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          Finding Hope in the Ashes of California Wildfires      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Guy Gonzales received a text message from his wife saying four short words: “We just lost power.” He immediately realized that loss of electricity was not the real problem, but that one of California’s worst wildfires was approaching his home. Guy rushed home, knowing that without power his wife Lebra would be trapped and unable to get her car out of the garage. Bypassing three police barricades, he pulled into his neighborhood and saw flames already licking the treetops in his backyard. Within 90 seconds the house was on fire, and his wife and 12-year-old daughter were still inside. There was no time to waste. Guy broke open the garage door, and they quickly loaded into two vehicles and sped out of their neighborhood. As they pulled away, Guy looked back and saw his home burst into a ball of flames. They barely escaped. Guy, a former firefighter, is no stranger to wildfires. He knew this fire was dangerous from the beginning and warned Lebra that this fire was different. “This is a bad one like no other bad ones.” The Carr Fire has already engulfed more than 170,000 acres near the city of Redding, destroyed over 1,100 homes and killed seven people. Firefighters continue to battle the fast and unpredictable blaze. “It was a monster. It all happened so fast.” Guy said. Despite tremendous loss, the Gonzales’ faith never wavered. “We are seeing God’s provision and the pieces of the puzzle that have been knit together years and years before,” Lebra said. “You can’t see how it all comes together until you finally get the missing puzzle piece.” Little by little, Lebra feels like the pieces of the puzzle are linking together. She said that she has never felt more of God’s provision, peace, comfort and even joy. “Samaritan’s Purse came. They worked in the heat and in the ashes. It’s so dirty, but they still came,” Lebra said as she thanked the volunteers. “We tried to sift the ashes ourselves, but we couldn’t have accomplished it alone.” ‘Something for Them to Hold On To' Charlotte Bailey felt that her home was safe, because she lived across the Sacramento River from the Carr Fire. This false sense of security was shattered when she walked outside the afternoon of July 26 and looked up. “As soon as I saw the sky, I knew we had to get out of there. It was awful— I’d never seen that color before. The fire had jumped the river.” A few days later, Samaritan’s Purse sent a team of volunteers to Charlotte’s property to help her sift for anything that might have survived the flames. Her expectations were low that anything valuable could be salvaged, but she held out hope. When Bert Won, a volunteer from the San Francisco area, found a set of military dog tags, he hoped this was something meaningful. As soon as Charlotte saw them, she was overcome with emotion. Her husband, who died ten years ago, served in the Army during the Korean War. These dog tags were an unexpected gift. Throughout the day, volunteers continued to find treasures in the ashes such as her husband’s class ring from the University of Iowa and captains badges from their time serving in the volunteer fire department. The value of these items was magnified by their significance. To Charlotte, these finds were priceless. Being on the receiving end of aid was a new experience for the 78-year-old widow. For 20 years, she served in the volunteer fire department in Kenwood, California and now she regularly volunteers with California Highway Patrol. “I was meant to volunteer. I love it. It’s harder to be on the receiving end, but I’m learning,” she said. “What a joy it is to give to people and love them and help them in their worst times. We can be steadfast, something for them to hold on to.” This week, Samaritan’s Purse volunteers were this steadfast support for Charlotte. Miguel Garcia, the team leader said, “We are here to do two things. One is our task and the other is our job. Our task is to sift the ashes, but our real job is to love on the homeowner.” Charlotte felt this love. While the day was filled with tears and loss, it was also filled with laughter and joy. The volunteers rallied around Charlotte, encouraging her as they served. “I can feel God wrapping His arms around me and telling me that it’s going to be okay,” she said.
      

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          South Sudan – worrying signs of inreased elephant poaching      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Xinhua (China) August 9, 2018 Wildlife and plant protection officials in South Sudan are worried about the growing number of elephant poaching cases on the country’s reserves. Thomas Sebit, deputy spokesman of the Ministry for the Conservation of Fauna and Flora and Tourism, told Xinhua on Wednesday that around 20 elephants have been killed in […]
          Africa and China: Industrialization, Agricultural Reform or Export of Natural Resources?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Washington Post Monkey Cage published on 24 July 2018 an article titled "Xi Jinping Is Visiting Africa This Week. Here's Why China Is Such a Popular Development Partner" by Deborah Brautigam, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

Commenting on Xi Jinping's recent visit to Rwanda, Senegal, and Mauritius, the author explains that China is gaining popularity in Africa by supporting industrialization, which is the top priority of many African leaders.

The East African published on 1 August 2018 an interview with Holger A. Kray, agricultural economist at the World Bank, titled "Is East African Agriculture at Risk of Playing Second Fiddle to Oil Wealth?"

While the interview does not deal with China or industrialization, it makes the point that in several East African countries the economic policy focus should be on commercialization of agriculture rather than a reliance on the export of oil. The key challenge for Kenya, Uganda and South Sudan, says Kray, is how to support the agricultural sector to take advantage of the shift in consumer behavior and consumer demand globally towards higher quality agricultural products.

My point is that there is no single prescription for economic success in Africa's 54 countries. Some combination of industrialization, agricultural reform, resource extraction, and enhancement of the service sector is required. My concern is that the current emphasis by many African leaders, supported by China, to focus on industrialization will have disappointing results. A small number of African countries may be ready to shift significantly into industrialization; most are not. Most would be well advised at this stage of development to focus their energy on the improvement of agriculture, including policy reform.
          South Sudan in Focus - August 09, 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
President Salva Kiir decides to give amnesty to rebel leader Riek Machar and all groups who have fought to topple his government; and the U.S. ambassador to South Sudan says all sides must uphold their commitment to the newly signed power-sharing agreement.
          President Kiir orders South Sudan’s army to integrate ex-rebels      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
August 9, 2018 (JUBA) – President Salva Kiir who is also the commander-in-chief of the national army has instructed the South Sudanese military to turn their back to the war and prepare themselves to welcome and integrate the former rebels who will join them soon to form one army. Within 8 months from the beginning […]
          Kiir visits troops after peace deal      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
South Sudan President Salva Kiir on Thursday visited Bilpham, the headquarters of the SPLA army in northern parts of Juba. President Kiir, who also doubles as the commander in chief of the army, went to talk to his troops, days after signing a peace agreement with opposition groups including his archival Riek Machar. State-owned media […]
          Mothers in Jonglei urged to exclusively breastfeed their children      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Mothers in South Sudan’s Bor town of Jonglei State have been urged to ‘exclusively breastfeed’ their babies to prevent early childhood diseases. Addressing the press on Tuesday during an event to mark the World Breastfeeding Week commemorated under the theme “Breast feeding: Foundation of Life”, Jonglei state health minister Rachel Amuor encouraged lactating mothers to […]
          Lol governor distributes 18 million SSPs for counties development      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The governor of South Sudan’s Lol state has devolved all household taxes to county authorities, saying the taxes should be channeled to development purposes, a state official has said. Lol state minister of local of government Anei Anei Juach told Radio Tamazuj that more than 18 million South Sudanese Pounds were given back to county […]
          Local pastor stoned to death in a settlement camp in Uganda      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Police authorities in Uganda’s Adjumani district have said a group of South Sudanese refugees at Pagirinya Refugee Settlement on Wednesday lynched a local preacher, allegedly for preaching that peace would never come to South Sudan. Adjumani District Police Commander Maundo Jackson told the press that the incident which happened yesterday afternoon was unfortunate.   Jackson […]
          UPDATE 3-South Sudan president Kiir grants Machar, other rebels amnesty      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
* General amnesty issued days after peace deal signed * Free jailed government critics, says Human Rights Watch * Machar’s group says Kiir should observe all parts of new deal (Adds opposition reaction, residents comments) By Denis Dumo JUBA, Aug 9 (Reuters) – President Salva Kiir granted a general amnesty to rebels in South Sudan’s […]
          S. Sudan’s Kiir grants amnesty to rebel leader      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
JUBA. -- South Sudanese President Salva Kiir on Wednesday night granted amnesty to rebel leader Riek Machar, a few days after warring parties signed a power-sharing deal in Sudan.
          South Sudan's Kiir grants rebel leader Machar, others amnesty      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

President Kiir pardoned all those involved in the nation's civil war as part of a recent peace deal.

President Salva Kiir


          Bank of SOUTH SUDAN - sestava dvou bankovek UNC - 129      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Sestavu dvou bankovek SOUTH SUDAN v perfektním sbírkovém stavu UNC nabízím za celkovou cenu 129Kč + poštovné. ...
          South Sudan grants amnesty to rebels      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
South Sudan's president has granted amnesty to armed opposition leader Riek Machar and all rebel groups but the opposition has taken offence at the move. Reported by SBS 8 hours ago.
          South Sudan:Rebels Free Over 100 Child Soldiers      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[CAJ News] Khartoum -REBEL groups in war-torn South Sudan have this week released more than 100 child soldiers. Reported by allAfrica.com 8 hours ago.
          US Cheers South Sudan’s Progress Toward Peace, Expects ‘Long Process’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
While the Trump administration applauds this week’s progress in South Sudan’s peace talks, it expects that ending nearly five...

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          US Cheers South Sudan’s Progress Toward Peace, Expects ‘Long Process’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
While the Trump administration applauds this week’s progress in South Sudan’s peace talks, it expects that ending nearly five...

Więcej informacji można znaleźć w PolskaUA.com
          US Cheers South Sudan’s Progress Toward Peace, Expects 'Long Process'       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
While the Trump administration applauds this week's progress in South Sudan's peace talks, it expects that ending nearly five years of civil war and rebuilding confidence in the eastern African nation's governance will be "a long process," the top U.S. diplomat there says. "We're excited about the progress made so far," said Thomas Hushek, U.S. ambassador to South Sudan. "And we're really hoping that the parties stick to their efforts to come to the table, compromise where necessary, uphold their commitments first and foremost to the cease-fire, and then start working on ways to resolve remaining issues of conflict" so they can sign a final peace agreement. The peace talks are "at a very critical stage," he acknowledged in an exclusive interview Thursday at the U.S. embassy here with VOA's "South Sudan in Focus" radio program. On Sunday, South Sudan's President Salva Kiir and opposition leader Riek Machar signed a power-sharing pact that will restore Machar as the first of several vice presidents in a transitional government of national unity. Machar, who leads the Sudan People's Liberation Movement-in-Opposition (SPLM-IO), has been in exile in South Africa. Hushek said the U.S. government would take what he calls “tough measures” against people who either obstruct the peace process or divert public funds for war rather than peace. In September, the U.S. Treasury Department imposed sanctions on three people closely affiliated with Kiir for "their roles in threatening the peace, security or stability of South Sudan," it said in a statement. Three companies also were sanctioned. Asked what it might take to lift sanctions, Hushek said that if the transitional government rebuilds public confidence and proves itself trustworthy, "I think you would start to see some changes." South Sudan gained independence from neighboring Sudan in 2011. But ethnic violence erupted in 2013 over a power struggle between Kiir and Machar. The fighting has left tens of thousands of South Sudanese dead and dislodged millions from their homes. The United States, South Sudan's biggest single benefactor, has allocated $481 million in humanitarian funding for fiscal 2018 for refugees there and in neighboring countries, according to the U.S. Agency for International Development. It has spent more than $3.4 billion since 2013.   For Hushek, "one of the first barometers" of peace prospects is "whether people are upholding the ceasefire," he said. "And, in fact, there's been a reduction in violence on the ground. "There are still other things that I'm a bit concerned about," the diplomat acknowledged. "I think recruitment is continuing into various militias, and that's something that doesn't necessarily bode well." As Hushek said earlier in the interview, "The ultimate yardstick of whether or not there is success in the peace process is whether they can set up a system that resolves conflicts through peaceful means, without resorting to arms." Hushek, a career Foreign Service officer, was appointed ambassador in May after serving as acting assistant secretary for the U.S. State Department's Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations. VOA's Carol Van Dam Falk and Carol Guensburg contributed to this report.  
          Kiir Gives Amnesty to Opposition Groups        Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Opposition politicians’ reactions are mixed regarding South Sudan President Salva Kiir’s decision to give amnesty to rebel leader Riek Machar and other groups who have been fighting to topple his government for years. One official with the National Salvation Front said his group did not recognize the amnesty offer, calling Kiir’s administration “illegitimate.” Peace talks continue Speaking from Khartoum where the South Sudan peace talks continue, General Nathaniel Oyet Pierino, head of the SPLM-IO’s governance committee, told South Sudan in Focus that Kiir must also free political opponents. "We want this to be accompanied by the release of all political detainees, the release of all prisoners of war. We will only believe that there is a change in attitude if we see all these South Sudanese who are currently under detention by the regime go free and unconditionally,” Oyet told VOA. He also called on the government to release hundreds of detained SPLM-IO supporters, including civil society activists. "We have those who were abducted from Nairobi, Kenya. We have our former spokesperson, James Gadtet. We have Samuel Dong Luak. We have Agrrey Idri. We have Marko Lotpiyo. ... We have Peter Sule. We have all these under government detention,” Oyet said. Amnesty offer in place The president’s amnesty offer went into effect as it was being announced on state television and radio Wednesday night. Kiir reiterated his order that the army observe the permanent cease-fire that was agreed to in the security arrangement signed in Khartoum last month and to fight only in self-defense. In addition, Kiir ordered the army and all other military forces to allow aid workers unfettered access to people in need of humanitarian assistance across South Sudan. Yien Mathew, a senior member of the National Salvation Front, or NAS, said the government lacks authority to pardon NAS. “We can only believe in a government which is people-centered, which is answerable. There are so many civilians in the camps today, even around Juba. If there is a people’s government, why should people still stay in the camps, even in their state capital? This at least is a good signal that the government is not people-centered, and the people are fearing the government itself,” Mathew told South Sudan in Focus. Much to be decided Kiir’s amnesty offer followed the recent power-sharing and governance deal in Khartoum, which paves the way for a final peace agreement by all parties, to be decided in the future.  Some opposition groups “bracketed” parts of the power sharing they did not agree with, such as the number of states and positions of power at the state and local levels. 
          South Sudan: No Amnesty for War Crimes      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

President Salva Kiir of South Sudan, right, with the opposition leader, Riek Machar, left, as Mr. Machar was sworn in as vice president in Juba, capital of South Sudan, on April 26, 2016.

© 2016 Reuters
 (Nairobi) – South Sudanese leaders should not undermine their efforts to bring an end to the country’s devastating conflict with an amnesty for war crimes and crimes against humanity, Human Rights Watch said.

The parties to the conflict signed a peace agreement on August 5, 2018, in Khartoum, agreeing to new power sharing arrangements and a timetable for further talks. On August 8, President Salva Kiir offered a “general amnesty” to heads of armed groups involved in the nation's five-year civil war as part of the agreement to end the fighting.

“Amnesty for atrocities not only conflicts with South Sudan’s international obligations, but experience shows it is no way to build a lasting peace,” said Elise Keppler, associate international justice director at Human Rights Watch. “While South Sudan’s leaders may aim to provide assurances to opponents, they should make clear that the amnesty does not cover grave crimes by all parties since the conflict began.”

International law requires prosecuting those responsible for serious crimes, such as crimes against humanity and war crimes, to ensure victims’ rights to truth, justice, and an effective remedy, along with combating impunity. South Sudan has also ratified treaties such as the Convention against Torture, which provide for prosecution of people allegedly responsible for serious crimes. Because the United Nations takes the position that amnesties cannot be granted for serious crimes under international law, it will not endorse peace agreements that provide for such amnesties. The African Commission on Human and People’s Rights has also rejected amnesty for serious crimes.

South Sudan’s leaders have a history of providing de facto blanket amnesty to opponents as part of peace deals, even prior to the country’s independence in 2011. The resulting lack of justice has contributed to the country’s deepening social and ethnic divisions, and fueled violence and abuses. Human Rights Watch has previously urged mediators and South Sudanese leaders to ensure that peace deals did not include any amnesty for serious crimes.

Since the new conflict started in December 2013, continued fighting and abuses by government and opposition forces, and their aligned militias have forced more than 2 million people to flee the country. The fighting has displaced more than another 2 million people within the country, with more than 200,000 still in UN sites established to protect civilians.

Despite provisions in the August 2015 Agreement on the Resolution of Conflict in South Sudan (ARCSS) that envision a hybrid court to prosecute international crimes, South Sudan’s transitional government has not made genuine progress toward setting up the court. A memorandum of understanding on the court with the African Union (AU) has yet to be signed, and domestic legislation is yet to be adopted.

Under that agreement, the AU Commission has the authority to establish the hybrid court with or without the engagement of the South Sudanese government. The AU should proceed with creating the court on its own, unless the memorandum of understanding is immediately signed, Human Rights Watch said.

“The lack of accountability for serious crimes is a cause of South Sudan’s crisis, not a solution,” Keppler said. “Survivors of atrocities in South Sudan are strongly demanding justice. Their leaders should take urgent steps to make the hybrid court a reality as efforts to end the conflict continue.”
 


          Comic Book Project: Illustrator and/or Comic Writer - Canadian Association of Midwives/ Association canadienne des sages-femmes - Montréal, QC      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Strengthening Midwifery Services (SMS) Project, South Sudan*. Empowerwomen and girls to access quality midwifery care....
From Indeed - Tue, 17 Jul 2018 19:32:55 GMT - View all Montréal, QC jobs
          #CuriousGoat: Submit A Question About World Hunger And Famine      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
What do you want to know about world hunger? One thing we do know is that more than 20 million people are now at risk of starvation and famine. The United Nations is calling it the biggest humanitarian crisis since the U.N. was founded in 1945. Conflict and drought are blamed for the looming crisis in four countries in Africa and the Middle East: Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia and northeast Nigeria. Our blog has been covering the story. We've looked at who declares a famine and what that actually means . We've reported on a social media star's " crazy idea " to help out. (Basically, persuade Turkish Airlines to lend a cargo plane and fill it with food.) And we've looked at what goes into a food drop from above . As this crisis continues, we want to ask you: What do you want to know about world hunger and famine? Use the form below to submit your question. Our submission deadline has passed. Thanks for participating! You have until Friday, April 28, to submit a question. We'll pick one and
          8/10/2018: FRONT PAGE: African gang arrests ‘not the first priority’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A Victoria Police commander said officers chose not to arrest members of warring South Sudanese gangs who pelted rocks at the riot squad and damaged a police car, sparking a new round of criticism from Melburnians who have endured eight months of...
          8/10/2018: COMMENTARY: Rampaging gangs expose Victoria Police weakness      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Melburnians who thought police were responsible for public safety have had another shocking wake-up call. The failure of Victoria Police, some in riot gear, to arrest even one of the scores of South Sudanese youth who turned on them and hurled rocks at...
          Trump Administration Largely Phasing Out TPS, But Legal Challenges Are Ongoing      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Temporary Protected Status (TPS) may be an endangered species.  Having terminated TPS for Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone during the past year, the Trump Administration has turned its attention elsewhere.  There are currently ten remaining countries whose citizens are eligible for TPS.  Of those, six will be terminated over the next 18 months. The Trump Administration has announced the termination of TPS status for Haiti, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Nepal, Honduras and Sudan.  Somalia, South Sudan, Syria and Yemen for now remain in the protected category. USCIS grants TPS to nationals of certain countries who are in the U.S. (legally or illegally) when conditions in that country “temporarily prevent the country’s nationals from returning safely, or in certain circumstances, where the country is unable to handle the return of its nationals adequately.”  Common grounds for granting TPS include highly destructive natural disasters or…
          US Cheers South Sudan’s Progress Toward Peace, Expects ‘Long Process’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
While the Trump administration applauds this week’s progress in South Sudan’s peace talks, it expects that ending nearly five years of civil war and rebuilding confidence in the eastern African…

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          US Cheers South Sudan’s Progress Toward Peace, Expects ‘Long Process’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
While the Trump administration applauds this week’s progress in South Sudan’s peace talks, it expects that ending nearly five years of civil war and rebuilding confidence in the eastern African…

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          U.S. diplomat welcomes progress in South Sudan peace process      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
August 9, 2018 (JUBA) – U.S. Ambassador to Juba welcomed the recent progress achieved by the South Sudanese parties as they signed the governance and power-sharing deal but stressed that a successful peace and be measured by the willingness to work together and trust each other. Thomas Hushek (US Department of State) The United States, […]
          South Sudan Governance Agreement should be published officially      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
By Roger Alfred Yoron Modi This is a call for official publication of the recently signed Agreement on Outstanding Issues of Governance between the South Sudan government and other parties, including the main Opposition SPLM-IO in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum as part of IGAD-led efforts to end the civil war in the young nation. The […]
          IGAD extends South Sudan peace talks until 19 August      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
August 10, 2018 (KHARTOUM) – The IGAD Council of Ministers Thursday has adopted an implementation matrix and decided that the Khartoum round of talks will continue until the 19 August. The 64th Extraordinary Session of the IGAD Council of Ministers took place in Khartoum on the 9th of August 2018 to discuss issues “that should […]
          ‘No amnesty’: Rights group calls for prosecution of South Sudan war criminals      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
South Sudanese leaders should not undermine their efforts to bring an end to the country’s devastating conflict with an amnesty for war crimes and crimes against humanity, Human Rights Watch said. The parties to the conflict signed a peace deal on 5 August in Khartoum to form a new unity government. On Wednesday, President Salva […]
          Opinion: South Sudan governance agreement should be published officially      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This is a call for official publication of the recently signed Agreement on Outstanding Issues of Governance between the South Sudan government and other parties, including the main Opposition SPLM-IO in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum as part of IGAD-led efforts to end the civil war in the young nation. The Sudanese mediation, and IGAD secretariat […]
          South Sudan:U.S. Cheers Progress Toward Peace, Expects 'Long Process'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[VOA] While the Trump administration applauds this week's progress in South Sudan's peace talks, it expects that ending nearly five years of civil war and rebuilding confidence in the eastern African nation's governance will be "a long process," the top U.S. diplomat there says.
          Egypt, Sudan agree to step up security cooperation      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir (L), Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi (R)


Two neighbors hold fifth round of military talks in Sudanese capital Khartoum

By Mohammed Amin | Anadolu Agency

The Egyptian and Sudanese militaries have agreed to work together to ensure Red Sea security, fight against terrorism and secure their shared borders.

The agreement was struck during the fifth round of Sudan-Egypt military talks, which kicked off in Khartoum on Monday with the participation of both countries’ military chiefs of staff.

After the talks, Egyptian army chief Mohamed Farid Higazi told reporters that the two sides had agreed to step up security cooperation following the recent reconciliation between Ethiopia and Eritrea and a new peace deal between South Sudan’s warring camps.

“We also agreed on the need to safeguard the Red Sea in a way that guarantees our mutual interests,” Higazi said.

“We also plan to work together in the training, military manufacturing and intelligence fields,” he added.

Sudanese Army Chief-of-Staff Kamal Abdul Maaroof, for his part, told reporters that the two sides also planned to step up coordination in the fight against terrorism, illegal migration and human trafficking.

Relations between Egypt and Sudan have improved since Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir visited Cairo in March.

The visit was reciprocated by Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi, who paid a visit to Sudan last month.



          434: Book Launch & signing to celebrate the work of Rtd. ArchBishop Deng       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Retired Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul, has published a new book based on his story: “From the Kraal to the Cathedral”. Hundreds of people are expected to have a glimpse of the publication at a book launch on Saturday morning, in Juba., South Sudan  Retired archbishop Daniel Deng Bul is expected to preside over the ceremony and autograph books. Earlier, I spoke with Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul to find out more about his book; “From the Kraal to the cathedral”.
          433: Continued detention of Peter Ajak sparks outrage from UK Parliament      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Exactly 13 days today since he was arrested and detained, more voices are joining the demand for the immediate release of Political activist, Peter Ajak.  Peter Ajak,  was arrested on July 28th on his way to Aweil and has since been in detention without any charges, attracting regional and international attention. On Thursday, Human rights watch, Jehanne Henry, associate Africa director at Human Rights Watch said South Sudan desperately needs public dialogue and greater respect for human rights, and not more repression and violations. Nic Dakin, the Vice Chairperson of the UK All Parliamentary Party Group for Sudan and South Sudan, told Radio Miraya reporter, Sani Martin that they are concerned about Peter Ajak’s detention and re-affirmed his country’s view that activists like Peter should be empowered to play a central role in the peace process. Dakin explains why Peter Ajak’s detention has attracted the attention of the UK parliamentary group on Sudan and South Sudan. Listen here
          435: Providing Youth “Safe civic and public Spaces” is critical, says Mamun Azad, UN Habitat, Country Programme Manager      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This Sunday August 12th marks the United Nations International youth day. The day observed annually aims to draw attention to a given set of cultural and legal issues surrounding youth. Ahead of the day, the United Nations Secretary General, Antonio Guterres, says the hopes of the world rest on young people. "Peace, economic dynamism, social justice, and tolerance today and tomorrow, will depend on tapping into the power of youth," said Guterres. Meanwhile, in Juba, South Sudan, Mamun Azad, UN Habitat, Country Programme Manager, spoke on Miraya Breakfast Show and said "providing safe civic, public and digital space is essential to address the challenges facing the youths today." Listen to the Interview.
          432: Exclusive Interview with Japan Ambassador to South Sudan, Seiji Okada      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A team of engineers from Japan has arrived in the country to prepare for the resumption of the construction of the Nile River bridge.  Japan’s Ambassador to South Sudan, Seiji Okada, says the engineers are here to assess the bridge and evaluate the possibility of resuming construction works as soon as possible.  Construction of the bridge was grounded to a halt more than two years ago, following a resumption of fighting in the country in July 2015. Ambassador Okada spoke with Radio Miraya's Henry Lokuri in an exclusive interview and highlighted Japan's support for South Sudan. Listen here.
          Tonj governor sacks six county commissioners      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The governor of South Sudan’s Tonj State has removed six county commissioners and replaced them with new officials. Governor Anthony Bol Madut, according to the orders which became public on Tuesday evening, sacked Duop Bath from his position as Luanyjang County Centre and replaced him with Alei Gum Ajang. The top state official also removed William Arop […]
          Reactions of South Sudanese citizens on new peace deal      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
South Sudanese citizens from different parts of the country have welcomed the peace deal signed in Khartoum, while most of them call on the warring parties to ensure smooth implementation for the sake of peace in the country. On Sunday, the government and other opposition parties signed a final peace pact ending more than four […]
          Did a ‘drunk’ Ganze MP Teddy Mwambire fight with Sudanese national?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Ganze MP Teddy Mwambire has distanced himself from media reports doing rounds that he was among a group of 6  legislators who got into a fight with a South Sudanese national at an upmarket bar in Kilimani popular with  Kenyan Mp last week. This was after media reports stated that the Mps had to draw guns at Cedar bar in Kilimani where they were having drinks after a South Sudanese puffed out cigarette smoke towards  Alego Usoga MP Sam Atandi’ s eyes. Atandi was allegedly in the company of Mwambire , Ayub Savula of Lugari, Oscar Sudi of Kapseret, Asman Kamana of Tiaty and Kimilili Mp Dismus Barasa. The media reports stated that the South Sudanese national who claimed to be a powerful PS in South Sudan threw a  beer bottle at Sudi’s direction who luckily ducked it prompting three of the MP ’s bodyguards to brandish their guns. Savula was even quoted saying that the South Sudanese national had started the fight prompting him to intervene to save his colleague. However, an angered Mwambire has claimed that he was not even in Nairobi on the material day and neither does he drink nor smoke. Mwambire who is now threatening to sue the publication that ran the story further said  that he has never gone out with the Mps mentioned in the publication. “Though I am fully aware of my colleagues, We have never spent our free time together since our election on 8/8/2017, “ Mwambire wrote.
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          Rohingya returns, counting the dead, and a MeToo round-up: The Cheat Sheet      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Every Friday, IRIN’s team of specialist editors offers a curation of humanitarian news, trends, and developments from around the globe.

 

On our radar:

 

The women of Syria’s war prisons

Over the past few months, the Syrian government has been quietly issuing death notices for hundreds of political prisoners who died in its jails. Many of the deaths appear to have taken place in the early years of the country’s seven year war, and analysts believe that the flurry of notices suggests president Bashar al-Assad’s regime may be signalling it is firmly in control of the country and no longer fears the anger that admitting these deaths could provoke.

 

Many thousands of detainees have gone into Syria’s notorious detention system, and among those who actually made it out is artist Azza Abo Rebieh, whose drawings of her fellow prisoners in Damascus’ Adra prison are profiled in the New York Times this week. Abo Rabieh, who painted protest murals at the start of the uprising against al-Assad and later smuggled food and medicine to displaced people, draws the women she met in detention from 2015 to 2016. She lives and draws in Beirut now, and the images she makes, as well as the stories she tells, are haunting.

 

And still the war is not over for civilians in northwestern Idlib province, where the UN estimates a looming government offensive on the last major rebel-held territory in the country could displace as many as 700,000 people. Many of Idlib’s 2.5 million civilians have already fled or been evacuated from their homes elsewhere in Syria, and the government has begun dropping leaflets over the province urging residents to cooperate with the army.

 

In search of “tangible progress” in Myanmar

 

It was billed as the first step in a long process to return Rohingya refugees to Myanmar. But two months after UN agencies signed a secretive agreement to explore repatriation with Myanmar’s government, there’s been little “tangible progress” to do just that. The UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, and its development arm, UNDP, released a statement this week urging the government to “improve conditions” in northern Rakhine State, where a military campaign last August pushed hundreds of thousands of Rohingya people into neighbouring Bangladesh. Calling for “tangible” progress, of course, implies there has been anything but. One key takeaway: the very basis of the controversial agreement was that UNHCR and UNDP would be given access to northern Rakhine, which has largely been closed off to international aid groups for the last year. This hasn’t happened. Both UN agencies submitted travel requests to start working in mid-June; the government hasn’t replied. In the meantime, remaining Rohingya and ethnic Rakhine communities in the state continue to “live in fear of one another” and there’s been no movement at all on the core issue for most Rohingya – a clear path to citizenship.

 

The ripples of #MeToo

 

The recent scandals in aid agencies and subsequent crackdown mean more cases of sexual harassment or abuse are being dealt with, according to the Thomson Reuters Foundation. For example, the Norwegian Refugee Council and Save the Children disclosed increases in reported cases in 2018 compared to last year. Others told TRF they expected cases to rise, while some in the survey of 21 agencies gave fewer details or were unable to report numbers yet. A few more developments on #MeToo issues:

 

- An IRIN investigation in Central African Republic, “I have no power to complain”, reveals new allegations of abuse by UN peacekeepers as well as broken promises on follow-up care for victims and botched investigations

- A pattern of alleged harassment by an official of UN Women was reported by Newsweek, and the UN agency has called upon investigators to wrap up the case, without offering details

- The British Parliament issued a report on sexual exploitation in the aid sector finding "complacency verging on complicity" and more concern for reputations than victims

- UN OCHA will provide a $1 million fund to help aid agencies conduct thorough investigations

- The Geneva-based policy group, the Inter-Agency Standing Committee, has published a detailed account of measures under discussion to prevent “transgressors” being re-hired

 

The civilian cost of bombing Islamic State

It has been four years since the United States first announced it was using airstrikes against so-called Islamic State in Iraq, an operation that began near Erbil. Other countries later joined the anti-IS coalition in Iraq and Syria. Nearly 30,000 airstrikes plus plenty of ground fighting later, the militants now hold little in the way of territory and are on the back foot. But, as casualty monitor Airwars points out, civilians paid dearly for the liberation of cities like Raqqa and Mosul. Counting casualties in war is tricky, but Airwars estimates that between 6,500 and 10,000 civilians were killed in coalition air and artillery strikes. The coalition puts the numbers much lower, at just over 1,000, but Amnesty International this week said its own investigations had prompted the US-led coalition to admit that its aerial bombardments during the Raqqa offensive killed 77 civilians. And the human rights watchdog says that’s likely just “the tip of the iceberg”. Meanwhile, without any major cities to its name, IS is reverting to the horrifying tactics that first brought it notoriety: executions and kidnapping minorities.

Counting the dead, correctly

 

On a related and similarly morbid topic, humanitarian situations that ought to ring alarm bells don't do so because mortality data is badly calculated on the basis of a 30-year-old benchmark, according to researcher Fabrice Weissman. What makes a crisis severe is the numbers dying. As people still die of natural causes, emergency workers need to know how many deaths are above normal. To do this, they calculate the crude mortality rate (CMR) of "deaths per 10,000 per day". Many humanitarian organisations work on the basis that a rate of one or more death per 10,000 per day is an emergency. (It can get worse than that: UNHCR benchmarks say 5/10,000 per day is a "major catastrophe"). (This primer from think tank ODI can tell you more.)

 

In a new blog, MSF veteran Weissman says the 1/10,000/day threshold is based on the assumption that twice the underlying rate should count as an emergency. But he finds that the underlying rate (0.5/10,000/day) was based on a US review of routine mortality rates in various African countries in the 1980s (which may have since halved). A more careful application of the benchmark should, where possible, be set at double the real normal rate in the surrounding population but too often is not, Weissman suggests. (This is also recommended by the Sphere humanitarian standards group). Taking the example of northeastern Nigeria, he cites an MSF study where people displaced by the Boko Haram insurgency had a mortality rate of more than double the local population (0.41 compared to 0.19) but since neither passed the 1/10,000/day cutoff, field teams couldn't convince their management that the situation was as serious as it really was. Weissman writes that this issue is "highly political" as it defines what is "excessive" and therefore requiring exceptional action. He has a simple proposal: cut the threshold in half.

 

In case you missed it, 6 August-10 August

Indonesia: The death toll continues to climb after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck the Indonesian island of Lombok on 5 August, but the government has so far “strongly” declined international aid, according to the AHA Centre, a regional inter-governmental disaster coordination agency. The government says at least 321 people have died. Yayasan Sayangi Tunas Cilik, a local NGO, says communities an hour’s drive from the district capital in North Lombok have been cut off by landslides and are living in tents without any help.

South Sudan: Rival leaders in the world’s youngest country may have taken another step towards ending one of the world’s most brutal and devastating civil wars by signing a deal on power-sharing and governance that’s meant to pave the way for a comprehensive peace accord. President Salva Kiir and rebel leader Riek Machar expressed regret for the “untold human suffering” their rivalry has brought about since December 2013, but similar deals in the past have done nothing to end the killing, so optimism over this new document is at best “cautious”. Look out for our upcoming analysis.

United Nations: UN Secretary-General António Guterres has nominated Michelle Bachelet to be the organisation’s top human rights official. If approved by the General Assembly, the two-time president of Chile will succeed Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein as High Commissioner for Human Rights. Zeid has been an outspoken critic of powerful countries, and chose not seek a second four-year term, saying last December that doing so “might involve bending a knee in supplication”.

Yemen: On Thursday morning, a bus carrying children in a Houthi-controlled area in northern Saada province was hit by the Saudi Arabia-led coalition, killing dozens. According to the International Committee of the Red Cross, the official toll is 51 dead, including 40 children, as well as 79 wounded, 56 of whom are children. The coalition said in a statement that the strike was a “legitimate military action” aimed at rocket launchers used to strike Saudi Arabia, and accused the Houthis of using children as soldiers and human shields.

 

 

Our weekend read:

 

Briefing: Another Ebola outbreak, this time in a conflict zone

 

The Democratic Republic of Congo has more experience than any country when it comes to tackling Ebola. The latest outbreak, announced on 1 August, is its 10th since the virus emerged in the country (near the Ebola River) in 1976. Gabon, Sudan, and Uganda would be next on that list, with three major outbreaks apiece. However, this time around, there’s an added problem: it broke out in North Kivu Province, where dozens of armed groups operate and where decades of conflict have devastated key infrastructure. Hopes are high that the vaccine that may have helped quickly contain the previous outbreak last month in Equateur Province can do the same now. But, as our weekend read spells out, tracing all those who have come into contact with suspected cases in the midst of an active warzone and then vaccinating them in time may not be possible. There are also large population centres nearby, and international borders. As of Friday, the outbreak had claimed 37 lives (nine confirmed as Ebola, 28 still being verified), but it’s worth getting up to speed now in case things get worse from here.

 

And finally:

KCNA

You can leave your hat on

 

We don’t strive to be your go-to source for sartorial matters here on the Cheat Sheet (well, sometimes we do), but we couldn’t help but take note of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s slimmed-down wardrobe. Pictures published in state media this week show Kim ditching his usual Mao suit for a loosely buttoned white T-shirt and a breezy hat. Blistering heat waves around the globe have also hit North Korea, which likely has something to do with Kim’s recent fashion choices. But more importantly, humanitarian groups warn the soaring heat is likely to wither crop yields in a country where chronic food insecurity and malnutrition are widespread. And, as we pointed out last month, the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization was already projecting a 652,000-tonne cereal shortfall, in part due to low rainfall and soaring temperatures earlier this year. State media have called the heatwave an “unprecedented natural disaster”. The UN’s humanitarian aid chief, Mark Lowcock, recently warned of declining aid funds for North Korea, but such entreaties haven’t been enough for donors to overcome years of misgivings: this year’s UN-wide appeal for North Korea is only 10.8-percent funded – the second-lowest commitment to any emergency.

(TOP PHOTO: Rohingya refugees who came to Bangladesh by boat in November 2017. CREDIT: Patrick Brown/UNICEF)

bp-as-il-am/ag

un0147322.jpg News Aid and Policy Migration Conflict Politics and Economics Rohingya returns, counting the dead, and a MeToo round-up IRIN Geneva Africa DRC South Sudan United Nations HQ Asia Indonesia Myanmar North Korea Global Syria Yemen
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          Comic Book Project: Illustrator and/or Comic Writer - Canadian Association of Midwives/ Association canadienne des sages-femmes - Montréal, QC      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Strengthening Midwifery Services (SMS) Project, South Sudan*. Empowerwomen and girls to access quality midwifery care....
From Indeed - Tue, 17 Jul 2018 19:32:55 GMT - View all Montréal, QC jobs
           US, Britain, Norway express concern over South Sudan...       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
WASHINGTON, Aug 10 (Reuters) - The United States, Britain and Norway jointly expressed concern on Friday over an agreement between South Sudan's feuding...
          U.S., Britain, Norway express concern over South Sudan agreement      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The United States, Britain and Norway jointly expressed concern on Friday over an agreement between South Sudan's feuding sides to establish a power-sharing government, saying the arrangements were not realistic or sustainable.

          Dietro la guerra in Sud Sudan, c’è il petrolio      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

I leader del Sud Sudan stanno usando la ricchezza petrolifera del Paese per arricchirsi e terrorizzare i civili. Questa l’analisi scaturita dai documenti analizzati da The Sentry nel report 'Fueling Atrocities Oil and War in South Sudan’. Ecco cosa sta accadendo secondo il report pubblicato

L'articolo Dietro la guerra in Sud Sudan, c’è il petrolio proviene da L'Indro.


          Comic Book Project: Illustrator and/or Comic Writer - Canadian Association of Midwives/ Association canadienne des sages-femmes - Montréal, QC      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Strengthening Midwifery Services (SMS) Project, South Sudan*. Empowerwomen and girls to access quality midwifery care....
From Indeed - Tue, 17 Jul 2018 19:32:55 GMT - View all Montréal, QC jobs
          EU transposes UNSC sanctions on South Sudan      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
BRUSSELS, Aug 10 (KUNA) -- The European Union Friday announced that it has transposed UN Security Council resolution 2428 (2018) which imposes an arms embargo and adds two persons to the list of people and entities in South Sudan subject to sanctions. The
          Press Releases: Troika Statement on South Sudan Peace Talks      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
August 10, 2018


The text of the following statement was issued jointly by the Governments of the United States of America, the United Kingdom, and Norway.

The members of the Troika (the United States, the United Kingdom, and Norway) support the engagement of the region in the recent Khartoum-based negotiations on outstanding governance and security issues. We acknowledge the role of Sudan in hosting these negotiations. Considerable challenges lie ahead, and we are concerned that the arrangements agreed to date are not realistic or sustainable. Given their past leadership failures, South Sudanese leaders will need to behave differently and demonstrate commitment to peace and good governance.

Above all, we support the people of South Sudan’s aspirations to lead lives unburdened by fear, and to experience peace, pluralism, and prosperity. We remain steadfast that the best hope for sustainable peace is a process inclusive of ordinary men and women, civil society, religious leaders, ethnic minorities, and other excluded groups. We urge mediators to ensure the open and free participation of these groups and other participants in the negotiations, to ensure their interests are fully protected. Moreover, the process should culminate in free, fair, and credible elections, and allow for a peaceful transition in leadership in the most expeditious and responsible manner.

During the next stage of the talks, parties must bring in a wider range of stakeholders, and develop clear plans for the transition period, including how resources will be used in a transparent and accountable way for the benefit of all South Sudanese. Critical questions remain, such as how security will be provided in Juba during the transition period and how meaningful checks will be placed on executive power.

We call on the parties to develop clear and realistic governance and security timelines and plans for the transition period, and on the Intergovernmental Authority on Development member states and the AU to continue and intensify their involvement in the implementation phase of any agreement.

We note that there has been some reduction in fighting, the most serious confidence-building measure of all. Sustained peace is a necessary condition for the legitimacy of a transitional arrangement. In furtherance of this, we call on our regional partners to uphold the United Nations Security Council arms embargo and on their financial institutions to ensure that the proceeds from corrupt and war-making activities do not flow through their jurisdictions. We now expect to see a change in the situation on the ground, beginning with a further significant reduction in violence, and all parties taking measures to allow full humanitarian access.


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.


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          President of Security Council Briefs Press      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Informal comments to the media by Karen Pierce, Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom to the United Nations and the President of the Security Council for the month of August, on the situation in South Sudan and Yemen.
          UN / SOUTH SUDAN YEMEN      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Security Council issued statements expressing “grave concern about the level of food insecurity in South Sudan” and at the recent attacks in Saada, Yemen by Saudi-led coalition forces. UNIFEED
          Sudan ruling party chooses Bashir as candidate for 2020      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Author: 
AFP
article author: 
ID: 
1533901435855257900
Fri, 2018-08-10 11:41

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s ruling party has chosen President Omar Al-Bashir to stand for re-election in 2020, state media reported Friday, even though the constitution allows only two five-year terms.
The National Congress Party’s advisory council announced Bashir as its candidate after an overnight meeting held in Khartoum, the official SUNA news agency reported.
The veteran leader has been in power since a 1989 military coup but has only faced contested elections since the new constitution went into effect in 2010.

Main category: 

          Museveni urges South Sudan refugees to return home      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
. Friday August 10 2018. South Sudanese refugees at the Bidibidi resettlement camp in northern Yumbe district on April 14, 2017. The camp is the largest refugee settlement in Uganda. PHOTO | AFP In Summary. Ugandan president says he hopes the refugees could go home by January. Uganda hosts the largest number of South Sudanese refugees.
          Breaking News: Salva Kirr secretly orders his Troop to be alert      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
August 10, 2018, South Sudan President Salva Kiir on Thursday visited Bilpham, the headquarters of the SPLA army in northern parts of Juba. President Kiir, who also doubles as the commander in chief of the army, went to talk to his troops, days after signing a peace agreement with opposition groups including his archrival Riek…
          Breaking News: Troika rejected Khartoum peace peace Process calling it ‘not realistic’ –      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
August 10, 2018, The United States, Britain and Norway on Friday said considerable challenges lie ahead of South Sudan’s peace agreement, citing unrealistic arrangements. After years of fighting, President Salva Kiir and opposition groups signed a peace deal in the Sudanese capital Khartoum last Sunday. In a joint statement seen by Radio Tamazuj, the Troika…
          South Sudan Says PM Dr. Abiy Ahmed Plays a Big Role for Peace in The Country - ለደቡብ ሱዳን ሰላም የጠቅላይ ሚኒ      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

ለደቡብ ሱዳን ሰላም የጠቅላይ ሚኒስትር ዶ/ር አብይ አህመድ ሚና ከፍተኛ መሆኑን ሀገሪቱ አስታወቀች

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          South Sudan in Focus - August 10, 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Residents in Yei River State call on President Salva Kiir and rebel leader Riek Machar to implement the power-sharing agreement; Sudan’s ruling party selects President Omar al-Bashir to run for re-election in 2020; and bus companies suspend travel service between Uganda and South Sudan.


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