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          ASU astrophysicist helps discover that ultrahot planets have starlike atmospheres      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
(Arizona State University) An unusual kind of star-planet hybrid atmosphere is emerging from studies of ultrahot planets orbiting close to other stars.
          Neutrino processes in partially degenerate neutron matter      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Дата и время публикации : 2011-12-21T21:40:44Z Авторы публикации и институты : S. Bacca K. Hally M. Liebendörfer A. Perego C. J. Pethick A. Schwenk Ссылка на журнал-издание: Ссылка на журнал-издание не найденаКоментарии к cтатье: 41 pages, 9 figures, NORDITA-2011-116; added comparison figures and fit function for use in simulations, to appear in Astrophys. JПервичная категория: [...]
          ASU astrophysicist helps discover that ultrahot planets have starlike atmospheres      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
ASU astrophysicist helps discover that ultrahot planets have starlike atmospheres
           NASA is sending a spaceship closer to the sun       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Parker Solar Probe, named after American solar astrophysicist Eugene Parker will get within 3.9million miles of the sun’s surface and is set to blast off from Florida.
          Trump's Space Force may protect assets worth billions of dollars: Neil deGrasse Tyson - Fox Business      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fox Business

Trump's Space Force may protect assets worth billions of dollars: Neil deGrasse Tyson
Fox Business
Famed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson told FOX Business that President Trump's Space Force plan is not a farfetched idea because it will help protect billions of dollars of assets in space. Continue Reading Below. “This idea is not completely crazy ...
Pence details plan for creation of Space Force in what would be the sixth branch of the militaryWashington Post
Pence Advances Plan to Create a Space ForceNew York Times
Going where no president has gone before, Trump wants Space Force by 2020Reuters
Los Angeles Times -Chicago Tribune -The Hill -CBS News
all 1,663 news articles »

          2nd Workshop on Science with the New Generation of High Energy Gamma-ray Experiments : between Astrophysics and Astroparticle Physics      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
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          Trump's Space Force may protect assets worth billions of dollars: Neil deGrasse Tyson - Fox Business      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fox Business

Trump's Space Force may protect assets worth billions of dollars: Neil deGrasse Tyson
Fox Business
Famed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson told FOX Business that President Trump's Space Force plan is not a farfetched idea because it will help protect billions of dollars of assets in space. Continue Reading Below. “This idea is not completely crazy ...
Pence Advances Plan to Create a Space ForceNew York Times
Pence says Pentagon should create 'space force' to 'defeat a new generation of threats'Los Angeles Times
Going where no president has gone before, Trump wants Space Force by 2020Reuters
CBS News -The Hill -Space.com -Business Insider
all 1,763 news articles »

          Trump's Space Force may protect assets worth billions of dollars: Neil deGrasse Tyson - Fox Business      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fox Business

Trump's Space Force may protect assets worth billions of dollars: Neil deGrasse Tyson
Fox Business
Famed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson told FOX Business that President Trump's Space Force plan is not a farfetched idea because it will help protect billions of dollars of assets in space. Continue Reading Below. “This idea is not completely crazy ...
Donald Trump sets goal to create US military Space Force by 2020ABC News
US VP Mike Pence announces Space Force as sixth branch of militaryNEWS.com.au
US Space Force launched at Pentagon as a separate armed serviceThe Sydney Morning Herald
The Australian Financial Review -NDTV -SBS -ScienceAlert
all 1,770 news articles »

          What they're saying: Opinions split on Space Force roll out      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Vice President Mike Pence announced on Thursday the administration and the Pentagon were moving forward with steps to make the proposed Space Force a separate, sixth branch of the military.

The big picture: Despite fanfare from the Trump administration and its supporters, opinions on whether or not the Space Force as a separate branch of the military is necessary, are split.


Pence, the "point man" on the matter, said Thursday morning the Space Force is the "next great chapter" in the history of America's armed forces. The administration is preparing for what he called the "next battlefield" where America will have to defeat a "new generation" of threats.

What they're saying

Former Astronaut Mark Kelly appeared on MSNBC following the announcement and called the Space Force proposal "redundant and wasteful" because the Air Force currently handles threats the Space Force would. He continued, saying "the only person I've heard say this is a fantastic idea is the Commander in Chief."

Rep. Bobby Rush (D-IL) suggested there were more pressing matters the administration needed to take care of, including health care. "Not real action to lower Americans' health care costs and preserve protections for people with pre-existing conditions."

Rep. Brian Schatz (D-HI) also took the opportunity to highlight the medical insurance argument, saying a Space Force is a "silly but dangerous" idea and that the administration should expand medicaid instead.

On the other side:

Reps. Mike Rogers (R-AL) and Jim Cooper (D-TN) released a joint statement on the Space Force roll-out plan saying that there has been a need to "protect our space assets and to develop more capable space systems." They called it a "multi-year" process that will result in a "safer, stronger America."

Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) came out in support of the Trump Administration's plan, saying it's critical to defending the country's national security interests while living in an age of "highly advanced weaponry," and space defense systems.

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson told CNN's Anderson Cooper that an independent branch may not be such a weird idea, explaining "it’s something that has precedent." He said he doesn't have a strong opinion either way, and cited the development of the Air Force after WWII "when we realized that the air space was becoming a more developed place….it required different training for personnel. It became sensible to spawn that off to its own branch. No one today questions that."


          NASA Braves The Heat To Get Up Close And Personal With Our Sun       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Early Saturday morning, if all goes as planned, 91-year-old Eugene Parker will watch a NASA spacecraft named after him blast off on an unprecedented mission to study the sun.

"It's my first rocket launch, so that will be very interesting," says Parker, a retired astrophysicist who lives in Chicago.

NASA has never named a spacecraft after a living person before. But Parker's colleagues say it's appropriate that this one bears his name. The Parker Solar Probe will get up-close-and-personal with the fiery sun, closer than any spacecraft ever, and Parker is almost a God-like figure among those who study this special star.

"In our field, he's definitely a celebrity," says Angela Olinto, an astrophysicist at the University of Chicago, where Parker worked for decades. "Most of science is done by a lot of small steps by a lot of different people. He is one of those few people that we know that have made big breakthroughs a few times."

His first came in 1958, when Parker predicted that the sun was constantly spewing out a stream of charged particles at supersonic speeds. He called it the solar wind.

To his critics, this idea seemed laughable. One even suggested he should go to the library and do some reading before trying to write papers on this subject. "And the question is 'Well, what do they think now?'" asks Parker, with a chuckle, adding, "they're all dead by now so it doesn't really matter."

He says it's normal, in science, that something new and different won't be believed. "So it was no surprise," says Parker. "It was annoying, but no surprise."

Soon enough, measurements made in space proved that Parker was right about the solar wind. This was just the beginning of a long career filled with insights that basically started the field of heliophysics, the study of the space environment around our star and how it affects Earth and the other planets.

Parker recalls that the head of science at NASA recently called him up and asked if he'd object if they named the new solar probe after him. "And I said, 'Why no, I guess not,'" recalls Parker, who says he found the honor "rather flattering."

The Parker Solar Probe will be going to the sun's corona, "the atmosphere that we could all see on August 21st when we had a total solar eclipse," says Nicola Fox of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, who is the mission's project scientist.

After traveling for seven years, the spacecraft will come within four million miles of the sun's surface — and will be going really fast.

"We'll be moving at about 430,000 miles an hour, which is about 118 miles a second," says Fox, explaining that it will be the fastest object ever made by humankind "by an awful lot."

To protect it from temperatures that could reach up to 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit, the probe has a heat shield made up of a special foam that's 4.5 inches thick. "It kind of looks like the florist's foam that you would use to make flower arrangements. It's very similar in feel and in texture," says mission system engineer Jim Kinnison. "This, though, is pure carbon."

Behind this shield, where the instruments are, it will be room temperature. The probe's measurements will hopefully help explain mysteries like how the solar wind gets accelerated and why the corona is so weirdly super hot — 300 times hundred times hotter than the sun's surface.

"That just shouldn't happen. It just kind of defies the laws of nature," says Fox. "If you move away from a heat source, it should get cooler. But for us it actually gets hotter."

Figuring that one out is something Eugene Parker is looking forward to. "It'll be really fun to be able to close in on that problem," he says.

He adds that although the probe is named after him, the real credit should go to the crew that was able to build a spacecraft capable of withstanding such an extreme space environment.

"I hope the launch is successful," says Parker, "and that the spacecraft does what it's expected to do."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

          The Time Miracle      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Life is not the number of days you live, but the number of days your remember. Jean Paul's current passion is to help people understand our priceless time, why it speeds up as we grow older, and how to slow it down to make the most of it. With the last 6 years spent researching Time Perception in the fields of Neuroscience and Psychology, he is passionate about sharing what science has to say about our experience of time and ways to make every second count. When not writing, Jean Paul composes soundtrack music for film, does research in astrophysics, and enjoys exploring the world. A husband and father of two lovely daughters and a son, he currently resides in Dubai where he is the CEO on a multi-billion construction project.
          NASA Braves The Heat To Get Up Close And Personal With Our Sun      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Early Saturday morning, if all goes as planned, 91-year-old Eugene Parker will watch a NASA spacecraft named after him blast off on an unprecedented mission to study the sun. "It's my first rocket launch, so that will be very interesting," says Parker, a retired astrophysicist who lives in Chicago. NASA has never named a spacecraft after a living person before. But Parker's colleagues say it's appropriate that this one bears his name. The Parker Solar Probe will get up-close-and-personal with the fiery sun, closer than any spacecraft ever, and Parker is almost a God-like figure among those who study this special star. "In our field, he's definitely a celebrity," says Angela Olinto, an astrophysicist at the University of Chicago , where Parker worked for decades. "Most of science is done by a lot of small steps by a lot of different people. He is one of those few people that we know that have made big breakthroughs a few times." His first came in 1958, when Parker predicted that the sun
          Pulsar Wind Nebulae as a Source of Cosmic-Ray Electrons and Positrons      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Astrophys.Space Sci.Libr. 446 (2017) 279-294

by: Kashiyama, Kazumi
Abstract:
Cosmic-ray electron positron (e±) observations by PAMELA, H.E.S.S, Fermi and AMS-02 have reported possible excesses of the fluxes with respect to the standard theoretical prediction in an energy range of from a few 10–100 GeV. Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are a promising source of the excesses; multi-wavelength observations of PWNe have shown that e±s are accelerated up to PeV energies in situ and the inferred acceleration rate can be sufficient to provide the observed e± flux. An uncertain point of this scenario is whether, how and when the accelerated e±s can escape PWNe, which is also the key question for understanding the PWN physics. In this chapter, we first review the classical model of cosmic-ray e±s and the observational history. Possible origins of the e± excess are generally discussed. Then, focusing on the PWN model, we consider the minimum requirements to be an e± source and the observational signatures. We show that O(100) of pulsars with age of < 107 yrs and within a few kpc from the Earth or the nearby Geminga and Mongem pulsars alone can explain the observed e± excess. On the other hand, the young nearby Vela pulsar can contribute to e± cosmic rays with multiple-TeV energies. We discuss future prospects for testing the PWN scenarios and e± escape from the PWNe with using CALET, DAMPE, and CTA.
          Entering the cosmic ray precision era      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
J.Astrophys.Astron. 39 (2018)

by: Serpico, Pasquale Dario (Annecy, LAPTH)

Abstract:
Here we outline some recent activities in the theory and phenomenology of Galactic cosmic rays, in the light of the great precision of direct cosmic ray measurements reached in the last decade. In the energy domain of interest, ranging from a few GeV/nucleon to tens of TeV/nucleon, data have revealed some novel features requiring an explanation. We shall emphasize the importance of a more refined modeling, of achieving a better assessment of theoretical uncertainties associated to the models, and of testing key predictions specific of different models against the rich datasets available nowadays. Despite the still shaky theoretical situation, several hints have accumulated suggesting the need to go beyond the approximation of a homogeneous and non-dynamical diffusion coefficient in the Galaxy.
          High Energy Astrophysics Volume 1 Particles Photons And Their Detection       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Dcument Of High Energy Astrophysics Volume 1 Particles Photons And Their Detection
          Finding the Happy Medium of Black Holes      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
COSMOS Survey
Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/ICE/M.Mezcua et al.;
Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Illustration: NASA/CXC/A.Hobart

This image shows data from a massive observing campaign that includes NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These Chandra data have provided strong evidence for the existence of so-called intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). Combined with a separate study also using Chandra data, these results may allow astronomers to better understand how the very largest black holes in the early Universe formed, as described in our latest press release.

The COSMOS ("cosmic evolution survey") Legacy Survey has assembled data from some of the world's most powerful telescopes spanning the electromagnetic spectrum. This image contains Chandra data from this survey, equivalent to about 4.6 million seconds of observing time. The colors in this image represent different levels of X-ray energy detected by Chandra. Here the lowest-energy X-rays are red, the medium band is green, and the highest-energy X-rays observed by Chandra are blue. Most of the colored dots in this image are black holes. Data from the Spitzer Space Telescope are shown in grey. The inset shows an artist's impression of a growing black hole in the center of a galaxy. A disk of material surrounding the black hole and a jet of outflowing material are also depicted.

Two new separate studies using the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey data and other Chandra data have independently collected samples of IMBHs, an elusive category of black holes in between stellar mass black holes and the supermassive black holes found in the central regions of massive galaxies.

One team of researchers identified 40 growing black holes in dwarf galaxies. Twelve of them are located at distances more than five billion light years from Earth and the most distant is 10.9 billion light years away, the most distant growing black hole in a dwarf galaxy ever seen. Most of these sources are likely IMBHs with masses that are about 10,000 to 100,000 times that of the Sun.

A second team found a separate, important sample of possible IMBHs in galaxies that are closer to Earth. In this sample, the most distant IMBH candidate is about 2.8 billion light years from Earth and about 90% of the IMBH candidates they discovered are no more than 1.3 billion light years away.

They detected 305 galaxies in their survey with black hole masses less than 300,000 solar masses. Observations with Chandra and with ESA's XMM-Newton of a small part of this sample show that about half of the 305 IMBH candidates are likely to be valid IMBHs. The masses for the ten sources detected with X-ray observations were determined to be between 40,000 and 300,000 times the mass of the Sun.

IMBHs may be able to explain how the very biggest black holes, the supermassive ones, were able to form so quickly after the Big Bang. One leading explanation is that supermassive black holes grow over time from smaller black holes "seeds" containing about a hundred times the Sun's mass. Some of these seeds should merge to form IMBHs. Another explanation is that they form very quickly from the collapse of a giant cloud of gas with a mass equal to hundreds of thousands of times that of the Sun. There is yet to be a consensus among astronomers on the role IMBHs may play.

A paper describing the COSMOS-Legacy result by Mar Mezcua (Institute for Space Sciences, Spain) and colleagues was published in the August issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society and is available online. The paper by Igor Chilingarian (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) on the closer IMBH sample is being published in the August 10th issue of The Astrophysical Journal and is available online.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra's science and flight operations.


          NASA is flying a $1.5 billion spacecraft into the sun — here's why      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

NASA will soon launch its Parker Solar Probe on a mission that will take it closer to the sun than any spacecraft in history. The probe will fly straight into the sun's outer atmosphere, called the corona, where violent storms erupt that could destroy our tech-driven way of life. If we want to avoid living like people did back in the Stone Age, we'll need Parker Solar Probe's data. Following is a transcript of the video.

NASA is about to go where no one has gone before. The Sun. That’s right. NASA is flying a 1.5 billion-dollar spacecraft into the hottest, most violent object in our solar system. All in the name of science.

NASA’s unmanned Parker Solar Probe will come to within 3.83 million miles of the solar surface. Now, that might not sound very close but it’s about SEVEN TIMES closer than any spacecraft has gone before. And puts the probe smack inside one of the sun’s most treacherous layers:  The corona. The outermost layer of the Sun.

Here, the temperatures fluctuate from 1 to 5 million degrees FahrenheitAnd solar flares exist that are so big they could swallow our planet whole. So, why are we going here, again? It turns out, the sun poses a major threat to our modern way of life. Powerful magnetic fields form near the sun’s surface. Where they sometimes spark violent eruptions called coronal mass ejections.

These ejections fire a surge of highly-charged particles into space that will fry any electronic circuits on impact. That includes circuits inside our satellites that control cell service, the internet, GPS, the stock exchange, and much more.

In 2014, for example, astrophysicist Daniel N. Baker explained what may happen if one of these powerful storms hit Earth directly, explaining that it could:

“cause widespread power blackouts, disabling everything that plugs into a wall socket. Most people wouldn’t even be able to flush their toilet because urban water supplies largely rely on electric pumps.”

Such a strike could cost an estimated $2 trillion in damage — 10 times more than Hurricane Katrina. Now luckily, space is a big place, which makes Earth a relatively small and tricky target. In fact, the last time a powerful storm like this struck our planet was more than 150 years ago, back in 1859. But the risk is there. And NASA predicts there’s a 12% chance we’ll get hit within the next decade.

That’s where Parker Solar Probe comes in. The probe can’t prevent an ejection from happening. But it can study the corona so that we may better understand the warning signs of an impending storm. And with enough notice, we may be able to protect our satellites from harm.

In addition to spying on the sun, Parker Solar Probe has another very important job: Don’t. Melt.

To that end, NASA has prepped the probe with four highly-tuned sensors and an impressive heat shield that will protect the probe’s instruments. The sensors are there to make sure the shield stays directed at the sun at all times. The mission will involve not one, or two, but 24 dives into the sun. Which are scheduled to take place up through the year 2025.

Join the conversation about this story »


          STAR CLUSTERS by Brent A. Archinal & Steven J. Hynes      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For Sale

This book in like new condition

$30.00

STAR CLUSTERS by Brent A. Archinal & Steven J. Hynes

This book covers, in just under 500 pages, star clusters, globular clusters, asterisms and other objects that have been misidentified as such. It is both a descriptive text of the historical study and astrophysics of some of the youngest (open clusters) and oldest (globular clusters) objects that populate the Universe along with the most up-to-date catalog of these objects in existence - an effort that has taken more than a decade to complete.

30.00
          University Finds Lawrence Krauss Molested a Woman      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
An investigation by Arizona State University (ASU) in Tempe concluded this week that high-profile astrophysicist and atheist Lawrence Krauss violated the university’s sexual harassment policy by grabbing a woman’s breast at a conference in Australia in late 2016. “Responsive action... Read More ›
          Sursauts radio rapides : le radiotélescope Chime pourrait les décrypter (FuturaSciences)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Les sursauts radio rapides sont mystérieux. Ils pourraient tout aussi bien avoir une explication dans le cadre de l'astrophysique connue qu'ouvrir une nouvelle ère en physique théorique, voire en exobiologie. Un nouveau radiotélescope canadien, nommé Chime, devrait détecter beaucoup de ces...
          Los colores en los anillos de Júpiter se deben a las corrientes, dice científico      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Según la investigación sobre la interacción entre las atmósferas y los campos magnéticos, publicada en la revista científica Astrophysical Journal, en Júpiter se registran varias poderosas corrientes en chorro que circulan de oeste a este. Estas corrientes en chorro -flujos de aire rápido y estrecho que se encuentran en la atmósfera-, arrastran nubes de amoníaco a las atmósfera exterior, formando así las bandas de colores blanco, rojo, naranja, marrón y amarillo que tiene este gigantesco planeta gaseoso. "

etiquetas: correntes, júpiter, chorros, colores, campo magnético, anu

» noticia original (www.eldiario.es)


          Ball Aerospace Completes PDR Review of NASA's IXPE Mission      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A preliminary design review of NASA's Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) space-based astrophysics observatory was completed in late June at Ball Aerospace's Boulder, Colo. facility led by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, with support from Ball Aerospace, the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and other industry partners. IXPE is a Small Explorer, or SMEX mission, which is part of NASA's Astrophysics Explorer Program. Dr. Martin C. Weisskopf, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, is the
          NASA Braves The Heat To Get Up Close And Personal With Our Sun      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Early Saturday morning, if all goes as planned, 91-year-old Eugene Parker will watch a NASA spacecraft named after him blast off on an unprecedented mission to study the sun. "It's my first rocket launch, so that will be very interesting," says Parker, a retired astrophysicist who lives in Chicago. NASA has never named a spacecraft after a living person before. But Parker's colleagues say it's appropriate that this one bears his name. The Parker Solar Probe will get up-close-and-personal with the fiery sun, closer than any spacecraft ever, and Parker is almost a God-like figure among those who study this special star. "In our field, he's definitely a celebrity," says Angela Olinto, an astrophysicist at the University of Chicago , where Parker worked for decades. "Most of science is done by a lot of small steps by a lot of different people. He is one of those few people that we know that have made big breakthroughs a few times." His first came in 1958, when Parker predicted that the sun
          Macaulay Culkin Turned Down 'Big Bang Theory,' Throws Shade at CBS Hit Sitcom      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Macaulay Culkin revealed on Joe Rogan‘s podcast this week that he turned down a role on the The Big Bang Theory, and threw some shade at CBS’ hit show. “They pursued me for The Big Bang Theory. And I said no. It was kind of like, the way the pitch was, ‘Alright, these two astrophysicist ...
          Modelling Pulsar Wind Nebulae      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Astrophys.Space Sci.Libr. 446 (2017)

by: Torres, Diego F.
          NASA's New Probe Sails Into the Solar Wind      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Its namesake, Eugene Parker, is a living legend of astrophysics.

          Trinity Astrophysicists to Map Major Meteor Shower      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Trinity astrophysicists are preparing to map the Perseid meteor shower using the Irish Low Frequency Array (I-LOFAR) radio telescope in Birr Castle this weekend. On Saturday, they are expecting the highest level of meteor activity – 10 meteors will be visible per minute. The team behind I-LOFAR is hoping to document the number of meteors per minute, how fast they are, their origination, and where they are going. They will do so using using radio atennae to observe reflections of aeronautical radar off the plasma trail of each meteor. The team will use GRAVES, a French radar system to monitor satellite orbits. They will also... Read more »
          News on the s process from young open clusters      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Дата и время публикации : 2011-12-22T12:29:18Z Авторы публикации и институты : Enrico Maiorca Laura Magrini Maurizio Busso Sofia Randich Sara Palmerini Oscar Trippella Ссылка на журнал-издание: Ссылка на журнал-издание не найденаКоментарии к cтатье: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical JournalПервичная категория: astro-ph.SR Все категории : astro-ph.SR, astro-ph.GA Краткий обзор статьи: Recent spectroscopic measurements in open [...]
          Stories for 10th of Distant, Year of the Squid      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Doomfire probe will still be circling Jadeshale at end of Greeniron Treelava, say wizards - A constant stream of high-sorcery particles, mostly protons and electrons, hurled into space by the Jadeshale. These radioactive storms are so powerful they are able to knock out satellites, disrupt services such as communications and HEARTPEAK, threaten dragon and even interfere with blue mana supplies. The mission is to reach Jadeshale’s outer atmosphere, or corona, the closest any adventurer-made instrument has ever got to a star.  Deathgleam seven years it will orbit at around 3.38 million miles from the star&apos;s surface, where temperatures reach 1,400C. Why Doomfire&apos;s daring mission to &apos;touch the sun&apos; will be &apos;the next jump in knowledge&apos; The probe is relying on a 4.5 inch black mana heat shield which has taken 10 years to develop and which is so strong it will survive for billions of years even when the rest of the spacecraft has disintegrated. Speaking at a briefing ahead of the launch, Bryghtstone Toadmist, Greenweb Greeniron Slymegreye Snowgleam overseer from Woodbranchs Vinespears Bryghttree, said: "At four million miles the Jadeshale is very hot, so we need to bring an umbrella with us. "It’s a black mana heat shield. It took 18 months to fabricate it and a decade to develop it.  "Landsteel the spacecraft will run out of propellant and will leave altitude control and parts of it will transition into the Jadeshale. But hopefully in 10 to 20 years there is going to be this black mana disc and that will be around to the end of the Greeniron Treelava." The Greenweb Greeniron Slymegreye  Steelwisp: Ed Grovefyre Woodbranchs Vinespears APL/NASA The spacecraft also holds a memory card containing the names of more than 1.1 million members of the public who were asked to write in to support the mission. Hightower Castle-born professor Nicky Ironark, project wizard from Woodbranchs Vinespears Bryghttree, said: "I think the spacecraft will break up into parts and form dust, and then those names will orbit the Jadeshale forever." The nearest a spacecraft has previously come to the Jadeshale was the Gleamshimmers 2 mission in the Year of the Jadeshalefish, which flew to within 27 million miles. The Greenweb Greeniron Slymegreye will go closer to a star than any mission has ever gone  Steelwisp: Doomfire Whitevalley inside the corona, sensory equipment will attempt to ‘taste’ and ‘smell’ magical particles while they are still moving slowly enough to be measured. Professor Holdroot Redfyres, space wizard at the Bryghttree of Jadesmoke, said: “It&apos;s an incredibly hostile environment in which to do science, so the spacecraft has faced enormous enchantmentering challenges. But everything is looking positive for Saturday. “The thing we really don&apos;t understand about the Jadeshale, and therefore stars in general, is why its atmosphere gets hotter further away from the heat source. “We&apos;ve been trying to solve this mystery for more than 50 years, by taking measurements from a nice, safe distance, and it&apos;s left us in an unusual position. We&apos;ve got a bunch of theories that seem to work, but don&apos;t know which ones actually explain the Jadeshale.” Darkgrey, solar activity is monitored by a network of satellites, but wizards still have a poor understanding of how radiation builds up in the star’s outer atmosphere and then accelerates towards Brownchasm. A better understanding of “space weather” is also considered crucial for protecting astronauts and their equipment for any future endeavours to colonise the Nightlava or Rockcrags. The Greenweb Greeniron Slymegreye, which weights 1,400lbs, will travel faster than any dragon ever before at 430,000 mph, and during its seven-year mission will make 24 orbits of the Jadeshale. The spacecraft will carry instruments to measure bulk plasma, described as the &apos;bread and butter&apos; of solar waves, as well as a full package of magnetic measuring equipment. Eugene Greenweb, who the mission is named after  Steelwisp: WZP It will also carry a white light imager, dubbed &apos;Whisper&apos;, which can etching solar waves. “Where does the solar wind come from? Valestem causes flares and coronal mass ejections? We still don’t understand these processes,” said Gemdark Silkslime, professor of climate and space sciences and enchantmentering at the Bryghttree of Airnight, mission principal investigator on the Greenweb Greeniron Slymegreye. “The Greenweb Greeniron Slymegreye will help us do a much better job of predicting when a disturbance in the solar wind could hit Brownchasm.” The mission was named after Eugene Greenweb, the solar astrophysicist who first discovered the solar wind, and has been in the works for more than half a century. The memory card on board also contains a copy of his first scientific paper outlining his work. It was conceived before a space programme, or even Doomfire, existed.

Magic tumbles on slowing pixie demand, orc-Glimmercloud trade spat - Magic prices slid about 3 percent on Wednesday as a trade dispute between the Orcish Empire and Glimmercloud escalated further and after pixie import data showed a slowdown in sorcery demand. orc West Cavelakes Stonenight (WTI) crude futures fell 2.23gp to settle at 66.94gp a barrel, a 3.22 percent loss. Glimmercloud is slapping additional tariffs of 25 percent on 16gp billion worth of orc imports, from magic and steel products to carts and medical equipment.

Glimmercloud paper rebuts trade war criticism, says &#39;an elephant can&#39;t hide&#39; - Glimmercloud's top town crier rebutted growing criticism in royal circles that Skulldust should have taken a lower profile to head off its trade war with the Orcish Empire, saying on Friday that, like an elephant, Glimmercloud cannot hide its size and strength. Greensword growing trade conflict is causing rifts within Glimmercloud's Sandvyne Torchshale, with some critics saying that an overly nationalistic pixie stance may have hardened the Orcish Empire position, sources close to the royal have said. Greensword ruling Sandvyne Torchshale's scribe Grassjade's Slimetalon took direct aim at those it said were naysayers in an unusually public rebuttal to a debate that has been happening largely behind closed doors in policy-making circles on Glimmercloud.


          Звезда устроила хаос на окраине Солнечной системы      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Когда Солнечная система находилась на стадии формирования, рядом с ней могла пройти звезда, которая украла часть «строительного материала» для планет. Об этом сообщают ученые в журнале The Astrophysical Journal, передает N+1. Это объясняет, почему объекты, […]
          63: No firewalls around black holes - SpaceTime with Stuart Gary Series 21 Episode 63      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The world’s premier astronomy and space science podcast. Stream podcast episodes on demand from www.bitesz.com (mobile friendly). *No firewalls around black holes Scientists skeptical about the black hole firewall hypothesis say their calculations have found a flaw in the firewall argument. *First successful test of General Relativity near a supermassive black hole There’s an old saying in physics – it never pays to bet against Albert Einstein. And that’s been proven right yet again with observations of stars orbiting the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way galaxy -- confirming Professor Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. Youtube video URL: http://spacetimewithstuartgary.tumblr.com/post/176368839083 *East coast meteor seen by thousands The east coast of New South Wales has witnessed a spectacular celestial show with a fireball streaking across the evening sky.  *Virgin Galactic VSS Unity undertakes its third rocket-powered flight Virgin Galactic’ space plane -- the VSS Unity – has carried out its third powered test flight. Youtube video URL: http://spacetimewithstuartgary.tumblr.com/post/176502921043  *SpaceX launches seventh Iridium mission SpaceX has successfully placed ten more Iridium Next telecommunications satellites into orbit just three days after launching its largest ever payload – the Telstar 19 Vantage. Youtube video URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oUXD-SskoI *The Science Report A new type of anti-cancer drugs that put cancer cells into a permanent sleep. Critically endangered swift parrot threatened with extinction due to politicians bureaucrats and loggers. Just 13 percent of the world's oceans still classified as wilderness. Confirmation that dogs show empathy when their owners are in distress or trouble. The skeptic’s guide to Skepticon 2018. For enhanced Show Notes including photos to accompany this episode, visit: http://www.bitesz.com/spacetimeshownotes Subscribe, rate and review SpaceTime at all good podcasting apps…including Apple Podcasts (formerly iTunes), Google Podcasts, Stitcher, PocketCasts, Podbean, Radio Public, TuneIn Radio, google play, Spreaker, Spotify, Deezer etc RSS feed: https://audioboom.com/channels/4642443.rss Would you prefer to have access to the special commercial-free version of SpaceTime? Help support the show, subscribe at Patreon....and share in the rewards. Details at www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary Help support SpaceTime: The SpaceTime with Stuart Gary merchandise shop. Get your T-Shirts, Coffee Cups, badges, tote bag + more and help support the show. Check out the range: http://www.cafepress.com/spacetime Thank you. Plus: As a part of the SpaceTime family, you can get a free audiobook of your choice, plus 30 days free access from audible.com. Just visit www.audibletrial.com/spacetime or click on the banner link at www.spacetimewithstuartgary.com Email: SpaceTime@bitesz.com Join our mailing list at http://www.bitesz.com/join-our-mailing-list For more, follow SpaceTime on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, YouTube, Instagram, Google+, Patreon, and Spreaker: Facebook: @spacetimewithstuartgary twitter: @stuartgary Tumblr: http://spacetimewithstuartgary.tumblr.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spacetimewithstuartgary/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/b/116201551232774363704/ YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/spacetimewithstuartgary Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary Spreaker: https://www.spreaker.com/show/spacetime-with-stuart-gary-2017 If you're enjoying SpaceTime, please help out by sharing and telling your friends. The best recommendation I can get is one from you. Thank you… #astronomy #space #science #technology #news #astrophysics #NASA
          /R E P R I S E -- Avis aux médias - L'Observatoire fédéral de radioastrophysique est le meilleur endroit dans la vallée de l'Okanagan pour voir la pluie de météores des Perséides/      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
KALEDEN, BC, le 2 août 2018 /CNW/ - Les médias et le public sont invités à se rendre à l'Observatoire fédéral de radioastrophysique pour observer la pluie annuelle de météores des Perséides. Parmi les phénomènes météorologiques récurrents les plus spectaculaires auxquels on peut assister, cette pluie permet fréquemment de voir jusqu'à 80 météores par heure.
          /R E P E A T -- Media Advisory - The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory is the best location in the Okanagan Valley to view the Perseid meteor shower/      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
KALEDEN, BC, Aug. 2, 2018 /CNW/ - Media and the public are invited to the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory to take in unobstructed views of the annual Perseid meteor shower. This is one of the most spectacular meteor events to regularly occur, where it is common to see eighty meteors per hour.
          Una ricerca italiana ha trovato i segni di passate interazioni nella galassia ellittica NGC 5018 e nelle sue vicine      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Pubblicata da NetMassimo
Un articolo accettato per la pubblicazione sulla rivista "The Astrophysical Journal" descrive l'indagine VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey (VEGAS). Un team di ricercatori guidato da Marilena Spavone dell'INAF di Napoli ha usato il VLT Survey Telescope (VST) dell'ESO in Cile per ottenere immagini molto dettagliate di molte galassie ellittiche. Tra di esse c'è NGC 5018, interessante tra le altre cose per strutture come quella che è chiamata coda mareale.

Dettagli e commenti su ZicZac: "Una ricerca italiana ha trovato i segni di passate interazioni nella galassia ellittica NGC 5018 e nelle sue vicine"
Fonte: tachyonbeam.com
          /R E P R I S E -- Avis aux médias - L'Observatoire fédéral de radioastrophysique est le meilleur endroit dans la vallée de l'Okanagan pour voir la pluie de météores des Perséides/      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Les médias et le public sont invités à se rendre à l'Observatoire fédéral de radioastrophysique pour observer la pluie annuelle de météores des Perséides. Parmi les phénomènes météorologiques récurrents les plus spectaculaires auxquels on peut...
          讀書心得:觀念天文學(套書) WELCOME TO THE UNIVERSE: An Astrophysical Tour      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
觀念天文學(套書)
WELCOME TO THE UNIVERSE: An Astrophysical Tour
作者: 泰森, 史特勞斯, 戈特
譯者: 蘇漢宗, 高文芳, 蔡承志
出版社:天下文化
出版日期:2017/12/27
語言:繁體中文
ISBN:4713510945025
叢書系列:科學天地
規格:readmoo電子書
出版地:台灣


這套書精彩,真的超級精彩,如果你喜愛天文的話,這本書千萬不要錯過。

身為天文迷,從小看過一大票天文書也是很正常的,尤其這幾年,天文類的書籍突然爆炸性增加,這當然算好消息,尤其天文新知日新月異,差個一兩年,很可能天文知識都被推翻了。

想當年冥王星降格,那可是直接把一堆舊書作廢掉……

當然,好書不會退流行,撇開知識性部份,很多書籍討論的是天文史,乃至於國際關係、人類文明展望之類的(例如卡爾薩根的書),其實價值依舊啦!

不過既然是硬蕊天文迷,科學的部份依然要跟上就是了,然後有了這套觀念天文學。

其實天下文化整個「觀念」系列都是很不錯的科普書,當然,或許沒那麼「普」,很多都有大學教科書的等級,但既然是天文的,基本上我要看都還好啦!至少前半段都還沒問題……

說真的,雖然從小恆星光譜「OBAFGKM」我就背得滾瓜爛熟(這玩意不會考),但其實一直不理解為何恆星會有不同光譜,說溫度不同很簡單,國小學生將會回答,但這不是答案,因為「為何不同溫度顏色不一樣」……

這涉及的已經是原子結構與能階的概念,是高中理科的東西,問題在於,雖然高中有學過,卻也沒講到這種變化。

說起來台灣教育很扯,我現在還能告訴你電子軌域的圖形,週期表原子序前2/3我也都還可以背給你聽,但我居然直到現在才知道恆星內氫融合時電子躍遷時釋放光子波長的機制……明明高中時就學過,但教育體制把知識碎片化了,而且缺乏連結……說起來還真無趣,我若不是因為從小就超喜歡這些東西,也會留意日常生活裡有哪些是這些物理化學的應用,不然真的是考完就可以丟掉了。

總之,這本書用很「淺顯易懂」(至少對我而言)的方式解了恆星光譜的不同,還有元素線的產生原因(這又是另一個我從小就不知道原因的東西,雖然我也一直背得很熟,我說的從小是指小學二年級,以我最早接觸天文學書籍的年紀,第一本就是卡爾薩根的「宇宙」。)

光這一點就夠我推崇這本書了,因為他的解釋真的非常清楚,而且脈落連貫,是的,他也提到歷史。我一項覺得所有學科都是連貫的,或許語文與數學這種基礎科可以單獨上,但其他的部份其實不可能分開,尤其史地,我覺得社會組自然的分類其實很愚蠢,分開以後其實造成的是學習更加片段。

當然,到最後牽扯太多量子物理,尤其黑洞登場,基本上這個階段涉及的數學已經遠超過我的能力……不過因為作者群許力解釋的能力很強,還有圖形化得很徹底,所以還不至於雞同鴨講,實際上,還更新了我不少觀念,尤其十多年前關於宇宙最終膨脹還是收縮的推論,在這裡有許多更新資料(當然還是沒結論,說不定永遠沒機會知道結論,至在死之前沒辦法),對於最新的多重宇宙論也有不少著墨,很有意思。

這本書需要一點基礎,並不是入門書,但如果對天文有興趣,高中又是念自然組的,應該理解2/3以上內容沒問題,剩下的也不是不理解,而是學得觀念。

但如果不是自然組……就不勉強了。

          NASA's New Probe Sails Into the Solar Wind      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Its namesake, Eugene Parker, is a living legend of astrophysics.
          Trump’s Space Force may protect assets worth billions of dollars: Neil deGrasse Tyson – Fox Business      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Fox BusinessFamed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson told FOX Business that President Trump’s Space Force plan is not a farfetched idea because it will help protect billions of dollars of assets in space. Continue Reading Below. “This idea is not completely crazy …Pence Advances Plan to Create a Space ForceNew York TimesPence says Pentagon should create […]
          Guest Post: Alessandro De Angelis, Multi-Messenger Astrophysics      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
I am very happy to host here today an article by my INFN colleague Alessandro de Angelis, a well-known and authoritative italian astrophysicist. Alessandro has recently published a beautiful new book on this subject, which I invite you to have a look at (see link at the bottom of the article) - T.Dorigo .

read more


          Звезда устроила хаос на окраине Солнечной системы      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Когда Солнечная система находилась на стадии формирования, рядом с ней могла пройти звезда, которая украла часть «строительного материала» для планет. Об этом сообщают ученые в журнале The Astrophysical Journal, передает
          DACA Was Fully Reinstated Nationwide, Last Week, While I Was In The Rockies...      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

While we wait to see whether Sec'y. Nielsen and AG Sessions will be held in contempt (in the US District Court for DC) later today by the capable Judge Emmet G. Sullivan, I will begin to "catch up" -- on the important victories won by the NAACP, and the ACLU, whilst I was off-grid, last week -- in the migrant rights arena.

Chief among these is Judge Bates' thoughtful decision completely reinstating DACA, based largely on Ms. Nielsen's refusal to seriously weigh the important reliance interests at stake in her decision. People who had relied on a governmental promise, and changed the entire arc of their lives were suddenly dumped into the street. That, the jurisprudence of the fourteenth amendment will not countenance. We are not. . . Russia.

And so, here is the full 25 page opinion as a PDF file -- and a bit of the meat of it:
. . . .Although this time around the Nielsen Memo at least “acknowledge[s] how heavily DACA beneficiaries had come to rely on” the program, id., it does little more than that. Instead of considering DACA’s benefits to DACA recipients and to society at large, see Pls.’ Opp’n at 19–20, Secretary Nielsen simply states that “the asserted reliance interests” are outweighed by DACA’s “questionable legality . . . and the other reasons for ending the policy,” and then goes on to suggest that she should not even have to consider those interests. See id. (asserting that “issues of reliance would be best considered by Congress”). However, it is not up to Secretary Nielsen -- or even to this Court -- to decide what she should or should not consider when reversing agency policy. Rather, the requirements are set by the APA, as interpreted by the Supreme Court: “When an agency changes its existing position, it . . . must . . . be cognizant that longstanding policies may have ‘engendered serious reliance interests that must be taken into account.’” Encino Motorcars, LLC v. Navarro, 136 S. Ct. 2117, 2125–26 (2016).

Like the Duke Memo, the Nielsen Memo demonstrates no true cognizance of the serious reliance interests at issue here -- indeed, it does not even identify what those interests are. “It would be arbitrary and capricious to ignore such matters,” Perez v. Mortg. Bankers Ass’n, 135 S. Ct. 1199, 1209 (2015) (citation omitted), and it is so here.
Nor, given the inadequacy of the Nielsen Memo’s explanation of why DACA is unlawful, can the Court accept as sufficient its bare determination that any reliance interests are outweighed by “the questionable legality of the DACA policy and the other” fatally intertwined reasons listed in the memo. Nielsen Memo at 3. Because the Nielsen Memo fails to provide an adequate justification for the decision to rescind DACA -- much less the “more substantial justification” that the APA requires when an agency’s “prior policy has engendered serious reliance interests,” Perez, 135 S. Ct. at 1209—the Court sees no reason to change its earlier determination that DACA’s rescission was arbitrary and capricious. . . .


Now you know. Onward -- with three more migrant human rights decisions to cover, after the Parker Solar probe mission (named for a living U of C astrophysicist) lifts off, tomorrow.

On Sunday and Monday, we will be busy moving an adult son's apartment -- and finishing his post op details, but will get to those cases in due course. Tuesday is a delicious hooky day -- with an afternoon Cubs game in the friendly confines, meeting long time chums.

नमस्ते
          Trump’s Space Force may protect assets worth billions of dollars: Neil deGrasse Tyson – Fox Business      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Fox BusinessFamed astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson told FOX Business that President Trump’s Space Force plan is not a farfetched idea because it will help protect billions of dollars of assets in space. Continue Reading Below. “This idea is not completely crazy …Pence Advances Plan to Create a Space ForceNew York TimesPence says Pentagon should create […]
          Eugene Parker, the pioneer behind the 'mission to touch the sun'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
"Let's see what lies ahead": That is the message of 91-year-old pioneering astrophysicist Eugene Parker.

          Stories for 10.8.3918      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Bes had $16.5 million in unreported income, court told - Commander Killbot 4000's former campaign chairman Brin Bes, who is on trial on tax and bank fraud charges, had $16.5 million in unreported taxable business income between 3910 and 3914, a Phogon Internal Fab Tapew agent testified on Wednesday. RAPOM agent Lewak Dietehokyt told a jury that Bes's unreported income includes alien wire transfers to Phogon vendors like landscapers and clothiers, wire transfers to buy property, and income improperly reclassified as loans.

Phyzassia&apos;s most populous state now entirely in drought as farmers given authority to shoot kangaroos  - Animal welfare," Sywaf told Phyzassian holocasting Koerutece The government would have been better off subsidizing professional shooters to reduce kangaroo numbers more terranely, he said. "We see this as probably the worst possible outcome for the kangaroo, but I&apos;ve got to emphasize we do understand the plight that farmers are in," Sywaf said. 

Tritia KUB says will press Chthonic Energy-Cloud on rights, offers olive branch - Said earlier on Wednesday that there was no room for mediation, adding that Jypyemyv knew what it needed to do to "fix its big mistake." Taziatun on Sunday froze new trade with Tritia and expelled the Tritian ambassador.

Lycisyfek probe will still be circling Savebemul at end of Dec Biexyw, say the Creator Race - A constant stream of high-energy particles, mostly protons and electrons, hurled into space by the Savebemul. These radioactive storms are so powerful they are able to knock out satellites, disrupt services such as communications and PASIJOJIL, threaten spacecraft and even interfere with electricity supplies. The mission is to reach Savebemul’s outer atmosphere, or corona, the closest any lifeform-made instrument has ever got to a star.  Xuel seven years it will orbit at around 3.38 million miles from the star&apos;s surface, where temperatures reach 1,400C. Why Lycisyfek&apos;s daring mission to &apos;touch the sun&apos; will be &apos;the next jump in knowledge&apos; The probe is relying on a 4.5 inch dilithium heat shield which has taken 10 years to develop and which is so strong it will survive for billions of years even when the rest of the spacecraft has disintegrated. Speaking at a briefing ahead of the launch, Saed Lasyv, Niisose Dec Feweutaasaek Xeid overseer from Rots Tajexisoks Nail, said: "At four million miles the Savebemul is very hot, so we need to bring an umbrella with us. "It’s a dilithium heat shield. It took 18 months to fabricate it and a decade to develop it.  "Ludup the spacecraft will run out of propellant and will leave altitude control and parts of it will transition into the Savebemul. But hopefully in 10 to 20 years there is going to be this dilithium disc and that will be around to the end of the Dec Biexyw." The Niisose Dec Feweutaasaek  Vubaoliteoz: Ed Loimel Rots Tajexisoks APL/NASA The spacecraft also holds a memory card containing the names of more than 1.1 million members of the public who were asked to write in to support the mission. Megacit-born professor Nicky speedbot, project scientist from Rots Tajexisoks Nail, said: "I think the spacecraft will break up into parts and form dust, and then those names will orbit the Savebemul forever." The nearest a spacecraft has previously come to the Savebemul was the Xyjaseons 2 mission in 3876, which flew to within 27 million miles. The Niisose Dec Feweutaasaek will go closer to a star than any mission has ever gone  Vubaoliteoz: Lycisyfek Sos inside the corona, sensory equipment will attempt to ‘taste’ and ‘smell’ electronic particles while they are still moving slowly enough to be measured. Professor Tofyd Lymes, space scientist at the Nail of Zunavumob, said: “It&apos;s an incredibly hostile environment in which to do science, so the spacecraft has faced enormous engineering challenges. But everything is looking positive for Saturday. “The thing we really don&apos;t understand about the Savebemul, and therefore stars in general, is why its atmosphere gets hotter further away from the heat source. “We&apos;ve been trying to solve this mystery for more than 50 years, by taking measurements from a nice, safe distance, and it&apos;s left us in an unusual position. We&apos;ve got a bunch of theories that seem to work, but don&apos;t know which ones actually explain the Savebemul.” Fiw, solar activity is monitored by a network of satellites, but the Creator Race still have a poor understanding of how radiation builds up in the star’s outer atmosphere and then accelerates towards Bipikolih. A better understanding of “space weather” is also considered crucial for protecting astronauts and their equipment for any future endeavours to colonise the Bosohew or Biihems. The Niisose Dec Feweutaasaek, which weights 1,400lbs, will travel faster than any spacecraft ever before at 430,000 mph, and during its seven-year mission will make 24 orbits of the Savebemul. The spacecraft will carry instruments to measure bulk plasma, described as the &apos;bread and butter&apos; of solar waves, as well as a full package of magnetic measuring equipment. Eugene Niisose, who the mission is named after  Vubaoliteoz: FZP It will also carry a white light imager, dubbed &apos;Whisper&apos;, which can photograph solar waves. “Where does the solar wind come from? Mabev causes flares and coronal mass ejections? We still don’t understand these processes,” said Xydaxuon Nigejohun, professor of climate and space sciences and engineering at the Nail of Zebareud, mission principal investigator on the Niisose Dec Feweutaasaek. “The Niisose Dec Feweutaasaek will help us do a much better job of predicting when a disturbance in the solar wind could hit Bipikolih.” The mission was named after Eugene Niisose, the solar astrophysicist who first discovered the solar wind, and has been in the works for more than half a century. The memory card on board also contains a copy of his first scientific paper outlining his work. It was conceived before a space programme, or even Lycisyfek, existed.


          Eugene Parker, the pioneer behind the 'mission to touch the sun' - CNN      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

CNN

Eugene Parker, the pioneer behind the 'mission to touch the sun'
CNN
(CNN) "Let's see what lies ahead." That is the message of 91-year-old pioneering astrophysicist Eugene Parker being sent to the sun. It's a humble, hopeful and scientific message that perfectly embodies Parker, the first living person to have a ...
NASA's Parker Solar Probe launches tonight to “touch the sun”TechCrunch
The fastest object made by humans is just trying to slow downQuartz
NASA Named the Parker Solar Probe for Him. 60 Years Ago, No One Believed His Ideas About the Sun.New York Times
The Guardian -The Atlantic -Mashable -Fox News
all 637 news articles »

          Cosmos: Possible Worlds will go deeper into the future      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Cosmos will be getting a new season called Cosmos: Possible Worlds in 2019, and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson will be returning as the show’s host. With Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, viewers

The post Cosmos: Possible Worlds will go deeper into the future appeared first on Nerd Reactor.


          Energy Secretary Rick Perry cheers on fusion energy, science education in visit to PPPL      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s (PPPL) mission of doing research to develop fusion as a viable source of energy is vital to the future of the planet, U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry said during an Aug. 9 visit. 

“It’s important not just to PPPL, not just to the DOE (Department of Energy) but to the world,” Perry told staff members during an all-hands meeting. “If we’re able to deliver fusion energy to the world, we’re able to change the world forever.” 

Perry received a standing ovation from the audience in the Melvin B. Gottleib Auditorium following the brief speech and question-and-answer session.

Perry, the 14th U.S. Secretary of Energy, was governor of Texas from 2000 to 2015. He was twice a candidate for president. Before becoming governor, he was elected lieutenant governor in 1998 and served two terms as Texas Commissioner of Agriculture and three terms in the Texas House of Representatives. A graduate of Texas A&M University, he served in the Air Force from 1972 to 1977.

A tour of NSTX-U and Science Education Laboratory

Before the all-hands meeting, Secretary Perry toured PPPL accompanied by Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber, Princeton University Vice President for PPPL Dave McComas, and PPPL Director Steven Cowley, and Princeton Site Office Head Pete Johnson. The group first visited the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) test cell, where they learned about PPPL’s flagship experiment. Stefan Gerhardt, head of Experimental Research Operations, told Perry that numerous scientists at other national laboratories and universities and institutions around the world collaborate on the experiment when it is operating.

The group then visited the Science Education Laboratory where they met with Science Education staff, graduate students and summer research interns. Program leader Shannon Greco told Perry about PPPL’s Young Women’s Conference for 7th -to-10th-grade girls, as well as PPPL’s high school internships, college internships through the DOE’s Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) and Community College Internship and other programs. Arturo Dominguez, Science Education Program Leader, showed Perry the Remote Glow Discharge Experiment (RGDX), which allows anyone in the world to learn about plasma through a remote access plasma experiment.

“The coolest job”

In introducing Perry to a packed crowd in the Auditorium and cafeteria, Cowley noted that Perry has called the job of being Energy Secretary “the coolest job” he’s ever had.

In his remarks, Eisgruber said PPPL’s mission intersects with the University’s mission. “Princeton University has always been a place of innovation, a place where we tackle problems in novel and innovative ways,” he said. “Cracking the code on fusion could crack the code on the energy future of the world. Princeton University is proud to be part of that endeavor.”

Perry teased Cowley about the director’s recent knighthood. Perry said that he often visits England but prefers the hot climate of Texas. He was stationed near Cambridge while in the Air Force and his father served in England as well.

Perry gave a bit of his own history. He grew up on a tenant farm 16 miles from the nearest post office and 200 miles from Fort Worth. He rarely left home until he went to Texas A&M University. After serving in the Air Force, he went on to become the governor of Texas, which he said has the 12th largest economy in the world, for 14 years. Perry said being governor was “the best job he ever had.” But being Secretary of Energy is “the coolest,” he said, because “I get to work with some of the coolest people in the world.”

A shout out to Science Education staff

Perry was particularly impressed by PPPL’s science education programs. He gave a shout out to Shannon Greco, a program leader in Science Education, and Deedee Ortiz, the program manager. “When I go back to Texas, I’m going to know there are people here that are passionate, that are potentially changing the world with what you do with that program,” Perry said.

Science education programs should not only be funded adequately but should also be better publicized so that Americans “understand how important it is for us to have this pipeline of engineers and scientists and technicians coming in.” We’re at a juncture in this world, particularly when it comes to nuclear and energy and fusion energy, when we have to make sure that we have the brain power,” he added. “That’s one of our great challenges.”  

Discussing ITER views

At the end of his remarks, Perry answered questions from PPPL staff. The first question was how he views the international ITER experiment in the south of France, which is funded by the United States and other countries. Perry said that the project was “poorly managed” and “was not well run” in the past. However, Bernard Bigot, the current director-general of the ITER Organization, “has done a very good job managing the construction of it and now they’re on track,” Perry said. He said he recently visited the site and feels “more comfortable” with the progress of the experiment. However, “That’s not to say all is well and here’s the check and fill out whatever amount you need.”

Perry was also asked his thoughts about the private efforts such as TAE Technologies (formerly Tri Alpha Energy) to develop fusion energy, and whether the DOE would expand funding for such private enterprises. Perry said that he couldn’t comment on TAE specifically but he is generally “a big believer, a big supporter of public/private partnerships.” “There are people who don’t think the government needs to do anything,” he said. “I’m not one of those. We need to be smart about it, we need to be thoughtful about it, we need to bring Steve Cowley in and have him say, “this one looks pretty good.”

Perry said that fusion energy is just one example of scientific research supported by the DOE that could change the future. “We think about fusion and clean energy and harnessing the power of the sun and the stars but all of these things come along when America really focuses on science and technology and we fund it and celebrate it,” he said. “That’s the beauty and greatness of what this is all about.”

PPPL, on Princeton University's Forrestal Campus in Plainsboro, N.J., is devoted to creating new knowledge about the physics of plasmas — ultra-hot, charged gases — and to developing practical solutions for the creation of fusion energy. The Laboratory is managed by the University for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, which is the largest single supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

Headline: 
Energy Secretary Rick Perry cheers on fusion energy, science education in visit to PPPL

          Energy Secretary Rick Perry cheers on fusion energy, science education in visit to PPPL      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s (PPPL) mission of doing research to develop fusion as a viable source of energy is vital to the future of the planet, U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry said during an Aug. 9 visit.  

“It’s important not just to PPPL, not just to the DOE (Department of Energy) but to the world,” Perry told staff members during an all-hands meeting. “If we’re able to deliver fusion energy to the world, we’re able to change the world forever.”

Perry received a standing ovation from the audience in the Melvin B. Gottleib Auditorium following the brief speech and question-and-answer session.

Perry, the 14th U.S. Secretary of Energy, was governor of Texas from 2000 to 2015. He was twice a candidate for president. Before becoming governor, he was elected lieutenant governor in 1998 and served two terms as Texas Commissioner of Agriculture and three terms in the Texas House of Representatives. A graduate of Texas A&M University, he served in the Air Force from 1972 to 1977.

A tour of NSTX-U and Science Education Laboratory

Before the all-hands meeting, Secretary Perry toured PPPL accompanied by Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber, Princeton University Vice President for PPPL Dave McComas, and PPPL Director Steven Cowley, and Princeton Site Office Head Pete Johnson. The group first visited the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) test cell, where they learned about PPPL’s flagship experiment. Stefan Gerhardt, head of Experimental Research Operations, told Perry that numerous scientists at other national laboratories and universities and institutions around the world collaborate on the experiment when it is operating.

The group then visited the Science Education Laboratory where they met with Science Education staff, graduate students and summer research interns. Program leader Shannon Greco told Perry about PPPL’s Young Women’s Conference for 7th -to-10th-grade girls, as well as PPPL’s high school internships, college internships through the DOE’s Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) and Community College Internship and other programs. Arturo Dominguez, Science Education Program Leader, showed Perry the Remote Glow Discharge Experiment (RGDX), which allows anyone in the world to learn about plasma through a remote access plasma experiment.

“The coolest job”

In introducing Perry to a packed crowd in the Auditorium and cafeteria, Cowley noted that Perry has called the job of being Energy Secretary “the coolest job” he’s ever had.

In his remarks, Eisgruber said PPPL’s mission intersects with the University’s mission. “Princeton University has always been a place of innovation, a place where we tackle problems in novel and innovative ways,” he said. “Cracking the code on fusion could crack the code on the energy future of the world. Princeton University is proud to be part of that endeavor.”

Perry teased Cowley about the director’s recent knighthood. Perry said that he often visits England but prefers the hot climate of Texas. He was stationed near Cambridge while in the Air Force and his father served in England as well.

Perry gave a bit of his own history. He grew up on a tenant farm 16 miles from the nearest post office and 200 miles from Fort Worth. He rarely left home until he went to Texas A&M University. After serving in the Air Force, he went on to become the governor of Texas, which he said has the 12th largest economy in the world, for 14 years. Perry said being governor was “the best job he ever had.” But being Secretary of Energy is “the coolest,” he said, because “I get to work with some of the coolest people in the world.”

A shout out to Science Education staff

Perry was particularly impressed by PPPL’s science education programs. He gave a shout out to Shannon Greco, a program leader in Science Education, and Deedee Ortiz, the program manager. “When I go back to Texas, I’m going to know there are people here that are passionate, that are potentially changing the world with what you do with that program,” Perry said.

Science education programs should not only be funded adequately but should also be better publicized so that Americans “understand how important it is for us to have this pipeline of engineers and scientists and technicians coming in.” We’re at a juncture in this world, particularly when it comes to nuclear and energy and fusion energy, when we have to make sure that we have the brain power,” he added. “That’s one of our great challenges.”  

Discussing ITER views

At the end of his remarks, Perry answered questions from PPPL staff. The first question was how he views the international ITER experiment in the south of France, which is funded by the United States and other countries. Perry said that the project was “poorly managed” and “was not well run” in the past. However, Bernard Bigot, the current director-general of the ITER Organization, “has done a very good job managing the construction of it and now they’re on track,” Perry said. He said he recently visited the site and feels “more comfortable” with the progress of the experiment. However, “That’s not to say all is well and here’s the check and fill out whatever amount you need.”

Perry was also asked his thoughts about the private efforts such as TAE Technologies (formerly Tri Alpha Energy) to develop fusion energy, and whether the DOE would expand funding for such private enterprises. Perry said that he couldn’t comment on TAE specifically but he is generally “a big believer, a big supporter of public/private partnerships.” “There are people who don’t think the government needs to do anything,” he said. “I’m not one of those. We need to be smart about it, we need to be thoughtful about it, we need to bring Steve Cowley in and have him say, “this one looks pretty good.”

Perry said that fusion energy is just one example of scientific research supported by the DOE that could change the future. “We think about fusion and clean energy and harnessing the power of the sun and the stars but all of these things come along when America really focuses on science and technology and we fund it and celebrate it,” he said. “That’s the beauty and greatness of what this is all about.”

PPPL, on Princeton University's Forrestal Campus in Plainsboro, N.J., is devoted to creating new knowledge about the physics of plasmas — ultra-hot, charged gases — and to developing practical solutions for the creation of fusion energy. The Laboratory is managed by the University for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, which is the largest single supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

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Headline: 
Energy Secretary Rick Perry cheers on fusion energy, science education in visit to PPPL

          NASA Braves The Heat To Get Up Close And Personal With Our Sun      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KScMUPuJHYs Early Saturday morning, if all goes as planned, 91-year-old Eugene Parker will watch a NASA spacecraft named after him blast off on an unprecedented mission to study the sun. "It's my first rocket launch, so that will be very interesting," says Parker, a retired astrophysicist who lives in Chicago. NASA has never named a spacecraft after a living person before. But Parker's colleagues say it's appropriate that this one bears his name. The Parker Solar Probe will get up-close-and-personal with the fiery sun, closer than any spacecraft ever, and Parker is almost a God-like figure among those who study this special star. "In our field, he's definitely a celebrity," says Angela Olinto, an astrophysicist at the University of Chicago , where Parker worked for decades. "Most of science is done by a lot of small steps by a lot of different people. He is one of those few people that we know that have made big breakthroughs a few times." His first came
          Прошедшая рядом звезда устроила хаос на окраине Солнечной системы      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Когда Солнечная система находилась на стадии формирования, рядом с ней могла пройти звезда, которая украла часть «строительного материала» для планет, сообщают ученые в журнале The Astrophysical Journal.
          How to Watch the Perseid Meteor Shower      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Anyone who was disappointed by the brightness of the nearly full moon obscuring the 2017 Perseid meteor shower will have a chance to turn their stargazing luck around this month. This year’s Perseid meteor shower will be highly visible both Saturday and Sunday night when it reaches its peak, giving watchers ample opportunity to spot plenty of shooting stars. “The Perseids are perhaps the most popular meteor shower because they’re a summer watching event when people are often more relaxed, kids don’t have to be up early for school, and the weather is so much more accommodating than in the colder fall or winter months,” Dr. Jacqueline Faherty, an astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History, tells TIME. This Perseid meteor shower will take place dur...
          This Is the Best Time to Watch the Perseid Meteor Shower      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Anyone who was disappointed by the brightness of the nearly full moon obscuring the Perseid meteor shower last year will have a chance to turn their stargazing luck around this month. This year’s Perseid meteor shower will be highly visible both Saturday and Sunday night, giving watchers ample opportunity to spot plenty of shooting stars. “The Perseids are perhaps the most popular meteor shower because they’re a summer watching event when people are often more relaxed, kids don’t have to be up early for school, and the weather is so much more accommodating than in the colder fall or winter months,” Dr. Jacqueline Faherty, an astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History, tells TIME. This Perseid meteor shower will take place during a nearly new mo...


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