB01_0050_large

Made of 4.5 inches of carbon foam sandwiched between two sheets of carbon composites, the eight-feet-wide shield will absorb and deflect solar energy that might otherwise fry the probe. A water cooling system will also help prevent the spacecraft's solar panels from roasting and keep the spacecraft a cozy 85 deg F.

PSP's mission is to crack two 60-year-old mysteries: why the sun has a solar wind at all, and how the corona — the star's outer atmosphere — can heat up to millions of degrees. Both factors are key to understanding what leads to potentially devastating solar storms.

"That defies the laws of nature. It's like water rolling uphill," Nicola Fox, a solar physicist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, said during a NASA briefing in 2017.

"Until you actually go there and touch the sun, you can't answer these questions," said Fox, who's a project scientist for the new mission.

You can watch the Parker Solar Probe launch toward the sun on Saturday, August 11, around 3 a.m. EDT via NASA TV.

The probe's mission will end many years from now, after it runs out of the propellant it needs to keep its heat shield pointed at the sun. When that happens, the star's blistering heat will burn up "90% of the spacecraft," science writer Shannon Stirone said on Twitter — but not the heat shield itself.

"The heat shield will then orbit the sun for millions of years," she said.

SEE ALSO: NASA's $1 billion mission to Jupiter has taken years of stunning images — here are some of Juno's best shots

DON'T MISS: NASA's biggest-ever hunt for alien planets is finally underway — and the agency expects to discover 'strange, fantastic worlds'

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: The White House has a plan in case a solar storm wipes out our technology


          Time saving tooling rods used on NASA's Webb Telescope sunshield      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Folding and refolding bed sheets to ensure they are squared can take a lot of time. It's the same with unfurling and folding up NASA's massive James Webb Space Telescope sunshield during testing.
          Indian telescope spots distant radio galaxy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Astronomers have used an Indian telescope to discover the most distant radio galaxy ever known, located at a distance of 12 billion light-years. The g
          Karoo’s MeerKAT radio telescope sets scene for pioneering scientific discovery      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Karoo-based MeerKAT radio telescope, located about 90 km from Carnarvon, in the Northern Cape, was inaugurated on July 13, giving the public a glimpse into what was unveiled as the best of its kind and a true benchmark in terms of pioneering scientific cosmic discovery, says South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (Sarao) chief scientist Dr Fernando Camilo.
          Telmu 70mm Portable Travel Telescope $63.99      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Telmu 70mm Portable Travel Telescope $63.99
          Lead Electrical Systems Eng - Honeywell - Ottawa, ON      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Honeywell Aerospace creates advanced, specialized UV/optical/infrared instrumentation, such as the Fine Guidance Sensor for the James Webb Space Telescope, the...
From Honeywell - Tue, 03 Jul 2018 20:53:01 GMT - View all Ottawa, ON jobs
          Pune radio telescope helps discover farthest galaxy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Leiden Observatory researcher Aayush Saxena and his colleagues from various countries have discovered a galaxy 12 billion light-years from the earth with data derived from a sky survey done by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) seven years ago. ​
          Comment on Alan Ross Texas Freedom Parade – Old by Solis Mammography Marches in Support of Breast Health Equality – The Daily Telescope      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[…] Join Solis Mammography at the 34th annual Alan J. Ross Texas Freedom Parade on Sunday, Sept. 17. The parade kicks off at 2 p.m. at the corner of Wycliff Avenue and Cedar Springs, continues on Turtle Creek Boulevard and finishes on Fairmont Street. For more information about this free event, please visit https://dallaspride.org/alan-ross-texas-freedom-parade/. […]
          Finding the Happy Medium of Black Holes      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
COSMOS Survey
Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/ICE/M.Mezcua et al.;
Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Illustration: NASA/CXC/A.Hobart

This image shows data from a massive observing campaign that includes NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These Chandra data have provided strong evidence for the existence of so-called intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). Combined with a separate study also using Chandra data, these results may allow astronomers to better understand how the very largest black holes in the early Universe formed, as described in our latest press release.

The COSMOS ("cosmic evolution survey") Legacy Survey has assembled data from some of the world's most powerful telescopes spanning the electromagnetic spectrum. This image contains Chandra data from this survey, equivalent to about 4.6 million seconds of observing time. The colors in this image represent different levels of X-ray energy detected by Chandra. Here the lowest-energy X-rays are red, the medium band is green, and the highest-energy X-rays observed by Chandra are blue. Most of the colored dots in this image are black holes. Data from the Spitzer Space Telescope are shown in grey. The inset shows an artist's impression of a growing black hole in the center of a galaxy. A disk of material surrounding the black hole and a jet of outflowing material are also depicted.

Two new separate studies using the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey data and other Chandra data have independently collected samples of IMBHs, an elusive category of black holes in between stellar mass black holes and the supermassive black holes found in the central regions of massive galaxies.

One team of researchers identified 40 growing black holes in dwarf galaxies. Twelve of them are located at distances more than five billion light years from Earth and the most distant is 10.9 billion light years away, the most distant growing black hole in a dwarf galaxy ever seen. Most of these sources are likely IMBHs with masses that are about 10,000 to 100,000 times that of the Sun.

A second team found a separate, important sample of possible IMBHs in galaxies that are closer to Earth. In this sample, the most distant IMBH candidate is about 2.8 billion light years from Earth and about 90% of the IMBH candidates they discovered are no more than 1.3 billion light years away.

They detected 305 galaxies in their survey with black hole masses less than 300,000 solar masses. Observations with Chandra and with ESA's XMM-Newton of a small part of this sample show that about half of the 305 IMBH candidates are likely to be valid IMBHs. The masses for the ten sources detected with X-ray observations were determined to be between 40,000 and 300,000 times the mass of the Sun.

IMBHs may be able to explain how the very biggest black holes, the supermassive ones, were able to form so quickly after the Big Bang. One leading explanation is that supermassive black holes grow over time from smaller black holes "seeds" containing about a hundred times the Sun's mass. Some of these seeds should merge to form IMBHs. Another explanation is that they form very quickly from the collapse of a giant cloud of gas with a mass equal to hundreds of thousands of times that of the Sun. There is yet to be a consensus among astronomers on the role IMBHs may play.

A paper describing the COSMOS-Legacy result by Mar Mezcua (Institute for Space Sciences, Spain) and colleagues was published in the August issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society and is available online. The paper by Igor Chilingarian (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) on the closer IMBH sample is being published in the August 10th issue of The Astrophysical Journal and is available online.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra's science and flight operations.


          NASA is about to 'touch' a star for the first time — here are the hellish conditions the Parker Solar Probe must survive      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

nasa parker solar probe plus sun mission illustration

  • NASA's Parker Solar Probe is scheduled to launch Saturday, August 11 around 3:33 a.m. EDT.
  • To "touch" the sun and study its weather, the $1.5-billion mission must survive hellish conditions.
  • Temperatures will reach a searing 2,500 degrees when the spacecraft zooms through the star's atmosphere at 430,000 mph.
  • Once the probe runs out of fuel, pretty much everything but its carbon heat shield will be destroyed.

Touching a star isn't easy. The sun is an enormous, searing-hot orb of plasma that generates a chaos of magnetic fields and can unleash deadly blasts of particles at a moment's notice.

But that is precisely what NASA plans to do — 24 times or more — with its car-size Parker Solar Probe (PSP). The goal of the $1.5-billion mission is to edge within 4 million miles of the sun, which is close enough to study the star's mysterious atmosphere, solar wind, and other properties.

Information gathered by the probe may help space weather forecasters better predict violent solar outbursts that can overwhelm electrical grids, harm satellites, disrupt electronics, and possibly lead to trillions of dollars' worth of damage.

The spacecraft is slated to launch from the Florida coast on Saturday at 3:33 a.m. EDT, should weather cooperate, though NASA has through August 23 to fire off its probe. PSP will reach the sun a few months after launch.

Here are some of the brutal conditions and tremendous challenges NASA's probe will have to survive to pull off its unprecedented mission.

The tricky process of touching a star

parker solar probe sun flybys orbits mission design venus earth map jhuapl

The first hurdle PSP needs to clear is Earth itself.

To make the trip, the probe will ride atop a Delta 4 Heavy rocket, which is one of the most powerful operational launch vehicles on Earth (though not quite as powerful as SpaceX's new Falcon Heavy system).

NASA chose the rocket because it's surprisingly hard to get to the sun, which is 93 million miles away.

Earth orbits the sun at a speed of 67,000 mph, and so does anything launched off of the planet. To fall toward the sun, PSP will have to slow down by 53,000 mph, NASA said in a video about its mission.

Three different rocket stages (one firing after the other runs out of fuel) in the Delta 4 Heavy will help considerably with boosting PSP toward that goal, but it's not enough to repeatedly fly the probe close to the sun.

Instead, the rocket will shoot the probe on a path toward Venus, a planet it will fly past seven times over six years. The world's strong gravitational field will help gradually absorb PSP's "sideways motion" imparted by Earth and direct it closer and closer to the sun.

The consequence of this orbital dance is that PSP will fall toward the sun faster and faster after each pass. On its first orbit of the sun in November 2018, the probe will be some 15.4 million miles from the sun. About 21 orbits later, in December 2024, it will sneak within 4 million miles of the sun, traveling at a speed of nearly 430,000 mph relative to the star.

Achieving such a velocity would make PSP the fastest a human object in space. It's nearly 120 miles per second — fast enough to fly from New York to Tokyo in less than a minute — and 3.3 times as fast as NASA's Juno spacecraft, which zips past Jupiter at speeds of 130,000 mph.

How to fly through hell and back

parker solar probe plus sun temperature wind heat shield withstand graphic jenny cheng business insider graphics

During its journey, PSP must withstand sunlight 3,000 times more powerful than occurs at Earth. Outside the spacecraft, in the outer fringes of the sun's corona or atmosphere, temperatures may reach 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit — hot enough to liquify steel.

The probe also must contend with a "solar wind" of charged, high-energy particles that can mess with electronics.

The key to protecting the probe, as well as its sensors for measuring the sun's magnetic fields and solar wind, is a special heat shield called the Thermal Protection System.

parker solar probe plus nasa sun mission carbon compsite heat shield KSC 20180627 PH_GEB01_0050_large

Made of 4.5 inches of carbon foam sandwiched between two sheets of carbon composites, the eight-feet-wide shield will absorb and deflect solar energy that might otherwise fry the probe. A water cooling system will also help prevent the spacecraft's solar panels from roasting and keep the spacecraft a cozy 85 deg F.

PSP's mission is to crack two 60-year-old mysteries: why the sun has a solar wind at all, and how the corona — the star's outer atmosphere — can heat up to millions of degrees. Both factors are key to understanding what leads to potentially devastating solar storms.

"That defies the laws of nature. It's like water rolling uphill," Nicola Fox, a solar physicist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, said during a NASA briefing in 2017.

"Until you actually go there and touch the sun, you can't answer these questions," said Fox, who's a project scientist for the new mission.

You can watch the Parker Solar Probe launch toward the sun on Saturday, August 11, around 3 a.m. EDT via NASA TV.

The probe's mission will end many years from now, after it runs out of the propellant it needs to keep its heat shield pointed at the sun. When that happens, the star's blistering heat will burn up "90% of the spacecraft," science writer Shannon Stirone said on Twitter — but not the heat shield itself.

"The heat shield will then orbit the sun for millions of years," she said.

SEE ALSO: NASA's $1 billion mission to Jupiter has taken years of stunning images — here are some of Juno's best shots

DON'T MISS: NASA's biggest-ever hunt for alien planets is finally underway — and the agency expects to discover 'strange, fantastic worlds'

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: The White House has a plan in case a solar storm wipes out our technology


          Intes Micro MN66 - Maksutov Newtonian      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For Sale

Sad to sell this one, but circumstances dictate otherwise.

This is the most recent version which is lighter, has the quartz mirror, venting, multiple baffles, and higher transmission coatings. I added a very nice 2-speed crayford focuser for it. With 19% co and 1/10th optics this is by far one of the finest planetary instruments I have ever owned. Cooldown times are very fast with the open design and planetary features are sharp, defined, and free of false color. Includes original case, Telrad, and flexible dewshield.

Will give preference to local sale to avoid damaging this fine instrument.
I also have an Atlas Pro AZ for $1500 that is a superb match for this telescope if you are interested.

1000.00
          JMI Motofocuser for Celestron C8      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For Sale

JMI Motofocuser for Celestron C8 in good condition. The knob was cut down to fit a 150mak telescope but may still be usable, see picture. The motor body was filed down slightly to fit on the rear of the mak OTA (due to close proximity to the visual back mtg flange). Other than these two modifications it is in very good working condition. $39 shipped to Con US addresses.

39.00
          Victory In Sight Hand Crafted Telescope for Display      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For Sale

Victory In Sight
Hand Crafted Telescope

Nickel Plated



Telescope is brand new and never displayed. Includes original styrofoam packing which has a broken corner, no box.
Was only removed from plastic for pictures. Tripod is still wrapped in tissue paper.
This is the way I got, noting else included. Telescope has been stored for many years, pictures show dust on lens but appears to be on the inside.

Ships in original styrofoam (broken) packing and a new box.
Makes a great display piece.

The original box is no more - nothing else included, only what is pictured.

Free shipping in the CONUS

First photo is a stock photo and not of the original telescope, all other photo's are of the actual telescope.

PayPal only - No Trades

165.00
          Mallincam Ds2.3 Skyraider Plus      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For Sale

Have for sale a Mallincam Ds2.3 Plus Skyraider in like new condition.
Specs available on the Mallincam site.
Comes with 15 ft cable and telescope adaptor.Also guiding cable
Shipping included most places
Pay Pal ok add 3 percent

600.00
          Spiral Galaxy NGC 6744      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Spiral Galaxy NGC 6744 Beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 6744 is nearly 175,000 light-years across, larger than our own Milky Way. It lies some 30 million light-years distant in the southern constellation Pavo and appears as only a faint, extended object in small telescopes. We see the disk of the nearby island universe tilted towards our line of sight.
          Bahtinov Mask      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Bahtinov Mask for 8 inch / 200 mm telescope. Added a lip so it just sits on top. Not the greatest, it's the first thing I did to learn Cad.


          RC, why does the filter for sun telescope need power?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
DrPepper: http://www.daystarfilters.com/
           White Styrene Round Tubing Diameter: 4.8mm/.187" - 4pcs Length: 35cm (14")       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
White Styrene Round Tubing Diameter: 4.8mm/.187

Note: Odd numbered sizes of round tubing telescope into next odd numbered size. Even numbered sizes of round tubing telescope into next even numbered size.



Buy Now
          Re: Remembering Michael Brian Lake, 1950-2015      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

My Uncle Mike was my favorite Uncle period. He was so silly and his laugh was contagious. He and I would cruise around in his MG in the 70's. He showed my Saturn through his telescope when I was 10. Now, he is visiting his sister, (my Mom), in her nursing home! He will move things and switch the calendar to January. I miss him so much. Thank you for all of the kind words about him. His Spirit lives on!


          ‘Gauguin’ recalls painter’s experiences in Tahiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

“Gauguin: Voyage to Tahiti” is an immersive, strikingly shot, wisely telescoped look at the years — 1891 to 1893 — in which famed post-Impressionist painter Paul Gauguin escaped the artistic and financial struggles of his Paris life for the jungles of French Polynesia, where he would create some of his most pivotal artwork.


          Sibling Rivalry Caused Eta Carinae’s Historic Explosion      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Faint echoes of light illuminate what really happened during the Great Eruption of the super-star Eta Carinae.

The post Sibling Rivalry Caused Eta Carinae’s Historic Explosion appeared first on Sky & Telescope.


          Binoculars and Mounting Solutions Market Volume Analysis, Size, Share and Key Trends 2015-2025      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Future Market Insights has announced the addition of the “Binoculars and Mounting Solutions Market: Global Industry Analysis and Opportunity Assessment 2015-2025" report to their offering.

Valley Cottage, NY -- (SBWIRE) -- 08/09/2018 -- Most of you must have often observed bright stars, formations of stars, and once away from metropolitan illuminations, the magnificent Milky Way. While bare eye stargazing is pleasant, putting some kind of lens amid your eyes and the stars results in enhancing the experience substantially. The simplest and economical optics you can apply to stargazing is a pair of binoculars.Binoculars are chiefly dual telescopes which are mounted next to each other, and associated so that an individual can gaze at aloof entity with both the eyes. Binoculars makes use of prisms mainly in both the barrels to provide an upright appearance to the consumer. Roof prisms binoculars, which are more compressed, look similar to two traditional through telescopes mounted sideways. Compressed binoculars are pleasant, particularly for daytime observing. However, just as the telescopes, binoculars equipped with bigger diameter lens displays more.Low control binoculars are great for extensive star fields, and can simply be hand held. But it becomes pretty challenging holding binoculars that are too enormous and heavyweight. An additional feature is, when hovering or pulling down the binoculars, most of the time the binoculars stay jagged at the objective. These mounts look great if you are out observing with another individual and sharing views, even if another person is of different height (like a child). Moreover, due to factors such as accumulative risks on security coupled with rapid technical advancements, binoculars and mounting solutions market is gaining importance. The global binoculars and mounting solutions marketplace is predicted to expand at a encouraging CAGR during the forecast period (2015-2025).

Request to Sample of Report @ https://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/sample/rep-gb-718

Binoculars and Mounting SolutionsMarket: Drivers & Restraints

Rising infrastructure investments necessitates the requirement of positioning for cargo management systems for rail traffic, airports and ports. Large construction sites require positioning systems to support the information management system. Aforementioned are some of the key factors driving the growth of the binoculars and mounting solutions market. Whereas the changes in the allocation of radio frequency bands, cost of sensors, safety, development time and customization associated with the binoculars and mounting solutions, dependency on external suppliers for components are probable factors restraining the growth of the binoculars and mounting solutions market globally.

Binoculars and Mounting SolutionsMarket: Segmentation

The global binoculars and mounting solutions market is majorly classified on the basis of applications and regions.

On the basis of application, the global binoculars and mounting solutions market is segmented into:

Defense

Maritime

Land & Survey

Space

Binoculars and Mounting SolutionsMarket:Region-wise Outlook

The global binoculars and mounting solutions market is anticipated to record a significant CAGR for the forecast period. On the basis of geographic regions, the global binoculars and mounting solutions market is segmented in the following key regions: North America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Latin America, Japan, Middle East & Africa and Asia Pacific. In 2015, the global binoculars and mounting solutions market is dominated by North America in terms of market value followed by Europe and Russia, respectively. Japan and Asia Pacific are anticipated to increase at a considerable growth rate and is expected to contribute to the global binoculars and mounting solutions market value exhibiting a substantial CAGR during the forecast period, 2015?2025.

Request Report for TOC @ https://www.futuremarketinsights.com/toc/rep-gb-718

Binoculars and Mounting SolutionsMarket: Key Player

Some of the key market participants in the Binoculars and Mounting Solutions Market are S4Gear,ZEISS, Lunt Engineering USA, LEICA, Nikon Corporation, Bushnell Outdoor Products and OLYMPUS CORPORATION among numerous others.

For more information on this press release visit: http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/binoculars-and-mounting-solutions-market-volume-analysis-size-share-and-key-trends-2015-2025-1026137.htm

Media Relations Contact

Abhishek Budholiya
Manager
Future Market Insights
Telephone: 1-347-918-3531
Email: Click to Email Abhishek Budholiya
Web: https://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/binoculars-and-mounting-solutions-market

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          New Radio Telescope Picks Up Mysterious Signal From Space      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A new radio telescope in Canada is picking up mysterious signals from deep space known as "fast radio bursts" (FRBs).
          Documentary on Greenland Telescope to premiere at NTU      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Taipei, Aug. 9 (CNA) A science documentary about the Taiwan-led Greenland Telescope (GLT) project will make its world premiere at National Taiwan University's (NTU) Astronomy Mathematics Building on Aug. 17, Academia Sinica announced Thursday.
          Spiral Galaxy NGC 6744      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 6744 is nearly 175,000 light-years across, larger than our own Milky Way. It lies some 30 million light-years distant in the southern constellation Pavo and appears as only a faint, extended object in small telescopes. We see the disk of the nearby island universe tilted towards our line of sight. This remarkably detailed galaxy portrait covers an area about the angular size of the full moon. … Read More →
          Cortlandt Manor Downsizing Online Auction - Robbie Road - Cortlandt Manor NY - Wednesday August 22nd, 2018 - MaxSold Inc.      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Online Auction - Cortlandt Manor NY - Wednesday August 22nd, 2018 - MaxSold Inc. | Cortlandt Manor Downsizing Online Auction Robbie RoadWILL SELL by Wednesday August 22 2018 8 30 PM nbsp This online auction features FURNITURE Bedroom wood cabinet sofa and more STERLING SILVER Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee bowl vintage fish course set Celestron Ultima 80 telescope and tripod Waterford crystal Haviland figures Turquoise necklace and much more Please view catalog and pictures online at MaxSold Everything will SELL BY Wednesday August 22 2018 8 30 PM regardless
          INAF - Elegante e vorace: così il VST svela i dettagli di una galassia ellittica      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Comunicato stampa - Le recenti osservazioni effettuate con il VLT Survey Telescope (VST) dell'ESO da un gruppo di ricercatori guidati da Marilena Spavone...
          8/10/2018: FRONT PAGE: Pune telescope helps discover farthest galaxy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Aayush Saxena, a researcher at a Dutch observatory, and scientists from various countries have found the most distant radio galaxy yet discovered — 12 billion light-years from Earth — with data from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope near Pune. The...
          8/10/2018: TIMES NATION: Pune radio telescope helps discover farthest galaxy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Pune: Aayush Saxena, a researcher at a Dutch observatory, and his colleagues from various countries have found the most distant radio galaxy yet discovered — 12 billion light-years from Earth — with initial data derived from a sky survey done at...
          Bojack Horseman: Anthropomorphic Angst and Queer Characters      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
In a world where humans and anthropomorphic animals interact, Bojack Horseman (voiced by Will Arnett)  is a washed-up celebrity, the star of a 1980s TGIF sitcom, Horsin' Around, which people still remember fondly.  But he hasn't worked in years.  Finally he lands the role of a lifetime, playing the famous racehorse Secretariat, but it turns out to be a disaster.








Bojack's private life is a disaster, also.  He tries various romances, first with his assistant Diane (Alison Brie), then with Wanda, an owl who has just awoken from a 30-year long coma, and finally with his agent, Princess Carolyn (Amy Sedaris), but none of them work.

He has no friends except his cheerful housemate/couch potato, Todd (Aaron Paul) and the dog actor Mr. Peanutbutter (Paul F. Tompkins), another star of a TGIF sitcom who has managed to continue working by cheerfully taking any role, however demeaning.










Eventually Mr. Peanutbutter (that's his first name) marries Diane, an angst-ridden relationship that each tries hard to pretend is making them happy, and we learn about the abusive parents who pushed Bojack into self-destructive behavior.

Bojack: Are you punishing me for smoking, Mother?
Mother: No, I'm punishing you for existing.

The anthropomorphic animals make for some clever bits.  Russell Crowe's last name is crow, but he's actually a raven.

 There are sometimes humorous subplots.  I sort of like "Vincent Adultman," who Princess Carolyn dates.  No one but Bojack realizes that he's actually three young boys in an overcoat, in spite of statements like "I went to the Stock Market today and did a business."

 But overall the stories are sad, about broken, incomplete people struggling with their inner demons.

But there is considerable gay content.

Bojack took Todd in because his parents disapproved of his "lifestyle" and kicked him out of the house.  He thought he was helping a gay teen, but it turns out that the "lifestyle" Todd's parents disapproved of was laziness.

Bojack and Todd crash a lesbian wedding.

Bojack kisses Diane, Mr. Peanutbutter's wife, so the only way to restore their friendship is to have him kiss Mr. Peanutbutter, too.

When Bojack was on Horsin' Around, his close friend and producer, Herb Kazzazz,was fired after rumors emerged of a same-sex relationship.  Bojack refused to defend his friend, and as a result Herb doesn't speak to him again for 20 years, until he is dying of cancer.

Bojack's long-lost daughter has been adopted by a polyamorous group of eight men, of varying personalities and species.













Todd  eventually comes out as asexual and joins an Ace support group.  He's probably the only openly asexual character on tv.

All four seasons are on Netflix. I recommend skipping the first few episodes, produced before the show found its way, and starting with Episode 8, "The Telescope."
          Lightning black holes as unidentified TeV sources      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
arXiv:1808.03075

by: Hirotani, Kouichi
Abstract:
Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes have revealed more than 100 TeV sources along the Galactic Plane, around 45% of them remain unidentified. However, radio observations revealed that dense molecular clumps are associated with 67% of 18 unidentified TeV sources. In this paper, we propose that an electron-positron magnetospheric accelerator emits detectable TeV gamma-rays when a rapidly rotating black hole enters a gaseous cloud. Since the general-relativistic effect plays an essential role in this magnetospheric lepton accelerator scenario, the emissions take place in the direct vicinity of the event horizon, resulting in a point-like gamma-ray image. We demonstrate that their gamma-ray spectra have two peaks around 0.1 GeV and 0.1 TeV and that the accelerators become most luminous when the mass accretion rate becomes about 0.01% of the Eddington accretion rate. We compare the results with alternative scenarios such as the cosmic-ray hadron scenario, which predicts an extended morphology of the gamma-ray image with a single power-law photon spectrum from GeV to 100 TeV.
          Perseid Meteor Shower This Weekend      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   


This Sunday evening and Monday morning, there will be one of the best meteor showers you and your family can watch – the Perseids.    And since the Moon will not be in the sky during this shower, dark skies will make it easier for even casual viewers to spot a good number of “shooting stars.”

The best night is the evening of Aug. 12th and morning of Aug. 13th, although there could be significantly more meteors in the sky on the night before and the night after too.  Meteorsor “shooting stars” (which have nothing to do with stars) are pieces of cosmic dust and dirt hitting the Earth’s atmosphere at high speed and making a flash of light.  These flashes could happen anywhere in the sky, so it’s best to view the shower from a dark, wide-open place.  See the list at the end for viewing suggestions.

The Perseid meteors are cosmic “garbage” left over from a regularly returning comet, called Swift-Tuttle (after the two astronomers who first discovered it).  The comet itself returns to the inner solar system every 130 years or so; it was last here in 1992.  During each pass, it leaves dirt and dust behind and it is this long dirt and dust stream that we encounter every August.  

Each flash you see is a bit of material from the comet hitting the Earth’s atmosphere and getting heated up (and heating up the air around it) as it speeds through our thick atmosphere.  Both the superheated dust and dirt and the heated air contribute to the visible light we observe.  Since comets are left-overs from the early days of our solar system, you can tell yourself (or your kids) that each flash of light is the “last gasp” of a bit of cosmic material that formed some 5 billion years ago.

MY EIGHT HINTS
FOR “TAKING A METEOR SHOWER”

1. Get away from city lights and find a location that’s relatively dark
2. If it’s significantly foggy or cloudy, you’re out of luck
3. Your location should allow you to see as much of the dome of the sky as possible
4. Allow time for your eyes to get adapted to the dark (at least 10 -15 minutes)
5. Don’t use a telescope or binoculars – they restrict your view (so you don’t have to be part of the 1% with fancy equipment to see the shower; this is a show for the 99%!)
6. Dress warm – it can get cooler at night even in August (and don’t forget the insect repellent while you are outside)
7. Be patient (it’s not fireworks): keep looking up & around & you’ll see flashes of light
8. Take someone with you with whom you like to spend time in the dark!

[The photo shows a Perseid meteor over the Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory in Chile.]


          Aug 9th: What’s Wrong With Your Face ?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Podcaster:  Paul M. Sutter Title: Space Radio: Ep 47: What’s Wrong With Your Face ? Organization:  INFN Trieste and OSU CCAPP Link :  Twitter @PaulMattSutter, http://www.Facebook.com/PaulMattSutter, and http://www.pmsutter.com/spaceradio-archive/ Support the show: http://www.patreon.com/pmsutter YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/PaulMattSutter Description: Today on Space Radio: How Venus got its ugly face, Will James Webb be groundbreaking?, What’s my favorite next-generation space telescope?, […]
          Telescope      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Telescope toy (no optics included).

Just a nice desk toy to have.


          New documentary celebrates the ground-breaking SF art of Chelsey Bonestell      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Art by Chelsey Bonestell, used to publicise Chelsey Bonestell: A Brush With The Future. Image: Bonestell LLCLong before satellites would journey to planets and deep-space telescopes would photograph distant galaxies, there was an artist whose prescient
          Trinity Astrophysicists to Map Major Meteor Shower      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Trinity astrophysicists are preparing to map the Perseid meteor shower using the Irish Low Frequency Array (I-LOFAR) radio telescope in Birr Castle this weekend. On Saturday, they are expecting the highest level of meteor activity – 10 meteors will be visible per minute. The team behind I-LOFAR is hoping to document the number of meteors per minute, how fast they are, their origination, and where they are going. They will do so using using radio atennae to observe reflections of aeronautical radar off the plasma trail of each meteor. The team will use GRAVES, a French radar system to monitor satellite orbits. They will also... Read more »
          This Week’s Sky at a Glance, August 10 – 18      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Tonight's Moon, stars and planets -- Sky & Telescope magazine's daily sky sights for the naked eye, binoculars and telescopes.

The post This Week’s Sky at a Glance, August 10 – 18 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.


          NASA’s Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes observations used to discover why Water Vapor is missing from Ultrahot Jupiters      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
These simulated views of the ultrahot Jupiter WASP-121b show what the planet might look like to the human eye from five different vantage points, illuminated to different degrees by its parent star. The images were created using a computer simulation being used to help scientists understand the atmospheres of these ultra-hot planets. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Vivien Parmentier/Aix-Marseille University (AMU))

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena, CA – Imagine a place where the weather forecast is always the same: scorching temperatures, relentlessly sunny, and with absolutely zero chance of rain. This hellish scenario exists on the permanent daysides of a type of planet found outside our solar system dubbed an “ultrahot Jupiter.” These worlds orbit extremely […]

The post NASA’s Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes observations used to discover why Water Vapor is missing from Ultrahot Jupiters appeared first on Clarksville, TN Online.


          Land Board member violates rules in TMT case      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A member of the Board of Land and Natural Resources who supports the Thirty Meter Telescope tried to contact state Supreme Court Justice Michael Wilson in violation of court rules.


          Improved Search for Solar Chameleons with a GridPix Detector at CAST      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
We report on a new search for solar chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). A GridPix detector was used to search for soft X-ray photons in the energy range from 200 eV to 10 keV from converted solar chameleons. No signiffcant excess over the expected background has been observed in the data taken in 2014 and 2015. We set an improved limit on the chameleon photon coupling, $\beta_\gamma < 5.7\times10^{10}$ for $1
          Una ricerca italiana ha trovato i segni di passate interazioni nella galassia ellittica NGC 5018 e nelle sue vicine      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Pubblicata da NetMassimo
Un articolo accettato per la pubblicazione sulla rivista "The Astrophysical Journal" descrive l'indagine VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey (VEGAS). Un team di ricercatori guidato da Marilena Spavone dell'INAF di Napoli ha usato il VLT Survey Telescope (VST) dell'ESO in Cile per ottenere immagini molto dettagliate di molte galassie ellittiche. Tra di esse c'è NGC 5018, interessante tra le altre cose per strutture come quella che è chiamata coda mareale.

Dettagli e commenti su ZicZac: "Una ricerca italiana ha trovato i segni di passate interazioni nella galassia ellittica NGC 5018 e nelle sue vicine"
Fonte: tachyonbeam.com
          Improved Search for Solar Chameleons with a GridPix Detector at CAST      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
We report on a new search for solar chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). A GridPix detector was used to search for soft X-ray photons in the energy range from 200 eV to 10 keV from converted solar chameleons. No signiffcant excess over the expected background has been observed in the data taken in 2014 and 2015. We set an improved limit on the chameleon photon coupling, $\beta_\gamma < 5.7\times10^{10}$ for $1
          Lead Electrical Systems Eng - Honeywell - Ottawa, ON      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Honeywell Aerospace creates advanced, specialized UV/optical/infrared instrumentation, such as the Fine Guidance Sensor for the James Webb Space Telescope, the...
From Honeywell - Tue, 03 Jul 2018 20:53:01 GMT - View all Ottawa, ON jobs
          Elliptical Elegance      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A glittering host of galaxies populate this rich image taken with ESO’s VLT Survey Telescope, a state-of-the-art 2.6-m telescope designed for surveying the sky in visible light. The features of the multitude of galaxies strewn across the image allow astronomers to uncover the most delicate details of galactic structure. Whereas ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) can observe very faint astronomical objects in great detail, when astronomers want to understand how the huge variety of galaxies
          Daily Weather Briefing for Friday, August 10, 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   



YEAR TO DATE RAINFALL 




The image below shows the year to date rainfall expressed as the percentage of normal. The western segment of the county has received normal or slightly below normal rainfall for the year and the eastern segment of the county has received above normal with the southeastern section receiving between 125 and 150 percent normal amounts of rain. The image below shows the year to date rainfall expressed in inches. The map legend is to the right of the images.




LOCAL WEATHER OUTLOOK

A weak cold front will stall across the region into the weekend. Thunderstorm coverage will be fairly high each afternoon and evening through Monday. The main impacts will be cloud-to-ground lightning, heavy rainfall, and gusty winds. Isolated flooding will be possible each day, especially in locations that see multiple storms in an afternoon. An upper-level disturbance will move across the area on Monday leading to drier weather on Tuesday and Wednesday.



WEATHER SPONSOR



Adams Products, a Division of Oldcastle is underwriting the daily weather briefing & public safety updates for the month.

Open 7:30 AM to 4:00 PM, M-F, located at 895 Hickory Knoll Road, Franklin, NC. Visit our Facebook page at:
https://www.facebook.com/Adams.Oldcastle.Franklin.NC/

All your masonry needs are available. Our phone number is 828.524.8545, the public is welcome, we’ll help you with your with your next project.

Weather Almanac for August 10th (1872-2016)
Record weather events for this date in Macon County

Highest Temperature 95°F in Franklin in 1980
Lowest Temperature 44°F at the Coweeta Experimental Station in 1953
Greatest Rainfall 3.14 inches in Nantahala in 1973

Record Weather Events for August (1872-2017)

Highest Temperature 99°F in Franklin on August 9, 1980
Lowest Temperature 40°F at the Coweeta Experimental Station on August 29, 1968
Greatest Rainfall 9.68 inches in Highlands on August 13, 1940


WEATHER FORECAST MAPS

Forecast maps for 8 am, 2 pm, and 8 pm. 

[click on any image in this article to enlarge]
(These images replace the three-day forecast maps)





THREE DAY OUTLOOK



--------------------------------------

FRANKLIN AREA

TODAY

Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly after 5pm. Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly sunny, with a high near 84. Light and variable wind. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

TONIGHT

Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly before 8pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 64. Calm wind. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

SATURDAY

A chance of showers and thunderstorms before 2pm, then showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm between 2pm and 5pm, then showers and thunderstorms likely after 5pm. Partly sunny, with a high near 84. Calm wind. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

SATURDAY NIGHT

Showers and thunderstorms likely before 11pm, then a slight chance of showers between 11pm and midnight. Partly cloudy, with a low around 64. Calm wind. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

SUNDAY

A chance of showers, with thunderstorms also possible after 11am. Mostly sunny, with a high near 84. Chance of precipitation is 50%.

SUNDAY NIGHT

Showers and thunderstorms likely before 10pm, then a chance of showers between 10pm and midnight. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 64. Chance of precipitation is 60%.


--------------------------------------

OTTO AREA

TODAY

Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly between 4pm and 6pm. Patchy fog before 9am. Otherwise, partly sunny, with a high near 83. Light and variable wind becoming west southwest around 5 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

TONIGHT

A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly before 1am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 64. Calm wind. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

SATURDAY

A chance of showers before noon, then showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm between noon and 2pm, then showers and thunderstorms likely after 2pm. Partly sunny, with a high near 81. Light and variable wind. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

SATURDAY NIGHT

Showers and thunderstorms likely before 11pm, then a slight chance of showers between 11pm and 4am. Partly cloudy, with a low around 64. Light north wind. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

SUNDAY

A chance of showers and thunderstorms before 4pm, then showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm between 4pm and 5pm, then showers and thunderstorms likely after 5pm. Mostly sunny, with a high near 82. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

SUNDAY NIGHT

A chance of showers and thunderstorms before 9pm, then a chance of showers between 9pm and 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 64. Chance of precipitation is 40%.


--------------------------------------

HIGHLANDS AREA

TODAY

Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly after 4pm. Patchy fog before 9am. Otherwise, partly sunny, with a high near 75. Northwest wind 6 to 9 mph becoming southwest in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

TONIGHT

A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly before 1am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 61. West wind around 6 mph. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

SATURDAY

Showers and thunderstorms likely before 2pm, then showers and possibly a thunderstorm between 2pm and 4pm, then showers and thunderstorms after 4pm. High near 75. Light and variable wind. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.

SATURDAY NIGHT

Showers and thunderstorms likely before midnight, then a slight chance of showers. Partly cloudy, with a low around 62. Calm wind becoming north around 6 mph after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

SUNDAY

A chance of showers and thunderstorms before 3pm, then showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm between 3pm and 4pm, then showers and thunderstorms likely after 4pm. Partly sunny, with a high near 76. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

SUNDAY NIGHT

Showers and thunderstorms likely before 10pm, then a chance of showers between 10pm and 2am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 61. Chance of precipitation is 60%.


--------------------------------------

NANTAHALA AREA

TODAY

Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly after 4pm. Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 76. West southwest wind 3 to 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

TONIGHT

Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly before 7pm. Patchy fog after 10pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 61. West southwest wind 3 to 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

SATURDAY

A chance of showers and thunderstorms before 2pm, then showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm between 2pm and 4pm, then showers and thunderstorms likely after 4pm. Partly sunny, with a high near 77. Calm wind becoming west around 5 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

SATURDAY NIGHT

A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly before 8pm. Partly cloudy, with a low around 61. North wind 3 to 5 mph.

SUNDAY

A chance of showers, then showers and thunderstorms likely after 10am. Mostly sunny, with a high near 77. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

SUNDAY NIGHT

A chance of showers and thunderstorms before 9pm, then a chance of showers between 9pm and 10pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 60. Chance of precipitation is 40%.

--------------------------------------



GOES-16 GeoColor - True Color daytime, multispectral IR
12:17 am to 3:12 am this morning


HAZARDS

Numerous thunderstorms are expected to form in the region this afternoon. Some of them may become strong or severe. The main concerns are dangerous cloud-to-ground lightning, high winds, small hail and brief torrential downpours. If you're out and about when one of these storms hit, please slow down and increase your following distance because hydroplaning may be an issue for you or other motorists. Be sure to unplug your electronics when the storms roll through.


Macon Media maintains a Severe Weather Preparedness Page at http://thunderpigblog.blogspot.com/p/breaking-news-hub.html for those who are interested.

As always, you can check to see what advisories, watches, and warnings are in effect for Macon County by visiting http://is.gd/MACONWARN



GOES 16 - Band 15 - 12.3 µm - Dirty Longwave Window - IR (Precipitation)
3:12 am this morning

TROPICAL OUTLOOK



Tropical Weather Outlook
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL
800 PM EDT Thu Aug 9 2018

For the North Atlantic...Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:

The National Hurricane Center has issued its last advisory on Post-Tropical Cyclone Debby, located several hundred miles northwest of the Azores.

Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 5 days.



Suminski Family Books Summer Film Fest for Families

All ticket sales sold by FROG volunteers benefit:

FRIENDS OF THE GREENWAY, INC.

Location: Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts
Start time for each movie: 7:00 PM
Save When You Pre-Buy Your Tickets!

Single Ticket $5 for each movie (pre & at the door)
Season Pass $15 1 ticket to each movie Family of 4 Season Passes $50 4 tickets to each movie

Movies and Dates:

Paddington 2 on July 12, 2018
Hidden Figures on July 19, 2018
Peter Rabbit on August 19, 2018
Wonder on August 26, 2018 (benefits Friends of the Greenway)

Purchase at FROG Quarters, 573 E. Main (next to new bridge) Hours: Wed-Fri, 9 AM-2 PM

There are 3 other non-profits involved: Folk Heritage Association of Macon County NC, Grandpa’s Woodshed Project, Women’s History Trail, and Read2Me. The FROG-specific specific movie is Wonder, but our members can pre-sell tickets to all movies.

Franklin Health & Fitness 30th Anniversary Celebration [LINK]
http://thunderpigblog.blogspot.com/2018/07/franklin-health-fitness-announces-their.html

Uptown Gallery classes
(These are on-going classes – repeat weekly)

Free classes and open studio times are being offered at The Uptown Gallery in Franklin. Join others at a painting open studio session every Tuesday from 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm or on Thursday from 11:00 am – 3:00 pm.
Bring your own materials and join an on-going drawing course led by gallery artists on Fridays, from 11am – 2 pm. For information on days open, hours and additional art classes and workshops, contact the gallery on 30 East Main Street at (828) 349 – 4607.

National Alliance on Mental Illness
Appalachian South


Meets each Thursday at 7pm
The First Methodist Church Outreach Center
at the intersection of Harrison Ave. and West Main Street
(directly across from Lazy Hiker Brewery)

Come join our weekly support group for anyone suffering from mental illness and their family or friends. This includes Depression, Bipolar,8chizophrenia, PTSD, Substance Abuse, Etc.

Here you will find:
— others living with mental health challenges YOU ARE NOT ALONE
- learn coping skills and ?find hope in shared experience
- help learning how to break down stigma and guilt surrounding mental health
- how to live life with the expectation of a better a better future

Kay (706)970-9987 Denise (828)347-5000)

SYRINGE EXCHANGE PROGRAM

On January 1, 2017, the Syringe Exchange Program of Franklin began operating a comprehensive harm reduction program to address the opioid epidemic that is impacting western NC. Opioid overdose reversal kits including naloxone are available free of charge. If you have any questions about our services or if you know someone interested in volunteering, please contact Stephanie Almeida at 828-475-1920.



Sun and Moon

Sun

Begin civil twilight 6:22 a.m.
Sunrise 6:50 a.m.
Sun transit 1:39 p.m.
Sunset 8:28 p.m.
End civil twilight 8:55 p.m.


Moon

Moonrise 5:45 a.m.
Moon transit 12:59 p.m.
Moonset 8:07 p.m.


Phase of the Moon on August 10, 2018: Waning Crescent with 1% of the Moon's visible disk illuminated.
Closest Primary Moon Phase: New Moon on August 11, 2018 at 5:58 a.m. (local daylight time)


Sky Guides for this week


Sky and Telescope Magazine 
Astronomy Magazine


There will be three solar and two lunar eclipses in 2018. [LINK]

Heavens Above has an Android App that will assist you in observing the sky and even has a satellite tracker that will let you know when the International Space Station and dozens of other satellites are overhead. [LINK]

Stellarium is also an app that will assist you in observing the sky. It is available in both Android [LINK] and iOS versions. [LINK]

CROWDFUNDING OR DAY SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES


If you receive value from what Macon Media provides to the community, please consider becoming a supporter and contribute at least a dollar a month.


Become a Patron!

If you have a business or event you are interested in sponsorship opportunities or underwriting coverage, send an email to editor@MaconMedia.com for more information. Serious inquiries only. Macon Media rewards early sponsors/underwriters with lifetime guaranteed low rates while newer sponsors/underwriters pay higher rates based on the date they first support Macon Media.

Thank You to the people who have been sending in donations and those businesses who are underwriting coverage of news and events. You have kept Macon Media online.


Published at 3:40 am on August 10, 2018

#WNCscan #MaconWx #MaconSafety


Data and information sources: Sources (except where otherwise credited): heavens-above.com, Ian Webster's Github, National Centers for Environmental Prediction, The National Weather Service, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, National Hurricane Center, Penn State University Electronic Wall Map, The State Climate Office of North Carolina, Storm Prediction Center, U.S. Naval Observatory, University of Utah Department of Atmospheric Sciences, and the Weather Prediction Center.

          Reclaiming The Nation Of Hawaii’s Destiny      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

There has been a lot of discussion about the Thirty Meter Telescope and about the role of the Hawaiian community and institutions in deciding its fate. One of that telescope’s powers is to look at stars and galaxies farther out on the extremes of the universe. It can harvest light that has travelled billions of […]

The post Reclaiming The Nation Of Hawaii’s Destiny appeared first on Honolulu Civil Beat.


          Things to Do Sunday!      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
10 Things to Do for August 12 by Mercury Things to Do Staff

Panic! at the Disco, Haley Kiyoko
Even if alternative pop-rock band Panic! At the Disco’s music isn’t your thing, there’s no denying they’ve got an overflowing handful of bops—such as 2016’s Sinatra-like “Death of a Bachelor.” With powerhouse singer Brendon Urie as its frontman and lots of supplemental horns and strings, Panic! dropped its sixth studio album Pray for the Wicked earlier this summer. Standouts from the 11-track project include “Dancing’s Not a Crime,” “King of the Clouds,” and “One of the Drunks.” Come for the older hits, but stay to hear Urie’s soaring vocals on his jazz-influenced new material. JENNI MOORE
7 pm, Moda Center, $38.75-68.75, all ages


Spec Script: Entourage
I know little to nothing about the TV show Entourage. (It’s about leisure suits, right?) And I’m looking forward to knowing even less about it thanks to this month’s Spec Script reading, where a local comedian (in this case the super-funny Laura Anne Whitley) pens a script for an episode of a show they have never seen. Is John Stamos on Entourage? It sort of doesn’t matter. What matters is who Whitley THINKS is on Entourage. Minority Retort’s Julia Ramos and many hilarious others help table read the glorious creation. SUZETTE SMITH
7 pm, Kelly's Olympian, $7

Deafheaven, Drab Majesty, Uniform
It can be difficult to align Deafheaven with any one genre—the band’s soft, hazy tendencies don’t quite fit into black metal, yet their harshness alienates them from shoegaze. Regardless, Deafheaven's new record Ordinary Corrupt Human Love contains the best of both genres. Throughout the album, frontman George Lesage Clarke balances melancholy and delicacy while tackling songs that seethe with frustration and rage. CERVANTE POPE
8:30 pm, Wonder Ballroom, $18-20

XRAY.FM's Heatwave: And And And, Plastic Cactus, Miss Rayon, Just Pretend, Natasha Kmeto, DJ Chanti Darling, House of Ada
The local radio station takes over the White Owl Social Club with an all-day mini-festival, featuring music from live bands and DJs, an XRAY-curated record fair with wax from an array of local shops, summer drink specials, food, and a pop-up photobooth.
2 pm, White Owl Social Club, $5-10

Tom Brosseau, Shelley Short, Tomo Nakayama
L.A.-based singer/songwriter Tom Brosseau brings his charming folk music up the coast for an intimate Portland show with support from Portland's own Shelley Short.
8 pm, Turn! Turn! Turn!, $7

The Princess Bride
This movie is 100 percent pure charm in film form. That’s not to say Rob Reiner’s adaptation of William Goldman’s bestselling novel isn’t also shot through with moments of real romance (“As you wish”) and cathartic satisfaction (“I want my father back you sonofabitch,”) but the reason this movie occupies such a precious place for so many is the charm radiating off its styrofoamy sets, through a score that sounds like it’s coming out of a Casio keyboard’s single built-in-speaker, humming under dialogue written so beautifully the actors can’t help but smile at the magic flowing out of their mouths. It proves you don’t need $200 million and two years of post-production to realize pure imagination. Not when you’ve got a big heart and all the charm in the world. BOBBY ROBERTS
2:05 & 7:15 pm, Academy Theater, $3-4, all ages

Elder, Serial Hawk, Holy Grove
Boston-hailing quartet Elder bring their heavy psych and progressive stoner rock landslide through Mississippi Studios for the Portland stop on a West Coast tour supporting their latest full-length, Reflections of a Floating World.
9 pm, Mississippi Studios, $15-20

Strum Fest PDX
Portland Radio Project presents a new entry in Portland's ever-growing, ever-wonderful list of local music festivals, this one focused on the region's lively, vibrant Bluegrass scene, with performances from Scratchdog, Jackstraw, Dirty Revival, Left Coast Country, and more.
2 pm, The Evergreen, $30

Olivia Awbrey, Clara Baker, Tara Velarde
Local singer/songwriter Olivia Awbrey brings her psych-punk and indie rock stylings out to the Doug Fir patio to head up the latest installment of "Pickin' on Sundays" along with support from Clara Baker and Tara Velarde.
3 pm, Doug Fir, free

OMSI Star Party: Perseid Meteor Shower
OMSI hosts a massive stargazing party at Rooster Rock in conjunction with the Perseid Meteor Shower, with plenty of telescopes and OMSI staff on hand to answer any questions and help you get a better look at the spectacle.
9 pm, Rooster Rock State Park

Don't forget to check out our Things To Do calendar for even more things to do!

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          Release of the ESO Archive Science Portal      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A recent update to the ESO Science Archive has made accessing ESO’s vast collection of astronomical data more intuitive and easier than ever before. The highlight of this update is the launch of the ESO Archive Science Portal — an interactive, browser-based sky interface allowing anyone to quickly search for, and obtain, astronomical data from ESO’s telescopes.

ESO builds and operates some of the world's most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes, and competition to use these instruments is fierce, with successful proposals gaining access to pristine astronomical data. However, this data doesn’t permanently belong to the researchers who gathered it. After a proprietary period, which usually lasts one year, the gathered data becomes publicly available from the ESO Science Archive.  

The ESO Science Archive has been providing astronomers around the world with access to data since 1988. The goal of the latest update was to ensure that this data  is available to anyone through powerful, yet convenient interfaces, making ESO’s treasure trove of archival astronomical data accessible to everyone.

You can explore the new ESO Archive Science Portal here.


          Media Advisory: Invitation to attend La Silla Solar Eclipse 2019      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

On 2 July 2019, the Moon will cover the face of the Sun, turning day to night in a total solar eclipse covering a 100 km-wide swathe of northern Chile, including ESO’s La Silla Observatory. Thousands of visitors from around the globe will travel to the region to experience this phenomenon against the beautiful backdrop of the dramatic Chilean landscape. As part of a wider campaign in Chile, ESO is organising a 2019 Total Solar Eclipse event at the La Silla Observatory on the day of the eclipse.

ESO is now inviting members of the press from around the world to attend the event, which will offer an unparalleled view of the solar eclipse in unique surroundings. As the solar eclipse will occur during the late afternoon, the rest of the day will be devoted to many different activities, including interviews, tours of the La Silla telescopes, talks and workshops. Viewing the eclipse itself will depend on weather conditions, which cannot be guaranteed.

All applications will be considered, but space at the event for media participants is limited. Applications can be submitted here.

More Information

Members of the press, including online media and broadcasters, may sign up here to receive the ESO Media Newsletter. Under normal circumstances this contains ESO press releases sent about 48 hours in advance of public dissemination as well as latest videos and footage from ESO, available for use in documentaries, movies, video news etc. To sign up to the ESO Media Newsletter, please fill out this form.


          Solar eclipse visible from Iceland tomorrow      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A partial solar eclipse will be visible from Iceland tomorrow morning between roughly 08.00 and 09.00. During a partial solar eclipse, the moon covers part of the sun as the moon’s orbit around the earth passes in front of the earth’s view of the sun. The eclipse will be visible across all of Iceland, though Veðurstofan (the Icelandic Met Office) predicts cloud in many areas.  At its height, the eclipse will obscure 17-25% of the sun over Iceland. In Reykjavík the eclipse will begin at 08.10, with the sun 18° above the horizon. The eclipse will reach its maximum magnitude in the capital at 08.44, when the sun will have reached 21° above the horizon. At this point, the moon will cover 20% of the sun and obscure 10% of the sun’s brightness. The eclipse will be over in Reykjavík at 09.19, when the sun reaches 25° above the horizon.  The effect of the eclipse will be greater in the north of Iceland, where 25% of the sun will be obscured, and its brightness reduced by 15%.  Veðurstofan is forecasting clear skies in North Iceland tomorrow morning, while other parts of the country will probably be cloudy.  People wishing to look at the eclipse must not do so directly, as this can cause blindness. Special eclipse viewing glasses are necessary, or preferably a telescope with sun filter attached. Normal sunglasses are not strong enough.  The next solar eclipse visible from Iceland will occur on 10th June 2021 and will be a 70% eclipse, seen from Reykjavík.   Iceland’s first total solar eclipse since 1954 will be visible on 12th August 2026.   
          Gigantes simpáticos no Chajnantor      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Muitos telescópios são compostos por vários espelhos ou antenas e não um/uma só. O Very Large Telescope do ESO (VLT), situado no Observatório do Paranal do ESO no Chile, é um exemplo clássico. O VLT é composto por quatro telescópios principais e quatro telescópios auxiliares amovíveis mais pequenos — oito estruturas individuais no total. Mesmo …

Continue reading

          A quick way to understand the basic steps in smartphone astrophotography      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
I’ve posted a few times about my experience with smartphone astrophotography. A person who is active online in this area, Kevin Francis, shared with me a copy of an infographic he did based on his experiences. You can find the infographic over at: Smartphone Astrophotography: In 6 Steps [Infographic] Note that the infographic isn`t meant to give you all the details, but I like his framing: Choosing your equipment (i.e., pick a smartphone); Choose a camera app (there are only really two great ones, depends on which OS you`re running); Use a tripod or mount to make it steady; Decide if you`re using the phone by itself, marrying it to a lens, or shooting through a telescope; Capture the image (single shots, long or short exposures, multiple images for stacking, etc.); Process the images you took. Is that level of detail going to get you going today? No, but it will tell you the basics you need to know so you can start thinking about what you want to do. Thanks to Kevin for sharing… Continue reading →
          Get to Know Gemini! Jared Eckersley      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Get to Know Gemini is a new series of blog posts aimed to highlight the different careers, backgrounds, and types of people contributing to Gemini Observatory and its science. Name:  Jared Eckersley What is your current position and at which telescope? My current title is Web Application Developer and I am physically located at Gemini […]

The post Get to Know Gemini! Jared Eckersley appeared first on Gemini Observatory.


          Spiral Galaxy NGC 6744      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 6744 is nearly 175,000 light-years across, larger than our own Milky Way. It lies some 30 million light-years distant in the southern constellation Pavo and appears as only a faint, extended object in small telescopes. We see the disk of the nearby island universe tilted towards our line of sight. This remarkably detailed galaxy portrait covers an area about the angular size of the full moon. In it, the giant galaxy's elongated yellowish core is dominated by the l [...]

          Microscope and Telescope Lens Holder      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

I made a Microscope/telescope holder for 23mm and 32mm lenses


          NRL's sun imaging telescopes fly on NASA Parker Solar Probe      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
(Naval Research Laboratory) The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's unique expertise in sun-viewing telescopes will be an integral part of the historic NASA Parker Solar Probe mission scheduled to launch Aug. 11, 2018 to better understand how the Sun affects our solar system.
          NRL's sun imaging telescopes fly on NASA Parker Solar Probe      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's unique expertise in sun-viewing telescopes will be an integral part of the historic NASA Parker Solar Probe mission scheduled to launch Aug. 11, 2018 to better understand how the Sun affects our solar system.
          Video: Neutrino Telescope Data Management and Analysis      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

In this video from PASC18, Tessa Carver from the University of Geneva presents: Neutrino Telescope Data Management and Analysis. "We will describe the data flow structure of onsite DAQ to filtered steams for various physics scopes of IceCube and ANTARES and the plans for KM3NeT. The Data formats and data management software will also be described as well as plans for making data public."

The post Video: Neutrino Telescope Data Management and Analysis appeared first on insideHPC.


          Borrow a telescope from your local library to watch the Perseid meteor shower this weekend      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   


Bet ya didn't know that you could rent an Orion Starblast 4.5 telescope from your local library. Well, you do now — and we're filling you in on this little known fact on the eve of the Perseid meteor shower, which peaks this weekend during the nights of Aug. 11 and Aug. 12. You can check out one of six telescopes, with one located at each regional branch location as well as the Main Library. 'Scopes come with a user guide, Audubon constellation book, and a headlight.


          Traxxas Tool Kit & Scissors      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

From Traxxas: The new Traxxas Tool Kit includes virtually every tool required to maintain Traxxas vehicles and stores them in a handy carrying case. A comfortable ratcheting handle allows the 11 included bits to telescope for those hard-to-reach screws. The kit includes nut drivers, hex drivers, standard and Phillips head screwdrivers, and a wrench. Features: […]

The post Traxxas Tool Kit & Scissors appeared first on RC Car Action.


          KMT-2016-BLG-1107: A New Hollywood-Planet Close/Wide Degeneracy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
KMT-2016-BLG-1107: A New Hollywood-Planet Close/Wide Degeneracy Hwang K-H; Ryu Y-H; Kim H-W; Albrow MD; Chung S-J; Gould A; Han C; Jung YK; Shin I-G; Shvartzvald Y; Yee JC; Zang W; Cha S-M; Kim D-J; Kim S-L; Lee C-U; Lee D-J; Lee Y; Park B-G; Pogge RW We show that KMT-2016-BLG-1107 displays a new type of degeneracy between wide-binary and close-binary Hollywood events in which a giant-star source envelops the planetary caustic. The planetary anomaly takes the form of a smooth, two-day "bump" far out on the falling wing of the light curve, which can be interpreted either as the source completely enveloping a minor-image caustic due to a close companion with mass ratio $q=0.036$, or partially enveloping a major-image caustic due to a wide companion with $q=0.004$. The best estimates of the companion masses are both in the planetary regime ($3.3^{+3.5}_{-1.8}\,M_{\rm jup}$ and $0.090^{+0.096}_{-0.037}\,M_{\rm jup}$) but differ by an even larger factor than the mass ratios due to different inferred host masses. We show that the two solutions can be distinguished by high-resolution imaging at first light on next-generation ("30m") telescopes. We provide analytic guidance to understand the conditions under which this new type of degeneracy can appear.
          KMT-2016-BLG-1820 and KMT-2016-BLG-2142: Two Microlensing Binaries Composed of Planetary-mass Companions and Very-Low-Mass Primaries      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
KMT-2016-BLG-1820 and KMT-2016-BLG-2142: Two Microlensing Binaries Composed of Planetary-mass Companions and Very-Low-Mass Primaries Jung YK; Hwang K-H; Ryu Y-H; Gould A; Han C; Yee JC; Albrow MD; Chung S-J; Shin I-G; Shvartzvald Y; Zang W; Cha S-M; Kim D-J; Kim H-W; Kim S-L; Lee C-U; Lee D-J; Lee Y; Park B-G; Pogge RW We present the analyses of two short-timescale (tE ∼ 5 days) microlensing events, KMT-2016-BLG-1820 and KMT-2016-BLG-2142. In both light curves, the brief anomalies were clearly captured and densely covered by the Korea Microlensing Telescope Network survey. From these analyses, we find that both events have small Einstein radii of θE = 0.12 mas, suggesting that the binary-lens systems are composed of very low-mass components and/or are located much closer to the lensed stars than to Earth. From Bayesian analyses, we find that these binaries have total system masses of 0.043+0.043−0.018 M⊙ and 0.088+0.120−0.041 M⊙, implying that they are well within the very-low-mass regime. The estimated lens-component masses indicate that the binary lenses consist of a giant-planet/brown-dwarf pair (KMT-2016-BLG-1820), and a dark/faint object pair (KMT-2016-BLG-2140) that are located near the deuterium-burning and hydrogen-burning mass limits, respectively. Both lens systems are likely to be in the Galactic disk with estimated distances of about 6 kpc and 7 kpc. The projected lens-components separations are 1.1 AU and 0.8 AU, and the mass ratios are 0.11 and 0.20. These prove that the microlensing method is effective to identify these closely-separated very-low-mass binaries having low mass-ratios.
          Why the Concept of God Might Be a Useful Error      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
by Charles Mudede

This supermassive black hole is eating a star.
This supermassive black hole is eating a star. NASA/JPL-Caltech

A galaxy that's 12 billion light-years away was identified by a team of astronomers in the Netherlands. They used a Giant Meter-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) in India to spot the distant object. The galaxy is located at a time when the universe has only existed for a billion years—that is, seven percent of its current age, 13.5 billion. This is the most distant radio galaxy on record. Radio galaxies are very active systems because they eject from the supermassive black holes at their center terrific jets of relativistic particles (meaning, particles that move at a speed that's "comparable to the speed of light"). The name of the galaxy is TGSS J1530+1049.

The discovery of this particular radio galaxy has surprised astronomers because of where it is in time. The thinking has been that a galaxy with a supermassive black hole takes a very long time to develop. And so the expectation has been, the deeper you look into time—the early years of the universe—the less active the galaxies. TGSS J1530+1049 has thrown this thinking into confusion. A radio galaxy matured in the youth of the universe. With that said, let's turn to another question that might be on your mind. What has God to do with any of this?

As far as I can tell, simply nothing. I'm almost certain that God, as conceived by Christians, does not exist anywhere in this or other universes. And almost nothing could make me bet on Quentin Meillassoux's God (He might not exist now, but He could exist in the future). Nevertheless, the idea of God might have something to it. To get my meaning across, I need to exhume the story of John Dee, Thomas Digges, and a supernova that appeared in the skies of 1572.

Because there are few with anything that approximates a classical training, the Aristotelian universe that dominated the thought not only of medieval Europe but also the Bright Age of Islam, is unknown to most people with or without an advanced education. The Aristotelian universe saw the stars as fixed and forever stuck in the third to last sphere in the heavens above. The last sphere was that of the prime mover.

So, there was, in this conception, nothing like Yeats' "disheveled wandering stars." Then in 1572, something bright appeared in the sky. And it grew and grew and became visible during the day. Eventually, this new star, which amazed many humans, began to dim. Among the amazed were Thomas Digges, an English mathematician and astronomer, and his mentor, John Dee, another English mathematician and astronomer (and advisor to Queen Elizabeth). Dee had one foot in science and the other in magic.

It was the magician who suggested to Digges that the new star in the sky could be a moving one: it got closer to earth, which is why it got brighter; now it's going away from the earth, which is why it's getting dimmer. The idea was, of course, totally wrong. The bright object in the sky was not a star but a supernova, which was eventually identified in 1952. But just the idea of a moving star finally cracked the wholly incorrect Aristotelian astral shell.

The idea itself (that stars moved), which was derived from an error, made it possible to eventually access the truth of the universe. Stars are not fixed and eternal and close to some prime mover. They did wander through space. They came and went through time. They were a part of a process that often formed galaxies, which were also moving and evolving. The journey to these scientific truths was a total error. A wrong reading led to the right ideas.

I think God might be like this. A complete misreading of a feeling that, as a concept, might be useful or even reveal the correct picture of things to (or an ontology of) beings that can reflect through a form of thought that is surplus, or overflows usefulness or utility. God might be something like fucking with a condom or birth control. Meaning, an abortion might actually be closer to Him. He or She (and most likely the latter) can only be extra, be overflowing. This is a kind of luxurious panpsychism. How else can we better explain a Coltrane or a Shakespeare? Surplus sound, surplus words, surplus being.

I once saw a tailless raccoon in my backyard playing on the hammock in the morning. It fell off it; it climbed on it again, swung for a bit, and fell of it again. It was having a good time. Maybe one day I will say a little prayer to this moment in time, in the city, in the solar system, in the galaxy.

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          Save Me Money Mondays: "Personal Deal Shopping" Follow-Up at Ben's Bargains      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

TGIF! On Monday we again asked you to tell us what types of items you're looking for deals on, and we picked a few to gather ideas for! If you don't see your suggestions today, please know we're still on the hunt and will do our best to feature them in the coming weeks. Have a great weekend, Ben's fans!

1. For AthruC, looking for the Kohler Whitehaven 36" Farmhouse Sink:


2. For Sylvo2121, looking for (amateur) photography lighting and backdrop setups:


3. For kent_li, looking for a good reliable fitness tracker for Android:

4. For handogen, looking for a mid grade telescope:


5. For kaivamei, looking for Sonos-like WiFi speakers:


6. For Benj, looking for an Android tablet with at least 10" screen:


7. For barryk, who wants an air fryer with lots of bells and whistles, not the typical basic smaller models:


          NASA’s New Planet-hunting Telescope Captures a Distant Comet      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

NASA’s newest planet-huting telescope TESS has officially begun its search for planets outside solar system on July 25. But before it started science operations, the telescope stumbled upon a distant...
          Carbon Fiber Tube for C-14! (Last one!)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For Sale

Hi everyone,
We have built another set of C-14 carbon fiber replacement tubes and we have just 1 left unsold. The tube is ready to ship now. If you'd like to purchase it or just want to know more about our products, please visit http://carbonscopetu...tron_Tubes.html today.
These particular tubes are specifically made for the Celestron C-14 telescope. These tubes have a beautiful, polished clear-coat exterior, a flat black painted interior, and are pre-drilled for easy installation.
As always, we have a large selection of tooling for making custom tubes. Our sizes range from 7.5" to 24". We can tailor the wall thickness, length, and finish to your needs.
All of our tubes are professionally made of aerospace quality, compression wrapped carbon fiber. These premium tubes have an automotive two-part UV protected urethane clear coat for a beautiful, hi-gloss finish.
Carbon fiber has vastly superior thermal expansion properties over aluminum. From my personal experience using a typical aluminum C-11, you need to refocus for every 1.5 to 2 degrees of temperature drop. Since the C-14 uses a longer tube, the effect is even greater. With our carbon tube, you can easily go many hours without refocusing. During a typical Michigan night, the temperature can easily drop 2 degrees per hour. Hence, Ha exposures over 45 minutes were impossible. Now I can image most of the night without re-focusing.
As always, this was a very limited run and it may be 6+ months before we make another.
Please click http://carbonscopetu...tron_Tubes.html for more details or to order yours today!
Thanks for reading,
---Frank

589.95
          NEW STARSENSE AUTOALIGN FOR CELESTRON SCOPES      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For Sale

ALIGN YOUR CELESTRON COMPUTERIZED TELESCOPE WITH A TOUCH OF A BUTTON 3X

This new package which includes a dedicated camera enables automatic alignment of your Celestron computerized telescope.
You may check (www.celestron.com/products/starsense-auto-align) for a complete list of telescopes and requirements which include:

CGEM,CGEM-DX,CGX-I,ASTRO-FI,ADVANCE VX,CPC,CPC DX,NEXTSTAR SE SERIES, CGE,CGE PRO, CG5, and more.

This is a new item. I opened box to check contents. I will pay for shipping in the contiguous USA and PayPal fees.

259.99
          Brand New Astro-Smart Astro-Cube Dew Annihilator Controller(MDA)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For Sale

Buy a brand new Astro-Smart 2 Channel Dew Annihilator Controller (Model MDA). The MDA can be setup with your telescope for trouble free operation controlled manually by the user supplied dial. The Astro-Cube Dew Annihilator ( Model: MDA) is designed for Astronomers and Astrophotography’s who want a low cost, small compact yet powerful(Tiny But Mighty!) dew heater controller that can be put in your pocket ready to grab and go yet at the same time be able to perform just as well as an observatory grade dew controller. The Astro-Cub dew Annihilator can be used with Astro-Smart’s RCA jack type dew straps or compatible RCA type dew straps such as Astro-Smart, Kendrick, etc. The Astro-Cube Dew Annihilator ( Model: MDA) is designed to be used with any make or model of telescope. Whether you have a refractor, newtonian, schmidt-cassegrain,ritchey-chretien for instance, the MDA will solve your dew problems while informing you every step of the way.

The Astro-Smart Astro-Cube Dew Annihilator (Model MDA) is designed to be user friendly, serviceable, elegant and reliable and include the following features shown below:
1. Worry Free Warranty Program For Life Of Product Sale.
2. Full Manually Operated Dial Dew Control Solution.
3. 1 Split 2 Port Output Heat Channels User Control
Capable of 120 Watts(12V, 10Amps). Works with any RCA type heat strap such as Astro-Smart, Kendrick, etc.
4.Variable Dial Power Control PWM Duty Cycle 0-100% @ 10 KHz PWM Power Intensity.
5.PWM LED Flash Intensity Indicator For Heat PWM Output Ports.
6.Dimensions (2.3” Long x 2.5” Wide x 1.3” High.)
7.4 X Mounting Brackets Top and Bottom Provided as Part Of Package Design.
8.High quality design employs multi-layer PCB form factor and only the best quality components with conformal coatings for outdoor use.
9.Void of RFI(Radio Frequency Interference) protected to enhance Astro-Imaging .
10.Price point set below development cost for such a system while providing more features.


Each The Astro-Smart Astro-Cube Dew Annihilator (Model MDA) package contains:
1. MDA Dew Controller
2. 12VDC 5 Amp Fused Cigarette Power Adapter Harness.


Please, feel free to ask any questions at dale@astro-smart.com or navigate our site for more information at your convenience using the following links below.. Our preferred method of payment is Paypal for your convenience. Clear Skys and thanks for looking.

Additional Product Info.......... http://www.astro-sma...ator-Series-MDA
User Manual......................... http://www.astro-sma...l_a_9_23_16.pdf
Purchase Page LInk............ http://www.astro-sma...p=1_51_Purchase

59.00
          Celestron 2-Inch XLT Diagonal Mirror (for SCT Telescope)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For Sale

Celestron Model 93527

Description:
  • 2” SCT mirror diagonal with high performance XLT coatings
  • 1/10th wave mirror is tested with an interferometer to ensure quality
  • Housing is precision machined to achieve and hold good optical alignment.
  • Includes a 2” to 1.25” adapter and aluminum carry case

Used with a 8SE.
Screws directly into the back of Celestron's SCTs
Stored in a foamed lined case when not in use.

Price includes free shipping and Paypal fee.
Shipping to USA addresses only.

100.00
          Making the Most of the 2018 Perseid Meteor Shower Using Mobile Apps - Space.com      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Space.com

Making the Most of the 2018 Perseid Meteor Shower Using Mobile Apps
Space.com
This weekend brings us one of 2018's best astronomical events: the Perseid meteor shower. The Perseids are one of the most rewarding showers of the year, frequently delivering bright fireballs exhibiting long, persistent trails. While the shower recurs ...
The Perseid meteor shower has many colors of shooting stars. There's a reason for that.Washington Post
What you're really seeing during a meteor showerBusiness Insider
How To See The Perseid Meteor Shower 2018, The Most Stellar Event Of The YearBustle
myfox8.com -Lifehacker -Virtual Telescope Project
all 205 news articles »



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