Next Page: 10000

          Takes on the World: Kathy Kelly:US Role in KSA-UAE War Crimes in Yemen, Segment 1      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Renowned peace and nonviolence activist Kathy Kelly explains what is behind her long history of involvement in antiwar protests which has led her to take up the issue of US complicity in the Saudi Arabian-United Arab Emirates war on Yemen and its Houti militia, to the point, she argues that with selling the weaponry, in air refueling, and surveilling and selecting the bombing targets, that the US is leading the coalition that is killing and starving the Yemeni people after destroying the country's infrastructure. That destruction, she explains, is what led to the country's first cholera epidemic that took a million lives while pointing out that, given the deteriorating conditions and the lack of food, clean water and medical supplies, aid agencies have warned that another epidemic is on its way. Kelly describes how mercenaries from Chad and the Sudan, hired by the Saudis, have already cut a swath through the African coastline across from Yemen on their way to the fighting, the tortures experienced by captured Houti fighters and the disappeared which the remnants of the unelected Yemeni government can provide no accounting, She says that the main beneficiaries from the war are the US arms manufacturers who she names and shames and that it is incumbent upon the American people to mobilize not only to stop the fighting in Yemen but to roll back the record breaking multi billion dollar weapons appropriation. Pointing to past successes in difficult political terrain, she believes it can be done.

          On pace to meet last year’s figure      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Saudi Arabia likes executing people even more than the US does.

The European Saudi Organization for Human Rights, a human-rights group, said 146 people were executed in 2017, slightly lower than 154 in 2016. “Such a level of executions has not been witnessed since the mid 1990s,” the group said in a report released this week. The group said that as of April 2018, Saudi authorities had executed 47 people and were on pace to meet last year’s figure. Dozens more, it said, continue to face the death penalty, including some under the age of 18.

That’s out of a population of 32 million, so a tenth of ours in the US. We executed 23 people last year, 20 … Read the rest


          Saudi Arabia Says It Wants to Modernize—But Criticism Still Strikes a Nerve      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A spat between Saudi Arabia and Canada escalated after the Canadian Foreign Minister called for the release of women’s-rights activists

The post Saudi Arabia Says It Wants to Modernize—But Criticism Still Strikes a Nerve appeared first on RocketNews | Top News Stories From Around the Globe.


          Mazda, Saudi Aramco and AIST launch research project      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Mazda Motor Corporation announced the start of a joint research project with Saudi Aramco, the state-owned oil company of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) aimed at making internal combustion engines more efficient and reducing carbon dioxide emissions. The research topic focuses on developing a […]
          Ankara on collision course with Washington over Iran sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
U.S. President Donald Trump’s executive order Monday to introduce sanctions against Iran threatens to put Washington and Ankara on a collision course. Ankara insists Trump’s unilateral actions do not bind it. The looming dispute threatens to exacerbate existing tensions between the two NATO allies. “We are going to aggressively enforce our sanctions, and that puts a very important test to those companies, to those banks and to those governments—who do they want to do business with?” said a senior official Monday. “We are very serious to enforce those sanctions, and that’s what the president has directed us to do.” The first wave of Iranian sanctions goes into effect Tuesday and targets mainly financial transactions and commercial airline sales with Iran. In November, measures to stop the sale of Iranian energy are set to go into effect. Turkish foreign minister Mevlut Cavusoglu has ruled out complying with U.S. measures, insisting Turkey is bound only by international agreements. Ankara identifies Tehran as a key trading partner to help boost its flagging economy. Iranian oil and gas are critical to energy-poor Turkey. In the first six months of this year, Turkey imported an average of 176,000 barrels a day of Iranian oil, accounting for 49 percent of Turkish imports. “It’s pretty damn serious, obviously, with the Turkish economy facing difficult times. To give up on trade with Iran and not being able to buy gas and oil would really hurt the Turkish economy,” said international relations expert Soli Ozel of Istanbul’s Kadir Has University. “So, there is a big problem, and there is very little time to solve it, and at a time when both sides don’t trust one another.” Strained relations Turkish-U.S. relations are already profoundly strained over myriad differences. Last week, Washington took the unprecedented step of sanctioning two Turkish ministers over the ongoing detention of U.S. pastor Andrew Brunson. Brunson, facing terrorism charges, is under house arrest. Ankara retaliated in kind, sanctioning two unnamed U.S. officials. With Turkey a significant importer of Iranian oil, analysts say it will be a priority of Washington to persuade Ankara to comply with its sanctions. Last month, senior U.S. officials—led by Marshall Billingslea, assistant secretary of the Treasury for terrorist financing—visited Ankara to meet with government ministers and business leaders to press the case for sanctions. Billingslea described the talks as positive, but a source privy to the meeting described the meetings as difficult. A Turkish business source claims Washington’s suggestion to use Saudi Arabian oil instead of Iran’s fails to take into account the costly and timely readjustment of Turkish refineries to accommodate the lower quality of Saudi oil. Ankara also has strategic concerns about relying on Saudi Arabia. “Turkey is being told to buy oil from Saudi Arabia, while it has a pipeline with neighboring Iran and can get crude at a lower price,” wrote Ilnur Cevik, a senior presidential adviser in Turkey’sSabahnewspaper. “Besides, who can guarantee that Turkey will be provided a steady flow of oil at reasonable prices when Saudi Arabia at times is displaying an antagonistic policy toward Ankara?” Former U.S. President Barack Obama granted Ankara some exemptions when imposing sanctions against Iran. However, critics point out, Ankara severely undermined U.S. sanctions by using gold to circumvent restrictions on the use of dollars to trade with Iran. Turkey at one time was one of the world’s biggest gold importers and exporters. Washington has now closed the door to using gold in trade with Tehran. Halkbank case Earlier this year, a New York court convicted a senior official of Turkish state-controlled Halkbank for a violation of U.S. Iranian sanctions. The U.S. Treasury is considering a hefty fine against the bank, which analysts warn could be several billion dollars. Analysts see the Halkbank experience as a warning to Ankara and the Turkish financial system of the risks violating future U.S. sanctions. “It will actually force Ankara to choose between Iran and the United States,” said former senior Turkish diplomat Aydin Selcen, who served in Washington. “Not complying with Iran sanctions is not an option. There will be increased pressure from the U.S. bringing a vicious circle in bilateral relations.” The deepening U.S.-Turkish tensions are taking a heavy toll on Turkey’s financial markets. The Turkish lira suffered heavy drops last week over Washington sanctioning two Turkish ministers. On Monday, the currency hit another record low on news of new U.S. economic tariffs against Turkey. U.S. Iranian sanctions are set to be the latest in an ever-growing list of disputes between Ankara and Washington. “You could actually find ways out of all this,” Ozel said. “But trust in these relations has been totally decimated. And to rebuild trust in relations is the main, hard task.”
          Tesla's board may reportedly tell Elon Musk to recuse himself from talks about taking the company private (TSLA)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

elon musk

  • Tesla's board of directors may tell CEO Elon Musk to recuse himself as it explores the possibility of taking the company private, CNBC reports, citing people familiar with the matter. 
  • According to the publication, the board plans to meet with financial advisors to determine how it will explore the idea of converting Tesla into a private company and has told Musk that he must consult a separate, personal set of advisors. 
  • The board will probably form a smaller, special committee comprised of independent directors to analyze buyout proposals, CNBC reports. 
  • According to the publication, Musk spoke with Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund about backing Tesla's transition to becoming a private company, citing one source close to the matter. 


Tesla's board of directors may tell CEO Elon Musk to recuse himself as it explores the possibility of taking the company private, CNBC reports, citing people familiar with the matter. 

According to the publication, the board plans to meet with financial advisors to determine how it will explore the idea of converting Tesla into a private company and has told Musk that he must consult a separate, personal set of advisors. 

The board will probably form a smaller, special committee comprised of independent directors to analyze buyout proposals, CNBC reports. 

But Musk has not yet given the board detailed information about how a deal may be funded, Reuters reports.

According to CNBC, Musk spoke with Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund about backing Tesla's transition to becoming a private company, citing one source close to the matter. 

The Financial Times reported on Tuesday that Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund had acquired a $2 billion stake in the company. The fund owns between 3% and 5% of Tesla's total stock, meaning the stake is likely worth $1.7 billion to $2.9 billion.

Tesla and Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund did not immediately respond to Business Insider's requests for comment.

(Have a Tesla news tip? Contact this reporter at mmatousek@businessinsider.com.)

Musk shocked observers on Tuesday when he announced his desire to take Tesla private, saying he had the funding for such a deal secured and merely needed the proposal to pass a shareholder vote before it could go through. (He indicated via Twitter that he had investor support.)

But two days later, it's unclear where that funding will come from. Tesla has yet to submit any regulatory filings that provide more detail into Musk's proposal, and on Wednesday The Wall Street Journal reported that the Securities and Exchange Commission made an inquiry into Tesla about whether one of Musk's tweets regarding the possibility of taking the company private was truthful.

According to The Journal, the SEC is also looking into why Musk's first statement about the potential of taking Tesla private was made on Twitter instead of in a regulatory filing. The agency also asked the company whether it believes Musk's tweet follows SEC rules about protecting investors, the report said.

Bloomberg reported on Thursday that the SEC was "intensifying" its inquiry into Tesla. According to the publication, the agency had already been gathering information about statements Tesla has made regarding sales and manufacturing targets.

An inquiry from the SEC does not necessarily mean an investigation will follow.

Some experts have raised an eyebrow over Musk's statements.

James Rosener, a partner at the law firm Pepper Hamilton, told Business Insider that Twitter was not the right medium for a securities disclosure since the platform's 280-character limit prevented Musk from disclosing enough information relevant to investors — including the structure of the deal, its tax impact, and the amount of debt it would require — to ensure he's not misleading them.

According to Rosener, Musk's tweet likely ran afoul of the SEC's anti-fraud rules.

"There's definitely material omissions," Rosener said. "Clearly, it was not what any lawyer with any experience in this kind of stuff would advise to put out."

David Whiston, an equity strategist at Morningstar who covers the US auto industry, said he was confused by Musk's tweets, which he said indicated Musk had both the funding and the shareholder votes necessary to take the company private.

"I'm still trying to understand why he even went public like this," Whiston said, "because I don't see a point in going public to say you are considering going private unless you're trying to get, perhaps, the price higher than $420 a share, or you're just really eager to hurt the short-sellers. Otherwise, why wouldn't you just wait until you're definitely doing a deal to say something?"

Tesla's board released a statement on Wednesday morning, but it was very brief and offered few details besides that Musk met with the board last week to bring up the possibility of going private. 

Tesla has been public since 2010, but Musk has said in the past that he would like to take Tesla private.

"I wish we could be private with Tesla," Musk said in an interview with Rolling Stone published in November. "It actually makes us less efficient to be a public company."

Musk has also said on multiple occasions that Tesla will become profitable by the end of this year and won't need to raise additional funds, despite its increased cash-burn rate in recent quarters.

At the end of June, Tesla said it achieved its goal of making 5,000 Model 3s in one week. Musk previously said that the company would hit that number by the end of 2017 and that sustaining such a production rate is critical for Tesla to become profitable.

Read CNBC's full story here.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Have a Tesla news tip? Contact this reporter at mmatousek@businessinsider.com.

Read more about Tesla possibly going private:

SEE ALSO: Tesla appears to be on a hiring spree in the US and in China two months after laying off 9% of its employees

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Most affluent investors would rather go to the dentist than invest in a company that hurts the environment


           Canada asks for help in Saudi dispute       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Canada is quietly nudging allies including Germany and Sweden for help with resolving its row with Saudi Arabia, a government source confirmed Thursday.The...
          Trump Attacks California’s Carbon Standards as Global Heatwave Sweeps across the Globe; Saudi Arabia Starts Trade and Diplomatic war With Canada over Criticism      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
On Today's Show:July 2018 has been an unfortunate month for the planet’s climate. Severe heatwave has caused dozens of wildfires and deaths...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

           Saudi Arabia reassures Canada on oil, Trudeau comments...       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
By Aziz El YaakoubiRIYADH, Aug 9 (Reuters) - A row over human rights in Saudi Arabia will not have any impact on Saudi oil supplies to Canada, its energy...
          Saudi Arabia's explosion at a Canadian tweet shows how rules have changed      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The question now is whether Europe and the U.S. will support Canada’s call for improvement in the kingdom’s human rights record, or will remain silent in the face of the country’s economic muscle. So far, the official response from the European Union and the U.S. has been muted. The European Commission said it was looking […]

The post Saudi Arabia's explosion at a Canadian tweet shows how rules have changed appeared first on 41NBC News | WMGT-DT.


          No plans to retaliate against Saudis: Morneau      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks at a press conference in Vancouver, B.C. on Monday, August 6, 2018 as MP Randy Boissonnault looks on. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jimmy Jeong

Canada still seeking clarity from Saudi Arabia on diplomatic dispute


          Aircraft ground equipment technician      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Aircraft Ground Equipment Technician Oaklands Global has been commissioned by a leading military &amp defence client to identify and recruit experienced Aircraft Ground Equipment Technicians to join them on a permanent basis in Saudi ArabiaThe successful candidate will be responsible for actively supporting the recovery of Aerospace Ground
          Saudi official says Canada dispute won't affect oil sales      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Saudi official says Canada dispute won't affect oil salesDUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Saudi Arabia's diplomatic dispute with Canada over its arrest of women's rights activists will not affect the ultraconservative kingdom's oil sales to Canadian customers, the Saudi energy minister said Thursday.



          Singh pitches payback for Saudi spat - buying our oil somewhere else      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
NDP Singh BC 20180713

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh says Canada should look at buying oil from countries other than Saudi Arabia as Canada's diplomatic dispute with the kingdom continues.


          Over 50 Nigerian girls trapped in Saudi Arabia – NAPTIP      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The agency says the girls are working under slave-like conditions in people’s home.

The post Over 50 Nigerian girls trapped in Saudi Arabia – NAPTIP appeared first on Premium Times Nigeria.


          Determined diplomacy needed to mend relations between Canada and Saudi Arabia, experts say      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

OTTAWA—Relations between Canada and Saudi Arabia are likely to be frosty for a considerable time in the wake of this week’s bruising diplomatic meltdown and it will take determined fence-mending to restore the relationship, experts say.

“I think it’s going to take a cooling-off period, perhaps a significant cooling-off period for this brouhaha to pass over,” said Peter MacKay, who served as foreign affairs minister in the previous Conservative government.

Roland Paris, a former foreign affairs adviser to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, said Saudi Arabia’s “extraordinary, fierce and impetuous” reaction this week makes it tough to quickly get things back on an even keel.

“I think the chances of normalizing the bilateral relationship in the short term are quite low. The Saudis seem to have made a decision to turn Canada into an example for other countries,” said Paris, a University of Ottawa professor.

Thursday passed with no further apparent recriminations from Saudi Arabia, which this week has enacted a series of measures to underscore its anger at Canada’s criticism of the detention of several activists in the country, comments it branded as “blatant and unacceptable interference.”

Those measures include booting Canada’s ambassador from Riyadh, returning its own envoy home, ending the studies by more than 15,000 Saudi students at Canadian universities, halting the purchase of Canadian wheat and barley, suspending flights by its national airline to Toronto and freezing future trade and investments.

There has been no word whether a $15-billion contract inked in 2014 to supply Saudi Arabia with Canadian-made light armoured vehicles could also be in jeopardy.

It started when Freeland and her department took to social media to protest the Saudi detention of rights activists, including Samar Badawi. Her brother Raif was arrested in 2012 and sentenced to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes for insulting Islam in his blogging. Ensaf Haidar, his wife, was given Canadian citizenship last month.

MacKay framed Saudi Arabia’s reaction as “unreasonable,” adding, “they’ve really gone over the top.” But he said the original Twitter comments were a “misstep” that Freeland likely wishes she could take back.

“Taking to Twitter to chastise a country like Saudi Arabia is probably ill-advised. Not the wrong subject matter, not even the wrong words. But Twitter is a blunt instrument,” said MacKay, who said the tweets were done in a “hectoring, cavalier, righteous way.”

“The more important question, how do we get out of this,” said MacKay, now a partner in the Toronto office of the law firm Baker McKenzie.

MacKay said that Freeland has already started what he called the necessary “subtle, behind-the-scenes work” to resolve the crisis, noting her Tuesday telephone conversation with her Saudi counterpart.

“Short of a complete climb down, which I don’t see happening. I think it’s going to take some serious diplomatic stroking behind the scenes,” he said.

Saudi’s foreign minister has called on Canada to “fix its big mistake” but publicly offered no specifics on what Riyadh seeks to make amends.

Trudeau on Wednesday refused to back down, stating that the federal government would always speak “clearly and firmly” on human rights issues. But he did offer some potentially appeasing language, saying that Saudi Arabia is “making some progress when it comes to human rights.”

Paris said that the federal government now needs to keep its powder dry to avoid ramping up tensions.

“What’s important is that Canada not recant its defence of human rights but signals to Saudi Arabia that it wishes a more stable relationship and that Canada not escalate this dispute any further,” Paris said.

“The Saudis need to understand that Canada is not going to abandon its advocacy of human rights. If their position is ‘we’ll talk to you when you’re ready to apologize’, that’s not the basis for a constructive conversation,” Paris said in an interview.

He said that there are risks to Saudi Arabia too and that its “arbitrary” reaction could spook international investors at a time when the country is seeking billions of dollars in foreign investment to support domestic reforms.

He said the reaction of other countries to the dispute — that has seen some like Jordan, Russia, Bahrain and United Arab Emirates side with Saudi Arabia while others like the U.S. and U.K. avoided taking sides — is a “significant symbol” of how global politics is changing.

The stance of the U.S. government is not surprising, Paris said, given that the Trump White House has shown little interest in addressing Saudi human rights issues.

More disappointing was to see European nations sitting on the sidelines, which Paris called a “very uncourageous stance.”

“What we’re getting is a glimpse of what the world looks like without the United States advocating for human rights. It’s a darker world in which autocrats feel emboldened and liberal democracies seek shelter,” Paris said.

Messages to Freeland’s office and the prime minister’s office were not returned Thursday.

Bruce Campion-Smith is the Star's Ottawa bureau chief and a reporter covering national politics. Follow him on Twitter: @yowflier


          Dozens killed, including children on a bus, in Yemen air strikes      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A Western-backed alliance fighting the Iranian-aligned Houthi group said the strike was in retaliation for one in Saudi Arabia the day before.
          9th Aug: A hologram for the king (2016), 1hr 38m [14A] (6.05/10)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A broke American businessman trying to sell an IT contract to Saudi Arabia's king finds himself changed by an unfamiliar culture and a new romance.

          No plans to retaliate against Saudis: Morneau      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks at a press conference in Vancouver, B.C. on Monday, August 6, 2018 as MP Randy Boissonnault looks on. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jimmy Jeong

Canada still seeking clarity from Saudi Arabia on diplomatic dispute


          Trump(ed) up deal      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The announcement of president Trump last week expressing his willingness to hold a summit with Iran with ‘no preconditions’, after a chain of threatening exchanges between him and president Rouhani, for a new model of US-Iran Nuclear deal indicates yet another flip flop in US policies. It is unlikely to be taken seriously so easily, after witnessing US withdrawal from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA) of 2015 with Iran (Commonly known as Iran Nuclear Deal) even at the cost of differing with its allies and strategic partners, who have critical trade relations with Iran.

Can any future US – Iran nuclear deal succeed?

The intent of JCPoA in 2015 in which the United States and allies agreed to reduce sanctions on Iran, was that it will give up the means to make nuclear weapons. This remains unchanged, when president Trump says that Iran cannot be allowed to go nuclear. The Republicans were not too happy with its clauses at that time and made it an election issue, which president Trump delivered by walking out of it. I do not think that the intent of US has changed even now. President Trump duly supported by Israel has managed to raise the temperatures by rhetoric, provocative speeches, renewed sanctions on Iran, and tried to curtail their oil exports, but it has not worked. US knows that it cannot up the ante beyond economic, diplomatic and information warfare domain, because further pressure is likely to push Iran towards nuclear bomb even faster than what US expects. While US may be ready for summit, it will have to struggle very hard to find a workable replacement deal to the existing deal, which can be devoid of risks of failure, with no change of intention expressed in JCPoA, 2015, and may eventually find that the previous deal was not too bad to meet their strategic interests.

Additional complexities, but compromise is possible

The situation is much more complex in this case because none of its allies, who were part of JCPoA, 2015, have walked out of it so far. This has also raised doubts over the reliability, credibility and stability of policies of US to continue with a signed commitment, which can have repercussions on complete denuclearisation of North Korea, which may think twice before complete verifiable, irreversible denuclearisation. The emergence of a pro-Iran lobby to include Russia, Turkey, Qatar and China to oppose anti-Iran lobby including USA, Israel, Saudi Arabia and some other neighbours, is another major change in international environment, which can speed up nuclear ambition of Iran, if pushed to wall. It is not easy to pressurise Iran which has great strategic significance due to its location as well as oil export, which concerns US allies, strategic partners and China. If Iran sustains sanctions and goes nuclear, it will encourage others like Saudi Arabia also to go nuclear creating further instability in the region.  An ill-defined meeting with Iran is not likely to yield much, in such an environment. I sincerely feel that compromises are possible; because of some of US allies are still honouring JCPoA, 2015, so far, and the inclination of president Trump to talk to Iran. In case US tries to strike a US centric deal with Iran in isolation, its acceptability by others may be doubtful. Having two concurrent deals (JCPoA, 2015 with EU and new arrangement with US) will cause utter confusion, and may not be to lead to any workable solution.

Impact on India: is CAATSA waiver on Iran possible after S-400?

As a strategic partner of India, US is aware that India has historic, cultural, and oil centric relations with Iran, which are deep rooted. Iran has jumped one notch up by becoming the second largest crude oil supplier to India and energy security is core interest for India. Connectivity with CAR and Chabahar port is another strategic compulsion of India.  US has understood the need of S-400 missiles for India, based on Indian threat perception, and have agreed to give a waiver on CAATSA for its purchase from Russia. A similar waiver/understanding with US on the critical strategic issues of India with Iran including energy security is a fair expectation/ possibility. 

I visualise that US sanctions on Iran may continue, but US may have to rethink about CAATSA, or modify it to suit fast changing strategic and economic global dynamics to make it more flexible.  On the issue of Iran and Russia, it cannot afford to put EU, China, Russia and other strategic partners on sanctions together, and expect to make ‘America Great’. A rigid CAATSA may lead ‘America First’ to ‘America Alone’ hence it needs modifications to suit changing geopolitical environment.

 (The writer is chief instructor, USI of India)

Trump(ed) up deal

          No plans to retaliate against Saudis: Morneau      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks at a press conference in Vancouver, B.C. on Monday, August 6, 2018 as MP Randy Boissonnault looks on. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jimmy Jeong

Canada still seeking clarity from Saudi Arabia on diplomatic dispute


          A Bold Foreign Policy Platform for the New Wave of Left Lawmakers      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

ACROSS THE COUNTRY, A NEW COHORT OF PROGRESSIVES IS RUNNING FOR—AND WINNING—ELECTIONS. The stunning victory of democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in the Democratic congressional primary in New York is perhaps the most well-known, but she is far from alone. Most of these candidates are young, more than usual are people of color, many are women, several are Muslims, at least one is a refugee, at least one is transgender—and all are unabashedly left. Most come to electoral politics after years of activism around issues like immigration, climate and racism. They come out of a wide range of social movements and support policy demands that reflect the principles of those movements: labor rights, immigrant and refugee rights, women’s and gender rights, equal access to housing and education, environmental justice, and opposition to police violence and racial profiling. Some, though certainly not all, identify not just with the policies of socialism but with the fundamental core values and indeed the name itself, usually in the form of democratic socialism.

Rashida Tlaib, a Palestinian-American woman in Detroit, just won the Democratic primary for the legendary Congressman John Conyers’ seat. Four women, two of them members of Democratic Socialists of America and all four endorsed by DSA, beat their male incumbent opponents in Pennsylvania state house primaries. Tahirah Amatul-Wadud is running an insurgent campaign for Congress against a longstanding incumbent in western Massachusetts, keeping her focus on Medicare-for-All and civil rights. Minnesota State Rep. Ilhan Omar, a former Somali refugee, won endorsement from the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party, and is running for Keith Ellison’s former congressional seat as an “intersectional feminist.” And there are more.

Many highlight their movement experience in their campaigns; they are champions of immigrant rights, healthcare, student debt organizing and the fight for $15. Intersectionality has grown stronger, as the extremism of Trump’s right-wing racist assault creates significant new gains in linking separate movements focused on racism, women’s rights, immigrant rights, climate, poverty, labor rights and more.

But mostly, we’re not seeing progressive and socialist candidates clearly link domestic issues with efforts to challenge war, militarism and the war economy. There are a few exceptions: Congressional candidate and Hawaii State Rep. Kaniela Ing speaks powerfully about U.S. colonialism in Hawaii, and Virginia State Rep. Lee J. Carter has spoken strongly against U.S. bombing of Syria, linking current attacks with the legacy of U.S. military interventions. There may be more. But those are exceptions; most of the new left candidates focus on crucial issues of justice at home.

A progressive foreign policy must reject U.S. military and economic domination and instead be grounded in global cooperation, human rights, respect for international law and privileging diplomacy over war.

It’s not that progressive leaders don’t care about international issues, or that our movements are divided. Despite too many common assumptions, it is not political suicide for candidates or elected officials to stake out progressive anti-war, anti-militarism positions. Quite the contrary: Those positions actually have broad support within both our movements and public opinion. It’s just that it’s hard to figure out the strategies that work to connect internationally focused issues, anti-war efforts, or challenges to militarism, with the wide array of activists working on locally grounded issues. Some of those strategies seem like they should be easy—like talking about slashing the 53 cents of every discretionary federal dollar that now goes to the military as the easiest source to fund Medicare-for-all or free college education. It should be easy, but somehow it’s not: Too often, foreign policy feels remote from the urgency of domestic issues facing such crises. When our movements do figure out those strategies, candidates can easily follow suit.

Candidates coming out of our movements into elected office will need clear positions on foreign policy. Here are several core principles that should shape those positions.

A progressive foreign policy must reject U.S. military and economic domination and instead be grounded in global cooperation, human rights, respect for international law and privileging diplomacy over war. That does not mean isolationism, but instead a strategy of diplomatic engagement rather than—not as political cover for—destructive U.S. military interventions that have so often defined the U.S. role in the world.

Looking at the political pretexts for what the U.S. empire is doing around the world today, a principled foreign policy might start by recognizing that there is no military solution to terrorism and that the global war on terror must be ended.

More broadly, the militarization of foreign policy must be reversed and diplomacy must replace military action in every venue, with professional diplomats rather than the White House’s political appointees in charge. Aspiring and elected progressive and socialist office-holders should keep in mind the distinction between the successes and failures of Obama’s foreign policy. The victories were all diplomatic: moving towards normalization with Cuba, the Paris climate accord and especially the Iran nuclear deal. Obama’s greatest failures—in Libya, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and Yemen—all occurred because the administration chose military action over robust diplomacy.

Certainly, diplomacy has been a tool in the arsenal of empires, including the United States. But when we are talking about official policies governing relations between countries, diplomacy—meaning talking, negotiating and engaging across a table—is always, always better than engaging across a battlefield.

A principled foreign policy must recognize how the war economy has distorted our society at home—and commit to reverse it. The $717 billion of the military budget is desperately needed for jobs, healthcare and education here at home—and for a diplomatic surge and humanitarian and reconstruction assistance to people of countries devastated by U.S. wars and sanctions.

A principled foreign policy must acknowledge how U.S. actions—military, economic and climate-related—have been a driving force in displacing people around the world. We therefore have an enormous moral as well as legal obligation to take the lead in providing humanitarian support and refuge for those displaced—so immigration and refugee rights are central to foreign policy.

For too long the power of the U.S. empire has dominated international relations, led to the privileging of war over diplomacy on a global scale, and created a vast—and invasive—network of 800-plus military bases around the world.

Now, overall U.S. global domination is actually shrinking, and not only because of Trump’s actions. China’s economy is rapidly catching up, and its economic clout in Africa and elsewhere eclipses that of the United States. It’s a measure of the United States’ waning power that Europe, Russia and China are resisting U.S. efforts to impose new global sanctions on Iran. But the United States is still the world’s strongest military and economic power: Its military spending vastly surpasses that of the eight next strongest countries, it is sponsoring a dangerous anti-Iran alliance between Israel and the wealthy Gulf Arab states, it remains central to NATO decision-making, and powerful forces in Washington threaten new wars in North Korea and Iran. The United States remains dangerous.

Progressives in Congress have to navigate the tricky task of rejecting American exceptionalism. That means recognizing that it is often a good thing when U.S. global military and economic efforts fail, because they are generally aimed at maintaining domination and control. Without that U.S. domination, the possibility arises of a new kind of internationalism: to prevent and solve crises that arise from current and potential wars, to promote nuclear disarmament, to come up with climate solutions and to protect refugees.

That effort is increasingly important because of the rapid rise of right-wing xenophobic authoritarians seeking and winning power. Trump is now leading and enabling an informal global grouping of such leaders, from Egypt’s Abdel Fattah el-Sisi to Victor Orban in Hungary and others. Progressive elected officials in the United States can pose an important challenge to that authoritarian axis by building ties with their like-minded counterparts in parliaments and governments—possibilities include Jeremy Corbyn in the United Kingdom and Andrés Manuel López Obrador in Mexico, among others. And progressive and leftist members of Congress will need to be able to work together with social movements to build public pressure for diplomatic initiatives not grounded in the interests of U.S. empire.

In addition to these broad principles, candidates and elected officials need critical analyses of current U.S. engagement around the world, as well as nuanced prescriptions for how to de-escalate militarily, and ramp up a new commitment to serious diplomacy.

GEOPOLITICAL POWER PLAYS

RUSSIA: Relations with Russia will be a major challenge for the foreseeable future. With 90 percent of the world’s nuclear weapons in U.S. and Russian hands, and the two powers deploying military forces on opposite sides of active battlefronts in Syria, it is crucial that relations remain open—not least to derail potential escalations and ensure the ability to stand down from any accidental clash.

Progressives and leftists in Congress will need to promote a nuanced, careful approach to Russia policy. And they will face a daunting environment in which to do so. They will have to deal with loud cries from right-wing war-mongers, mainly Republicans, and from neo-con interventionists in both parties, demanding a one-sided anti-Russia policy focused on increased sanctions and potentially even military threats. But many moderate and liberal Democrats—and much of the media—are also joining the anti-Russia crusade. Some of those liberals and moderates have likely bought into the idea of American exceptionalism, accepting as legitimate or irrelevant the long history of U.S. election meddling around the world and viewing the Russian efforts as somehow reaching a whole different level of outrageousness. Others see the anti-Russia mobilization solely in the context of undermining Trump.

But at the same time, progressive Congress members should recognize that reports of Russian efforts to interfere with the 2016 and 2018 elections cannot be dismissed out of hand. They should continue to demand that more of the evidence be made public, and condemn the Russian meddling that has occurred, even while recognizing that the most serious threats to our elections come from voter suppression campaignsat home more than from Moscow. And they have to make clear that Trump’s opponents cannot be allowed to turn the president’s infatuation with Vladimir Putin into the basis for a new Cold War, simply to oppose Trump.

CHINA: The broad frame of a progressive approach should be to end Washington’s provocative military and economic moves and encourage deeper levels of diplomatic engagement. This means replacing military threats with diplomacy in response to Chinese moves in the South China Sea, as well as significant cuts in the ramped-up military ties with U.S. allies in the region, such as Vietnam. Progressive and socialist members of Congress and other elected officials will no doubt be aware that the rise of China’s economic dominance across Africa, and its increasing influence in parts of Latin America, could endanger the independence of countries in those parts of the Global South. But they will also need to recognize that any U.S. response to what looks like Chinese exploitation must be grounded in humility, acknowledging the long history of U.S. colonial and neocolonial domination throughout those same regions. Efforts to compete with Chinese economic assistance by increasing Washington’s own humanitarian and development aid should mean directing all funds through the UN, rather than through USAID or the Pentagon. That will make U.S. assistance far less likely to be perceived as—and to be—an entry point for exploitation.

NATO: A progressive position on NATO flies straight into the face of the partisan component of the anti-Trump resistance—the idea that if Trump is for it, we should be against it. For a host of bad reasons that have to do with personal enrichment and personal power, Trump sometimes takes positions that large parts of the U.S. and global anti-war and solidarity movements have long supported. One of those is NATO. During the Cold War, NATO was the European military face of U.S.-dominated Western anti-Communism and anti-Sovietism. With the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union, peace activists from around the world called for the dissolution of NATO as an anachronistic relic whose raison d’etre was now gone.

Instead, NATO used its 50th anniversary in 1999 to rebrand itself as defending a set of amorphous, ostensibly “Western” values such as democracy, rather than having any identifiable enemy—something like a military version of the EU, with the United States on board for clout. Unable to win UN Security Council support for war in Kosovo, the United States and its allies used NATO to provide so-called authorization for a major bombing campaign—in complete violation of international law—and began a rapid expansion of the NATO alliance right up to the borders of Russia. Anti-war forces across the world continued to rally around the call “No to NATO”—a call to dissolve the alliance altogether.

But when Trump, however falsely, claims to call for an end to the alliance, or shows disdain for NATO, anti-Trump politicians and media lead the way in embracing the military alliance as if it really did represent some version of human rights and international law. It doesn’t—and progressives in elected positions need to be willing to call out NATO as a militarized Cold War relic that shouldn’t be reconfigured to maintain U.S. domination in Europe or to mobilize against Russia or China or anyone else. It should be ended.

In fact, Trump’s claims to oppose NATO are belied by his actions. In his 2019 budget request he almost doubled the 2017 budget for the Pentagon’s “European Deterrence Initiative,” designed explicitly as a response to “threats from Russia.” There is a huge gap between Trump’s partisan base-pleasing condemnation of NATO and his administration&rdqou;s actual support for strengthening the military alliance. That contradiction should make it easier for progressive candidates and officeholders to move to cut NATO funding and reduce its power—not because Trump is against NATO but because the military alliance serves as a dangerous provocation toward war.

THE WAR ON TERROR

What George W. Bush first called “the global war on terror” is still raging almost 17 years later, though with different forms of killing and different casualty counts. Today’s reliance on airstrikes, drone attacks and a few thousand special forces has replaced the hundreds of thousands of U.S. and allied ground troops. And today hardly any U.S. troops are being killed, while civilian casualties are skyrocketing across the Middle East and Afghanistan. Officials from the Bush, Obama and Trump administrations have repeated the mantra that “there is no military solution” in Afghanistan, Syria, or Iraq or against terrorism, but their actions have belied those words. Progressive elected officials need to consistently remind the public and their counterparts that it is not possible to bomb terrorism out of existence. Bombs don’t hit “terrorism”; they hit cities, houses, wedding parties. And on those rare occasions when they hit the people actually named on the White House&rdqou;s unaccountable kill list, or “terrorist” list, the impact often creates more terrorists.

The overall progressive policy on this question means campaigning for diplomatic solutions and strategies instead of military ones. That also means joining the ongoing congressional efforts led by Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.) and others  to challenge the continued reliance on the 2001 and 2002 Authorizations for the Use of Military Force (AUMF).

In general, privileging diplomatic over war strategies starts with withdrawing troops and halting the arms sales that flood the region with deadly weapons. Those weapons too often end up in the hands of killers on all sides, from bands of unaccountable militants to brutally repressive governments, with civilians paying the price. Congress members should demand an end of massive arms sales to Saudi Arabia, the UAE and other U.S. allies carrying out brutal wars across the Middle East, and they should call for an end to the practice of arming non-state proxies who kill even more people. They should call for a U.S. arms embargo on Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Qatar, Iraq, Afghanistan, Egypt, Turkey, Pakistan, Jordan and Israel (which presents a whole other set of arms-related challenges), while urging Russia to stop its arms sales to Syria, Iran and Pakistan. Given the power of the arms industries in the United States, arms embargoes are the most difficult—but perhaps the most important—part of ending the expanding Middle East wars.

Progressives in Congress should demand real support for UN-sponsored and other international peace initiatives, staffing whole new diplomatic approaches whose goal is political solutions rather than military victories—and taking funds out of military budgets to cover the costs. The goal should be to end these endless wars—not try to “win&rdqou; them.

ISRAEL-PALESTINE: The most important thing for candidates to know is that there has been a massive shift in public opinion in recent years. It is no longer political suicide to criticize Israel. Yes, AIPAC and the rest of the right-wing Jewish, pro-Israel lobbies remain influential and have a lot of money to throw around. (The Christian Zionist lobbies are powerful too, but there is less political difficulty for progressives to challenge them.) But there are massive shifts underway in U.S. Jewish publicopinion on the conflict, and the lobbies cannot credibly claim to speak for the Jewish community as a whole.

Outside the Jewish community, the shift is even more dramatic, and has become far more partisan: Uncritical support for Israel is now overwhelmingly a Republican position. Among Democrats, particularly young Democrats, support for Israel has fallen dramatically; among Republicans, support for Israel’s far-right government is sky-high. The shift is particularly noticeable among Democrats of color, where recognition of the parallels between Israeli oppression of Palestinians and the legacies of Jim Crow segregation in the United States and apartheid in South Africa is rising rapidly.

U.S. policy, unfortunately, has not kept up with that changing discourse. But modest gains are evident even there. When nearly 60 members of the House and Senate openly skipped Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech when he came to lobby Congress to vote against President Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran, the sky didn’t fall. The snub to the Israeli prime minister was unprecedented, but no one lost their seat because of it. Rep. Betty McCollum’s bill to protect Palestinian children from Israel’s vicious military juvenile detention system (the only one in the world) now has 29 co-sponsors, and the sky still isn’t falling. Members of Congress are responding more frequently to Israeli assaults on Gaza and the killing of protesters, often because of powerful movements among their constituents. When Trump moved the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, the Israeli daily Ha’aretz acknowledged the divide: “While members of the Republican Party overwhelmingly expressed support for the move, Democrats were split between those who congratulated Trump for it and those who called it a dangerous and irresponsible action.”

That creates space for candidates and newly elected officials to respond to the growing portion of their constituencies that supports Palestinian rights. Over time, they must establish a rights-based policy. That means acknowledging that the quarter-century-long U.S.-orchestrated “peace process” based on the never-serious pursuit of a solution, has failed. Instead, left and progressive political leaders can advocate for a policy that turns over real control of diplomacy to the UN, ends support for Israeli apartheid and occupation, and instead supports a policy based on international law, human rights and equality for all, without privileging Jews or discriminating against non-Jews.

To progress from cautiously urging that Israel abide by international law, to issuing a full-scale call to end or at least reduce the $3.8 billion per year that Congress sends straight to the Israeli military, might take some time. In the meantime, progressive candidates must prioritize powerful statements condemning the massacre of unarmed protesters in Gaza and massive Israeli settlement expansion, demands for real accountability for Israeli violations of human rights and international law (including reducing U.S. support in response), and calls for an end to the longstanding U.S. protection that keeps Israel from being held accountable in the UN.

The right consistently accuses supporters of Palestinian rights of holding Israel to a double standard. Progressives in Congress should turn that claim around on them and insist that U.S. policy towards Israel—Washington’s closest ally in the region and the recipient of billions of dollars in military aid every year—hold Israel to exactly the same standards that we want the United States to apply to every other country: human rights, adherence to international law and equality for all.

Many supporters of the new crop of progressive candidates, and many activists in the movements they come out of, are supporters of the increasingly powerful, Palestinian-led BDS (boycott, divestment and sanctions) movement, that aims to bring non-violent economic pressure to bear on Israel until it ends its violations of international law. This movement deserves credit for helping to mainstream key demands—to end the siege of Gaza and the killing of protesters, to support investigations of Israeli violations by the International Criminal Court, to oppose Israel’s new “nation-state’ law—that should all be on lawmakers’ immediate agenda.

AFGHANISTAN: More than 100,000 Afghans and 2,000 U.S. troops have been killed in a U.S. war that has raged for almost 17 years. Not-Yet-President Trump called for withdrawal from Afghanistan, but within just a few months after taking office he agreed instead to send additional troops, even though earlier deployments of more than 100,000 U.S. troops (and thousands more coalition soldiers) could not win a military victory over the Taliban. Corruption in the U.S.-backed and -funded Afghan government remains sky-high, and in just the past three years, the Pentagon has lost track of how $3.1 billion of its Afghanistan funds were spent. About 15,000 US troops are still deployed, with no hope of a military victory for the United States.

Progressive members of Congress should demand a safe withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Afghanistan, acting on the long-held recognition that military force simply won’t work to bring about the political solution all sides claim to want.

Several pending bills also would reclaim the centrality of Congress’ role in authorizing war in general and in Afghanistan in particular—including ending the 2001 AUMF. Funding for humanitarian aid, refugee support, and in the future compensation and reparations for the massive destruction the U.S.-led war has wrought across the country, should all be on Congress’ agenda, understanding that such funding will almost certainly fail while U.S. troops are deployed.

IRAN: With U.S. and Iranian military forces facing each other in Syria, the potential for an unintentional escalation is sky-high. Even a truly accidental clash between a few Iranian and U.S. troops, or an Iranian anti-aircraft system mistakenly locking on to a U.S. warplane plane even if it didn’t fire, could have catastrophic consequences without immediate military-to-military and quick political echelon discussions to defuse the crisis. And with tensions very high, those ties are not routinely available. Relations became very dangerous when Trump withdrew the United States from the multi-lateral nuclear deal in May. (At that time, a strong majority of people in the United States favored the deal, and less than one in three wanted to pull out of it.)

The United States continues to escalate threats against Iran. It is sponsoring a growing regional anti-Iran alliance, with Israel and Saudi Arabia now publicly allied and pushing strongly for military action. And Trump has surrounded himself with war-mongers for his top advisers, including John Bolton and Mike Pompeo, who have both supported regime change in Iran and urged military rather than diplomatic approaches to Iran.

Given all that, what progressive elected officials need to do is to keep fighting for diplomacy over war. That means challenging U.S. support for the anti-Iran alliance and opposing sanctions on Iran. It means developing direct ties with parliamentarians from the European and other signatories to the Iran nuclear deal, with the aim of collective opposition to new sanctions, re-legitimizing the nuclear deal in Washington and reestablishing diplomacy as the basis for U.S. relations with Iran.

It should also mean developing a congressional response to the weakening of international anti-nuclear norms caused by the pull-out from the Iran deal. That means not just supporting the nonproliferation goals of the Iran nuclear deal, but moving further towards real disarmament and ultimately the abolition of nuclear weapons. Progressives in and outside of Congress should make clear that nuclear nonproliferation (meaning no one else gets to have nukes) can’t work in the long run without nuclear disarmament (meaning that the existing nuclear weapons states have to give them up). That could start with a demand for full U.S. compliance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, which calls for negotiations leading to “nuclear disarmament, and on a treaty on general and complete disarmament.”

SYRIA: Progressive candidates and elected officials should support policies designed to end, not “win” the war. That means withdrawing troops, ceasing airstrikes and drone attacks, and calling for an arms embargo on all sides of the multiple proxy war. The civil war component of the multiple wars in Syria is winding down as the regime consolidates its control, but the sectarian, regional and global components of that war have not disappeared, so continuing a call for an arms embargo is still important. The first step is to permanently end the Pentagon’s and the CIA’s “arm and train” policies that have prolonged the war and empowered some of its most dangerous actors.

There will also need to be negotiations between the regional and global actors that have been waging their own wars in Syria, wars that have little to do with Syria itself, but with Syrians doing the bulk of the dying. That means support for the UN’s and other internationally-sponsored de-escalation efforts, and serious engagement with Russia towards a permanent ceasefire, as well as the arms embargo. U.S. policy should include absolute prohibitions on Washington’s regional allies—including Saudi Arabia and Turkey—sending U.S.-provided arms into Syria. And progressive supporters of diplomacy should also maintain pressure on the United States to back multi-lateral diplomatic processes organized by the UN and others—on humanitarian issues in Geneva, and political issues in Astana. Cutting the United States’ multi-billion dollar arms sales to Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Jordan, Turkey and other U.S. allies involved in the Syrian wars would also lend legitimacy to U.S. efforts within those diplomatic processes to press Russia to stop providing arms to the Assad regime.

IRAQ: Congress has largely abrogated its responsibilities even as the 15-year war initiated by the United States continues. Progressive policymakers would do well to join the existing efforts to end—not replace, but cancel—the 2002 Authorization for the Use of Military Force against Saddam Hussein's government in Iraq, and reopen congressional debate, with the goal of ending funding for war in Iraq once and for all. When President Obama withdrew the last troops from Iraq at the end of 2011, stating that “war in Iraq ends this month,” many assumed that the authorization ended as well. But it was never officially repealed and had no expiration date, and three years later Obama claimed that the then-12-year-old authorization justified the war against ISIS in Iraq. While Trump has relied primarily on the 2001 AUMF, the Iraq-specific authorization of 2002 remains in place and should be withdrawn. 

In the meantime, progressives in Congress should support many of the same policies for Iraq as for Syria: withdraw the troops and special forces, stop the assassination program that is the heart of Washington’s “counter-terrorism” campaign and cease sending arms. Congress should end funding to force the closure of the network of small “forward operating bases” and other U.S. military bases that may remain in U.S. hands in Iraq despite earlier agreements to turn them over to the Iraqi government. The U.S. must figure out new ways to provide financial compensation and support to the people whose country and society has been shredded by more than a dozen years of crippling U.S.-led economic sanctions bookended by two devastating wars (Desert Storm, starting in 1991, and the Iraq War, starting in 2003)—while somehow avoiding the further empowerment of corrupt and sectarian political and military leaders.

YEMEN AND SAUDI ARABIA: The ongoing Saudi-led war against Yemen reflects the most deadly front of Saudi Arabia’s competition with Iran for regional hegemony. The United States is providing indirect and direct support, including U.S. Air Force pilots providing in-air refueling so Saudi and UAE warplanes can bomb Yemen more efficiently, and Green Berets fighting alongside Saudi troops on the border, in what the New York Times called “a continuing escalation of America’s secret wars.”

The U.S.-backed Saudi war against Yemen has also created what the UN has declared the world’s most serious humanitarian crisis. Congress’ first action must be to immediately end all U.S. involvement in the war. Next, Congress must reject all approvals for arms sales to Saudi Arabia and the UAE as long as they continue to bomb and blockade Yemen.

Ending these arms sales may be a serious challenge, given the power of the arms manufacturers’ lobby, Israel’s strong support of Saudi Arabia against Iran and the fact that Saudi Arabia remains the top U.S. arms customer. But recent efforts and relatively close votes in both the House and Senate, while not successful, indicate that challenging the longstanding process of providing the Saudis with whatever weapons they want may be closer to reality than anticipated. The House called the U.S. military involvement in the Saudi war in Yemen “unauthorized.” Reps. Ro Khanna, Marc Pocan and others have introduced numerous House bills in recent months aimed at reducing U.S. arms sales and involvement in the Saudi-led assault. In the Senate, a March resolution to end U.S. military involvement in the Yemen war failed by only 11 votes, a much narrower margin than anticipated. Progressive candidates and new members of Congress should support all those efforts, and move further with a call for ending the longstanding U.S. alliance with Saudi Arabia, especially military sales and support for the Saudi-Israeli partnership against Iran.

A QUICK GLANCE AT SOME OTHER POLICY QUESTIONS

NORTH KOREA: Progressive elected officials will need to support Trump’s diplomatic initiatives, challenging mainstream Democrats willing to abandon diplomacy because Trump supports it (however tactically or temporarily). Progressives will also need to condemn U.S. military provocations that undermine that same diplomacy, and build public and congressional support for the inter-Korean diplomatic moves already underway. That should include pushing for exemptions in the U.S.-imposed sanctions that would allow inter-Korean economic and other initiatives to go forward. Progressives in Congress can also play a major role in supporting people-to-people diplomacy with North Korea, and they can lead the way in replacing the current armistice with a peace treaty finally ending the Korean War.

AFRICA: Across the continent, there is an urgent need to reverse the militarization of foreign policy, including reducing the size, breadth of responsibilities and theater of operations of AFRICOM.  The wide-ranging but unauthorized and largely secretive special operations and other military actions across the continent violate not only international law, but U.S. domestic law as well.

LATIN AMERICA: In Latin America, there is an urgent need for a new anti-interventionist policy, not least to stop the current attempts to take advantage of serious domestic crises in Venezuela, Nicaragua and elsewhere. Progressives will need to challenge the U.S. economic and foreign policies that create refugees from Central America in particular (including the consequences of the U.S. wars of the 1980s), even while fighting to protect those migrants seeking safety in the United States as a result of those earlier policies. Regarding Mexico, Congress needs to fight for a U.S. position in trade negotiations that is not based on economic nationalism, but rather on making sure that Mexican workers and U.S. workers are both equally lifted up. Left policymakers will also have the chance to play a leading role in forging a new relationship with Mexico’s just-elected progressive President Lopez-Obrador. 

All of the areas where U.S. wars are or were underway, as well as places where U.S. economic and climate policies have helped create crises threatening people’s lives, also become areas from which migrants are forced to flee their homes. U.S. policymakers must acknowledge that U.S. policies are direct causes of the refugee crises that exist in and around the war zones and climate crisis zones of the Middle East, Africa and elsewhere—and that the refugees seeking asylum in Europe, and the far fewer trying to come to the United States, are a consequence of those policies. So progressive candidates and policymakers should support massive expansion of funding for these victims of war, including humanitarian support in their home regions and acceptance of far greater numbers of refugees into the United States. They must directly challenge the xenophobic policies of the Trump administration that include the Muslim Ban, the separation of children from their families at the border and the vast reduction in refugees accepted into this country. In Congress, that might include introducing bills to cut funding for ICE or eliminate the institution altogether.

Finally, progressive candidates and elected officials will need to continue to craft policy proposals that recognize what happens when the U.S. wars come home. This requires more voices in Congress challenging the military budget because it’s used to kill people abroad and because the money is needed for jobs, health care and education at home. It means challenging Islamophobia rising across the United States because of how it threatens Muslims in the United States and because it is used to build support for wars against predominantly Muslim countries. It means exposing—on the floor of the House and beyond—the fact that the Muslim bans targeted primarily countries the United States was bombing, sanctioning or stationing soldiers in. And it means being clear that protecting refugees, asylum seekers and other migrants has to include ending the wars that create refugees in the first place.

Certainly, we shouldn’t expect every progressive or even every socialist running for national office to become an instant expert on every complicated piece of U.S. foreign policy. And for those running for state and local office, there may seem to be even less urgency. But we’ve seen how the Poor People’s Campaign, with its inclusion of militarism and the war economy as one of its four central targets (along with racism, poverty and environmental destruction), has demonstrated to all of our movements the importance of—and a model for—including an anti-war focus within multi-issue state and local mobilizations. The Movement for Black Lives has created one of the strongest internationalist and anti-war platforms we’ve seen in years—including calls for cutting the military budget, supporting Palestinian rights, stopping the Global War on Terror and the so-called War on Drugs, ending the militarized U.S. interventions across Africa, and linking U.S. military and economic policies with the rise in Haitian and other—predominantly Black—immigration.

Immigrant rights activists are linking movements for sanctuary (and against ICE) with opposition to the wars that create refugees. Campaignsare underway to reject the training of U.S. police by Israeli police and military forces. Battles are being waged to get local law enforcement agencies to refuse Pentagon offers of weapons and equipment left over from U.S. wars in Afghanistan and elsewhere. These campaigns all play out at the local and state level.

So especially for those running for Congress, but really for all candidates at every political level and venue in this country, there is a clear need for a strong, principled position on at least a few key foreign policy issues. And the key to making that happen still lies with our movements.


          Tension Escalates After Canada Criticizes Saudi Arabia's Human Rights Record      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: Saudi Arabia is in a diplomatic standoff with Canada. It all happened after Canadian officials criticized the kingdom's human rights record. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is not backing down, though. Here's what he told reporters yesterday. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) PRIME MINISTER JUSTIN TRUDEAU: Canadians have always expected our government to speak strongly, firmly, clearly and politely. We will continue to do that. MARTIN: But this tension is ramping up. Over the past week, Saudi Arabia recalled its ambassador to Canada, expelled the Canadian ambassador in Riyadh and stopped all new trade between the two countries. NPR's Jackie Northam has been covering the story and joins us now. Hey, Jackie. JACKIE NORTHAM, BYLINE: Good morning, Rachel. MARTIN: So as I mentioned in the intro, this is about human rights, Canadian officials criticizing the kingdom on this front. Specifically, what happened? NORTHAM: Well,
          Did Saudi Arabia Crucify a Man During a Human Rights Dispute with Canada?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
News accounts juxtaposed the grisly form of punishment with Saudi Arabia's umbrage over Canadian criticism of human rights violations.
          Saudi critics jab Canada on Twitter and TV as diplomatic feud deepens      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Saudi Twitter accounts and media outlets release outlandish claims and genuine criticism of Canada amid escalating row

It’s a country that regularly ranks among the best places to live, and is often lauded for its tolerance and quality of life. But this week, a very different view of Canada has been peddled online amid an escalating diplomatic row between the two countries.

Soon after Saudi Arabia announced that Canada’s ambassador to the kingdom was now persona non grata, a surge of Saudi Twitter accounts began expressing concerns about Canada’s treatment of indigenous peoples.

Related: Saudi group posts photo of plane about to hit Toronto's CN tower amid Canada spat

Related: A tweet, then a trade freeze: latest row shows Saudi Arabia is asserting new rules

Continue reading...
          Saudi Arabia picks a pointless fight with Canada      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

QUEBEC’S proudly Francophone separatists may want to learn some Arabic. On August 5th, as Canadians enjoyed a long weekend, Saudi Arabia abruptly expelled their ambassador and froze bilateral trade and investment. Its state-run funds have reportedly been ordered to dump their Canadian assets, no matter how much it costs to do so. The kingdom is angry about tweets from Canada’s foreign minister, Chrystia Freeland, criticising the arrests of Saudi human-rights activists. For Saudi Arabia, this was unacceptable “foreign interference”.

If anyone is qualified to opine on meddling abroad, it is the Saudis. Since 2011 they have helped quash an uprising in Bahrain, backed a coup in Egypt and detained Lebanon’s prime minister. If Canada keeps up its criticism, “we are allowed to interfere in Canada’s internal affairs,” the Saudi foreign ministry warned. Canadian diplomats joked about the kingdom arming Québécois rebels.

A legion of Saudis took to Twitter to voice their (no doubt long-held...


          Dozens killed — many of them children — in Saudi coalition airstrike on a bus in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

An airstrike launched by the Saudi Arabian-led military coalition in Yemen hit a school bus in the rebel-held north of the country Thursday, killing and injuring dozens of people, many of them children, according to local and international medical officials.

The regional coalition, which is backed...


          Dozens killed — many of them children — in Saudi coalition airstrike on a bus in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

An airstrike launched by the Saudi Arabian-led military coalition in Yemen hit a school bus in the rebel-held north of the country Thursday, killing and injuring dozens of people, many of them children, according to local and international medical officials.

The regional coalition, which is backed...


          Dozens killed — many of them children — in Saudi coalition airstrike on a bus in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

An airstrike launched by the Saudi Arabian-led military coalition in Yemen hit a school bus in the rebel-held north of the country Thursday, killing and injuring dozens of people, many of them children, according to local and international medical officials.

The regional coalition, which is backed...


          Department Press Briefings : Department Press Briefing - August 9, 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Heather Nauert
Spokesperson
Department Press Briefing
Washington, DC
August 9, 2018



Index for Today's Briefing
  • INDONESIA
  • DEPARTMENT
  • ZIMBABWE
  • YEMEN
  • IRAQ
  • TURKEY
  • ISRAEL/PALESTINIANS
  • RUSSIA
  • NORTH KOREA/SOUTH KOREA
  • CHINA

    TRANSCRIPT:

     

     

     

    3:00 p.m. EDT

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Hi, everybody. How are you today? And why are so many of you showing up on an August afternoon? You’re supposed to all be on vacation or something, but I notice a few empty seats. But Gardiner’s back from vacation. Gardiner, welcome.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Thank you.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: How’ve you been?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: I’ve been good.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Good. A couple announcements to start before we get started with your questions today.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    First, I would like to express our condolences to the victims of the recent earthquakes and also the aftershocks in Indonesia. The United States has experts and partner organizations on the ground. We’re consulting with the Government of Indonesia at this time. We’re closely monitoring the situation, and we stand ready to provide additional aid to the Government of Indonesia. Our U.S. consulate personnel are assisting affected U.S. citizens. At this time, we do not have any reports of U.S. citizen casualties associated with the earthquakes. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the Indonesian people. As many of you know, we were recently on the ground in Indonesia and had some terrific meetings with government officials there.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Next, I have some staffing news to bring you now. And I’m really excited about this one, because it affects our Bureau of Public Affairs and specifically the folks that you will working with. Today I’d like to announce that Robert Palladino will be joining our press team as the State Department’s deputy spokesperson. Robert is a career Foreign Service officer and I believe known well to some of you or perhaps many of you.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Over the past year, Robert has served as director of press and acting National Security Council spokesperson. In that role he’s helped to prepare Sarah Sanders for her briefings at the White House. He was also a spokesperson to the White House press corps and worked as NSC communications lead for both Asia and Europe. Robert’s Foreign Service career has included postings in Washington, where he worked for our Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, and the Office of the Under Secretary for Public Affairs and Public Diplomacy, and also on Capitol Hill. Overseas, he’s worked in Milan, Italy; Guangzhou, China; and also Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Prior to joining the State Department, he practiced law in Asia and Europe in the Army JAG Corps. His service included deployment to Rwanda. He is a graduate of Notre Dame University, Washington and Lee School of Law, the U.S. Army War College, and he also speaks Chinese and Italian. Pretty impressive.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    We are delighted that he is coming back to the State Department from the White House. I know you will enjoy working with him. For those of you who have not met him, he is a terrific guy. We’ve worked closely together for the past year or so. I asked him what his children thought, because he has two young girls – I asked him what they thought of his job, and I love these quotes. His youngest daughter said, “I’m proud of America and I’m proud of you, Dad, but it sounds really boring.” And then his older daughter said this – and you’ll appreciate it – “But wait a minute, everybody yells questions and they’re angry. That’s the worst job in the world.” That actually might be the White House press corps, not you all. But we look forward to welcoming Robert when he joins us on the 20th of August. But try not to bug him between now and then; he’s on vacation with his family. So another addition to our press family.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    And that’s it. With that, I’d be happy to take your questions.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay, thanks. We’ll try not to be so angry.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I said not you all.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Let’s – me, yes me. I just wanted to ask you briefly before I ask you about Yemen. I noticed the statement that you guys put out about Zimbabwe, the Zimbabwe elections and the Zambian decision to deport the opposition leader.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Right.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: And in that statement it said that you are reviewing certain aspects of your cooperation with the Zambian Government. Can you be a little bit more specific? What aspects of --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Some of those will be conversations that will be had privately with both governments. But my understanding is that there are certain agreements in which that government was taking steps that the Zimbabweans weren’t completely familiar with and weren’t supportive of, and there were some concerns related to that. But let’s just --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: No, I understand, but I was just --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: But let’s just back up a couple steps for folks who’ve not been following this perhaps as closely as you have. Elections on July the 30th – those were promising, very promising. We thought it was a historic chance to sort of move beyond the political and economic crises of the past and toward a more democratic change and better dialogue in that country. People turned out massively in those elections. We put out a statement just after those elections complimenting them on those elections.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    However, the success in delivering an election day that was peaceful and open to international observers was then marred by violence, which we’ve been seeing and has been heavily reported, at least in the international press, over the past about week and a half. We’ve seen a disproportionate use of deadly force against protestors by the security forces, which is a great concern of ours. We’re concerned by those numerous reports of human rights violations since the elections had taken place about a week and a half or two ago. We have received credible allegations of detentions, of beatings, and other abuses of the people of Zimbabwe, particularly targeting opposition activists.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Now, the latest news today is the foreign – excuse me, the former minister of finance had left to go to Zambia. Zambia returned him to Zimbabwe, we understand. And some of this is still fresh so we don’t have all the details at this point. But I understand he was detained and possibly let go.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    So I’m going to pause there because some of this is still unfolding, and I don’t want to give you any inaccurate information since it’s still developing.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: I get that. I just wanted to know is this a threat to withhold or suspend some aid to Zambia when you say you’re reviewing certain aspects of our cooperation?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Matt, I’m not going to get into that at this point, but we’re watching the situation carefully.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: All right. Let me ask you about this airstrike in Yemen, which appears to have killed dozens of children. The Saudis obviously are the ones who conducted this, but they do that with weapons supplied by the U.S., with training supplied by the U.S., and with targeting information, targeting data, supplied by the U.S. How can something like this happen?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: How can something like that report happen?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Well, I think we would start by saying --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: It’s more than a report. I mean, it’s – they admitted that it happened.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah. How can situations like this happen? We don’t have the full details about what happened on the ground. We’ve certainly seen the news reports of what has been reported happened, okay? I can’t confirm all the details because we are not there on the ground.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    We can say that we’re certainly concerned about these reports that resulted – that there was an attack that resulted in the deaths of civilians. We call on the Saudi-led coalition to conduct a thorough and transparent investigation into the incident. We take all credible accounts of civilian casualties very seriously. We call on the parties to take appropriate measures to protect civilians in accordance with international law and urge all parties to investigate all reported incidents of civilian casualties.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay. Well, they say – already the coalition says that they acted in accordance with international law. But if you look at the photographs, the video that come from the scene, it doesn’t look like that’s a really – that that’s a credible answer. So are you okay with the coalition on its own doing an investigation, or would you like to see some kind of an international component to it or an international investigation?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Well, I think I just answered that and we said that we would call upon the Saudi Government --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So you’re --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: -- to do a full and thorough investigation, as we always do. And we call upon all parties in any kind of situation like this to take appropriate measures to try to mitigate the risk of civilian casualties.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So you don’t think --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: DOD and other entities put out reports on this after the fact as they all start to investigate, and so we will look forward to any information on that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Right. But my question is you don’t see a need for there to be something other than a coalition investigation, you don’t see a need for an independent --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Matt, I’m not going to get – this is something that is fresh, that just happened, so I’m not going to get ahead of any kind of investigation that may take place. Okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: It’s only the latest in a huge number of civilians killed during these operations though.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I would encourage you to take a look – and that is we regret any loss of civilian life. That is something that the United States Government – in particular, any time you talk to the Department of Defense about civilian casualties, they will say the same thing --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: -- that – I’m not finished, okay? And they will say the exact same thing, that all parties take very strong responsibility and measures to try to protect against the loss of civilian life. As we have seen – and you all very rarely ask about the issue that has been unfolding and the devastation that has taken place in Yemen – let’s look at some of the things that have been happening in Yemen.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    You have the Houthi rebels who continue to attack Saudi Arabia. They continue to do that with Iranian weapons, missiles, and rockets. They continue to try to attack civilian infrastructure in Saudi Arabia, for example, and that is part of the reason why these actions are being taken.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Let me go back and remind you what I just said a moment ago, and that is we call for an investigation and we anticipate that a thorough investigation will be done. I don’t have anything more for you on that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: The Secretary isn’t planning on having a conversation with --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have any information for you on that. Okay.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Hi, Nick.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Is this – hey, Heather. Is this latest incident or the previous incidents causing the U.S. to re-evaluate in any way the role that it’s playing in the situation, in terms of its relationship with Saudi Arabia?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Look, we provide a tremendous amount of humanitarian assistance in Yemen to try to support civilians in Yemen and try to mitigate against the devastation that’s taken place there in that country. I don’t have anything more for you on that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But you also supply a tremendous amount of weaponry and the data for targeting to the Saudis.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Well, then – sorry.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Right? No?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: No.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Am I wrong? Is that wrong?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: That’s not wrong.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Sorry, these ladies over here are laughing. On that I would refer you to the Department of Defense that is involved with that, but as you know, Saudi Arabia is an important strategic partner in the region to the United States.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Okay. Hi, Gardiner.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Just a follow-up on that. Hey. So obviously, there’s growing concerns in Congress about the toll this war is taking within Yemen. It’s the worst humanitarian disaster on the planet. Aren’t you concerned that incidents like this will further erode congressional support and lead to further support for legislation that could cut off Saudi Arabia from arms sales and the rest?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I mean, I think that is an entirely hypothetical question and we don’t comment on congressional proposals in any event, but I would ask – all of you have been very silent on the issue of Yemen, and times --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Although Said has asked. You’ve been the one reporter who’s asked a lot about Yemen and the situation there.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well I would suggest that if you had more than two briefings a week and they lasted for longer than a half an hour or 40 minutes that you might get questions about something other than the actual main topic of the day.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Matt, I think you and I talk every single day.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Yes, we do.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: You have my phone number. You have all my numbers, and anytime you want to talk about Yemen, I’d be more than happy to answer your questions and provide you additional expert briefings --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: -- on Yemen anytime anyone is interested, but I have not seen a major level of interest on the part of our press corps, with the exception of Said, on the issue of Yemen.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Why does that matter, though? There’s news today, so --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Can you request an expert on Yemen?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, certainly, I’d be happy to. Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Wait, so first of all, I think that when there have been attacks against Saudi installations or missiles and stuff, I think you’ve seen that there have been just as vigorous of reporting.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t – I disagree, but --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well, I mean, that’s – it’s not our job to, like, sit here and go back and forth on that. We’re asking today. The U.S. has tried to increase its target training with – to try and improve the targeting of the Saudi coalition. Is that still continuing?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Elise, I think that would be a DOD issue, so I’d encourage you to talk with my --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But these are foreign – okay, but these are foreign military financing.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Which is out of the State Department.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: And I would encourage you to talk to DOD about that. So some --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well, maybe --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Some of this – some of this is a State Department equity, but much of this is Department of Defense, so I’d encourage you to talk with them about it.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Hey, Laurie.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Hi. On Iraq, the road between Erbil and Kirkuk, which was cut as a result of fighting last October, is being rebuilt, but Baghdad has said that it will establish a customs border on that road and collect revenues. Is that consistent, a customs border in the middle of the Erbil-Baghdad road, in which one party, the Iraqi Government, is going to collect revenues? Is that consistent with your view of a unified Iraq?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I would – there are other countries that have done this in the past, including our own country years ago in which this type of thing has been done. I think this is largely an internal matter for the Government of Iraq, between Iraq and Erbil, to try to work out. We do encourage them to resolve any remaining issues between Baghdad and Erbil.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: You don’t have a position beyond that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Look, we believe that a strong KRG government within a unified and federal Iraq is something that’s essential to Iraq’s long-term stability and the enduring defeat overall of ISIS.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay, if I could ask you about Turkey. So the deputy foreign minister was here; it seemed there was no progress. Is that the case? And was pastor – were the American hostages the only issues that were discussed or were there other questions like the Turkish purchase of the S-400 discussed as well?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah. I mean, obviously you all know that we have a very broad relationship with Turkey and a host of issues that we talk about with the Turkish Government whenever we do meet. Yesterday we had a wide-ranging conversation with Turkish Government officials. We made it clear that Pastor Brunson needs to be returned home. Much of this, though, we’re not going to negotiate in public.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Can you tell us --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Go ahead. Hi.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Can you tell us if you made any progress about the situation of Pastor Brunson?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, I would say we would define progress as Pastor Brunson being brought home.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So in other words, no.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: And so progress is --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Until he – until he’s --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Progress is Pastor Brunson being brought home to the United --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So until he’s home there is no progress?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: -- to the United States.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Did you give any --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Did you give any deadline? Did you give Turkish officials any deadline?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have any information for you on that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Thanks. Hi.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: I think progress is kind of coming closer towards an agreement, like you’re not – you don’t have full North Korean denuclearization but you say that there is progress in working towards that goal. So is there progress in coming to some kind of deal with the Turks or are you still as far apart as you were the day that he was being hospitalized?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, I’m not going to characterize it that way. As you know, we had – we met yesterday. They had wide-ranging meetings at the State Department and with other departments here in Washington. I’d refer you to those other departments that met with the Turkish Government. The progress that we want to be made is to have Pastor Brunson return home. And I’ll leave it at that. Okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So is that saying you will not engage with the Turks anymore on this issue until Pastor Brunson comes home?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I’m not going to speculate on that, and I’m not going to get ahead of the administration on that issue. Hey, Said.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Hi. Thank you, Heather. Could we move – could you comment on the escalation in Gaza? There has been escalation in Israeli bombardment of Gaza as we speak.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I’m sorry, start that over again.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: There is an escalation as we speak of Israeli bombardment of Gaza. They said that they killed a 23-year-old woman, pregnant, with her toddler. Do you have any comments on that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah. I mean, overall we’ve been watching this as it has been unfolding, and it’s a very concerning situation that has taken place in Gaza. Overall, we condemn the launching of missile attacks into Israel and call for an end to the destructive violence. We’ve seen reports that 180 or so rocket attacks have taken place, shot from Gaza into Israel, and we fully support Israel’s right to defend itself and to take actions to prevent provocations of that nature.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But this last round of bombardment, Israeli bombardment, actually began by the Israelis. It was not Hamas that started this latest round.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Look, I’m not going to get into how this thing started. Let’s not forget that Hamas bears ultimate responsibility for the dire humanitarian situation in Gaza. It’s a tremendous concern of ours.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay. Let me ask you about the peace efforts that are taking place. Now, there are reports that the unveiling of the plan, the deal of the century, has been pushed back. Can – do you have any comment on that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I would object to the premise of the question, your statement in that question. We have not unveiled the peace plan at this time. That will be unveiled by Mr. Kushner and Mr. Greenblatt when it is ready. And when it’s ready to be unveiled, they will unveil it.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: And lastly, last week you guys released some funds or some aid to the Palestinian Authority. I believe it was sent to the security forces. Can you share with us the amount of that aid? Is that a one-time thing, or is it part of the sort of unfreezing of the funds to the Palestinian Authority?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I’m going to have to get back to you on that issue. I don’t have any information for you on that today. Okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Russia?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Hi.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Russia?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay, two quick questions. First of all, on the sanctions that were announced yesterday, one of the requirements for Russia to avoid further sanctions is to allow inspections to make sure that they’re not using chemical weapons. Does the State Department have any reason to think that Russia is going to allow that? And is the U.S. expecting Russia to allow that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I mean, that’s asking us to look into the future, and we don’t know what the future holds. I think that’s a hypothetical question, so I don’t have an answer for you.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But the U.S. is fully expecting to have some kind of inspections take place, then, according to this law?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have anything for you on that today, and I’m not going to get ahead of anything that happens in the near future. Okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay, well, that’s what the law says.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yep.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But my other question is on the – is the U.S. then currently preparing for this next round of sanctions, then?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: As you well know, we don’t forecast sanctions. We have complied with the law in announcing those sanctions just yesterday, and we will comply with the law going forward, of course, as we always would. Okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Heather, just to get a follow-on on that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, sure. Hi, Gardiner.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So you – in the case of Iran, you have this 12-point plan of what behavior you want the government to implement in order to lift sanctions. You have a whole series of sanctions that are now revolving around Russia having to do with CAATSA, Magnitsky, now weapons. Can you give us some global sense of what these sanctions are trying to achieve from an American foreign policy perspective? What are you looking for from Russia? Why do we have sanctions on them? What’s your goal? And when’s the – when’s the periodicity of these things?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Sure. I think I would start by answering that question with this: That we approach every country very differently. Every country that we have a relationship or even countries that we don’t have relationships with are viewed through a separate lens. So what may be appropriate for one country is maybe not necessarily appropriate for another country.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The United States Government has determined that sanctions can be a very effective tool in trying to bring various governments to the table to negotiate with us or try to encourage countries to comply or to return to a better set of behaviors. So this is one tool that we have in a very big toolkit. The State Department works closely with Treasury and OFAC and other entities to implement, study, and enforce sanctions, and that is part of what you’ve seen yesterday. Let’s remember that one of the things that has brought North Korea to the table is sanctions. And we have found sanctions to be very effective in many cases around the world. So the U.S. Government looks at that as an overall tool.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Right, so North Korea is a great example. Sanctions – as a result, you want to get rid of their nuclear program. Again, Iran, you’ve got a list of 12 things. Venezuela, you’ve got sort of a clear list. I’m trying to understand what your policy is with Russia. You’ve got a variety – myriad now of sanctions. What’s your goal?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Well, I think the President has addressed this and so has Secretary Pompeo. We’d like to have a better relationship with the Russian Government, recognizing that we have a lot of areas of mutual concern. It is a major country; we are a major country as well. And so when you have that, you are forced to have to have conversations with other governments. And sanctions is a way that we can try to encourage better behavior on the part of government. Now, I’m speaking in a broad-based sense, but that’s one way that we can encourage better behavior. Okay.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Same topic?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Could I ask a follow-up on that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: (Off-mike)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Sure. What is your name, miss?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: My name’s Emily, I’m from Buzzfeed News.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Emily, hi.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So if these sanctions are in part meant to encourage better behavior with Russia, Russia today came out and said that these sanctions – sort of as was expected – that these sanctions are not in keeping with the spirit of Helsinki. So – and I understand these sanctions were – they’re in keeping with the law, et cetera, but does this – or to put it a different way, is the cooperation that was sort of established at Helsinki – is the U.S. Government still planning on having that with Russia after yesterday’s sanctions?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: We tend to believe that dialogue is always an important issue. I think I had just addressed this with Gardiner, and that is trying to build a better relationship with countries that we need to cooperate with or we need to be able to have relations with, and that would be one example.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: And then just on the other point on the second tranche, and I don’t mean to get you into hypotheticals, but yesterday at the briefing they did say that if Russia doesn’t do certain things, including sort of admit wrongdoing and say that they weren’t going to do it again, that there would be second tranche. And today, Russia said this is ridiculous, we didn’t do that. So if they keep that position for the next 90 days, won’t there – won’t there, under the law, have to be a second tranche?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: And that’s why I would go back and say that we will comply with the law. We are well aware of what the law contains; we will comply with the law. But I’m not going to get ahead of what could happen 90 days from now. Okay.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: The same topic – same topic?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: (Off-mike)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Janne, go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Thank you, thank you, Heather. On North Korean and South Korean issues.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Okay.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: And – recently, South Korea imported North Korean coal. What is the U.S. position on the smuggling of North Korean coal into South Korea? Is that – do you think this is the – South Korea has violated sanctions?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I think – we’d say this: that we have a great relationship with the Government of South Korea. My understanding is that they are looking into reports of this. We encourage all countries to maintain sanctions, and to not skirt sanctions and make sure that sanctions are adhered to.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But two days ago, John Bolton, national security advisor, and South Korean national security advisor Chung Eui-yong, they had telephone conversation and John Bolton said that he trust or believe in the South Korean Government. What does it mean that you trust the South Korean Government, so --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Well, the Government of the Republic of Korea is an ally and longstanding partner of ours, and we closely coordinate with that government.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But allies – but they do something behind the United States is smuggling something else, so how you going to trust them?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Look, we trust when they say that they will investigate that they will investigate. We closely coordinate with them. They’ve been longstanding allies and partners, and we have a strong relationship with them.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Are you still investigations or waiting --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have anything more for you on that, okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: All right, thank you.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Thanks.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: (Off-mike.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Kylie, go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So there’s been discussion of potentially having another meeting with North Korea. Has there been any progress on that that --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: We have no meetings, no travel plans to announce today, and by the way, we just got back from a long flight, which I will remind you was a very long flight. Headed over to Asia, a long flight back. We’re okay with being here for a while.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: All right.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: (Off-mike.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Okay. Hi. Go ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well wait, can I just follow up real quick on that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Just hold on, hold on, hold on. He asked first. Go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Oh, I’m sorry.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Yes. So about the North Korean coal, yeah. And South Korean Government is going to announce the result of investigation about North Korean coal smuggling maybe later today. So now the issue is that – whether the United States is going to apply the second boycott to the Korean companies, which it appears to be violated the sanctions. So I just wonder whether you are going to apply the secondary boycott to the companies.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I think I just answered that, that the investigation was initiated by the Government of South Korea, and we will wait to hear from them on any announcements with regard to that, okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    And we’re going to have to wrap it up in just a minute. Elise, go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Just on the – you said there’s nothing new to announce. Are the delegations trying to get another negotiating session? Like your team in Asia, are they trying to get another negotiating session together with the North Koreans?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Look, I mean, I can tell you we continue to have conversations virtually every day, every other day or so --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: With the North Koreans?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: -- with the North Koreans, and when I say “conversations,” that can be by phone, that can be my message, that can be by email. Those are – they take different forms, those conversations do. So we continue to have conversations with the government. When – if and when we have travel announcements to make, I will certainly let you know, but we have nothing yet.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But I mean, obviously that you’ll make those announcements, but I’m just wondering if like – if there is efforts being made to put together another negotiating session.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have anything for you on that right now.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Can I have one question on the sanctions?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Okay? Okay. Sir, go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Yeah. Just to follow up, you said you have nothing planned, but Mr. Bolton mentioned that in the letter that Secretary Pompeo gave to Foreign Minister Ri, there was an offer to meet. Has North Korea responded to that offer yet?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have any information for you on that. This was a letter from the President to Chairman Kim, so I don’t have any visibility on what was actually in that letter or what conversations the White House may or may not be having. I’d have to refer you to the White House for anything on that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So you can confirm that there was an offer?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I can confirm there was a letter. Anything that the White House has said about that or Ambassador Bolton has said about that, I’d refer you back to them on those matters. When I have something to let you know, I certainly would be happy to.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Okay, last question.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: (Off-mike.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Two days ago, President Trump claimed most Chinese students in the United States are spies. I’m not asking you to comment on what he said, but State Department as a agency to issue visa to Chinese students, do you share the view – do you think most Chinese students in the United States are spies?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, I don’t have the President’s comments in front of me. I have not seen those comments, so I would hesitate to comment on his comments without having read it and had the full context. As you are well aware, we have many Chinese students studying in the United States. We have strong people-to-people ties with the Government of China, but of course there are concerns with some who might come into the United States and try to pick up some of our technology and other information and bring it back home for reasons that the United States Government would be concerned about. But we have a strong relationship with China and we enjoy having students studying in the United States from China, and I’ll just leave it at that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Okay, thanks. We’ve got to go, guys. We’ll see you soon.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    (The briefing was concluded at 3:28 p.m.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    # # #

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
    External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.


          Yemen: Dozens of Civilians Killed in School Bus Attack      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Al Jazeera
The Saudi-UAE military alliance at war with Yemen's Houthi rebels has been blamed for an air attack on a school bus that killed dozens of people, including at least 29 children.The vehicle came under attack as it was driving near a crowded market in the Houthi-controlled province of Saada, which borders Saudi Arabia, said the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)."A hospital supported by our team in Yemen received the bodies of 29 children under the age of 15 and 48 wounded, including 30 children," the ICRC said in a post on Twitter.Johannes Bruwer, the head of an ICRC delegation...
          By bashing Canada, Saudi Prince is weaponizing his oil wealth - Duluth News Tribune      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Duluth News Tribune

By bashing Canada, Saudi Prince is weaponizing his oil wealth
Duluth News Tribune
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in New York on March 27, 2018. Bloomberg photo by Jeenah Moon. For Saudi Arabia, a new version of checkbook diplomacy is taking shape. The kingdom used to pursue a behind-the-scenes foreign policy, ...

and more »

          Saudi Oil-Production Data Sow Confusion      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia has pressed independent energy analysts to alter their estimates of its oil production, people familiar with the matter said, a move that could put it in conflict with other members of the fractious Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries.
          Customer Quality Engineer      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
IN-Muncie, Direct Hire. Travel for this position. Job Purpose Work with customers in the Rail Industry in the U.S. as well as export units to Egypt, Saudi Arabia and others. Ensure that locomotive build process complies with the Customer specification. Analyze vendor supplied components as per the specifications established by various types of reference materials such as prints. This involves performing prod
          Michelle Rempel: Update on the Saudi dispute with Canada      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

In this new video, Conservative MP Michelle Rempel presents her party's stand on the ongoing diplomatic crisis between Canada and Saudi Arabia:


          8/10/2018: Gulf/region: ‘Canada mishandled Saudi Arabia matter’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Canada should have been more professional and more respectful in its approach with Saudi Arabia, a former Canadian ambassador to Riyadh has said. “In my view, the purpose of foreign policy is to advance Canadian interests. Put simply, that is what we...
          Dozens killed — many of them children — in Saudi coalition airstrike on a bus in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

An airstrike launched by the Saudi Arabian-led military coalition in Yemen hit a school bus in the rebel-held north of the country Thursday, killing and injuring dozens of people, many of them children, according to local and international medical officials.

The regional coalition, which is backed...


          8/10/2018: Region: Saudi oil supplies to Canada to continue      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Arow over human rights in Saudi Arabia will not have any impact on Saudi oil supplies to Canada, its energy minister said yesterday, reassuring customers after Riyadh froze new trade with Canada and ruled out mediation efforts. Saudi Arabia, angered...
          8/10/2018: Sport: Omar thanks Al Ain      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

UAE midfielder Omar Abdul Rahman has tweeted his thanks to Al Ain after completing a one-season loan to Saudi Arabia’s Al Hilal for a regional record fee of €14 million (Dh59.5 million) this week. Following Gonzalo Higuain’s €18 million loan from...
          2018 Hajj: Be of good conduct, Obaseki tells Edo pilgrims      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
obaseki1 300x200 - 2018 Hajj: Be of good conduct, Obaseki tells Edo pilgrims

Gov. Godwin Obaseki of Edo on Thursday advised the 130 Saudi Arabia-bound pilgrims from the state to be of good conduct while in the Holy land. Obaseki, who gave the advice in a farewell address to the pilgrims at the Hajj Camp in Benin, charged them to make the state proud and a reference point […]

The post 2018 Hajj: Be of good conduct, Obaseki tells Edo pilgrims appeared first on Politics Nigeria.


          The Best of All in a Day, Aug 9, 2018: "Former Ambassador on Saudi-Canada Row"      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It's a diplomatic crisis that all started with a tweet. As the temperature continues to rise in the row between Canada and Saudi Arabia, some are asking whether Twitter is the right place to carry out diplomacy. We put that question to Canada's former ambassador to the Middle Eastern kingdom.
          SORRY LIBERALS: Your "resistance" to Donald Trump is doomed to fail      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
"After years lobbyist for repressive and corrupt countries like Saudi Arabia and Israel....corrupting the system to it's core". Lol, she's so awesome. Definitely my favorite jew bitch. I'm going to marry her one day.
          Saudi Order Uproots Students' Lives in Canada      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia’s diplomatic row with Canada has upended the lives of thousands of Saudi students at Canadian universities, forcing them to leave the country less than a month before the fall semester starts.
          Dozens killed — many of them children — in Saudi coalition airstrike on a bus in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

An airstrike launched by the Saudi Arabian-led military coalition in Yemen hit a school bus in the rebel-held north of the country Thursday, killing and injuring dozens of people, many of them children, according to local and international medical officials.

The regional coalition, which is backed...


          Dozens killed — many of them children — in Saudi coalition airstrike on a bus in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

An airstrike launched by the Saudi Arabian-led military coalition in Yemen hit a school bus in the rebel-held north of the country Thursday, killing and injuring dozens of people, many of them children, according to local and international medical officials.

The regional coalition, which is backed...


          Tesla stock sinks as reality sinks in      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Now the real work begins.

Two days after a choice investment from Saudi Arabia and a surprise tweet from Elon Musk sent Tesla’s stock skyrocketing, shares are coming back down to earth today as questions begin to emerge about the viability of Musk’s possible plan to take the company private.

After hitting a high of $367, Tesla’s stock was down almost 6% in late-day trading. That means the company has lost almost all of the value created in the wake of news on Tuesday that Tesla could soon go private–a move Musk says will alleviate the grind of quarterly earnings reports and short-term goals.

[Screenshot via Google]
But how the move would work remains a bit of a mystery. As Bloomberg wrote earlier today, the company hasn’t said who would front the estimated $60 billion needed to take Tesla private. Analysts who cover Tesla are confused, and investors probably are, too. Meanwhile, the SEC is said to be looking into Musk’s tweet, because announcing a big stock-moving corporate move on Twitter is unconventional, to say the least.


          Saudi Arabian Stock Market Predictions Based on Artificial Intelligence: Returns up to 23.11% in 3 Days      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Package Name: By Country - Saudi Arabian Stocks
Recommended Positions: Long
Forecast Length: 3 Days (08/05/2018 - 08/08/2018)
I Know First Average: 2.31%

Read The Full Forecast


Daily Stock Market Predictions

The post Saudi Arabian Stock Market Predictions Based on Artificial Intelligence: Returns up to 23.11% in 3 Days appeared first on Stock Forecast Based On a Predictive Algorithm | I Know First |.


          Airstrike reportedly hits bus full of children on field trip      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The strike was carried out Thursday by the Saudi Arabian-led coalition, which is backed in this war by the U.S.

          8/9/2018: NEWS: UBC trying to help Saudi students      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The University of British Columbia is doing everything it can to support Saudi Arabian students ordered to leave over a dispute between Canada and Saudi Arabia, says UBC president Santa Ono. In a statement Wednesday, Ono said UBC has about 280 new and...
          8/9/2018: NEWS | CANADA: Canada stands firm on Saudi human rights abuses      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says diplomatic talks with Saudi Arabia will continue but he’s not backing down on Canada’s criticism of the kingdom over the arrest of several social activists last week. Trudeau said Foreign Affairs Minister...
          8/9/2018: NEWS: Saudis warn of more retaliation      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Saudi Arabia said it will continue to ratchet up pressure on Canada for criticizing the recent arrests of women activists, as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau upheld his stance on human rights. The kingdom’s foreign minister, Adel Al-Jubeir, said...
          8/9/2018: NEWS | WORLD: KILLER CRUCIFIED      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Saudi Arabia executed and crucified a Myanmar man in the holy city of Mecca Wednesday in a rare form of punishment reserved for the most egregious crimes. Elias Abulkalaam Jamaleddeen was accused of breaking into the home of a woman from Myanmar,...
          Here Are 5 Reasons Why Paul Manafort Will Receive Every Benefit of the Doubt      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The wealthy Manafort has a major advantage in this trial.

The trial of Paul Manafort entered Day Eight this morning in Judge T.S. Ellis III’s federal courtroom in Alexandria, Virginia, where President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager continues to battle multiple charges of bank fraud and tax evasion. But the wealthy Manafort has a major advantage in this trial: class privilege—unlike countless poor or lower middle-class Americans who are crushed by the U.S.’ judicial system and the Prison/Industrial Complex. 

The U.S. has, per capita, the most prisoners in the world—more than Saudi Arabia, more than Iran, more than China, more than Russia. The U.S has 5% of the world’s population but 25% of its prison population; in other words, one in four of the world’s prisoners are incarcerated in the U.S. And as a rule, it isn’t men of privilege like Manafort who are being locked up.

Here are five reasons why Manafort will receive every benefit of the doubt in his trial.

1. Judge Ellis Is Skeptical About the Charges Manafort Is Facing 

Throughout Manafort’s trial, Judge Ellis has been quick to express his skepticism about the federal government’s case against Manafort—often discouraging testimony about his relationship with Ukrainian oligarchs. Ellis, in fact, has asked attorneys to refrain from using the word “oligarch,” which he considers prejudicial. Ellis has made it clear, throughout the trial, that he believes prosecutors are the ones who have the heavy lifting to do in this case—and certainly, in theory, prosecutors should always be the ones with the burden of proof in a democracy. But the reality is that in the U.S., prosecutors often have the upper hand when defendants are poor; in Manafort’s trial, prosecutors—not the defendant—are the ones facing an uphill climb.

Even Judge Andrew Napolitano—a right-wing libertarian and judicial analyst for Fox News—has criticized Ellis for “showing an extraordinary bias against the government” and asserted, “I’m not happy with this judge….If you feel that negatively about the government, you shouldn’t be on the case.”

2. Manafort Has the Best Legal Defense Money Can Buy

Thanks to the Prison/Industrial Complex and overzealous prosecutors, many public defenders are overwhelmed in a way that Manafort’s attorneys are not. Manafort not only has a sympathetic judge—he has skillful attorneys like Kevin Downing as part of his defense team. And Downing, this week, has been attacking the testimony and credibility of the prosecution’s star witness: Manafort’s former business partner Rick Gates, painting him as a sleazy opportunist who is not be trusted. In so many cases, America’s poor can only dream of having the type of defense team that is defending Manafort.

3. Manafort Might Have a Sympathetic Jury

Voir dire, the process of jury selection, requires incredible skill on the part of attorneys—and even then, they cannot be entirely sure what biases a juror might have or not have. Manafort has an advantage in that he has both a skeptical judge and an aggressive defense team, both of whom can play a role in convincing the jury that Manafort is being treated unfairly. That isn’t to say, with certainty, that he won’t be convicted, but it’s certainly advantageous when a defendant has both a judge and a defense team planting doubts in the minds of jurors.

4. Even If He’s Convicted, Manafort Could Receive Lenient Sentence

Ellis has noted that Manafort, if convicted of multiple bank fraud and charges, could spend the rest of his life in prison. But guidelines for these white-collar charges call for sentences well below the maximum allowable, and even if Manafort is convicted, the sentencing judge could exercise discretion and be as lenient as the law allows.

To his credit, Ellis has become critical of mandatory minimum sentences in another area of federal law: drug cases. In late June, when Ellis sentenced convicted meth dealer Frederick Turner to 40 years in prison, he asserted that he would have much preferred to be more lenient but was bound by mandatory minimum laws. All Ellis could do, he lamented, was “express my displeasure” and impose a sentence on Turner he didn’t want to impose. 

Turner is feeling the full weight of the Prison/Industrial Complex, even though Ellis isn’t happy about it; with Manafort, there’s more room for leniency.

5. Manafort Could Receive a Presidential Pardon 

Even if Manafort is convicted and sentenced to prison, he has yet another possible escape route: President Trump, who has made it clear that he considers Manafort’s incarceration during the trial “very unfair.” On June 15, Trump tweeted, “Wow, what a tough sentence for Paul Manafort, who has represented Ronald Reagan, Bob Dole and many other top political people and campaigns. Didn’t know Manafort was the head of the mob. What about (James) Comey and Crooked Hillary and all of the others? Very unfair!”

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani recently implied that Manafort could receive a presidential pardon, telling the New York Daily News, “When the whole thing is over, things might get cleaned up with some presidential pardons.” And if Manafort is convicted and sentenced to prison, he might be joining former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and other prominent right-wingers who have received presidential pardons from Trump.


          Dozens killed — many of them children — in Saudi coalition airstrike on a bus in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

An airstrike launched by the Saudi Arabian-led military coalition in Yemen hit a school bus in the rebel-held north of the country Thursday, killing and injuring dozens of people, many of them children, according to local and international medical officials.

The regional coalition, which is backed...


          Sources: Tesla's board to meet with advisers to discuss Musk's take-private proposal; source: Musk previously talked with Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund (CNBC)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

CNBC:
Sources: Tesla's board to meet with advisers to discuss Musk's take-private proposal; source: Musk previously talked with Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund  —  - The Tesla board is taking Elon Musk's offer to take the company private at $420-per-share seriously and may tell Musk to recuse himself …


          Why Is Andrew Scheer Still Failing To Condemn The Saudis?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   


It has now been three days since the clown prince of Saudi Arabia launched his deranged assault against Canada.

He's bad mouthing our country, trying to hurt our economy, his foreign minister is demanding a grovelling apology.

But still the hapless Andrew Scheer has not come to the defence of his country.

And all we've got so far from his treasonous Cons is this.
Read more »
          Saudi exodus a blow to hospital system      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The impact of losing 54 medical trainees from London’s health-care system is still being sorted, but it is clear that it could be bleak. Days after Saudi Arabian medical residents and research fellows were ordered out of Canada by their government, there is scant information from London Health Sciences Centre, St. Joseph’s Health Care or Western […]
          Letters: Aug. 10      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Door opens for Canadians Regarding the article London hospital patients caught in fallout of Saudi-Canada spat (Aug. 9). Canada’s dispute with Saudi Arabia has revealed that “visa trainees,” including 800 Saudis, buy Canadian medical residency positions. Canadians seem surprised by this, and concerned that Canadians are excluded from these positions. It’s not surprising that universities and hospitals are […]
          No plans to retaliate against Saudis: Morneau      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks at a press conference in Vancouver, B.C. on Monday, August 6, 2018 as MP Randy Boissonnault looks on. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jimmy Jeong

Canada still seeking clarity from Saudi Arabia on diplomatic dispute


          Commentary: What an empowered woman in Saudi Arabia looks like      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Many were hopeful when Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman shared his bold ambitions, one of which was allowing Saudi women to apply for driving licenses,, says one observer.
          43, mostly children killed in Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

43, mostly children killed in Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen

DF-Xinhua Report

At least 43 civilians, mostly children, were killed on Thursday when Saudi-led coalition air strikes hit buses in Yemen's northern province of Saada, the head of Saada Health Office Yahya Shayem told Xinhua.

   "A total of 43 people, mostly pupils under the age of 10, were killed and 64 were injured when two Saudi-led airstrikes hit passenger buses in Dhahyan popular market," Shayem said, adding that "the victims were mostly pupils who were on their way to attend a summer school in Dhahyan."

   Meanwhile, head of delegation for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in Yemen, said on a twitter that "scores killed, even more injured, mostly under the age of 10" after the attack targeted a bus that carries children in the Dhahyan market.

   The organization stressed that "civilians must be protected during conflict under international humanitarian law."

   However, the Saudi-owned Al Arabiya television quoted a statement by the Saudi-led coalition as saying that "Thursday's airstrikes targeted Iranian-allied Houthi rebels who fired a ballistic missile on Wednesday at the Saudi commercial city in border Jazan region."

   In response, Houthi spokesman Mohammed Abdulsalam mocked the coalition statement as "absolutely ridiculous."

   "They killed pupils driving to school ... this is a war crime," Abdulsalam tweeted.

   The Houthi spokesman's comments came at the same time the coalition warplanes hit the Houthi-controlled capital Sanaa 11 times, with no reports of casualties yet. The airstrikes targeted Sabeen Square and two military camps in Sanaa.

   The Saada attack was the latest in a series of recent airstrikes against civilians launched by the Saudi-led coalition on Yemen.

   Last week, the Saudi-led coalition airstrikes struck the gate of al-Thawra hospital and adjacent fish market in Yemen's Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, killing 52 civilians and wounding 102 others.

   The impoverished Arab country has been locked in a civil war since the Houthi rebels overran much of Yemen militarily and seized all northern provinces in 2014, including the capital Sanaa.

   Saudi Arabia leads an Arab military coalition that has intervened in the Yemen war since 2015 to support the government of exiled President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi.

   More than 10,000 Yemenis, mostly civilians, have been killed in the war, and about 3 million have been displaced.

© DAILY FINLAND Developed by : orangebd
#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000
          Hamilton in imminent danger of losing 153 doctors      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Ivy Lynn Bourgeault, lead of the Pan-Canadian Health Human Resources Network based at the University of Ottawa, says the situation with Canada and Saudi Arabia could make organizations rethink the potential consequences of diplomatic spat on the health-care system.

Heavy local reliance on Saudi doctors means it will be disruptive if they all depart by Sept. 1, says expert.


          Scores of Dead Yemeni Citizens ‘All About Billions’ in US Arms Sales to Riyadh      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A Saudi-led coalition airstrike reportedly struck a school bus transporting dozens of children, taking 50 lives and injuring 77 other people, according to a US NGO. The US, which supports the coalition, and the UN, called on Saudi Arabia to conduct an investigation.
          Wednesday 8 August      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
We unpack the fallout between Canada and Saudi Arabia as the Kingdom starts selling off its Canadian assets. Plus: how the Republicans’ toxic campaign strategy played out in Ohio and Argentina’s contentious vote on abortion.
          2018 Hajj: Obaseki Urges Intending Muslim Pilgrims To Be Good Ambassadors      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

LEADERSHIP

…donates bus to Pilgrims’ Welfare Board Edo State Governor, Mr. Godwin Obaseki, on Thursday charged the 130 Edo State’s intending pilgrims, comprising 77 females and 53 males, to be good ambassadors of the state and country in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Obaseki, who gave the charge in his farewell message to the pilgrims at the Hajj […]

The post 2018 Hajj: Obaseki Urges Intending Muslim Pilgrims To Be Good Ambassadors appeared first on Leadership Newspaper.


          2018 Global Ball Mill (Mining) Market Research Report by Manufactures and Region      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
(EMAILWIRE.COM, August 09, 2018 ) Introduction:
A ball mill is a type of grinder used to grind materials into extremely fine powder for use in mineral dressing processes, paints, pyrotechnics, ceramics and selective laser sintering.
Scope of the GlobalBall Mill (Mining) Market Report
This report focuses on the Ball Mill (Mining) in global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa. This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application.
Request a Sample of this Report @ http://www.orbisresearch.com/contacts/request-sample/2199757
The worldwide market for Ball Mill (Mining) is expected to grow at a CAGR of roughly -0.2% over the next five years, will reach 460 million US$ in 2023, from 460 million US$ in 2017, according to a new GIR (Global Info Research) study.
As Chinese overall economic downward trend in the past few years, and international economic situation is complicated, in the next few years there will be many uncertainties for Ball Mill industry. Attracted by the market profits, more and more companies have entered into Ball Mill industry, the competition between manufacturers at home and abroad is fierce for the time being.

Ball Mill demand has a certain space, but basically showing the scarcity of high-end products due to technology barrier and excess capacity of low-end products. There is increasing demand for high-end products.

Despite the presence of competition problems, due to the clear global economy recovery trend and industry profits, investors are still optimistic about this area; there will be more investments to enter the field.

Along with the development of Chinese domestic Ball Mill industry, the performance distance will shorten gradually, compared with the imported.

As large demand of high-end products at home and abroad, many companies begin to focus on the field of high end. Currently, the Chinese Ball Mill industry tries to transit to high-end Ball Mill field actively, as well as extends downstream industry chain.

Although sales of Ball Mill brought a lot of opportunities, the study group recommends the new entrants just having money but without technical advantage and downstream support do not enter into the Ball Mill field abruptly.

In recent years, construction machinery, mining machinery develop rapidly, in this area, energy-saving ball mill equipment becomes one of the faster-growing mining machinery and equipment. Therefore, many domestic machinery manufacturers made the ball mill, crusher related products as the company's flagship product, and have increased investment and research and development efforts, as an effort to take a chance to compete with other manufacturers and look forward to sharing the considerable potential profits.

In addition, from China's economic development we can conclude that in the process of urbanization and industrialization, highway, railway, water conservancy and other major infrastructure investment continues to increase, and forming a rigid demand to the ball mill equipment, at the same time, this fact will promote the ball mill sales.

In this era of rapid changes of market competition, ball mill manufacturers should know how to grasp the opportunity and seize market opportunities, in order to take a place for the development of the industry.
Browse the Full Report@http://www.orbisresearch.com/reports/index/global-ball-mill-mining-market-by-manufacturers-regions-type-and-application-forecast-to-2023
This report covers Analysis of GlobalBall Mill (Mining) Market Segment by Manufacturers
DCD
Metso
FLSmidth
Furukawa
KHD Humboldt Wedag
Gebr. Pfeiffer
Outotec
MIKRONS
CITIC HIC
Shenyang Metallurgy
Liaoning Provincial Machinery
Zhongde Heavy Industry
Henan Hongji Mine
Hongxing Machinery
Pengfei Group
Fote Heavy Machinery
Shanghai Minggong

GlobalBall Mill (Mining) Market Segment by regional analysis covers
North America (USA, Canada and Mexico)
Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy)
Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia)
South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.)
Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)
Make an enquiry before buying this report @ http://www.orbisresearch.com/contacts/enquiry-before-buying/2199757
GlobalBall Mill (Mining) Market Segment by Type
Wet grinding Ball Mill
Dry grinding Ball Mill
GlobalBall Mill (Mining) Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into
Metal Mining
Mineral Mining
Others
Some of the Points cover in GlobalBall Mill (Mining) Market Research Report is:
Chapter 1: DescribeBall Mill (Mining) Industry
Introduction,
Product Scope,
Market Overview,
Market Opportunities,
Market Risk,
Market Driving Force
Chapter 2: To analyze the top manufacturers ofBall Mill (Mining) Industry in 2016 and 2017
Sales
Revenue and price
Chapter 3: Competitive analysis among the top manufacturers in 2016 and 2017
Sales
Revenue and market share
Chapter 4: GlobalBall Mill (Mining)Market by regions from 2013 to 2018
Sales
Revenue and market share
Chapter 5, 6, 7 and 8: GlobalBall Mill (Mining) Market by key countries in these regions
Sales
Revenue and market share
Chapter 9 and 10: GlobalBall Mill (Mining)Market by type and application from 2013 to 2018
Sales
Revenue and market share
Growth rate
Chapter 11:Ball Mill (Mining) Industry Market forecast from 2018 to 2023
Regions
Type and application with sales and revenue
Chapter 12 and 13:Ball Mill (Mining) Industry
Sales channel
Distributors
Traders and dealers
Appendix
Data source
About Us:
Orbis Research (orbisresearch.com) is a single point aid for all your market research requirements. We have vast database of reports from the leading publishers and authors across the globe. We specialize in delivering customized reports as per the requirements of our clients. We have complete information about our publishers and hence are sure about the accuracy of the industries and verticals of their specialization. This helps our clients to map their needs and we produce the perfect required market research study for our clients.

Contact Us:
Hector Costello
Senior Manager Client Engagements
4144N Central Expressway,
Suite 600, Dallas,
Texas - 75204, U.S.A.
Phone No.: +1 (214) 884-6817; +912064101019



Hector Costello
+1 (214) 884-6817
sales@orbisresearch.com

Source: EmailWire.Com
          Audiophile HeadphoneMarket Global Size, Share, Trend & Forecast 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
(EMAILWIRE.COM, August 09, 2018 )
Introduction:

Audiophile Headphone is one kind of Headphone used in Headphone lover or pursuer. It is of high Sound quality.

Scope of the Global Audiophile Headphone Market Report

This report focuses on the Audiophile Headphone in global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa. This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application.

Request a Sample of this Report @ http://www.orbisresearch.com/contacts/request-sample/2199755

The worldwide market for Audiophile Headphone is expected to grow at a CAGR of roughly 8.0% over the next five years, will reach 300 million US$ in 2023, from 190 million US$ in 2017, according to a new GIR (Global Info Research) study.

The market estimations in this report are based on the marketed sale price of Dental Handpiece (excluding any discounts provided by the manufacturer, distributor, wholesaler or traders). The percentage splits, Market Share, and breakdowns of the product segments are derived on the basis of weightages assigned to each of the segments on the basis of their utilization rate and average sale price. The regional splits of the overall Dental Handpiece market and its sub-segments are based on the percentage adoption or utilization of the given product in the respective region or country.

Major players in the market are identified through secondary research and their market revenues determined through primary and secondary research. Secondary research included the research of the annual and financial reports of the top manufacturers; whereas, primary research included extensive interviews of key opinion leaders and industry experts such as experienced front-line staff, directors, CEOs and marketing executives. The percentage splits, Market Share Growth Rate and breakdowns of the product markets are determined through using secondary sources and verified through the primary sources.

All possible factors that influence the markets included in this research study have been accounted for, viewed in extensive detail, verified through primary research, and analyzed to get the final quantitative and qualitative data. The market size for top-level markets and sub-segments is normalized, and the effect of inflation, economic downturns, and regulatory & policy changes or other factors are not accounted for in the market forecast. This data is combined and added with detailed inputs and analysis from QYResearch and presented in this report.

Browse the Full Report@http://www.orbisresearch.com/reports/index/global-audiophile-headphone-market-by-manufacturers-regions-type-and-application-forecast-to-2023

This report coversAnalysis of GlobalAudiophile Headphone Market Segment by Manufacturers

Beats
Harman
Bose
Sennheiser
Audio-Technica
Sony
Beyerdynamic
Grado
Philips
Shure
Pioneer
Audeze
Etymotic Research
HiFiMan
OPPO

GlobalAudiophile Headphone Market Segment by regional analysis covers

North America (USA, Canada and Mexico)
Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy)
Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia)
South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.)
Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

Make an enquiry before buying this report @ http://www.orbisresearch.com/contacts/enquiry-before-buying/2199755

GlobalAudiophile Headphone Market Segment by Type

Wired Headphone
Wireless Headphones

GlobalAudiophile Headphone Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into

Below 18
18-34
Above 34

Some of the Points cover in GlobalAudiophile Headphone Market Research Report is:

Chapter 1: DescribeAudiophile Headphone Industry

Introduction,
Product Scope,
Market Overview,
Market Opportunities,
Market Risk,
Market Driving Force
Chapter 2: To analyze the top manufacturers ofAudiophile Headphone Industry in 2016 and 2017

Sales
Revenue and price
Chapter 3: Competitive analysis among the top manufacturers in 2016 and 2017

Sales
Revenue and market share
Chapter 4: GlobalAudiophile HeadphoneMarket by regions from 2013 to 2018

Sales
Revenue and market share
Chapter 5, 6, 7 and 8: GlobalAudiophile Headphone Market by key countries in these regions

Sales
Revenue and market share
Chapter 9 and 10: GlobalAudiophile HeadphoneMarket by type and application from 2013 to 2018

Sales
Revenue and market share
Growth rate
Chapter 11:Audiophile Headphone Industry Market forecast from 2018 to 2023

Regions
Type and application with sales and revenue
Chapter 12 and 13:Audiophile Headphone Industry

Sales channel
Distributors
Traders and dealers
Appendix
Data source
About Us:

Orbis Research (orbisresearch.com) is a single point aid for all your market research requirements. We have vast database of reports from the leading publishers and authors across the globe. We specialize in delivering customized reports as per the requirements of our clients. We have complete information about our publishers and hence are sure about the accuracy of the industries and verticals of their specialization. This helps our clients to map their needs and we produce the perfect required market research study for our clients.

Contact Us:

Hector Costello

Senior Manager Client Engagements

4144N Central Expressway,

Suite 600, Dallas,

Texas - 75204, U.S.A.

Phone No.: +1 (214) 884-6817; +912064101019


Hector Costello
+1 (214) 884-6817
sales@orbisresearch.com

Source: EmailWire.Com
          Saudi official says Canada dispute won't affect oil sales      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia's diplomatic dispute with Canada over its arrest of women's rights activists will not affect the...
          8/9/2018: LETTERS: Think you’re being treated unfairly? Try life in Saudi      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
I WOULD like to take issue with Sarah Khan (Letters, August 8) where she states: “Many of these women wear a hijab and nobody bullied them into doing so.” In the early 1980s my husband worked in Saudi Arabia for some years. I joined him with my son,...
          Trump Stays Publicly Quiet While Saudi Arabia-Canada Tensions Rise      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Trump administration is privately trying to coax Saudi Arabia to dial back hostilities with Canada even as the U.S. maintains a hands-off public approach to the escalating...
          Canada - Saudi Arabia's explosion at a Canadian tweet shows how rules have changed      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Analysis: The Saudi kingdom erupted in fury at criticism of its human rights record. Will the West resist Saudi pressure and back Canada?
          Saudi Arabia's feud with Canada is childish and stupid      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The last time Canada undertook an act of aggression was in 1999, when it declared war on the United States - in the comedic universe of “South Park,” that is. But few were...
          Canada - Father Raymond J. de Souza: Saudi Arabia's global ambitions leave no room for meddling      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The diplomatic fight between Saudi Arabia and Canada bears watching, and not for the astonishing novelty that anyone could really take offence at our prime minister, whose...
          August 9: Class warfare      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia Student, Yemen Airstrike, Ontario Clapping Out Media, Argentina Abortion, Farm Stripped and more.
          Canada seeks support in row with Saudi Arabia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Canada has sought help to resolve its dispute with Saudi Arabia from countries that have previously criticised the kingdom for human rights abuses.
          Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s Plan To Take Tesla Private      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
teslalogoShortly after an article by the Financial Times confirmed that the Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund had amassed a $2 billion stake in Tesla, Tesla CEO Elon Musk announced that he was considering taking the company private with a share buyback at a $420 price point. His initial tweet was confirmed within a few hours with a new blog post on Tesla's website, where the company shared an internal email from CEO Elon Musk to all Tesla employees sharing his logic for the move
          Saudi Arabia Buys Large Stake In Tesla, Elon Tweets Tesla May Go Private — Trading Halted On Stock Surge      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Tesla stock surges after the Saudi Arabia wealth fund makes substantial investment
          As Saudi medical trainees ordered home, Canada prepares for potential impact on hospitals      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
As a diplomatic showdown escalates, Saudi Arabia has told about 800 medical residents and fellows they must leave Canada and do their training elsewhere. - Source: www.cbc.ca
          Maersk-IBM blockchain platform signs up 94 clients      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Maersk said on Thursday that 94 companies and organizations have so far joined a blockchain platform that it is developing in partnership with IBM, an initiative aimed at providing more efficient and secure methods for conducting global shipping trade. Port operators in Singapore, Hong Kong and Rotterdam, customs authorities in the Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, […]
          'We Just Bombed a SCHOOL BUS': Democratic Senator Says 'We Need to End' American Support for Attacks in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Dozens of children were reportedly killed in a Saudi attack on Yemen.

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT) denounced American military aid to Saudi Arabia following reports of a devastating airstrike on a Yemeni school bus on Thursday.

CNN reported that dozens of children under the age of 15 were killed in the attack, and many more were injured, according to reports from Yemeni officials and the Red Cross.

"U.S. bombs. U.S. targeting. U.S. mid air support," Murphy said in a tweet. "And we just bombed a SCHOOL BUS."

He continued: "The Saudi/UAE/U.S. bombing campaign is getting more reckless, killing more civilians, and strengthening terrorists inside Yemen. We need to end this - NOW."

In a statement, Pentagon spokeswoman Rebecca Rebarich said that American aid helps reduce civilian casualties. However, a recent review of airstrikes by the United Nations found that "measures taken by the Saudi Arabia-led coalition in its targeting process to minimize child casualties, if any, remain largely ineffective."

American support for the Saudi attacks in Yemen began under President Barack Obama, and President Donald Trump has vigorously continued the policy and ramped up munitions sales to the U.S. ally.

“In retrospect, the problem is that we did just enough to produce the perception of complicity, without doing enough to actually influence their behavior,” a former senior Obama administration official told the Washington Post. “We tried to take this principled middle position, which left us stuck.”

Meanwhile, the war has caused what the United Nations says is a humanitarian disaster. In addition to the thousands of deaths from direct attacks, millions are believed to be on the brink of starvation because of the crisis.


          Project Engineer      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Mechanical Electrical Fire Comms Engineers needed for a minimum 1 year contract on Saudi Arabia AirportMy client is a specialist M &amp E Contractor with a turnover of over 80 million and offices nationwideMy client offers a bespoke engineering package specialising in large infrastructure projects to include Network Rail Cross Rail Tunn
          Saudis would only hurt themselves by cancelling Light Armoured Vehicle contract      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia is expecting a full apology from Canada for a tweet that raised questions about human rights issues in the Middle East country. It is unlikely that would be coming anytime soon. So the dispute between Saudi Arabia and Canada continues. In recent days, Riyadh suspended diplomatic ties with Canada, expelled the Canadian ambassador […]
          Is the BBC an Iranian proxy?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Yemen war: Saudi-led air strike on bus kills 29 children

A Yemeni man holds a boy injured in an air strike in Saada (9 August 2018)Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionThe Red Cross said a hospital it supports in Saada had received dozens of casualties
At least 29 children have been killed and 30 wounded in a Saudi-led coalition air strike in Yemen, the International Committee of the Red Cross says.
The children were travelling on a bus that was hit at a market in Dahyan, in the northern province of Saada. 
The health ministry run by the rebel Houthi movement said put the death toll at 43, and said 61 people were wounded.
The coalition, which is backing Yemen's government in a war with the Houthis, said its actions were "legitimate".
It insists it never deliberately targets civilians, but human rights groups have accused it of bombing markets, schools, hospitals and residential areas.

What happened in Saada?

Yemeni tribal elders told the Associated Press that the bus was hit as it passed through Dahyan market and that it was transporting local civilians, including many school children.
The vehicle was stationary when the attack happened, it added.
A doctor treats children injured by an air strike in Saada, Yemen (9 August 2018)Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionThe ICRC said it was sending extra supplies to help hospitals deal with the influx
The ICRC said a hospital it supported in Saada had received the bodies of 29 children, all of them under the age of 15, and 48 injured people, among them 30 children.
It sent additional supplies to the hospital to cope with the influx of patients.
Houthi-run Al-Masirah TV reported that 47 people were killed and 77 wounded, and broadcast graphic pictures showing the bodies of several young children, some of them wearing school uniform.

What has been the reaction?

Houthi spokesman Mohammed Abdul-Salam accused the coalition of showing "clear disregard for civilian life" by targeting a crowded public place.
The ICRC stressed that "under international humanitarian law, civilians must be protected during conflict", while the secretary-general of the Norwegian Refugee Council Jan Egeland called it a "grotesque, shameful" attack that showed "blatant disregard for rules of war".
Save the Children described the incident as "horrific", and called for a full, immediate and independent investigation into recent attacks on civilians and civilian infrastructure.
It was not immediately clear whether the bus was the target of the air strike, but coalition spokesman Col Turki al-Malki said the attack was "a legitimate military action, conducted in conformity with international humanitarian law". 
Smoke rises after a reported air strike in Sanaa, Yemen (9 August 2018)Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionAir strikes were reported in the rebel-held capital of Sanaa later on Thursday
He said it had hit "militants responsible for planning and targeting civilians" in the southern Saudi city of Jizan on Wednesday night, where one Yemeni resident was killed and 11 others were injured by fragments from an intercepted ballistic missile that was launched by the Houthis from neighbouring Amran province. 
He accused the rebels of using children as "tools and covers for their terrorist acts".
Map of Yemen showing location of Dahyan, Saada province
Later, air strikes were reported in the rebel-held Yemeni capital, Sanaa.
A week ago, at least 55 civilians were killed and 170 others wounded in a series of attacks on the rebel-held Red Sea port city of Hudaydah. The coalition denied that it had carried out air strikes in the area, and blamed the deaths on rebel mortar fire.

Why is there a war in Yemen?

Yemen has been devastated by a conflict that escalated in early 2015, when the Houthis seized control of much of the west of the country and forced President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi to flee abroad.
Media captionThe conflict in Yemen has been raging for years - but what is it all about?
Alarmed by the rise of a group they saw as an Iranian proxy, the UAE, Saudi Arabia and seven other Arab states intervened in an attempt to restore the government.
Almost 10,000 people - two-thirds of them civilians - have been killed and 55,000 others injured in the fighting, according to the United Nations.
The fighting and a partial blockade by the coalition has also left 22 million people in need of humanitarian aid, created the world's largest food security emergency, and led to a cholera outbreak that is thought to have affected a million people.

          Comment on Germany arms Saudi Arabian dictatorship by Saudis keep killing Yemeni children, British Conservatives complicit | Dear Kitty. Some blog      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[…] has clean hands, having opted to end its arms sales to Riyadh, but Britain, in common with other Nato powers, regards armaments industry shareholders’ […]
          Saudi-led Coalition Strikes School Bus In Yemen, Killing At Least 29 Children       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Dozens of students were returning from a summer camp when their driver paused to grab a something at a market in Yemen's Saada province. It was there, as the students sat waiting to resume their journey home on Thursday, that a Saudi-led coalition airstrike hit their school bus.

Hours later, well after the blast's violent rumble gave way to sirens and the victim's screams, a clearer sense of the human cost has emerged: At least 29 children under the age of 15, some as young as 6 years old, were killed in the attack, according to the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Citing "local officials," the head of the international aid group's delegation in Yemen says that in total at least 50 people died and dozens more were injured.

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres condemned the attack in a statement released by his spokesperson, saying he "expresses his deepest condolences to the families of the victims."

"The Secretary-General calls on all parties to respect their obligations under international humanitarian law, in particular the fundamental rules of distinction, proportionality and precautions in attack," his spokesperson, Farhan Haq, said Thursday. "The Secretary-General emphasizes that all parties must take constant care to spare civilians and civilian objects in the conduct of military operations."

And Guterres called for a prompt independent investigation into the incident.

Saudi Arabia, the driving force behind a coalition of its Arab neighbors, saw no reason to apologize, however. In a statement released through the state-run Saudi Press Agency, Riyadh called the airstrike a "legitimate military action" conducted in accordance with international law.

The coalition's spokesperson said the operation sought to target the militants responsible for a missile intercepted over Saudi civilian territory on Wednesday. Upon interception, Saudis say the missile exploded into fragments that killed one Yemeni civilian and injured 11 other people.

"The Coalition will take all necessary measures against the terrorist, criminal acts of the terrorist Iranian-Houthi militia, such as recruiting child soldiers, throwing them in battlefields and using them as tools and covers to their terrorist acts," coalition spokesperson Col. Turki al-Malki said in a statement.

The Iran-backed Shiite militia has controlled Yemen's northwest, including Saada, since ousting the country's internationally recognized government from the capital, Sanaa, in 2014.

It is with the stated aim of dislodging the Houthis, and restoring the previous government, that the Sunni coalition has waged a years-long airstrike campaign in the country with the support of the U.S. Since large-scale fighting erupted in 2015, the ensuing violence has left more than 10,000 people killed and the country's health infrastructure so badly battered, nearly 18 million Yemenis lack reliable access to food.

Norway Refugee Council Secretary-General Jan Egeland described Thursday's airstrike differently: "grotesque, shameful, indignant." He asserted that it evinces a "blatant disregard for rules of war when [a] bus carrying innocent school children is fair game for attack."

Houthi media broadcast what appears to be graphic scenes of the aftermath, depicting children drenched in blood and burned black by the blast. They wail in pain as medics attempt to treat them, standing beside boys missing limbs and gazing on with shell-shocked stares.

The frame then hovers over what appears to be a pile of bloodied bodies, unmoving.

Asked about the airstrike by the U.S.-backed coalition, State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert told reporters "we are certainly concerned."

"We call on the Saudi-led coalition to conduct a thorough and transparent investigation into the incident," she said.

Thursday's attack marks a grim milestone in a war that lately has seen yet another escalation, as coalition-backed Yemeni government forces have made a recent push to reclaim the key port city of Hodeidah from rebels. Just last week at least 55 people died in the city during a particularly bloody exchange of fire in residential areas and outside a hospital.

"How many more children will suffer or die before those who can act, do by putting a stop to this scourge?" UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore asked.

"It's hard to believe we live in a world where children should live in fear of such attacks, yet here we are," she added. "This doesn't have to be their reality though. Parties to the conflict and those who have influence over them, including Security Council members, can and should choose to end this catastrophe for the sake of Yemen's children."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

          TheFace: Sara Abdullah Alrumikhani, hospital customer-care manager      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
article author: 
Thu, 2018-08-09 22:17

Helping a new generation of Saudi students and graduates find their professional and personal path has become a life’s goal for Sara Abdullah Alrumikhani, a customer-care manager at Dr. Soliman Fakeeh Hospital, one of Jeddah’s leading medical facilities.

Alrumikhani, who was born to a Qassimi father and Syrian mother and raised in Jeddah, gained her master’s degree in health administration from the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania, US.

Main category: 

          FaceOf: Dr. Bandar bin Mohammed Al-Aiban, president of Saudi Arabia’s Human Rights Commission      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Author: 
ARAB NEWS
article author: 
ID: 
1533842894170174700
Thu, 2018-08-09 22:26

Dr. Bandar bin Mohammed Al-Aiban has been the president of Saudi Arabia’s Human Rights Commission since his appointment in 2009 upon a royal decree.
In 1979, Al-Aiban graduated from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles with a bachelor’s degree in industrial and systems engineering.
He also holds a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Southern California, and a Ph.D. in philosophy, political science and international relations from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore (1996).

Main category: 

          Silicon Valley sets out a path for Saudi women high-flyers      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
article author: 
Thu, 2018-08-09 21:01

JEDDAH: At the Google Community Space in San Francisco, two companies joined forces on Tuesday to encourage women-led start-ups from Saudi Arabia to Silicon Valley. 

Invested, a women and business empowerment event to inspire and equip the next generation of female leaders, was co-organized by Spark, the Bay Area’s largest community of young philanthropists working for gender equality, and Blossom, the first Jeddah-based accelerator to focus on women-led technology startups in Saudi Arabia 

Main category: 

          Trudeau defies Saudi Arabia and says Canada will stand up for human rights      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Trudeau defies Saudi Arabia and says Canada will stand up for human rightsSaudi foreign minister Adel al-Jubeir speaks to reporters in Riyadh on 8 August. Justin Trudeau has defied Saudi Arabia’s demand to withdraw Canada’s calls for the release of jailed civil rights activists and insisted that Canada will continue to defend human rights around the world, suggesting that the escalating diplomatic row between the two countries is set to continue.



          Saudis appear to threaten Canada with 9/11-style attack      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
(Business Insider) Saudi Arabia’s state media on Monday tweeted a graphic appearing to show an Air Canada airliner heading toward the Toronto skyline in a way that recalled the September 11, 2001, terrorist hijackings of airliners that struck the Twin Towers and the Pentagon. The graphic warned of “Sticking one’s nose where it doesn’t belong!” […]
          Rex Tillerson Literally Prevented A War      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Rex Tillerson really sucks, but he actually did a great thing here. In the months that followed his departure, press reports strongly suggested that the countries lobbying hardest for Tillerson's removal were Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, both of which were frustrated by Tillerson's attempts to mediate and end their blockade of Qatar. One report in the New York Times even suggested that the UAE ambassador to Washington knew that Tillerson would be forced out three months before he was fired in March.
          Women In Saudi Arabia Start A Harley-Davidson Chapter      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A month after Saudi women finally won the right to drive on June 24, eight of them are creating their own Harley-Davidson bike chapter.
          Over 50 Nigerian girls trapped in Saudi Arabia – NAPTIP      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The agency says the girls are working under slave-like conditions in people’s home.

The post Over 50 Nigerian girls trapped in Saudi Arabia – NAPTIP appeared first on Premium Times Nigeria. Reported by Premium Times Nigeria 7 hours ago.
          No plans to retaliate against Saudis: Morneau      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks at a press conference in Vancouver, B.C. on Monday, August 6, 2018 as MP Randy Boissonnault looks on. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jimmy Jeong

Canada still seeking clarity from Saudi Arabia on diplomatic dispute


          Canada and Saudia Arabia feud, the word 'hen,' sunflower selfies      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A public spat between Canada and Saudi Arabia gets out of hand on social media. Also, one Mexican restaurant is offering relief for firefighters in northern California. And, the word "hen" has new meaning for a gender-neutral pronoun.
          Saudis appear to threaten Canada with 9/11-style attack      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
(Business Insider) Saudi Arabia’s state media on Monday tweeted a graphic appearing to show an Air Canada airliner heading toward the Toronto skyline in a way that recalled the September 11, 2001, terrorist hijackings of airliners that struck the Twin Towers and the Pentagon. The graphic warned of “Sticking one’s nose where it doesn’t belong!” […]
          Comment on Second Amendment Foundation, National Rifle Association sue Edmonds over gun storage rule by Matthew Richardson      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Here's real news story, Mueller and Comey are morons. https://www.ocregister.com/2017/05/21/comey-mueller-bungled-big-anthrax-case-together/ I severed 6 years in the AF, deployed three times, but I refused to take the anthrax vaccine. I lived in NJ at the time, and my upstairs neighbor contracted anthrax at the Mt. Hamilton Post Office. I lawyer-ed up, got a great attorney, but was facing court martial. I followed Comey and Mueller's investigation closely, just to learn that bad actors in our own government attacked us with anthrax letters, while bad actors from Saudi Arabia (not much unlike those colluding with the Clinton Foundation) attacked us in NYC. More real news: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/21/us/politics/hillary-clinton-presidential-campaign-charity.html McCabe and Comey stalled Wiener's pedophilia investigation because Hillary Clinton State Department emails were found on a computer confiscated while looking for child pornography. This is what real collusion looks like. https://www.dailywire.com/news/26556/whacked-weiner-mccabe-under-investigation-stalling-emily-zanotti
          By bashing Canada, Saudi Prince is weaponizing his oil wealth - Duluth News Tribune      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Duluth News Tribune

By bashing Canada, Saudi Prince is weaponizing his oil wealth
Duluth News Tribune
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in New York on March 27, 2018. Bloomberg photo by Jeenah Moon. For Saudi Arabia, a new version of checkbook diplomacy is taking shape. The kingdom used to pursue a behind-the-scenes foreign policy, ...

and more »

          Evaluation of the Future Saudi Cities Programme (FSCP), (Home-based), Deadline: 19 August 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
CONSULTANCT VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT   Issued on: 10 August 2018 ORGANIZATIONAL LOCATION: UN-Habitat DUTY STATION: Home-based FUNCTIONAL TITLE: Evaluation of the Future Saudi Cities Programme (FSCP) DURATION: Total eight weeks over September 2018 to December 2018   SUPERVISORS / REPORTING ARRANGEMENT Head of UN-Habitat HQs Evaluation Unit; FSCP coordinator MISSIONS TO Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: October […]
          [bart13] Gold Prices Are Soaring In Venezuela By Frank Holmes - Aug 07, 2018, 9:20 AM ...      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Gold Prices Are Soaring In Venezuela

By Frank Holmes - Aug 07, 2018, 9:20 AM CDT

Last month in Venezuela’s capital city of Caracas, a cup of coffee would have set you back 2 million bolivars. That’s up from only 2,300 bolivars 12 months ago, meaning the price of a cup of joe has jumped nearly 87,000 percent, according to Bloomberg’s Café Con Leche Index. And you thought Starbucks was expensive.

But that was July. Prices in Venezuela are doubling roughly every 18 days. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) now projects inflation to hit an astronomical 1 million percent by the end of this year. This puts the beleaguered Latin American country on the same slippery path as Zimbabwe a decade ago and Germany in the 1920s, when a wheelbarrow full of marks was barely enough to get you a loaf of bread.

Venezuela’s socialist president Nicolas Maduro—who only this past weekend survived an assassination attempt involving several explosive-laden drones—announced recently that the country plans to rein in hyperinflation by lopping off five zeroes from its currency. If you recall, Zimbabwe similarly tried to combat soaring prices of its own by issuing a cartoonish $100 trillion banknote—which in 2009 was still not enough to buy a bus ticket in the capital of Harare.

Without structural governmental reforms, a new bolivar is just as unlikely to steady Venezuela’s skyrocketing inflation or remedy its crumbling economy.

So where does this put gold? At some point, hyperinflation gets so ludicrously out of control that discussing exchange rates becomes pointless. But as of July 30, an ounce of the yellow metal would have gone for 211 million bolivars—an increase of more than 3.1 million percent from just the beginning of the year.



(Click to enlarge)

My point in bringing this up is to reinforce the importance of gold’s Fear Trade, which says that demand for the yellow metal rises when inflation threatens to destroy a nation’s currency—as it’s doing right now in Venezuela. A Venezuelan family that had the prudence to store some of its wealth in gold would be in a much better position today to survive or escape President Maduro’s corrupt, far-left regime.

In extreme cases like this, gold could literally help save lives.

Such was the case following the fall of Saigon in 1975. If not for gold, many South Vietnamese families might not have managed to escape the country. A seat on one of the thousands of fleeing boats reportedly went for eight or 10 taels of gold per adult, four or five taels per child. (A tael is slightly more than an ounce.) Gold was their passport. Thanks to the precious metal, tens of thousands of Vietnamese “boat people,” as they’re now known, were able to start new lives in the U.S., Canada, Australia and other developed countries.

Venezuela’s Once Prosperous Economy Destroyed by Corruption and Mismanagement

But back to Venezuela. Amid the corruption and mismanagement, the only thing helping the country pay its bills right now is gold. Two years ago, it had the world’s 16th largest gold reserves. Today it stands at number 26 as it’s sold off more than half its holdings since 2010. While countries such as China and Russia continue to add to their holdings, Venezuela has been the world’s largest seller of gold for the past two years.



(Click to enlarge)

It’s hard to remember now, but as recently as 2001, Venezuela was the most prosperous country in all of South America. Like Zimbabwe, the OPEC nation is rich in natural resources, home to the world’s largest oil reserves and what’s believed to be the fourth largest gold mine. Oil exports account for virtually all of its export revenue.

In 2016, Venezuela was the third largest exporter of crude to the U.S. following Canada and Saudi Arabia, but with output in freefall, this is changing rapidly. For the first time ever in February, Colombia sold more crude oil to the U.S. than its eastern neighbor did. And in June, Venezuela’s state-owned oil and gas company, Petróleos de Venezuela (PDVSA), informed at least eight foreign clients that it would be unable to meet supply commitments. According to GlobalData, production is on track to fall to only 1 million barrels per day by 2019, down from 3 million a day in 2011, meaning the petrostate might soon have nothing left to deliver.

President Maduro now has the ignoble distinction of reigning over an economic recession that rivals the very worst in modern history. Last month, the IMF forecast that the country’s real gross domestic product (GDP) would fall 18 percent this year—the third straight year of double-digit declines.



(Click to enlarge)

A mass exodus of young, working-age Venezuelans, many of them college-educated, is unlikely to help. Estimates of the number of people who have fled the country in the past two years alone range from 1.7 million to as high as 4 million.

Their escape is no easy task, as numerous international airlines, citing rampant crime and a lack of electricity, have canceled all flights in and out of Caracas. The only U.S. carrier still operating in the country is American Airlines, which offers a single daily flight from the nation’s capital to Miami. Just two years ago, there were as many as 40 nonstop American flights, not to mention those of rival carriers, between the two cities—a sign of just how dramatic and swift Maduro’s mismanagement has been in crippling Venezuela’s once-robust economy.

The Diversification Benefits of Gold

The gold bears were on top last week, with the metal trading as low as $1,205 on Thursday. That’s the closest it’s come to dipping below $1,200 since February 2017. Friday’s lower-than-expected jobs report gave gold a modest boost, but it wasn’t enough to prevent a fourth straight week of price declines.

In times like this, it’s important to remember that, according to gold’s DNA of volatility, it’s a non-event for the metal to close up or down 1 percent at the end of each session, 2 percent for the 10-day trading period. And guess what? The S&P 500 Index has the same level of volatility.

Ten days ago, gold was trading just under $1,230 an ounce, or 0.6 percent more than today. The math is sound.

It’s also worth remembering that gold has traditionally had a low to negative correlation with other assets such as equities. This is why many investors over the years have used it as a portfolio diversifier.

Case in point: On June 26, suffered its worst single-day decline since the company went public in 2012. Its stock plunged 19 percent, erasing some $120 billion in market capitalization—the most ever in history for a single trading session.

Gold, meanwhile, held relatively steady, slipping only 0.62 percent.

          Homo erectus were too short-sighted and lazy to survive, research finds      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The 'why bother?' approach of an early species of human in Saudi Arabia meant they did not know what to do when their environment changed, ANU research finds.


          Canada-Saudi spat highlights perils of Twitter diplomacy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
CAE Investment 20180808

As the diplomatic crisis between Canada and Saudi Arabia continues to escalate, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau signalled that his government will continue to use Twitter and social media as a means of conducting foreign relations.


          Saudi man granted release after UN requests Canadian government halt deportation      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Immigrant Detainees 20160815

A Saudi Arabian man has been granted release, under certain conditions, from the Laval, Que., detention facility he's been held in since July 26, pending his deportation.


          Gillibrand: I Will Look Into Whether Robert Mueller Was Part of a 9/11 Cover-Up      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) told a protester at a town hall event in New York City on Wednesday that she would look into whether Special Counsel Robert Mueller was involved in covering up the role Saudi Arabia played in the 9/11 terrorist attacks while serving as FBI director. In a video posted from the town hall on YouTube, the protestor asked Gillibrand if she would support legislation proposed by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) calling for the “federal government to declassify thousands of remaining documents related to the 9/11 terrorist attacks.” The protestor accused Gillibrand of knowing that Mueller was involved...
          Saudi Arabia and Canada: A Tit for Tat over a Tweet      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
I know, I know. Everyone is talking about this, but it’s because it is kind of an anomaly and
          Corporate Associate Attorney - Asia-Other      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Riyadh office of our client seeks corporate associate attorney with 2-4 years of experience in capital market transactions. The candidate should have an understanding of litigation in Saudi Arabia, gained at a leading international law firm. Should be US, UK or Saudi qualified.The firm's people are their strongest asset. They deliver collaborative service and stress free client service throughout 15 offices worldwide. This firm specializes in the following areas: Banking & Finance, Corporate, Counseling & Regulatory, Environmental, Intellectual Property, Litigation, Projects, Real Estate, Restructuring and Tax. Located across the globe, this firm has offices in North America, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. With their unique culture that extends across all of their offices, lawyers in this firm enjoy working in an environment where they value diverse perspectives, have fun, and deliver outstanding client service.
          Saudi Energy Minister: Canada Row Won’t Affect Oil Exports      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
An ongoing diplomatic row between Saudi Arabia and Canada will not affect crude oil exports from the Kingdom, Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih said, adding that Riyadh’s policy has always been to keep politics and energy exports separate, Reuters reports. Saudi Arabia earlier this week cut off diplomatic relations with Ottawa following criticism by Canada’s Foreign Minister about Saudi Arabia’s detention of several women’s rights activists. The Foreign Ministry has reiterated its stance on human rights, releasing a statement…
          Saudi Arabia donates $5 mn to Jamia Hamdard      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia donates $5 mn to Jamia Hamdard#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000New Delhi: Under the cooperation program between Saudi Arabia and India, Mohammed bin Saud Islamic University and Jamia Hamdard, an MoU was inked in March 2014. King Salman bin Abdul Aziz donated $5 mn to Jamia Hamdard University, New Delhi. This amount will be utilized for the extension of Majidia Hospital and Jamia Hamdard Medical …
          Canada asks for help in Saudi dispute      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Canada asks for help in Saudi dispute#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000Ottawa: Canada is quietly nudging allies including Germany and Sweden for help with resolving its row with Saudi Arabia, a government source confirmed Thursday. The senior official, who asked not to be identified due to the sensitivity of the diplomacy, said Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland had spoken with her counterparts in the two European nations. …
          Saudi effort to punish Canada seems to have little effect      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

TORONTO (AP) - When Saudi Arabia ordered its citizens studying in Canada to abruptly leave the country it left institutions like Techno Canada in the lurch, forcing the small Toronto business school to scramble for new students in the middle of the summer.

But that doesn't mean the school's director ...

          Raging feud between key Gulf allies fans Middle East rumor mill      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Middle Eastern press outlets are buzzing over a rumor that former U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson stopped a major military operation planned by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) against Qatar at the beginning of a regional crisis that erupted between key U.S. Gulf allies last year.

...
          Watch Reporters Slam US For Refusing To Condemn Saudi-US Airstrike On Yemen School Bus In Live Briefing      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Just as expected, State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert refused to condemn Thursday's coalition airstrike on a school bus in Yemen, which left as many as 50 people dead and 63 injured — the vast majority of which were children

As we reported previously, Saudi-US/UK coalition jets scored a direct hit on the school bus packed with children as it drove through a crowded market place in Dahyan, in the rebel-held north of Yemen.

During the State Department's daily press briefing, Nauert was asked point blank by journalists, starting with the AP's Matt Lee, whether the US condemns the attack.

The whole testy exchange on Yemen is worth watching, especially as Matt Lee lays out the case for direct US complicity in the attack on the bus packed with children from the start of his question: "The Saudis obviously are the ones who conducted this, but they do that with weapons supplied by the U.S., with training supplied by the U.S., and with targeting information, targeting data, supplied by the U.S. How can something like this happen?" he said.

Watch the State Department's response here:

Unbelievably, Nauert tried to obfuscate the issue by simply saying "I can’t confirm all the details because we are not there on the ground."

Not only did Nauert refuse to say the State Department condemned the attack, but wouldn't so much as agree to simply call for an independent investigation into the incident (she called only for a Saudi-led inquiry).

Nauert drew random incredulous expressions of laughter from the press pool by the end of the segment on Yemen when she was caught struggling to acknowledge the long established fact that the US supplies "a tremendous amount of weaponry and the data for targeting to the Saudis" while simultaneously touting that Washington provides "a tremendous amount of humanitarian assistance."

This section of the exchange played out as follows

MS NAUERT: Look, we provide a tremendous amount of humanitarian assistance in Yemen to try to support civilians in Yemen and try to mitigate against the devastation that’s taken place there in that country. I don’t have anything more for you on that.

QUESTION: But you also supply a tremendous amount of weaponry and the data for targeting to the Saudis.

MS NAUERT: Well, then – sorry.

QUESTION: Right? No?

QUESTION: No.

QUESTION: Am I wrong? Is that wrong?

QUESTION: That’s not wrong.

MS NAUERT: Sorry, these ladies over here are laughing. On that I would refer you to the Department of Defense that is involved with that, but as you know, Saudi Arabia is an important strategic partner in the region to the United States.

Meanwhile as Al Masdar News reports, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is calling for an independent and prompt investigation into the deadly Saudi-led coalition airstrike that hit the bus carrying children, United Nations deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said in a press release.

“The Secretary-General condemns the air strike today by the coalition forces in Saada, which hit a busy market area in Majz District, and impacted a bus carrying children from a summer camp,” Haq said on Thursday. “He calls for an independent and prompt investigation into this incident.”

According to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), citing local officials, a total of 50 people died in the attack, while another 77 were injured.

Leader of the Yemen’s rebel Supreme Revolutionary Committee Mohammed Houthi on Thursday urged Russia, China and France to hold an emergency United Nations Security Council meeting over the attack of the Saudi-led coalition, local media reported.

According to the Houthi-run Al Masirah TV, the committee’s leader said that the coalition’s attack confirmed that the coalition rejects peace in the region.


          Rickards: U.S. Must Turn To Russia To Contain China      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Authored by James Rickards via The Daily Reckoning,

Vladimir Putin stands accused in the media and global public opinion of rigging his recent reelection, imprisoning his political enemies, murdering Russian spies turned double-agent, meddling in Western elections, seizing Crimea, destabilizing Ukraine, supporting a murderous dictator in Syria and exporting arms to terrorist nations like Iran.

At the same time, the country of Russia is more than Mr. Putin, despite his authoritarian and heavy-handed methods. Russia is the world’s 12th-largest economy, with a GDP in excess of $1.5 trillion, larger than many developed economies such as Australia (No. 13), Spain (No. 14) and the Netherlands (No. 18).

Its export sector produces a positive balance of trade for Russia, currently running at over $16 billion per month. Russia has not had a trade deficit in over 20 years. Russia is also the world’s largest oil producer, with output of 10.6 million barrels per day, larger than both Saudi Arabia and the United States.

Russia has the largest landmass of any country in the world and a population of 144 million people, the ninth largest of any country. Russia is also the third-largest gold-producing nation in the world, with total production of 250 tons per year, about 8% of total global output and solidly ahead of the U.S., Canada and South Africa.

Russia is highly competitive in the export of nuclear power plants, advanced weaponry, space technology, agricultural products and it has an educated workforce.

Russia’s government debt-to-GDP ratio is 12.6%, which is trivial compared with 253% for Japan, 105% for the United States and 68% for Germany. Russia’s external dollar-denominated debt is also quite low compared with the huge dollar-debt burdens of other emerging-market economies such as Turkey, Indonesia and China.

Under the steady leadership of central bank head Elvira Nabiullina, the Central Bank of Russia has rebuilt its hard currency reserves after those reserves were severely depleted in 2015 following the collapse in oil prices that began in 2014.

Total gold reserves rose from 1,275 tons in July 2015 to about 2,000 tons today. Russia’s gold-to-GDP ratio is the highest in the world and more than double those of the U.S. and China.

In short, Russia is a country to be reckoned with despite the intense dislike for its leader from Western powers. It can be disliked but it cannot be ignored.

Russia is even more important geopolitically than these favorable metrics suggest. Russia and the U.S. are likely to improve relations and move closer together despite the current animosity over election meddling and the attempted murders of ex-Russian spies.

The reason for this coming thaw has to do with the dynamics of global geopolitics. There are only three countries in the world that are rightly regarded as primary powers — the U.S., Russia and China. These three are the only superpowers. Some analysts may be surprised to see Russia on the superpower list, but the facts are indisputable.

More to the point, Russia is a nuclear superpower at least on par with the United States and well ahead of China, France, the U.K. and other nuclear powers.

All others are secondary powers (U.K., France, Germany, Japan, Israel, etc.) or tertiary powers (Iran, Turkey, India, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, etc.). This strategic reality sets up a predictable three-party dynamic.

In any three-party dynamic, whether it’s a poker game or a struggle for global control, the dynamic is simple. Two of the powers align explicitly or implicitly against the third. The two-aligned powers refrain from using their power against each other in order to conserve it for use against the third power.

Meanwhile, the third power, the “odd man out,” suffers from having to expend military and economic resources to fend off adventurism by both of its opponents with no help from either.

China is the greatest geopolitical threat to the U.S. because of its economic and technological advances and its ambition to push the U.S. out of the Western Pacific sphere of influence. Russia may be a threat to some of its neighbors, but it is far less of a threat to U.S. strategic interests.

Therefore, a logical balance of power in the world would be for the U.S. and Russia to find common ground in the containment of China and to jointly pursue the reduction of Chinese power.

One of the keys to U.S. foreign policy the last 50 or 60 years has been to make sure that Russia and China never form an alliance. Keeping them separated was key, but China and Russia are forging stronger ties through the Shanghai Cooperation Organization – a military and economic treaty – and the BRICS institutions.

The BRICS analogs to the IMF and the World Bank, critical infrastructure, bilateral trade deals, bilateral currency swaps, arms sales, etc.

Meanwhile, the U.S. finds itself at odds with both Russia and China over different issues. Who’s on the losing end of that? Obviously, the United States.

This two-against-one strategic alignment of China and Russia against the U.S. is a strategic blunder by the U.S.

The United States has largely withdrawn from the Middle East while Russia has stepped in on Syria and elsewhere, China is expanding in the South China Sea, and Russia is expanding on its periphery. They have each other’s back, and the U.S. is the odd man out.

But the Russian/Chinese relationship can be exploited. China and Russia have a history of conflicting interests, despite the fact that they were both communist during the Cold War.

The two countries had a number of border skirmishes in the 1960s, and one in 1969 was particularly serious. According to a senior Soviet defector to the United States, “The Politburo was terrified that the Chinese might make a large-scale intrusion into Soviet territory.”

The Soviets even considered a preemptive nuclear attack on Chinese nuclear facilities. Soviet officials advised Washington of the possibility, but the U.S. response was firm, warning that any nuclear attack would possibly lead to World War III.

The point being, there are fissures in the Chinese-Russian relationship that the U.S. could exploit.

For another thing, the U.S. and Russia are the first and second largest energy producers in the world. Saudi Arabia is the third largest energy producer in the world. If you put the U.S., Russia, and Saudi Arabia in a loose alliance, they dominate the energy markets. They can cut you off, they can supply, they can set prices.

Who needs energy the most? China.

China has very little oil or natural gas. It does have coal, but if you’ve been to Beijing lately, you know it looks black at noon because the air is so bad and you can’t breathe it. Pulmonary disease is becoming fairly common. They’re literally choking themselves to death. So, Russia, the U.S., and Saudi Arabia acting jointly have China completely at their mercy.

But the U.S. presently has no relationship with Russia to help back up our position against China. It’s two-against-one, and the U.S. is the odd man out — thanks to U.S. political dysfunction and the media.

In a three-handed poker game, if you don’t know who the sucker is, you’re the sucker. Trump will try to make China the odd man out. Very few people seem to get this.

As China’s power expands and as U.S. power is put to the test in Asia, it is likely that the U.S. will correct its recent strategic shortsightedness and find ways to work with Russia. Or at least it should. This will not be done out of wishful thinking about the true nature of Putin or his regime but as a simple matter of geopolitical necessity.


          Tesla's board may reportedly tell Elon Musk to recuse himself from talks about taking the company private (TSLA)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

elon musk

  • Tesla's board of directors may tell CEO Elon Musk to recuse himself as it explores the possibility of taking the company private, CNBC reports, citing people familiar with the matter. 
  • According to the publication, the board plans to meet with financial advisors to determine how it will explore the idea of converting Tesla into a private company and has told Musk that he must consult a separate, personal set of advisors. 
  • The board will probably form a smaller, special committee comprised of independent directors to analyze buyout proposals, CNBC reports. 
  • According to the publication, Musk spoke with Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund about backing Tesla's transition to becoming a private company, citing one source close to the matter. 


Tesla's board of directors may tell CEO Elon Musk to recuse himself as it explores the possibility of taking the company private, CNBC reports, citing people familiar with the matter. 

According to the publication, the board plans to meet with financial advisors to determine how it will explore the idea of converting Tesla into a private company and has told Musk that he must consult a separate, personal set of advisors. 

The board will probably form a smaller, special committee comprised of independent directors to analyze buyout proposals, CNBC reports. 

But Musk has not yet given the board detailed information about how a deal may be funded, Reuters reports.

According to CNBC, Musk spoke with Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund about backing Tesla's transition to becoming a private company, citing one source close to the matter. 

The Financial Times reported on Tuesday that Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund had acquired a $2 billion stake in the company. The fund owns between 3% and 5% of Tesla's total stock, meaning the stake is likely worth $1.7 billion to $2.9 billion.

Tesla and Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund did not immediately respond to Business Insider's requests for comment.

(Have a Tesla news tip? Contact this reporter at mmatousek@businessinsider.com.)

Musk shocked observers on Tuesday when he announced his desire to take Tesla private, saying he had the funding for such a deal secured and merely needed the proposal to pass a shareholder vote before it could go through. (He indicated via Twitter that he had investor support.)

But two days later, it's unclear where that funding will come from. Tesla has yet to submit any regulatory filings that provide more detail into Musk's proposal, and on Wednesday The Wall Street Journal reported that the Securities and Exchange Commission made an inquiry into Tesla about whether one of Musk's tweets regarding the possibility of taking the company private was truthful.

According to The Journal, the SEC is also looking into why Musk's first statement about the potential of taking Tesla private was made on Twitter instead of in a regulatory filing. The agency also asked the company whether it believes Musk's tweet follows SEC rules about protecting investors, the report said.

Bloomberg reported on Thursday that the SEC was "intensifying" its inquiry into Tesla. According to the publication, the agency had already been gathering information about statements Tesla has made regarding sales and manufacturing targets.

An inquiry from the SEC does not necessarily mean an investigation will follow.

Some experts have raised an eyebrow over Musk's statements.

James Rosener, a partner at the law firm Pepper Hamilton, told Business Insider that Twitter was not the right medium for a securities disclosure since the platform's 280-character limit prevented Musk from disclosing enough information relevant to investors — including the structure of the deal, its tax impact, and the amount of debt it would require — to ensure he's not misleading them.

According to Rosener, Musk's tweet likely ran afoul of the SEC's anti-fraud rules.

"There's definitely material omissions," Rosener said. "Clearly, it was not what any lawyer with any experience in this kind of stuff would advise to put out."

David Whiston, an equity strategist at Morningstar who covers the US auto industry, said he was confused by Musk's tweets, which he said indicated Musk had both the funding and the shareholder votes necessary to take the company private.

"I'm still trying to understand why he even went public like this," Whiston said, "because I don't see a point in going public to say you are considering going private unless you're trying to get, perhaps, the price higher than $420 a share, or you're just really eager to hurt the short-sellers. Otherwise, why wouldn't you just wait until you're definitely doing a deal to say something?"

Tesla's board released a statement on Wednesday morning, but it was very brief and offered few details besides that Musk met with the board last week to bring up the possibility of going private. 

Tesla has been public since 2010, but Musk has said in the past that he would like to take Tesla private.

"I wish we could be private with Tesla," Musk said in an interview with Rolling Stone published in November. "It actually makes us less efficient to be a public company."

Musk has also said on multiple occasions that Tesla will become profitable by the end of this year and won't need to raise additional funds, despite its increased cash-burn rate in recent quarters.

At the end of June, Tesla said it achieved its goal of making 5,000 Model 3s in one week. Musk previously said that the company would hit that number by the end of 2017 and that sustaining such a production rate is critical for Tesla to become profitable.

Read CNBC's full story here.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Have a Tesla news tip? Contact this reporter at mmatousek@businessinsider.com.

Read more about Tesla possibly going private:

SEE ALSO: Tesla appears to be on a hiring spree in the US and in China two months after laying off 9% of its employees

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: An early investor in Airbnb and Uber explains why he started buying bitcoin in 2009


          UNICEF chief "horrified" by air strike hitting school bus in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

UNICEF chief "horrified" by air strike hitting school bus in Yemen

DF-Xinhua Report

The head of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) has strongly condemned the airstrike against a school bus in northern Yemen on Thursday, which has reportedly killed more than two dozen children.

   "Attacks on children are absolutely unacceptable," said UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore on Thursday. "I'm horrified by the reported airstrike on innocent children, some with UNICEF backpacks. Enough is enough."

   The attack hit the school bus in a market in Dahyan, in the northern province of Saada. While the exact death toll remains to be confirmed, initial news reports indicate that the number of casualties could be well above 60, with dozens severely injured. Many of the children were reported to be under the age of 10.

   Fore called all warring parties to "respect international humanitarian law," and spare children, civilians and civilian infrastructure to prevent Yemen from falling "further into the abyss and the humanitarian catastrophe" it has been facing for over three years.

   Since conflict between pro-government forces and Houthi rebels escalated in 2015, about 2,500 children have been killed and 3,600 maimed in Yemen, according to the UNICEF.

   Yemen's conflict has its roots in uprisings that date back to 2011, but fighting escalated in March 2015, when an international coalition led by Saudi Arabia intervened militarily at the request of Yemen's president.

   "Attacking children is the lowest any party of this conflict can go," UNICEF Yemen Resident Representative Meritxell Relano told UN News. "There is no justification whatsoever to attacking children."

   Attacks against civilians have been the scourge of this conflict. According to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), "tens of civilians were killed in violence in several governorates" in the past 10 days alone, UN News reported.

   Last Friday, during a particularly deadly attack, one of the last functioning hospitals, Al Thawra in Al Hudaydah, was struck, reportedly causing the death of dozens of vulnerable, sick and injured civilians.

© DAILY FINLAND Developed by : orangebd
#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000
          8/9/2018: OPINION: Call Saudi Arabia the repressive kingdom it is      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Pity Saudi Arabia, the world’s most fragile flower. It is feeling aggrieved. It is wilting under Canada’s withering gaze. Oh, the shame of it all. It took only two terse statements to set off the poor, put-upon Saudis. The great offence? Chrystia...
          8/9/2018: NP: SAUDIS: FIX YOUR ‘MISTAKE’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says diplomatic talks with Saudi Arabia will continue but he’s not backing down on Canada’s criticism of the kingdom over the arrest of several social activists last week. Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister, however, says...
          8/9/2018: CANADA: Hospitals brace for loss of Saudi med students      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

OTTAWA • Canadian hospitals are bracing for the loss of hundreds of medical residents and fellows after Saudi Arabia said it is pulling all of its students out of the country. While institutions are still hoping the federal government can find a way...
          8/9/2018: CANADA: MOSCOW CHASTISES CANADA’S ‘MORAL SUPERIORITY’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
As tensions simmer between Saudi Arabia and Canada over arrests of women’s rights activists, Russia’s Foreign Ministry says critics of Saudi Arabia should not claim “moral superiority.” Saudi Arabia on Monday expelled the Canadian ambassador and froze...
          8/9/2018: WORLD: MYANMAR MAN CRUCIFIED FOR WOMAN’S MURDER      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia says it executed and crucified a man from Myanmar convicted of killing a woman. The state-run Saudi Press Agency reported on the execution Wednesday, saying it was carried out in the Muslim holy city of Mecca. It said Elias Abulkalaam...
          Saudi effort to punish Canada seems to have little effect      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
TORONTO: When Saudi Arabia ordered its citizens studying in Canada to abruptly leave the country, it left institutions like Techno Canada in the lurch, forcing the small Toronto business school to scramble for new students in the middle of the summer.
          Watch Reporters Slam US For Refusing To Condemn Saudi-US Airstrike On Yemen School Bus In Live Briefing      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Just as expected, State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert refused to condemn Thursday's coalition airstrike on a school bus in Yemen, which left as many as 50 people dead and 63 injured — the vast majority of which were children

As we reported previously, Saudi-US/UK coalition jets scored a direct hit on the school bus packed with children as it drove through a crowded market place in Dahyan, in the rebel-held north of Yemen.

During the State Department's daily press briefing, Nauert was asked point blank by journalists, starting with the AP's Matt Lee, whether the US condemns the attack.

The whole testy exchange on Yemen is worth watching, especially as Matt Lee lays out the case for direct US complicity in the attack on the bus packed with children from the start of his question: "The Saudis obviously are the ones who conducted this, but they do that with weapons supplied by the U.S., with training supplied by the U.S., and with targeting information, targeting data, supplied by the U.S. How can something like this happen?" he said.

Watch the State Department's response here:

Unbelievably, Nauert tried to obfuscate the issue by simply saying "I can’t confirm all the details because we are not there on the ground."

Not only did Nauert refuse to say the State Department condemned the attack, but wouldn't so much as agree to simply call for an independent investigation into the incident (she called only for a Saudi-led inquiry).

Nauert drew random incredulous expressions of laughter from the press pool by the end of the segment on Yemen when she was caught struggling to acknowledge the long established fact that the US supplies "a tremendous amount of weaponry and the data for targeting to the Saudis" while simultaneously touting that Washington provides "a tremendous amount of humanitarian assistance."

This section of the exchange played out as follows

MS NAUERT: Look, we provide a tremendous amount of humanitarian assistance in Yemen to try to support civilians in Yemen and try to mitigate against the devastation that’s taken place there in that country. I don’t have anything more for you on that.

QUESTION: But you also supply a tremendous amount of weaponry and the data for targeting to the Saudis.

MS NAUERT: Well, then – sorry.

QUESTION: Right? No?

QUESTION: No.

QUESTION: Am I wrong? Is that wrong?

QUESTION: That’s not wrong.

MS NAUERT: Sorry, these ladies over here are laughing. On that I would refer you to the Department of Defense that is involved with that, but as you know, Saudi Arabia is an important strategic partner in the region to the United States.

Meanwhile as Al Masdar News reports, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is calling for an independent and prompt investigation into the deadly Saudi-led coalition airstrike that hit the bus carrying children, United Nations deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said in a press release.

“The Secretary-General condemns the air strike today by the coalition forces in Saada, which hit a busy market area in Majz District, and impacted a bus carrying children from a summer camp,” Haq said on Thursday. “He calls for an independent and prompt investigation into this incident.”

According to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), citing local officials, a total of 50 people died in the attack, while another 77 were injured.

Leader of the Yemen’s rebel Supreme Revolutionary Committee Mohammed Houthi on Thursday urged Russia, China and France to hold an emergency United Nations Security Council meeting over the attack of the Saudi-led coalition, local media reported.

According to the Houthi-run Al Masirah TV, the committee’s leader said that the coalition’s attack confirmed that the coalition rejects peace in the region.


          Rickards: U.S. Must Turn To Russia To Contain China      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Authored by James Rickards via The Daily Reckoning,

Vladimir Putin stands accused in the media and global public opinion of rigging his recent reelection, imprisoning his political enemies, murdering Russian spies turned double-agent, meddling in Western elections, seizing Crimea, destabilizing Ukraine, supporting a murderous dictator in Syria and exporting arms to terrorist nations like Iran.

At the same time, the country of Russia is more than Mr. Putin, despite his authoritarian and heavy-handed methods. Russia is the world’s 12th-largest economy, with a GDP in excess of $1.5 trillion, larger than many developed economies such as Australia (No. 13), Spain (No. 14) and the Netherlands (No. 18).

Its export sector produces a positive balance of trade for Russia, currently running at over $16 billion per month. Russia has not had a trade deficit in over 20 years. Russia is also the world’s largest oil producer, with output of 10.6 million barrels per day, larger than both Saudi Arabia and the United States.

Russia has the largest landmass of any country in the world and a population of 144 million people, the ninth largest of any country. Russia is also the third-largest gold-producing nation in the world, with total production of 250 tons per year, about 8% of total global output and solidly ahead of the U.S., Canada and South Africa.

Russia is highly competitive in the export of nuclear power plants, advanced weaponry, space technology, agricultural products and it has an educated workforce.

Russia’s government debt-to-GDP ratio is 12.6%, which is trivial compared with 253% for Japan, 105% for the United States and 68% for Germany. Russia’s external dollar-denominated debt is also quite low compared with the huge dollar-debt burdens of other emerging-market economies such as Turkey, Indonesia and China.

Under the steady leadership of central bank head Elvira Nabiullina, the Central Bank of Russia has rebuilt its hard currency reserves after those reserves were severely depleted in 2015 following the collapse in oil prices that began in 2014.

Total gold reserves rose from 1,275 tons in July 2015 to about 2,000 tons today. Russia’s gold-to-GDP ratio is the highest in the world and more than double those of the U.S. and China.

In short, Russia is a country to be reckoned with despite the intense dislike for its leader from Western powers. It can be disliked but it cannot be ignored.

Russia is even more important geopolitically than these favorable metrics suggest. Russia and the U.S. are likely to improve relations and move closer together despite the current animosity over election meddling and the attempted murders of ex-Russian spies.

The reason for this coming thaw has to do with the dynamics of global geopolitics. There are only three countries in the world that are rightly regarded as primary powers — the U.S., Russia and China. These three are the only superpowers. Some analysts may be surprised to see Russia on the superpower list, but the facts are indisputable.

More to the point, Russia is a nuclear superpower at least on par with the United States and well ahead of China, France, the U.K. and other nuclear powers.

All others are secondary powers (U.K., France, Germany, Japan, Israel, etc.) or tertiary powers (Iran, Turkey, India, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, etc.). This strategic reality sets up a predictable three-party dynamic.

In any three-party dynamic, whether it’s a poker game or a struggle for global control, the dynamic is simple. Two of the powers align explicitly or implicitly against the third. The two-aligned powers refrain from using their power against each other in order to conserve it for use against the third power.

Meanwhile, the third power, the “odd man out,” suffers from having to expend military and economic resources to fend off adventurism by both of its opponents with no help from either.

China is the greatest geopolitical threat to the U.S. because of its economic and technological advances and its ambition to push the U.S. out of the Western Pacific sphere of influence. Russia may be a threat to some of its neighbors, but it is far less of a threat to U.S. strategic interests.

Therefore, a logical balance of power in the world would be for the U.S. and Russia to find common ground in the containment of China and to jointly pursue the reduction of Chinese power.

One of the keys to U.S. foreign policy the last 50 or 60 years has been to make sure that Russia and China never form an alliance. Keeping them separated was key, but China and Russia are forging stronger ties through the Shanghai Cooperation Organization – a military and economic treaty – and the BRICS institutions.

The BRICS analogs to the IMF and the World Bank, critical infrastructure, bilateral trade deals, bilateral currency swaps, arms sales, etc.

Meanwhile, the U.S. finds itself at odds with both Russia and China over different issues. Who’s on the losing end of that? Obviously, the United States.

This two-against-one strategic alignment of China and Russia against the U.S. is a strategic blunder by the U.S.

The United States has largely withdrawn from the Middle East while Russia has stepped in on Syria and elsewhere, China is expanding in the South China Sea, and Russia is expanding on its periphery. They have each other’s back, and the U.S. is the odd man out.

But the Russian/Chinese relationship can be exploited. China and Russia have a history of conflicting interests, despite the fact that they were both communist during the Cold War.

The two countries had a number of border skirmishes in the 1960s, and one in 1969 was particularly serious. According to a senior Soviet defector to the United States, “The Politburo was terrified that the Chinese might make a large-scale intrusion into Soviet territory.”

The Soviets even considered a preemptive nuclear attack on Chinese nuclear facilities. Soviet officials advised Washington of the possibility, but the U.S. response was firm, warning that any nuclear attack would possibly lead to World War III.

The point being, there are fissures in the Chinese-Russian relationship that the U.S. could exploit.

For another thing, the U.S. and Russia are the first and second largest energy producers in the world. Saudi Arabia is the third largest energy producer in the world. If you put the U.S., Russia, and Saudi Arabia in a loose alliance, they dominate the energy markets. They can cut you off, they can supply, they can set prices.

Who needs energy the most? China.

China has very little oil or natural gas. It does have coal, but if you’ve been to Beijing lately, you know it looks black at noon because the air is so bad and you can’t breathe it. Pulmonary disease is becoming fairly common. They’re literally choking themselves to death. So, Russia, the U.S., and Saudi Arabia acting jointly have China completely at their mercy.

But the U.S. presently has no relationship with Russia to help back up our position against China. It’s two-against-one, and the U.S. is the odd man out — thanks to U.S. political dysfunction and the media.

In a three-handed poker game, if you don’t know who the sucker is, you’re the sucker. Trump will try to make China the odd man out. Very few people seem to get this.

As China’s power expands and as U.S. power is put to the test in Asia, it is likely that the U.S. will correct its recent strategic shortsightedness and find ways to work with Russia. Or at least it should. This will not be done out of wishful thinking about the true nature of Putin or his regime but as a simple matter of geopolitical necessity.


          US urges probe into Yemen attack amid accusations of supporting Saudi Arabia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Fri, Aug 10 2018 08:42:57 AM Washington, Aug 10 (IANS): As accusations grew over the US reported support of the Saudi-led coalition in the attack in Y...
          Saudi effort to punish Canada seems to have little effect      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
When Saudi Arabia ordered its citizens studying in Canada to abruptly leave the country it left institutions like Techno Canada in the lurch, forcing the small Toronto business school to scramble for new students in the middle of the summer.
          Saudi effort to punish Canada seems to have little effect      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
When Saudi Arabia ordered its citizens studying in Canada to abruptly leave the country it left institutions like Techno Canada in the lurch, forcing the small Toronto business school to scramble for new students in the middle of the summer.
          Burmese man crucified in Saudi Arabia amid country's diplomatic dispute with Canada      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia crucified a Burmese man convicted of killing a woman and committing other crimes Wednesday in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, state media reported.
          China blinks; Canada housing starts fall; Japan orders jump; China prices rise; air travel growth rises; Russia and Turkey battered; UST 10yr at 2.93%; oil and gold unchanged; NZ$1 = 66.3 USc; TWI-5 = 69.9      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Here's our summary of key events overnight that affect New Zealand, with news emerging economies are struggling to handle the fallout of a new chaotic trade environment.

Firstly, it looks like China has had a small blink in its trade tussle with the US. Omitted from its tariff retaliation was American crude oil, although sourcing that still will help keep prices down from other places - like Iran, where volume are rising.

In the first world, Canadian housing starts fell sharply in June, consistent with yesterday's weak building permit data.

Japanese machine tool orders rose more than expected in July, up by +13% and far better than its +11.4% rise in June.

In China, consumer prices rose at a faster pace in July, up +2.1% due to larger increases in food and fuel prices, while factory inflation slipped even though it is still at a high a +4.6% pa level.

Beijing is using the Shanghai markets to drive down interest rates. Overnight Shibor, a measure of the shortest-term bank lending rates, fell to 1.42% yesterday, its lowest since 2015. It ended the day a little higher however. This is a mechanism their Government is using to try to stimulate the economy by ensuring lenders have plenty of cheap funding to support businesses and consumers during the uncertainty of the trade war.

The central bank of the Philippines raised its official rate by its most in more than a decade, adding +50 bps to take it to 4.0%. They are battling fast-rising inflation which is now just under +6% and the rate hike comes despite growth falling below expectations.

Yesterday we reported a slowdown in the growth of air cargo traffic. Today we can report that international passenger traffic growth seems to be rising faster. Worldwide, passenger traffic was up +7.7% in June year-on-year. In the Asia-Pacific region it was up +9.5%. Both of these rates are faster than we have reported previously in 2018.

In the sea trade, shipping group Maersk said 94 companies and organizations have so far joined a blockchain platform developed with IBM aimed at boosting efficiency and limiting the enormous paper trail of global container shipping. This is one of the largest rollouts of blockchain technology in the world.

Meanwhile in some key emerging markets, new sanctions drove down Russia's ruble, while worries that Turkey was sliding into a full-blown economic crisis battered their currency. The Argentine and South African currencies were also hit hard.

The UST 10yr yield is down sharply at 2.93%, a -4 bps fall in a day. Their 2-10 curve has slipped to +28 bps. This is despite the US Treasury saying it will sell an eye-popping US$122 bln in new debt next week, taking total US Federal debt held by the public to US$15.6 tln, or 78% of US GDP. The Chinese 10yr is at 3.56% (up +3 bps) while the New Zealand equivalent is now just over 2.71%, down a very substantial -7 bps. And as we reported last night, New Zealand swap rates took a heavy dive yesterday, down about -10 bps across most of the curve.

Gold is little changed, today down -US$1 to US$1,212/oz.

US oil prices have stopped falling and are now still just under US$67/bbl. The Brent benchmark is now just over US$72/bbl. We should also note that Saudi Arabia's attempt to punish Canada over their fury for a perceived cultural slight is having zero impact. A trade war skirmish that failed.

The Kiwi dollar is starting today very much weaker having been dumped on after yesterday's RBNZ MPS and the Fonterra trading halt. It is now just at 66.3 USc and more than -1c lower. On the cross rates we are also very much weaker at 89.7 AUc, and at 57.3 euro cents. That puts the TWI-5 at 69.9 and under 70 for the first time in nearly three years.

Bitcoin is now at US$6.464 and +3.3% higher than this time yesterday. We track this rate daily in the interactive chart below.

This chart is animated here. For previous users, the animation process has been updated and works better now.

The easiest place to stay up with event risk today is by following our Economic Calendar here ».

Daily exchange rates

Select chart tabs »
The 'US$' chart will be drawn here.
Loading...
Daily benchmark rate
Source: RBNZ
The 'AU$' chart will be drawn here.
Loading...
Daily benchmark rate
Source: RBNZ
The 'TWI' chart will be drawn here.
Loading...
Daily benchmark rate
Source: RBNZ
The '¥en' chart will be drawn here.
Loading...
Daily benchmark rate
Source: RBNZ
The '¥uan' chart will be drawn here.
Loading...
Daily benchmark rate
Source: RBNZ
The '€uro' chart will be drawn here.
Loading...
Daily benchmark rate
Source: RBNZ
The 'GBP' chart will be drawn here.
Loading...
Daily benchmark rate
Source: RBNZ
The 'Bitcoin' chart will be drawn here.
Loading...
USD 
NZD
End of day UTC
Source: CoinDesk

          Canada asks for help in Saudi dispute      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Canada is quietly working back channels to prod allies including Germany and Sweden to help resolve its row with Saudi Arabia, a government source confirmed Thursday. The senior…
          GoAir to start international operations in October; to connect Kerala's Kannur to Saudi Arabia's Dammam      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

GoAir to start international operations in October; to connect Kerala's Kannur to Saudi Arabia's DammamCivil aviation secretary RN Choubey said they are working on a turnaround plan to make Air India competitive and are holding consultations with the finance ministry.



          Saudi effort to punish Canada seems to have little effect - Washington Post      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Washington Post

Saudi effort to punish Canada seems to have little effect
Washington Post
TORONTO — When Saudi Arabia ordered its citizens studying in Canada to abruptly leave the country it left institutions like Techno Canada in the lurch, forcing the small Toronto business school to scramble for new students in the middle of the summer.
Susan Rice: President Trump, the Autocrats' Best FriendNew York Times
Trump Stays Quiet While Saudi Arabia-Canada Tensions RiseBloomberg
Saudi Arabia's feud with Canada is childish and stupidNew York Post
CBC.ca -The Globe and Mail -National Post -CBC.ca
all 302 news articles »

                Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Iran Decries Fatal Saudi Air Raid on Yemeni Student Bus, Urges Pressure on Invaders
Thu Aug 9, 2018 02:15PM
pressstv.ir

Iran has sharply condemned a Saudi-led airstrike that killed dozens of Yemeni civilians, mostly children on a school bus, calling on the world community to put pressure on the Riyadh regime and its allies to stop perpetrating more crimes in the impoverished country.

In a statement on Thursday, Foreign Ministry spokesman, Bahram Qassemi, expressed sympathy with the families of those killed and injured in the latest Saudi airstrike, which hit the bus at a market in Yemen's northwestern province of Sa'ada earlier in the day.

Yemen's al-Masirah television network said those on the bus were a group of young students attending summer classes of the Holy Qur'an.

The Yemeni Health Ministry said at least 50 civilians, mostly children, lost their lives and around 77 others were wounded in the attack, which Qassemi described as a "war crime."

The Saudi-led coalition waging war on Yemen remained brazenly defiant on its new crime, calling the massacre a "legitimate action." It claimed the airstrikes were aimed at missile launchers used by Yemeni armed forces.

The Iranian official further called on the United Nations, human rights groups and other influential players to double their efforts and help bring a swift halt to such acts of aggression.

Qassemi added that the hike in the "bombardments of residential areas and non-military targets was indicative of coalition forces' consecutive defeats on the battlefield" against Yemen's Houthi Ansarullah fighters and allied forces -- who have been defending the nation against the Riyadh-led campaign of aggression since its onset in 2015.

The Iranian official further blasted certain states for failing to end their military support for the Saudi regime and its vassal states despite the bloodletting in the poorest Arabian Peninsula state.

The countries providing the Saudi regime and its allies with military equipment "are complicit in their crimes and should be answerable."

The Saudi-led military campaign was launched in support of Yemen's former Riyadh-friendly government and against its popular Houthi movement.

The US, the UK and other Western powers have been providing arms and intelligence to the alliance in the course of the war, which has unleashed the world's worst humanitarian crisis in Yemen, according to the UN.

'Saudis influencing OIC against Iran'

In a separate statement, Qassemi rejected an anti-Iran statement issued by the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) "under Saudi influence" following a meeting in the Saudi city of Jeddah, which took place in the absence of Tehran's representatives.

He criticized Riyadh for denying Iranian delegates entry visas for OIC summits, saying such statements "are compiled and released unilaterally and unjustly under pressure from Saudi Arabia."

Article 7 of the OIC communiqué, which was issued on Wednesday, repeats the baseless allegation that Iran provides Yemen's Houthi movement with missiles -- a claim strongly rejected by both Tehran and Sana'a.

Qassemi further said the countries involved in acts of aggression against Yemeni people resort to such statements in an attempt to cover up their criminal acts and divert world public opinion from the realities on the ground in the war-ravaged country.

          Shuttering Carpenters, Steel Fixers, Mason Job Opportunity      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
www.Jobz.pk announced Shuttering Carpenters, Steel Fixers, Mason Job Opportunity jobs. Shuttering Carpenters, Steel Fixers, Mason, Electr... This Overseas job / jobs opportunity is announced in daily Express newspaper of dated 09 August 2018, Thursday for region Saudi Arabia Pakistan, located in Saudi Arabia Union Trade Test andamp; Technical Center. To see full details of this job and many more visit www.Jobz.pk now.

          HTV Tralla Drivers Job Opportunity      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
www.Jobz.pk announced HTV Tralla Drivers Job Opportunity jobs. HTV Tralla Drivers are required in Saudi Arabia F... This Overseas job / jobs opportunity is announced in daily Express newspaper of dated 09 August 2018, Thursday for region Saudi Arabia Pakistan, located in Saudi Arabia Badshah Trade Test Center. To see full details of this job and many more visit www.Jobz.pk now.

          Electricians and Assistant Electricians Job Opportunity      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
www.Jobz.pk announced Electricians and Assistant Electricians Job Opportunity jobs. Electricians and Assistant Electricians are requir... This Overseas job / jobs opportunity is announced in daily Express newspaper of dated 09 August 2018, Thursday for region Saudi Arabia Pakistan, located in Saudi Arabia RBS Brothers. To see full details of this job and many more visit www.Jobz.pk now.

          Hydraulic Mechanics, HTV Tralla Drivers Job Opportunity      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
www.Jobz.pk announced Hydraulic Mechanics, HTV Tralla Drivers Job Opportunity jobs. Hydraulic Mechanics, HTV Tralla Drivers, Heavy Equ... This Overseas job / jobs opportunity is announced in daily Express newspaper of dated 09 August 2018, Thursday for region Saudi Arabia Pakistan, located in Saudi Arabia Zawer Recruitment Agency. To see full details of this job and many more visit www.Jobz.pk now.

          Labors Job in Saudi Bin Ladon Group      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
www.Jobz.pk announced Labors Job in Saudi Bin Ladon Group jobs. Labors are required in Saudi Bin Ladon Group For ... This Overseas job / jobs opportunity is announced in daily Express newspaper of dated 09 August 2018, Thursday for region Saudi Arabia Pakistan, located in Sakrand Sammaha Overseas Employment Promoters. To see full details of this job and many more visit www.Jobz.pk now.

          Marble Finishers, Marble Fixers, Labors Job Opportunity      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
www.Jobz.pk announced Marble Finishers, Marble Fixers, Labors Job Opportunity jobs. Marble Finishers, Marble Fixers, Labors and Marbl... This Overseas job / jobs opportunity is announced in daily Express newspaper of dated 09 August 2018, Thursday for region Saudi Arabia Pakistan, located in Saudi Arabia Union Trade Test andamp; Technical Center. To see full details of this job and many more visit www.Jobz.pk now.

          Tile Mason, Electricians, Building Painters Job Opportunity      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
www.Jobz.pk announced Tile Mason, Electricians, Building Painters Job Opportunity jobs. Tile Mason, Electricians, Building Painters, Steel... This Overseas job / jobs opportunity is announced in daily Express newspaper of dated 09 August 2018, Thursday for region Saudi Arabia Pakistan, located in Saudi Arabia Union Trade Test andamp; Technical Center. To see full details of this job and many more visit www.Jobz.pk now.

          Boom Truck Drivers, Grader Operators Job Opportunity      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
www.Jobz.pk announced Boom Truck Drivers, Grader Operators Job Opportunity jobs. Boom Truck Drivers, Grader Operators, Mobile Crane... This Overseas job / jobs opportunity is announced in daily Express newspaper of dated 09 August 2018, Thursday for region Saudi Arabia Pakistan, located in Saudi Arabia Abyan Enterprises. To see full details of this job and many more visit www.Jobz.pk now.

          Saudi Trainee Doctors Set to Head Home From Canada in Diplomatic Row      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia has told hundreds of trainee doctors to leave Canada with only weeks' notice in the midst of a diplomatic spat, a move that could disrupt Canadian hospitals and end a 40-year-old program to train specialists for the kingdom.
Reuters Health Information
          8/9/2018: CITY: CORRECTION      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabian human rights activist Samar Badawi was incorrectly identified as a Canadian citizen in the photo caption on the front page of the National Post section in Wednesday’s edition.
          8/9/2018: NP: SAUDIS: FIX YOUR ‘MISTAKE’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says diplomatic talks with Saudi Arabia will continue but he’s not backing down on Canada’s criticism of the kingdom over the arrest of several social activists last week. Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister, however, says...
          8/9/2018: CANADA: Hospitals brace for loss of Saudi med students      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

OTTAWA • Canadian hospitals are bracing for the loss of hundreds of medical residents and fellows after Saudi Arabia said it is pulling all of its students out of the country. While institutions are still hoping the federal government can find a way...
          8/9/2018: CANADA: MOSCOW CHASTISES CANADA’S ‘MORAL SUPERIORITY’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
As tensions simmer between Saudi Arabia and Canada over arrests of women’s rights activists, Russia’s Foreign Ministry says critics of Saudi Arabia should not claim “moral superiority.” Saudi Arabia on Monday expelled the Canadian ambassador and froze...
          8/9/2018: WORLD: MYANMAR MAN CRUCIFIED FOR WOMAN’S MURDER      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia says it executed and crucified a man from Myanmar convicted of killing a woman. The state-run Saudi Press Agency reported on the execution Wednesday, saying it was carried out in the Muslim holy city of Mecca. It said Elias Abulkalaam...
          Comment on BORIS, BURQAS & BREXITOPHOBIA: IABATO – It’s All Bollocks And That’s Official by Oddjob      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Israel Is The Real Problem. Is this fake too? Or some hard hitting truth finding its way to the surface? "Elite power cannot abide a serious challenge to its established position. And that is what Labour under Jeremy Corbyn represents to the Tory government, the corporate, financial and banking sectors, and the 'mainstream' media. The manufactured 'antisemitism crisis' is the last throw of the dice for those desperate to prevent a progressive politician taking power in the UK: someone who supports Palestinians and genuine peace in the Middle East, a strong National Health Service and a secure Welfare State, a properly-funded education system, and an economy in which people matter; someone who rejects endless war and complicity with oppressive, war criminal 'allies', such as the United States, Saudi Arabia and Israel." http://medialens.org/index.php/alerts/alert-archive/2018/876-israel-is-the-real-problem.html ---------------------- If you're suggesting that neo-fascist Palestinians are the answer in the Middle East, I would beg to differ. Netanyahu is a bombast and a jingoist, but he exists because of Hamas atrocities. JW
          Why it’s too early to place bets on Saudi reforms      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Morgan Stanley Capital International (MSCI) announced in June that it would include Saudi Arabia in its emerging markets index. The decision is widely regarded as being tantamount to a vote of confidence on the ongoing reform initiatives carried out by Mohammed bin Salman, the Saudi crown prince. To some extent, there is indeed fairly substantial […]
          News Brief: Russia Probe, Canada Takes Aim At Saudi Arabia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.
          Canada Quietly ‘Begging’ for Help in its Dispute with Saudi      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Canada Quietly ‘Begging’ for Help in its Dispute with Saudi Canada is quietly ‘begging’ allies including Germany and Sweden for help with resolving its dust-up with Saudi Arabia, a government source confirmed Thursday. The senior official said Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland had spoken with her counterparts in the 2 European nations. Germany and Sweden previously […]

The post Canada Quietly ‘Begging’ for Help in its Dispute with Saudi appeared first on Live Trading News.


          US urges probe into Yemen attack amid accusations of supporting Saudi Arabia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Washington, Aug 10 (IANS) As accusations grew over the US reported support of the Saudi-led coalition in the attack in Yemen that caused huge civilian casualties, the US State Department has urged to conduct a thorough and transparent investigation into the airstrikes.

In a press briefing on Thursday, State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said although Washington does not have full details of the attacks on the ground, it is certainly "concerned about" the reports of civilian casualties in the war-torn Middle East nation, Xinhua reported.

"We call on the Saudi-led coalition to conduct a thorough and transparent investigation into the incident. We take all credible accounts of civilian casualties very seriously. We call on the parties to take appropriate measures to protect civilians in accordance with international law and urge all parties to investigate all reported incidents of civilian casualties," she said.

Washington has been reportedly provided weapons, training and targeting data to Saudi Arabia that had facilitated the attacks.

As questions has also mounted over the Saudi-led coalition's earlier assertion that the attacks had been conducted in accordance with international law, the call for further investigation into the issue by independent bodies has been rising.

Nauert dodged the questions, only saying that "we regret any loss of civilian life" and "Saudi Arabia is an important strategic partner in the region to the United States."

At least 43 civilians, mostly children, were killed on Thursday when Saudi-led coalition air strikes hit buses in Yemen's northern province of Saada.

The Saudi-led coalition later defended the airstrike as "legitimate" response to a deadly Houthi attack on the Saudi border city Jazan.

Houthi spokesman Mohammed Abdulsalam mocked the statement, saying "this is a war crime".

Henrietta Fore, head of the United Nations Children's Fund (Unicef), strongly condemned the airstrike.

"Attacks on children are absolutely unacceptable," said Fore. "I'm horrified by the reported airstrike on innocent children, some with Unicef backpacks. Enough is enough."

"Attacking children is the lowest any party of this conflict can go," UNICEF Yemen Resident Representative Meritxell Relano told UN News. "There is no justification whatsoever to attacking children."

The Saada attack was the latest in a series of recent airstrikes against civilians launched by the Saudi-led coalition on Yemen.

Last week, the Saudi-led coalition airstrikes struck the gate of al-Thawra hospital and adjacent fish market in Yemen's Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, killing 52 civilians and wounding 102 others.

Saudi Arabia has led an Arab military coalition that had intervened in the Yemen war since 2015 to support the government of exiled President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi.

--IANS

pgh/


          Hamilton in imminent danger of losing 153 doctors      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Ivy Lynn Bourgeault, lead of the Pan-Canadian Health Human Resources Network based at the University of Ottawa, says the situation with Canada and Saudi Arabia could make organizations rethink the potential consequences of diplomatic spat on the health-care system.

Heavy local reliance on Saudi doctors means it will be disruptive if they all depart by Sept. 1, says expert.


          Susan Rice: President Trump, the Autocrats’ Best Friend       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Trump administration is tolerating abuses by Saudi Arabia instead of defending its democratic ally, Canada.
          Offer - Omnichannel ERP Software in Saudi Arabia: Blockchain is continue - UNITED ARAB EMRIATES      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
If you want Multichannel Store then Alrasmyat Omnichannel Cloud ERP Software in Saudi Arabia. Alrasmyat best Omnichannel Cloud ERP Software in Saudi Arabia and online business arrangements can bring these once-separated procedures together. Bilytica AI-Enabled Online ERP Software in Saudi Arabia can enhance client arrange processing. Services we Offers: Erpisto ERP: · Quick Overview · Financial Management · Microfinance ERP Software · Enterprises HR and Payroll · Budgeting and Financial Planning · CRM · Erpisto Sales Management · Inventory Management · Asset Management · Warehouse Management (WMS) · Point of Sales (POS) · Ready E-Commerce Shop · Production Management · Process Manufacturing · Discrete Manufacturing Mobile#: +966547315697 Email: sales@bilytica.com https://www.bilytica.com/erpisto/cloud-erp-software-solutions-in-saudi-arabia/ https://www.erpisto.com/saudi-arabia/cloud-erp-software/
          ICT Experts to Explore Saudi Arabia's Ongoing Digital Revolution as IDC's CIO Summit Returns to the Kingdom Next Month      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Riyadh, August 8, 2018 –  International Data Corporation (IDC) is delighted to announce that its annual Saudi Arabia CIO Summit will this year take place at Jeddah’s InterContinental Hotel on September 26-27. More than 100 of the Kingdom's most influential information and communication technology leaders will be in attendance as a roster of respected industry experts and visionaries share their unique insights and showcase innovative strategies for thriving in the digital economy.
          Saudi Students Fret Over Future After Order to Leave Canada      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia’s escalating diplomatic row with Canada has upended the lives of the thousands of Saudi students at Canadian universities who have been ordered out of the country by the kingdom.
          Ingram Pinn’s illustration of the week: Seeing Red      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia’s fury at Canadian criticism
          Estimation of solar radiation on PV panel surface with optimum tilt angle using vortex search algorithm      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The amount of solar energy incidence on a photovoltaic (PV) panel depends on the PV tilt angles with respect to the horizon. It is thus crucial to investigate the optimum tilt angles to maximise the efficiency of PV panels and at the same time to increase the performance of solar energy systems. The objective of this study is to estimate the optimum tilt angle for PV panels in order to collect the maximum solar radiation for the city of Dhahran in Saudi Arabia. A newly developed optimisation algorithm called the vortex search algorithm is used to estimate the solar radiation on the tilted surface. Moreover, one year can be divided into different periods in the proposed approach, and the optimum angle can be obtained for each one of these periods separately. The horizontal solar data (i.e. direct, diffuse and global solar radiation) is used to estimate the optimum tilt angle. The results demonstrate that the solar radiation estimated using the optimum tilt angle is maximised compared with the one estimated on a horizontal surface.
          Saudi Arabia assures Canada dispute won't block oil sales - The Globe and Mail      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Globe and Mail

Saudi Arabia assures Canada dispute won't block oil sales
The Globe and Mail
Saudi Arabia's Energy Minister says the diplomatic rift with Canada won't disrupt the kingdom's oil sales to Canadian customers, an announcement that demonstrates there are limits to the retaliation Riyadh is willing to mete out in the dispute over ...
Saudi student fears jail or 'maybe worse' if he's forced to leave CanadaCBC.ca
Alberta university officials face 'uncharted territory' with Saudi scholarshipsToronto Star
By the numbers: Canada's aid to Yemen vs. Saudi arms dealCTV News
Globalnews.ca -TheSpec.com -TheChronicleHerald.ca -Yahoo News Canada (blog)
all 335 news articles »

          8/10/2018: WORLD: Riyadh’s blowup with Canada bodes ill for it when wind changes      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The recent expulsion of the Canadian ambassador to Saudi Arabia and the recall of the Saudi ambassador to Canada, along with the cessation of flights to Canada and a ban on any new trade and investment deals with Ottawa, is another example of Riyadh’s...
          8/10/2018: WORLD: Trudeau sticks to his guns in spat with Saudis      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau yesterday refused to apologise for calling out Saudi Arabia on its human rights record, after Riyadh said it was considering further punitive measures against Ottawa over its criticisms of the kingdom. Mr Trudeau...
          Saudi Energy Minister: Canada Row Won’t Affect Oil Exports      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
An ongoing diplomatic row between Saudi Arabia and Canada will not affect crude oil exports from the Kingdom, Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih said, adding that Riyadh’s policy has always been to keep politics and energy exports separate, Reuters reports. Saudi Arabia earlier this week cut off diplomatic relations with Ottawa following criticism by Canada’s Foreign Minister about Saudi Arabia’s detention of several women’s rights activists. The Foreign Ministry has reiterated its stance on human rights, releasing a statement…
           Asia Fiber Coatings Industry Overview, Analysis, Opportunities, Forecast, Segmentation, Applications, Competitive Analysis : Ken Research      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
According to the study “Asia Fiber Coatings Industry Situation and Prospects Research report”, fiber coatings market is segmented on the basis of types such as optical fiber coatings, fiber glass coating and carbon fiber coating. The end-user industries of fiber coatings in Asia are electronics, textiles, automotive, aerospace, oil and gas industries. Geographically, Asia fiber coatings market is spread across China, India, Japan, Korea, Saudi Arabia and other regions. The leading players in...
          Kota Padang Bidik Investor Arab Saudi      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

PADANG – Walikota Padang H. Mahyeldi Ansharullah ikut membidik peluang kerjasama di bidang investasi dan lainnya yang tengah dijalin antara Indonesia- Arab Saudi atau Kerajaan Saudi Arabia (KSA). Hal ini terbukti dengan diundangnya Walikota Padang dalam kegiatan ‘Talk Show’ (gelar wicara) terkait Potensi Pasar Perdagangan, Pariwisata dan Investasi negara Arab Saudi dan Strategi menembusnya di […]

The post Kota Padang Bidik Investor Arab Saudi appeared first on Portal Berita Singgalang.


          Saudi Arabia, UNHCR sign agreement to assist displaced in Syria      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
RIYADH: The Saudi Fund for Development, a lending arm of the government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), have signed a cooperation agreement under which Saudi Arabia will provide US $ 5 million to improve the housing conditions of displaced in Syria. The agreement was co-signed by the Vice President and Managing Director of the Saudi Fund for Development, Khalid Bin
          Who Determines ‘Universal Values’?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Is it any of Canada’s business whether Saudi women have the right to drive? Well, Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland just made it her business. Repeatedly denouncing Riyadh’s arrest of women’s rights advocate Samar Badawi, Freeland has driven the two countries close to a break in diplomatic relations. “Reprehensible” said Riyadh of Freeland’s tweeted attack. Canada is “engaged in blatant interference in the Kingdom’s domestic affairs.” The Saudis responded by expelling Canada’s ambassador and ordering 15,000 Saudi students to end their studies in Canada and barred imports of Canadian wheat. A $15 billion contract to provide armored vehicles to Saudi Arabia … Continue reading

The post Who Determines ‘Universal Values’? appeared first on LewRockwell.


          CANADA FX DEBT-C$ dips ahead of domestic jobs data as greenback broadly rises      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The loonie was buffeted on Wednesday by a diplomatic dispute between Canada and Saudi Arabia, hitting a two-week low at C $1.3121. A dispute over human rights in Saudi Arabia will not have any impact on Saudi oil supplies to Canada, its energy minister said. "The big headlines on Canada and Saudi Arabia are much more noise than anything else," said Rahim Madhavji,...
          CANADA FX DEBT-C$ steadies as Saudi Arabia reassures Canadian oil customers      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
TORONTO, Aug 9- The Canadian dollar was little changed against its U.S. counterpart on Thursday as oil prices rose after a deep slide the day before and Saudi Arabia said its oil customers in Canada will not be affected by a diplomatic dispute. A row over human rights in Saudi Arabia will not have any impact on Saudi oil supplies to Canada, its energy minister said,...
          Why do educated divorced women need to be funded by ex-husbands? Gender equality is futile if we look for concessions being a woman      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It’s a verdict that seems to have come from Saudi Arabia, where women can’t do so many things, including driving and travelling alone. A Madras High Court judge recently passed order to a man, saying going by Hindu philosophy he shouldn’t expect his wife to get a job or earn money. The bench dismissed a […]
          Trump Stays Quiet While Saudi Arabia-Canada Tensions Rise - Bloomberg      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Bloomberg

Trump Stays Quiet While Saudi Arabia-Canada Tensions Rise
Bloomberg
The Trump administration is privately trying to coax Saudi Arabia to dial back hostilities with Canada even as the U.S. maintains a hands-off public approach to the escalating dispute between the two key allies, a senior U.S. official said. The U.S. is ...
Susan Rice: President Trump, the Autocrats' Best FriendNew York Times
Saudi effort to punish Canada seems to have little effectABC News
In Saudi-Canada standoff, Riyadh should stand downNew York Post
CBC.ca -CBC.ca
all 356 news articles »

          In Saudi-Canada standoff, Riyadh should stand down      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The last time Canada undertook an act of aggression was in 1999, when it declared war on the United States — in the comedic universe of “South Park,” that is. But few were laughing Monday when Saudi Arabia shockingly cut ties with Canada and enacted severe punitive measures against Ottawa. Riyadh’s gripe? A Canadian Foreign...
          Letters: Canada's criticism of Saudi Arabia upholds our international obligations      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada applauds Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland for voicing the forbidden truth — that Saudi Arabia’s “emperor” has no clothes.
          Canada seeks help from allies to help resolve Saudi row      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Government source says Canada is quietly working back channels to prod allies including Germany and Sweden to resolve spat with Saudi Arabia
          Canada seeks support in row with Saudi Arabia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Canada has sought help to resolve its dispute with Saudi Arabia from countries that have previously criticised the kingdom for human rights abuses. Reported by SBS 9 hours ago.
          Comment on 2:00PM Water Cooler 8/9/2018 by Yves Smith      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Mohammed bin Salman, Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia. He is widely referred to as MBS.
          8/10/2018: TIMES GLOBAL: SAUDI-LED AIR STRIKE KILLS 29 KIDS IN YEMEN      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

At least 50 people were killed, including 29 children, during an air strike by the Saudi Arabia-led coalition in Yemen’s Saada province on Thursday, the rebel-run health ministry said. The coalition is fighting the Iranian-aligned Houthi group in...
          Saudi Arabia spat leaves maple syrup producer in 'sticky situation'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A maple syrup producer in Nova Scotia has been forced to put a shipment on hold because of Ottawa's diplomatic row with Saudi Arabia.
          A Truckbed Full of Dead Children (Graphic Photos and Video)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The U.S. military industrial complex is all too enthusiastically helping the government of Saudi Arabia massacre civilians and children in one of the world's poorest countries, Yemen.



As multiple Silicon Valley tech giants coordinated a blanket ban of Alex Jones across their social media platforms for "glorifying violence," the Saudi government, a client state of the Western military industrial complex with firm backing from the U.S. federal government, actually did violence to a crowded market full of innocent civilians going about their business.

In fact, the airstrike deliberately targeted a school bus (via memeorandum) in a public marketplace carrying children home from summer school, resulting in 43 dead, 63 wounded.

This is a blatant act of terrorism and a crime against humanity, brazenly committed by a coalition of the world's governments.

Reuters will shows you some very sad pictures in its report linked to above, like this following picture of a boy injured in the attack, but even these are sanitized compared to what some human rights activists in Yemen have shared on social media.


Here's what else the Saudi government just accomplished:






As Daniel Larison writes at The American Conservative...
(hat tip: memeorandum):

'Coalition attacks on Yemeni markets are unfortunately all too common. The Saudis and their allies know they can strike civilian targets with impunity because the Western governments that arm and support them never call them out for what they do. The U.S. continues to arm and refuel coalition planes despite ample evidence that the coalition has been deliberately attacking civilian targets.

At the very least, the coalition hits civilian targets with such regularity that they are ignoring whatever procedures they are supposed to be following to prevent that. The weapons that the U.S., Britain, and other arms suppliers provide them are being used to slaughter wedding-goers, hospital patients, and schoolchildren, and U.S. refueling of coalition planes allows them to carry out more of these attacks than they otherwise could. Today’s attack ranks as one of the worst.

Saada has come under some of the most intense attacks from the coalition bombing campaign. The coalition illegally declared the entire area a military target three years ago, and ever since they have been blowing up homes, markets, schools, water treatment systems, and hospitals without any regard for the innocent civilians that are killed and injured.

The official U.S. line on support for the war is that even more civilians would be killed if the U.S. weren’t supporting the coalition. Our government has never provided any evidence to support this, and the record shows that civilian casualties from Saudi coalition airstrikes have increased over the last year. The Saudis and their allies either don’t listen to any of the advice they’re receiving, or they know they won’t pay any price for ignoring it. As long as the U.S. arms and refuels coalition planes while they slaughter Yemeni civilians in attacks like this one, our government is implicated in the war crimes enabled by our unstinting military assistance. Congress can and must halt that assistance immediately.'

This is the warped state of the modern, Western mind.

Our biggest corporations will take symbolic actions against violence by banning the social media channels of an independent media outlet for allegedly "glorifying violence," but will continue to host the U.S. State Department and U.S. Department of Defense's social media channels, which are the institutionalization of violence itself, and which not only glorify and justify violence with never-ending propaganda, but which actually perpetuate it themselves, often against the world's most poor and vulnerable people, and for the benefit, enrichment, and empowerment of the world's most entrenched and exploitative elite.

Interestingly enough, Alex Jones' websites have been frequent commentators and critics of the increasingly more violent U.S.-backed campaign of Saudi massacres in Yemen:






This is what gets taken down for glorifying violence.

And for dehumanizing language toward Muslims.

I think it's time for Western liberals to take a hard look at themselves and consider that Alex Jones is far more of a compassionate humanitarian than they are.


          Al Qaeda, Yemen, and the U.S./Saudi Relationship      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
If the United States has cut deals with Al Qaeda in the Saudi-led war in Yemen, what does that say about the corrosive nature of the relationship between the U.S. and Saudi Arabia? Sahar Khan and John Glaser comment.
          GoAir to start international operations in October; to connect Kerala's Kannur to Saudi Arabia's Dammam      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Civil aviation secretary RN Choubey said they are working on a turnaround plan to make Air India competitive and are holding consultations with the finance ministry.
          Saudi oil policies not swayed by politics      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi oil policies not swayed by politics#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000 Washington (UPI) Aug 9, 2018

Considerations regarding the supply of oil to customers and countries around the world won't be swayed by political issues, Saudi Arabia's oil minister said. Saudi Minster of Energy, Industry and Mineral Resources Khalid al-Falih said his government's policy ... Reported by Energy Daily 48 minutes ago.
          Saudi Arabia assures Canada dispute won’t block oil sales      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister says the diplomatic rift with Canada won’t disrupt the kingdom’s oil sales to Canadian customers. HASAN JAMALI/THE CANADIAN PRESS Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister says the diplomatic rift with Canada won’t disrupt the kingdom’s oil sales to Canadian customers, an announcement that demonstrates there are limits to the retaliation Riyadh is willing […]
          Saudi Arabia And Iran Woo Incoming Pakistani Prime Minister – Analysis      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
An offer by a Saudi-backed bank to lend financially strapped Pakistan US$4 billion is likely intended to bolster Saudi influence when former international cricket player Imran Khan is sworn in in the coming week as the South Asian country’s next prime minister. The offer was most ...
          Saudi Arabia's Spat With Canada Risks Backlash From Investors      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia’s diplomatic rupture with Canada is compounding a volatile business climate for a country that is seeking to overhaul its economy but has struggled to woo foreign investors.
          Golf Equipment Market Professional Survey Grooming Factor's 2022      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

New York, NY -- (SBWIRE) -- 08/10/2018 -- Golf equipment is used by the golfer in playing the Golf sport. These equipment include balls, clubs, gloves, shoes, ball markers, tees, club head covers, ball mark repair tools and other aids such as golf bag and golf carts.

Geographically, the revenue for golf equipment is majorly contributed by the North American region due to high number of golf courses in the region demanding quality golf equipment. Improving lifestyles and increasing disposable income in the developing economies such as India and China foresee tremendous growth for the golf equipment market.

The prime factor fuelling the growth of Golf Equipment market are rise in golf tourism, increasing number of professional & amateur female golfers and development of new golf courses. Also, it is an outdoor recreation activity providing opportunities for the consumers to spend their quality leisure time, thereby contributing to the growth of golf equipment market. Additionally rise in the number of high net worth individuals in emerging markets and introduction of customer friendly online booking portals for the golf court, are some other potential factors propelling the growth of the market in this region.

Request For Report Sample @ https://www.persistencemarketresearch.com/samples/9734

However, the lack of infrastructure in the underdeveloped economies is currently restraining the growth of golf equipment market. Also, the investments required in the construction of golf courses are very high. In such a scenario, most of the underdeveloped and developing economies in the world would prefer to invest in developing the basic infrastructure for education and healthcare. This further constraints the growth of the overall golf equipment market.

Additionally, the factors such as seasonality of the game and rising popularity of alternate sports & leisure activities among end-users are further expected to adversely impact the growth of Golf Equipment market during the forecast period.

Global Golf Equipment market is segmented by: type, and by region

Golf Equipment by type

Golf Balls
Recycled Balls
Markouts/X-Outs
Practice/Range Balls
Advanced Balls
Golf Clubs
Iron
Wood
Putter
Hybrid
Golf Shoes

Golf Equipment By Region:

Asia Pacific
Europe
North America
Latin America
The Middle East & Africa

Currently, North America and Europe accounts for significant portion of the global Golf Equipment market. The modern lifestyles of the population in the North American region looking to invest in leisure activities is the prime factor fuelling the growth of golf equipment market.. The initiatives taken by the governments to promote region-based tourism is another factor contributing to the growth of golf equipment market.

Increasing base of wealthy people in countries such as Saudi Arabia, UAE and Egypt, especially promises the market growth, given the inclination of the rich people to take up golf as a leisure interest. The rise in golf tourism is a key trend stimulating growth in the golf equipment market. Preferred destinations for golf tourism (other than U.S) includes Portugal, UAE, Scotland, Morocco and Ireland.

Some of the prominent players in the global Golf Equipment market include Bridgestone Golf, Callaway Golf Company, Cleveland Golf, Nike Golf, TaylorMade (Adidas Golf Company), Dunlop Sports Co. Ltd., Dixon Golf, American Golf, Turner Sports Interactive Inc. and Edwin Watts Golf and True Temper Sports.

The report covers exhaustive analysis on:

Golf Equipment Market Segments
Golf Equipment Market Dynamics
Historical Actual Market Size, 2013 - 2015
Golf Equipment Market Size & Forecast 2016 to 2022
Supply & Demand Value Chain
Golf Equipment Market Current Trends/Issues/Challenges
Competition & Companies involved
Technology
Value Chain
Golf Equipment Market Drivers and Restraints

Regional analysis for Golf Equipment Market includes

North America
Latin America
Europe
Asia Pacific & Japan
The Middle East and Africa

Download Table Of Content @ https://www.persistencemarketresearch.com/toc/9734

Report Highlights:

Shifting Industry dynamics
In-depth market segmentation
Historical, current and projected industry size Recent industry trends
Key Competition landscape
Strategies of key players and product offerings
Potential and niche segments/regions exhibiting promising growth
A neutral perspective towards market performance

For more information on this press release visit: http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/golf-equipment-market-professional-survey-grooming-factors-2022-1026854.htm

Media Relations Contact

Abhishek Budholiya
Marketing Head
Telephone: 1-800-961-0353
Email: Click to Email Abhishek Budholiya
Web: https://www.persistencemarketresearch.com/market-research/microbial-identification-market.asp

#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000


          Robert Redford retires finally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
So Robert Redford's announced he's retiring.  Should have happened decades ago.

He hasn't made a great film since 1975's THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR and 1976's ALL THE PRESIDENT'S MEN.  He is not a great actor and never was.  He was a passable leading man.

Or, he was a passable leading man up until around 1983.

The women opposite him got younger and he just looked older.  We didn't need LEGAL EAGLES.  We didn't need HAVANA.  We didn't need INDECENT PROPOSAL.  I could go on and on.

As the looks faded, he began wearing that ratty wig.  We are supposed to believe, at 82, that's his thick (and ratty) and natural blond hair?  Don't make me laugh.

Paul Newman was an actor and a leading man.  Redford was just a leading man.  It's why he never won an Academy Award for acting.

If he'd ended his career in the 70s, he would have still had charisma and some strong films -- including THE WAY WE WERE.  But he kept on going and he was just an embarrassment.  He can't act strong enough to deserve being cast in anything.

When he had his looks, he was cast because he was good looking.  But he never was cast because he was a great actor.  I think he damaged his reputation by continuing to make movies.  OUR SOULS AT NIGHT really was the last straw.  He reteamed with Jane Fonda and she's giving a performance that's measured and new and daring.  Him? He's playing romantic teen wounded.  The same performance he's given forever.  It wasn't fresh or inventive in the 70s but he still had his looks.


"Iraq snapshot" (THE COMMON ILLS):
Thursday, August 9, 2018.  As the US government attempts to install Hayder al-Abadi for a second term as prime minister, is Hayder's little world falling apart?

XINHUA reports:

Four Iraqi soldiers were killed and five others injured in an overnight attack by Islamic State (IS) militants in Iraq's central province of Salahudin, a provincial security source said on Thursday.
Fierce clashes erupted late on Wednesday night when IS militants attacked an army outpost in the rugged area of Mteibijah near Salahudin's eastern provincial border with neighboring Diyala province, Major Alaa al-Saadi, from Diyala Operations Command, told Xinhua.

Early in the morning, reinforcement troops arrived to the area and began an operation to hunt down the attackers who fled the scene under the dark, Saadi said.

So much for Hayder al-Abadi's defeat of ISIS.  He thought he could run for re-election that (false) claim and that the Iraqi people would rush to vote for him.  That is not how it turned out.  He came in third.  Third.  The sitting prime minister came in third.  He did not end corruption.  He did not end ISIS.  He did not do anything.

Elections were May 12th and Iraq has still not formed a government.  Behind the scenes, the US, via Special Envoy Brett McGurk, is up to its usual tricks.


Elijah J Magnier offers:

Iraq paid $100 million of Iranian debts but is faced with the US sanctions on Iran. Iraq, under Abadi, would like to abide by the US measures. Sources in the office of the Prime Minister said “the US is trying to substitute the Iranian supply of electricity by putting pressure on two main neighbouring countries (Saudi Arabia and Kuwait) to support Iraq with its basic needs and inviting them to offer their structural capabilities to Abadi offering electricity in exchange of oil. The aim is to push Iran away and limit its influence in Mesopotamia”.
Indeed, US Ambassadors based in the Middle East and the US special presidential envoy to Iraq Brett McGurk are doing their best to convince Gulf countries of the necessity to support Haidar Abadi and Moqtada al-Sadr and promote these so they can gain power in the new government selected, and stand against Iran and its allies in Iraq. They are asking neighbouring countries (rather than Iran) to provide Iraq with electricity so that the Iranian economy does not benefit.
“US envoy Brett McGurk visited us in Baghdad and asked us to support Moqtada and Abadi in one coalition to re-elect the actual prime minister. We told him that Moqtada al-Sadr is unpredictable and can’t be considered reliable. Your (US) policy in Iraq has never been successful and your choices are not in our interest” said the highest two political Sunni authorities in Iraq visited by the US envoy. Ambassador McGurk, said the sources, apparently didn’t like this unexpected answer: if Iraqi leaders don’t abide by the US’s” recommendations”, he threatened reprisals.
“We told Ambassador Brett that if he is threatening us he will receive no collaboration from our side and will create a negative outcome for all”, said the sources. And the Sunni are not the only ones refusing to support Moqtada and Abadi. The US envoy visited Kurdistan and received similar answers from the Kurdish leaders.
The US is also calling upon Shia party leaders, especially Sayyed Ammar al-Hakim, who seems the most docile of all those contacted, and shows himself very willing to collaborate.
It seems the chances of Haidar Abadi of renewing his mandate for another four years are becoming slimmer by the minute. Iran and its allies, or perhaps the anti-US parties in Iraq among Shia, Sunni and Kurds, are prevailing. There was a time when both Iran and the US agreed on the same candidate, the actual Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi. Today, the US has declared economic war on Iran to cripple its capabilities, affecting the Iranian people and its local currency. The embargo will seriously begin in August and will intensify in November.

On the US sanctions, yesterday some tried to claim Hayder was 'outraged.'  No.  A puppet doesn't show outrage.  REUTERS summed up his meek response correctly.



Link to headline article




He's hoping for a second term as prime minister that the US government is trying to get for him.  The voters don't want him.  He's not going to bite the hand that feeds him.


And people try to tell me that is not an American occupied land? and | Iraq | al-Abadi Disagrees With U.S. Sanctions Reimposed on Iran But Will Abide With via
2:05
17 views
 
 



Abadi shows he is a real stooge for the ,neglecting 's economy and citizens' wellfare just to keep enjoying support.
 
 




Poor Hayder al-Abadi.  He seemed such a shoe-in to the US government.


Despite coming in third in May’s election, Abadi was seen as having a good chance of keeping his seat. Now, other names are being tossed around including a member of his own party. A serious miscalculation by the US.
 
 




Having done nothing for years, he suddenly develops a whimsical interest in fighting corruption in July.  Two for show moves did nothing to enhance his reputation, so this month, he tries another move.



BREAKING: Al-Hadath reporter: |i PM Abadi dismisses number of managers at Ministry of Electricity

          U.S. to remain neutral as MBS continues his anti-Canada hissy-fit      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
I know I know, we are already 1.5 years into the Trump administration, but part of me still can't believe that the U.S. is "taking a neutral stance" as Saudi Arabia, a country with one of the worst human rights records in the world, shits all over the U.S.'s closest ally just because it pointed out one small example of how the Saudis have one of the worst human rights records in the world.



          Media Roundtable: Saudi-Canada row, the interview with Osama bin Laden's family & midterm elections      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This week, on Your Call’s media roundtable, we’ll have a conversation with the Guardian’s Middle East correspondent Martin Chulov about his exclusive interview with Osama bin Laden’s family, as well as the latest diplomatic row between Saudi Arabia and Canada over its criticism of the Kingdom’s human rights violation.
          Fake Bogeymen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The liberal element has been doing it for years but it seems to be ramping up lately.

The whoppers coming out of the liberal left aren't even good whoppers anymore; they are blatantly false or obvious - like those liberal white women posing as fake minorities, or feral niggers trashing their own neighbourhoods and blaming whitey. I think they just finished themselves off too - when their mouthpiece, the NYT - hired some racist chink that hates white people in general, white men in particular - and makes no secret of it.

Z wonders why the liberal left wants a war with Russia. The only reason I can offer is that our progressive left has drifted so far leftward that anyone to their right is an enemy; and now that outright loons have run away with the movement, they've made themselves the enemy of anyone with a triple digit IQ. I dunno - nothing else makes sense.

In Canada, Prime Minister Pink Socks wants to go to war with Saudi Arabia over the treatment of women. It just came up out of nowhere; one day it's life as usual in Canada, the next - Saudi Arabia is kicking our politicos out, freezing our assets in their country, and bringing their people home. And that fwench whoreson is in the papers blathering about human rights - while he will drop to his knees to fellate the Iranians, or the hordes of moslem animals he's already let into the country.

Why are our leaders trying to pick senseless fights like this, where we can only lose?

I am already a bogeyman. I own guns. I think queers and pedos and their various iterations are sexual degenerates. Lately I find myself admiring the Russians and loathing my countrymen who I am beginning to see more and more as craven, posturing idiots. I've been known to do that icky Christian thing from time to time too.

How long before you become a bogeyman?
          AWAS AMERIKA AKAN MENYEANG IRAN      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   




AWAS

DAULAH TERPENDAM AMERIKA
SEDANG MERANCANG 
UNTUK MENYERANG IRAN

BERITA MULA DISEBAR
PEJUANG DAN TENTER SIBER IRAN 
SEDANG MERANCANG
UNTUK MENYERANG AMERIKA

BERITA SADEMIKIAN
SEDANG DISEBAR 
OLEH 
MEDIA AMERIKA 
DAN
MEDIA ISRAEL

SERANGAN TERHADAP IRAN
DICADANG OLEH KUMPULAN
KANAN AMERIKA
YANG MENYOKONG ZIONIS ISREAL

INI TERMASUK 
KUMPULAN WAHABI 
DARI SAUDI ARABIA

DIBELAKANG SEMUA INI
IALAH ZIONIS ISRAEL






-------------------

          Saudi Arabia is completely unpredictable | Helsingin Sanomat - Finland      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
none
          Global macro overview for 10/08/2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Canadian Dollar has had a roller coaster ride due to oil, after Saudi Arabia comments and leaks from NAFTA negotiations. A lot of confusion arose from the information that as a result of a diplomatic dispute between Canada and Saudi Arabia (Prime Minister Trudeau criticized the arrest of a Saudi activist), Riyad ordered the central bank and the national funds to sell Canadian assets. The amount coming into play is not big and should not have a clear impact on CAD, but the information has become an excuse for the movement fueled by a sell-off of crude oil. However, as the CAD market is unstable, it showed a dynamic retreat to the USD/CAD decline after reports that the US and Mexico have agreed on the trade of cars, which opens the way for further negotiations of the NAFTA agreement. Nevertheless, it does not look like the "Saudi factor" would be sustained for longer, and expectations for NAFTA (and the implications for tightening the BoC policy) in the longer horizon should play a greater role.

Today, the global investor's attention should be focused on another set of Canadain economy data in form of Unemployment Rate, Employment Change, Part-Time Employment Change and Participation Rate.

Let's now take a look at the USD/CAD technical picture at the H4 time frame. The market has tested the 50% Fibo retracement level and hit the technical resistance at the level of 1.3111 before the drop. Currently, the bulls are again trying to rally higher and the same level should be in play. In a case of a breakout higher, the next target for bulls is located at 61% Fibo at 1.3164. On the other hand, the immediate support is seen at the level of 1.3000. Please notice the positive momentum that supports the short-term bullish bias.

analytics5b6d2a9ac2a4f.jpg

The material has been provided by InstaForex Company - www.instaforex.com

          NDI Inspector      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
FL-Lake Mary, Job Description POSITION IS LOCATED IN SAUDI ARABIA FOR FIRST YEAR Overview: The Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF) maintains the third largest fleet of F-15's in the world after the American and Japanese Air Forces. The RSAF are defending and protecting critical infrastructure locations and population centers of Saudi Arabia ensuring regional, and global stability for all of its allies including us. In
           Upsurge Profit by ERP & CRM Software in Saudi Arabia       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
السعر: 1 ر. س,
If you want to increase your Income then Alrasmyat, offering best Chatbots Integrated CRM Software in Saudi Arabia to maintain your business services with the help of fully integrated M2M, Augmented reality and AI, expert CRM Software in Saudi Arabia. It helps to improve in consistency through revie... https://olx.sa.com/ad/upsurge-profit-by-erp-crm-software-in-saudi-arabia-ID6O0L5.html
           Omnichannel ERP Software in Saudi Arabia: Blockchain is continue       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
السعر: 1 ر. س,
If you want Multichannel Store then Alrasmyat Omnichannel Cloud ERP Software in Saudi Arabia. Alrasmyat best Omnichannel Cloud ERP Software in Saudi Arabia and online business arrangements can bring these once-separated procedures together. Bilytica AI-Enabled Online ERP Software in Saudi Arabia can... https://olx.sa.com/ad/omnichannel-erp-software-in-saudi-arabia-blockchain-is-continue-ID6O0KP.html
          Comment on Zimbabwe’s Military Junta Shows its True Colors to the World  by shabbaranks      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
There is talk of a US led military force gathering off the coast of Mozambique. It is possible that the Trump administration is preparing to attack and destroy the indisciplined and ineffective Zimbabwe Army, take control of the country and install Nelson Chamisa as the duly elected leader. If I were Emerson Manangagwa, I would be thinking about fleeing the country, maybe to Saudi Arabia. Otherwise the US Marines and US Army maybe taking his head.
          Saudi-Canada row rattles investors      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
August 9, 2018 -- #SaudiArabia #Canada #canada_saudi The row between Saudi Arabia and Canada over human rights threatens to undermine Riyadh’s drive for foreign direct investment (FDI), with impulsive policies raising questions about financial security. Graphic shows falling FDI since Mohammed bin Salman (MbS) became defence minister in January 2015.
          Debate: Row with Riyadh: No show of support for Ottawa?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The diplomatic crisis between Saudi Arabia and Canada seems likely to escalate. Riyadh has instructed all Saudi students and patients to leave Canada. The crisis was triggered by a tweet by Canadian foreign minister Chrystia Freeland in which she called for civil rights activist Samar Badawi to be freed. Commentators criticise Europe for not supporting Ottawa in the row.
          Saudi Arabia is completely unpredictable | Helsingin Sanomat - Finland      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
none
          Determined diplomacy needed to mend relations between Canada and Saudi Arabia, experts say      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia has booted Canada’s ambassador, ended studies for thousands of Saudi students at Canadian universities, halted the purchase of Canadian wheat and barley, suspended flights and is freezing ... - Source: www.thestar.com
          Saudi Arabia breaks ties with Canada over Human Rights      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Canadian Politics : Saudi Arabia breaks ties with Canada over Human Rights

Stats : 22 Replies
          Saudi Arabia and Iran woo incoming Pakistani prime minister      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Credit: MPC Journal

By James M. Dorsey

An offer by a Saudi-backed bank to lend financially strapped Pakistan US$4 billion is likely intended to bolster Saudi influence when former international cricket player Imran Khan is sworn in in the coming week as the South Asian country’s next prime minister.

The offer was most immediately related to a statement by Asad Umar, Pakistan’s new finance minister-in-waiting, that Pakistan would decide on whether to seek a bailout from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) or friendly nations such as China and Saudi Arabia by the end of September.

Pakistan reportedly is looking to possibly ask the IMF for a US$12 billion bailout package. The country’s foreign exchange reserves have plummeted over the past year. Chinese loans have so far kept Pakistan afloat.  Pakistan’s currency, the rupee, has been devalued four times since December and lost almost a quarter of its value.

It was unclear whether the loan by the Jeddah-based Islamic Development Bank (IDB) would be in addition to IDB’s activation in late July of a three-year US$4.5-billion oil financing facility for Pakistan intended to stabilize the rupee-dollar exchange rate in the interbank market that has largely remained under pressure. The International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation (ITFC), an IDB subsidiary, at the same time rolled over a loan to Pakistan of $100 million.

Nonetheless, the offer even before Mr. Khan takes office, is also related to Saudi uncertainty over what his rise to power means geopolitically for the kingdom’s bitter rivalry with Iran, Pakistan’s neighbour.

A populist, Mr. Khan appears to be something of an enigma when it comes to Saudi Arabia, a close ally, and Iran. Saudi Arabia likely takes heart from the fact that Mr. Khan appears to be socially a conservative.

But in terms of Iran, Mr. Khan, whose Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party won the most votes in July 25 elections, has suggested that he may adopt a more independent course.

In a phone call with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, Mr. Khan this week accepted an invitation to visit Tehran. Mehdi Honardoost, Iran’s ambassador to Pakistan, was among the first diplomats Mr. Khan met after his election victory.

Mr. Khan met days earlier separately with Saudi ambassador to Pakistan Nawaf bin Said Al-Malki. Mr. Al-Malki said Saudi Crown Prince intended to visit Pakistan soon in a bid to strengthen bilateral relationship.

In a post-election televised speech Mr. Khan made a point of discussing his country’s relationship with Saudi Arabia and Iran.

“We want to improve ties with Iran. Saudi Arabia is a friend who has always stood by us in difficult times. Our aim will be that whatever we can do for conciliation in the Middle East, we want to play that role. Those tensions, that fight, between neighbours, we will try to bring them together," Mr. Khan said.

The prime minister noted in separate remarks that “if any country needs peace right now, then it is Pakistan… (Saudi Arabia) has stood by us in our toughest times. We would like to be a reconciliatory state and help them resolve their inner tensions.”

Saudi Arabia has so far given no indication that it is interested in mediated efforts or a negotiated resolution of its dispute with Iran. If anything, Saudi Arabia has welcomed US President Donald J. Trump’s withdrawal from the 2015 nuclear agreement that curbed Iran’s nuclear programme and his efforts to economically strangle the Islamic republic with harsh sanctions.

Saudi Arabia has also created building blocks in Pakistan’s troubled Balochistan province to stir unrest among Iran’s ethnic groups should it opt for a more aggressive anti-Iranian strategy

In a sign that Mr. Khan’s room to manoeuvre may be limited, Pakistan’s military earlier this year agreed to send troops to Saudi Arabia on a “training and advise mission” that would according to a military statement, not expand beyond the kingdom’s borders. Pakistan’s parliament rejected in 2015 a Saudi request that it authorize Pakistani troops to participate in its troubled military campaign in Yemen.

Nonetheless, Saudi Arabia is likely to be concerned about the possible appointment as defense minister of Shirin Mazari, a controversial academic, who last year criticized in a series of tweets the fact that Pakistani general Raheel Sharif commands the 41-nation, Saudi-sponsored Islamic Military Counter Terrorism Coalition (IMCTC).

Earlier, Ms. Mazari asserted that Pakistan should not cooperate in Saudi Arabia’s alleged pursuit of a US agenda and should instead forge ties to Iran and India.

“US always speak about promoting democracy but it supports an entirely different policy in the Middle East. We should review our foreign policy as Saudi Arabia is acting on a specific agenda. Pakistan should not become party in this agenda and we should establish cordial relations with all neighbours like India, Iran and Afghanistan,” Ms. Mazari said.

Ironically, controversy about Ms. Mazari focused on her advocacy two decades ago of nuclear strikes on Indian population centres in the event of a war between the two countries. Mr. Khan has suggested that he was willing to go the extra mile to improve relations with India.

Dr. James M. Dorsey is a senior fellow at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, co-director of the University of Würzburg’s Institute for Fan Culture, and co-host of the New Books in Middle Eastern Studies podcast. James is the author of The Turbulent World of Middle East Soccer blog, a book with the same title as well as Comparative Political Transitions between Southeast Asia and the Middle East and North Africa, co-authored with Dr. Teresita Cruz-Del Rosario,  Shifting Sands, Essays on Sports and Politics in the Middle East and North Africa, and just published China and the Middle East: Venturing into the Maelstrom



          'We Just Bombed a SCHOOL BUS': Democratic Senator Says 'We Need to End' American Support for Attacks in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Dozens of children were reportedly killed in a Saudi attack on Yemen.

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT) denounced American military aid to Saudi Arabia following reports of a devastating airstrike on a Yemeni school bus on Thursday.

CNN reported that dozens of children under the age of 15 were killed in the attack, and many more were injured, according to reports from Yemeni officials and the Red Cross.

"U.S. bombs. U.S. targeting. U.S. mid air support," Murphy said in a tweet. "And we just bombed a SCHOOL BUS."

He continued: "The Saudi/UAE/U.S. bombing campaign is getting more reckless, killing more civilians, and strengthening terrorists inside Yemen. We need to end this - NOW."

In a statement, Pentagon spokeswoman Rebecca Rebarich said that American aid helps reduce civilian casualties. However, a recent review of airstrikes by the United Nations found that "measures taken by the Saudi Arabia-led coalition in its targeting process to minimize child casualties, if any, remain largely ineffective."

American support for the Saudi attacks in Yemen began under President Barack Obama, and President Donald Trump has vigorously continued the policy and ramped up munitions sales to the U.S. ally.

“In retrospect, the problem is that we did just enough to produce the perception of complicity, without doing enough to actually influence their behavior,” a former senior Obama administration official told the Washington Post. “We tried to take this principled middle position, which left us stuck.”

Meanwhile, the war has caused what the United Nations says is a humanitarian disaster. In addition to the thousands of deaths from direct attacks, millions are believed to be on the brink of starvation because of the crisis.

 

Related Stories


          Here Are 5 Reasons Why Paul Manafort Will Receive Every Benefit of the Doubt      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The wealthy Manafort has a major advantage in this trial.

The trial of Paul Manafort entered Day Eight this morning in Judge T.S. Ellis III’s federal courtroom in Alexandria, Virginia, where President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager continues to battle multiple charges of bank fraud and tax evasion. But the wealthy Manafort has a major advantage in this trial: class privilege—unlike countless poor or lower middle-class Americans who are crushed by the U.S.’ judicial system and the Prison/Industrial Complex. 

The U.S. has, per capita, the most prisoners in the world—more than Saudi Arabia, more than Iran, more than China, more than Russia. The U.S has 5% of the world’s population but 25% of its prison population; in other words, one in four of the world’s prisoners are incarcerated in the U.S. And as a rule, it isn’t men of privilege like Manafort who are being locked up.

Here are five reasons why Manafort will receive every benefit of the doubt in his trial.

1. Judge Ellis Is Skeptical About the Charges Manafort Is Facing 

Throughout Manafort’s trial, Judge Ellis has been quick to express his skepticism about the federal government’s case against Manafort—often discouraging testimony about his relationship with Ukrainian oligarchs. Ellis, in fact, has asked attorneys to refrain from using the word “oligarch,” which he considers prejudicial. Ellis has made it clear, throughout the trial, that he believes prosecutors are the ones who have the heavy lifting to do in this case—and certainly, in theory, prosecutors should always be the ones with the burden of proof in a democracy. But the reality is that in the U.S., prosecutors often have the upper hand when defendants are poor; in Manafort’s trial, prosecutors—not the defendant—are the ones facing an uphill climb.

Even Judge Andrew Napolitano—a right-wing libertarian and judicial analyst for Fox News—has criticized Ellis for “showing an extraordinary bias against the government” and asserted, “I’m not happy with this judge….If you feel that negatively about the government, you shouldn’t be on the case.”

2. Manafort Has the Best Legal Defense Money Can Buy

Thanks to the Prison/Industrial Complex and overzealous prosecutors, many public defenders are overwhelmed in a way that Manafort’s attorneys are not. Manafort not only has a sympathetic judge—he has skillful attorneys like Kevin Downing as part of his defense team. And Downing, this week, has been attacking the testimony and credibility of the prosecution’s star witness: Manafort’s former business partner Rick Gates, painting him as a sleazy opportunist who is not be trusted. In so many cases, America’s poor can only dream of having the type of defense team that is defending Manafort.

3. Manafort Might Have a Sympathetic Jury

Voir dire, the process of jury selection, requires incredible skill on the part of attorneys—and even then, they cannot be entirely sure what biases a juror might have or not have. Manafort has an advantage in that he has both a skeptical judge and an aggressive defense team, both of whom can play a role in convincing the jury that Manafort is being treated unfairly. That isn’t to say, with certainty, that he won’t be convicted, but it’s certainly advantageous when a defendant has both a judge and a defense team planting doubts in the minds of jurors.

4. Even If He’s Convicted, Manafort Could Receive Lenient Sentence

Ellis has noted that Manafort, if convicted of multiple bank fraud and charges, could spend the rest of his life in prison. But guidelines for these white-collar charges call for sentences well below the maximum allowable, and even if Manafort is convicted, the sentencing judge could exercise discretion and be as lenient as the law allows.

To his credit, Ellis has become critical of mandatory minimum sentences in another area of federal law: drug cases. In late June, when Ellis sentenced convicted meth dealer Frederick Turner to 40 years in prison, he asserted that he would have much preferred to be more lenient but was bound by mandatory minimum laws. All Ellis could do, he lamented, was “express my displeasure” and impose a sentence on Turner he didn’t want to impose. 

Turner is feeling the full weight of the Prison/Industrial Complex, even though Ellis isn’t happy about it; with Manafort, there’s more room for leniency.

5. Manafort Could Receive a Presidential Pardon 

Even if Manafort is convicted and sentenced to prison, he has yet another possible escape route: President Trump, who has made it clear that he considers Manafort’s incarceration during the trial “very unfair.” On June 15, Trump tweeted, “Wow, what a tough sentence for Paul Manafort, who has represented Ronald Reagan, Bob Dole and many other top political people and campaigns. Didn’t know Manafort was the head of the mob. What about (James) Comey and Crooked Hillary and all of the others? Very unfair!”

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani recently implied that Manafort could receive a presidential pardon, telling the New York Daily News, “When the whole thing is over, things might get cleaned up with some presidential pardons.” And if Manafort is convicted and sentenced to prison, he might be joining former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and other prominent right-wingers who have received presidential pardons from Trump.

 

Related Stories


          'We Just Bombed a SCHOOL BUS': Democratic Senator Says 'We Need to End' American Support for Attacks in Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Dozens of children were reportedly killed in a Saudi attack on Yemen.

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT) denounced American military aid to Saudi Arabia following reports of a devastating airstrike on a Yemeni school bus on Thursday.

CNN reported that dozens of children under the age of 15 were killed in the attack, and many more were injured, according to reports from Yemeni officials and the Red Cross.

"U.S. bombs. U.S. targeting. U.S. mid air support," Murphy said in a tweet. "And we just bombed a SCHOOL BUS."

He continued: "The Saudi/UAE/U.S. bombing campaign is getting more reckless, killing more civilians, and strengthening terrorists inside Yemen. We need to end this - NOW."

In a statement, Pentagon spokeswoman Rebecca Rebarich said that American aid helps reduce civilian casualties. However, a recent review of airstrikes by the United Nations found that "measures taken by the Saudi Arabia-led coalition in its targeting process to minimize child casualties, if any, remain largely ineffective."

American support for the Saudi attacks in Yemen began under President Barack Obama, and President Donald Trump has vigorously continued the policy and ramped up munitions sales to the U.S. ally.

“In retrospect, the problem is that we did just enough to produce the perception of complicity, without doing enough to actually influence their behavior,” a former senior Obama administration official told the Washington Post. “We tried to take this principled middle position, which left us stuck.”

Meanwhile, the war has caused what the United Nations says is a humanitarian disaster. In addition to the thousands of deaths from direct attacks, millions are believed to be on the brink of starvation because of the crisis.

 

Related Stories


          Saudis Choose SITA For Airports Upgrade      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia’s aviation regulator, the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA), has selected SITA to support the modernization of the country’s airports, starting a major upgrade of airport and communication technology across 26 sites.

read more


          Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Picks a Very Strange Fight with Canada      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
none
          8/10/2018: World News: Saudi Arabia reassures Canada on oil      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A row over human rights in Saudi Arabia will not have any impact on Saudi oil supplies to Canada, its energy minister said yesterday, reassuring customers after Riyadh froze new trade with Canada and ruled out mediation efforts. Saudi Arabia, angered...
          Tesla’s board may reportedly tell Elon Musk to recuse himself from talks about taking the company private      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Tesla's board of directors may tell CEO Elon Musk to recuse himself as it explores the possibility of taking the company private, CNBC reports. According to the publication, Musk spoke with Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund about funding Tesla's transition to becoming a private company.
          8/10/2018: Canada / World: No plan to punish Saudis: Morneau      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

OTTAWA — The federal government has no plans to launch retaliatory economic measures against Saudi Arabia, Finance Minister Bill Morneau said Thursday in the wake of a series of actions taken by the Middle Eastern kingdom as it seeks to punish Canada...
          8/10/2018: Business: TSX bounces back, Saudi tensions ease      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
TORONTO — Canada’s main stock index closed higher in a broad advance Thursday as tensions with Saudi Arabia appeared to ease, while U.S. markets were mixed. The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index closed up 101.90 points at 16,416.98 as...
          Washington Allies with ISIS as Great Power Conflict Trumps “War on Terror”      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   



The “National Defense Strategy” document released at the beginning of this year declared bluntly that the nearly two-decade focus by the US military on the so-called “global war on terrorism” had come to an end. In its place, a new strategic orientation was being introduced based on preparing for “great power” confrontation, i.e., war with nuclear-armed Russia and China.
This was the first such defense strategy to be issued by the Pentagon in over a decade and expressed the urgency with which Washington views the preparations for a third world war.
A particularly crude and criminal outcome of this policy shift is becoming increasingly apparent in three major theaters where US forces are engaged in active combat operations. Reports from Yemen, Syria and Afghanistan provide firm evidence that the US and its local proxies are allying themselves with and employing the services of elements of ISIS and Al Qaeda in the pursuit of Washington’s broader strategic interests.
In Yemen, hundreds, if not thousands, of fighters from Al Qaeda of the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), branded by the US government as the “most dangerous” affiliate of the loose international Al Qaeda network, have been recruited by Washington’s closest allies in the Arab world, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, to fight as foot soldiers in the near-genocidal US-backed war that these Persian Gulf oil monarchies have been waging against the impoverished country of Yemen since 2015.
According to an investigative report published Monday by the Associated Press, the Saudi-led coalition “cut secret deals with al-Qaida fighters, paying some to leave key cities and towns and letting others retreat with weapons, equipment and wads of looted cash… Hundreds more were recruited to join the coalition itself.”
It added that “Key participants in the pacts said the US was aware of the arrangements and held off on any drone strikes.”
“Elements of the US military are clearly aware that much of what the US is doing in Yemen is aiding AQAP and there is much angst about that,” Michael Horton, a senior analyst at the Jamestown Foundation, a CIA-connected Washington think tank, told the AP.
“However, supporting the UAE and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia against what the US views as Iranian expansionism takes priority over battling AQAP and even stabilizing Yemen,” Horton added.
This is a gross understatement. Washington is providing indispensable military support for a war that has reduced millions of Yemenis to the brink of starvation. It is prepared to wipe out much of the country’s population in order to bolster its strategic position and that of the reactionary Arab regimes with which it is allied against the perceived threat of Iranian influence to US regional hegemony.
The war has escalated in recent days in the ongoing siege of the Yemeni Red Sea port of Hodeidah, which was green-lighted by the Trump administration. The UN has warned that a quarter of a million people could lose their lives in this operation, while millions more across the country may die of starvation if it shuts down the port, the sole lifeline for food, fuel and medicine for at least 70 percent of the population.
Recruiting Al Qaeda fighters to slaughter Yemenis in this immense and bloody war crime is entirely consistent with US policy.
In regard to Syria, meanwhile, Russia’s Defense Ministry last Thursday issued a statement warning that ISIS has increasingly concentrated its forces in the area around al-Tanaf, near the Syrian-Iraqi border, where the US military maintains a military base and has unilaterally declared a 34-mile exclusion zone around it. US troops there have provided training to so-called “rebels” opposing the government of President Bashar al-Assad and appear to be providing a security screen for ISIS.
Launched on the pretext of carrying out the “annihilation” of ISIS in Iraq and Syria, the illegal US military intervention in Syria has repeatedly seen the US and its local proxies facilitate the flight of ISIS from besieged cities. The most notorious incident was in Raqqa, where a column of vehicles carried 4,000 ISIS fighters and family members, along with their weapons, ammunition and explosives, into the eastern Syrian desert.
The goal was to turn these fighters against government troops and aid in the US operation to deprive Damascus of control over Syria’s oil and gas fields, which are vital for the reconstruction of the war-ravaged country. The US aims in Syria are bound up with wider preparations for war not only against Iran, but against Russia as well.
Finally, in regard to Afghanistan, where the US has waged war for nearly 17 years, the New York Times published an article Sunday titled, “Are ISIS Fighters Prisoners or Honored Guests of the Afghan Government?”
The article reported how two senior commanders of ISIS, along with 250 of their fighters, had surrendered to the US-backed Afghan National Army to avoid being routed by the Taliban in northern Afghanistan.
“If they were prisoners, however, it was hard to tell,” the Times reported. “The government arranged for them to stay in a guesthouse in the provincial capital of Sheberghan. Guards were posted around it not to keep the insurgents in, but to keep their potential enemies out, according to the provincial governor. Although the fighters were disarmed, they were allowed to keep their cell phones and other personal possessions.”
The Times added,
“The dubious nature of the Islamic State surrender has proved a propaganda bonanza for the Taliban.”
The newspaper does not provide any details on the nature of this “propaganda,” but it does report that the ISIS fighters “were ferried from the battlefield in Afghan Army helicopters, avoiding a potentially dangerous journey on the roads.”
The obvious conclusion from this account is that ISIS has functioned as a US asset in Afghanistan, attacking the Taliban and carrying out atrocities aimed at precluding any negotiated resolution of the conflict that does not serve US geo-strategic interests in the region.
This more or less open alliance between the Pentagon and ISIS, a supposed prime target in multiple US military interventions across three continents, is not so much a new policy as the revival of an old one that was never fully abandoned, despite the inflated rhetoric of that greatest of all “fake news” stories, the “global war on terrorism.”
Al Qaeda, the original supposed arch enemy in this unending war, was the direct product of CIA and US support for the Islamist mujahideen in Afghanistan against the Soviet-backed government in the 1980s. Since then, these elements have had a dual use for US imperialism, serving at one stage as proxy forces in wars for regime change, and at another as a pretext for US interventions in the name of fighting terror.
Under the mantle of the “war on terrorism,” successive US governments, Democratic and Republican alike, have not only conducted wars whose victims number in the millions, but also carried out an unrelenting attack on democratic rights, from domestic spying to censoring the Internet.
The emerging international alliance between the Pentagon and ISIS only serves to expose the real interests underlying these policies, which are bound up with the waging of war to offset US imperialism’s loss of economic preeminence and defend its crumbling global hegemony, and domestic repression to sustain a social order characterized by the most extreme inequality in modern American history.

The original source of this article is World Socialist Web Site

River to Sea Uprooted Palestinian   
The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Blog!

          Saudi Arabia And Canada's Fight Escalates      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Jordan Pix/ Getty Images Saudi Arabia will withdraw all of its students studying in Canada in an intensifying feud between the two countries. A Saudi government source told The Globe and Mail that more than 15,000 Saudis are studying in Canada on government funded courses or grants. Local media also reported that the country has been instructed not to transfer its patients to Canada for medical treatment.
          World Markets Roiled As Turkey Currency Crisis Goes Global      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

For once it's not about trade wars... but the alternative is hardly better.

European stocks tumbled most in a month, following Asian shares lower following contagion fears that Turkey’s economic problems will spill over into the euro zone and beyond. The Euro sank, while the safe haven dollar advanced alongside Treasuries, with the 10Y back under 2.90%. The Turkish Lira initially plunged and fell 45 big figures, with the USDTRY hitting a record high of 6.3005, or up more than 11%, before holding below 6.0 for the bulk of the session.

As described earlier the collapse started around midnight EDT when the FT reported that the ECB Single Supervisory Mechanism warned that BBVA, UniCredit and BNP Paribas are particularly exposed to a TRY selloff, and even though it "does not see situation as critical yet", it warned that the risk is that Turkish borrowers may not be hedged against TRY weakness and begin to default on foreign- currency loans.

There is some hope that Turkish President Erdogan's speech at 12 p.m. London time will calm matters but his earlier ad hoc comments did not give much room for optimism. Speaking outside a mosque earlier today, Erdogan told followers “Don’t forget this: if they have got dollars, we have got our people, our right, our Allah."

Commenting on the statement, Bloomberg macro analyst Stephen Kirkland said that it signals he’s sticking to a nationalist message and is uninclined to deliver the hard measures Turkish assets need, which according to some analysts such as ADM's Marc Ostwald include a 500 bps rate hike and an IMF bailout. As a result, option markets are now pricing in a one-in-five chance of USD/TRY reaching 7 per dollar in a month, from about 1% probability yesterday.

For the Turkey watchers, here is today's key sequence of events, all times London:

  • 12.00BST: President Erdogan to speak
  • 12.30BST: Finance Minister Albayrak announces new economic model
  • 14.30BST: President Erdogan to speak again

And as fears of contagion mounted, the EURUSD tumbled to the lowest level in a year, running stops as it broke below the barrier level of 1.15...

... as the DXY spiked to YTD highs amid a broad flight to safety with the USD bid seen across all pairs. The scramble for safety meant that both USTs and bunds rallied however in a more contained manner and the 10Y bund yields were lower by ~3.5bps.

In equities, Europe's Stoxx Europe 600 Index dropped with European equity markets selling off steadily as banks underperformed with BBVA, UniCredit and BNP Paribas - the three banks named by the ECB - in focus as all three fall 3.5-4.0%. Mining stocks also weaker as Russia considers a new mining tax of $7.5b, which also weighed on metals across the board.

U.S. equity futures declined alongside shares from Asia to Europe. Asian equity markets were also mostly negative with sentiment subdued. The ASX 200 (-0.1%) and Nikkei 225 (-0.7%) were lower with Australia weighed by weakness in energy stocks, while Tokyo trade failed to benefit from stronger than expected GDP amid a firmer currency. Elsewhere, Shanghai Comp. (-0.1%) and Hang Seng (-0.4%) traded choppy amid a lack of fresh drivers and after the PBoC refrained from operations again for a neutral position for the week.

“We’re going to have the uncertainty about Erdogan and him speaking later today that I think is going to keep the market volatile,” said Peter Chatwell, head of European rates strategy at Mizuho International, in a Bloomberg Television interview. “But probably some of the market reaction we had first thing this morning could start to retrace a bit.”

As has been the case for much of 2018, geopolitical tensions between the U.S. and other countries had set the tone for markets this week, with the latest leg of the lira’s downward spiral triggered by a diplomatic row with America. Earlier in the week, China responded to the Trump administration’s latest trade war volley with additional tariffs of its own.

Elsewhere in FX, via BBG:

  • The pound sank to the lowest since June 2017 against the dollar, and held the losses even after data showed the U.K. economy expanded 0.4% between April and June, in line with the median forecast in a Bloomberg survey
  • Norway’s krone enjoyed support from a better-than-forecast inflation report while Sweden’s krona weakened after price data matched estimates
  • China’s yuan extended its drop, heading for the biggest fall in three weeks
  • The ruble hit a two-year low after the U.S. announced new sanctions on Russia over the March 4 nerve-agent attack on a former double agent in the U.K.

Oil is still set for its 6th weekly loss as the crude complex is being hit by a rising USD, and risk aversion with both WTI and Brent down ~0.8% on the day, and Brent set for a near 2% and WTI looking at a near 3% fall for the week. In the metals complex, gold is down and straddling the USD 1210/oz level, as the rising dollar is hitting the gold market, which is looking at its 5th consecutive weekly fall. Copper has given up gains seen in early trade and is currently down 1.1% as an 11.3% fall in copper inventories seen by ShFE over the past week has not counteracted the USD hitting 13 month highs

Today's economic data include CPI and the monthly budget statement

Market Snapshot

  • S&P 500 futures down 0.4% to 2,842.25
  • STOXX Europe 600 down 0.7% to 387.50
  • German 10Y yield fell 3.7 bps to 0.338%
  • Euro down 0.6% to $1.1453
  • Brent Futures down 0.2% to $71.95/bbl
  • Italian 10Y yield fell 1.6 bps to 2.628%
  • Spanish 10Y yield fell 1.2 bps to 1.382%
  • MXAP down 1% to 165.29
  • MXAPJ down 1% to 536.41
  • Nikkei down 1.3% to 22,298.08
  • Topix down 1.2% to 1,720.16
  • Hang Seng Index down 0.8% to 28,366.62
  • Shanghai Composite up 0.03% to 2,795.31
  • Sensex down 0.3% to 37,921.73
  • Australia S&P/ASX 200 down 0.3% to 6,278.39
  • Kospi down 0.9% to 2,282.79
  • Brent Futures down 0.1% to $71.98/bbl
  • Gold spot down 0.4% to $1,207.93
  • U.S. Dollar Index up 0.6% to 96.09

Top Overnight News

  • European Central Bank’s Single Supervisory Mechanism sees BBVA, UniCredit and BNP Paribas as particularly exposed to the Turkish lira’s plunge, Financial Times reported, citing two people familiar with the matter who it didn’t identify
  • The Teachers Insurance & Annuity Association of America is among a number of pension and investment funds that hold hard-currency debt issued by Turkish banks, according to Bloomberg data. The lira’s 2018 loss exceeded 30 percent this week as investor confidence in the nation’s economic policies waned
  • The U.K. economy bounced back from its turgid start to the year in the second quarter but the dominant services sector lost momentum toward the end of the period. Gross domestic product increased 0.4 percent between April and June, in line with the median forecast in a Bloomberg survey
  • Fears about global oil supplies have receded after producers pumped more, according to the International Energy Agency, which a month ago warned of a potential shortage
  • Iran is slashing the relative cost of its exports versus OPEC’s No. 1 producer Saudi Arabia at a time when buyers in Asia -- the world’s biggest oil consuming region -- face mounting pressure from the U.S. to halt purchases from the Islamic Republic

Asian equity markets were mostly negative with sentiment subdued after a lacklustre lead from Wall St. where weakness in energy and financials dragged the DJIA and S&P 500, while the Nasdaq just about remained afloat to notch its 8th consecutive gain. ASX 200 (-0.3%) and Nikkei 225 (-1.3%) were lower with Australia weighed by weakness in energy stocks, while Tokyo trade failed to benefit from stronger than expected GDP amid a firmer currency. Elsewhere, Shanghai Comp. (flat) and Hang Seng (-0.8%) traded choppy amid a lack of fresh drivers and after the PBoC refrained from operations again for a neutral position for the week. Finally, 10yr JGBs were higher with demand spurred by losses in riskier assets and with the BoJ also present in the market for nearly JPY 800bln in JGBs. PBoC skipped open market operations and were net neutral for the week vs. last week's CNY 210bln net drain.

Top Asian News

  • Asia’s $184 Billion Debt Wall to Spark Buybacks, Bond Swaps
  • Hong Kong 2Q GDP Drops 0.2% Q/Q; Est. 0.2% Rise
  • HNA Gives Up Bid to Build a Hotel Empire With Radisson Sale
  • Qatar Set to Be Outstripped as World’s Richest Place by Macau

European equities have started the day negative (Euro Stoxx 50 -1.4%) as amid reports the ECB is expressing concerns of a weak TRY on European banks. This is pressuring European banks as a whole (STOXX® Europe 600 Banks (SX7P) -1.7%) as investors are repositioning into safe-haven assets and away from the financial sector, which is the current sector underperformer. BNP Paribas (-3.7%), BBVA (-3.3%) and UniCredit (-3.1%) are bringing up the rear of the Stoxx 600 on the back of high exposure to Turkish assets.

Top European News

  • ECB Concerned About European Banks’ Turkey Exposure, FT Reports
  • Core Inflation Shortfall Fuels Doubt on Riksbank Tightening Plan
  • Lira Plunge Boosts Odds of Turkey Credit Downgrade
  • European Banks Decline as Shares of Turkey-Exposed Lenders Slump

In FX, the highlight was the TRY with almost relentless selling early Friday, to the point of a full-on capital flight at one stage, saw the Lira collapse to new all time lows vs the Usd with vendors and price feeds quoting levels for the pair anywhere between 6.0000-50 in fast, if not frantic market conditions. However, some respite for the Try ahead of and after Turkish current account data that was slightly better than forecast in the event, but the focus now very much on speeches from President Erdogan (midday and 14.30BST), and more importantly the Finance Minister’s new economic model (12.30BST). Usd/Try back under 6.0000, but only just. DXY - The index is just off best levels, but riding high near fresh 2018 peaks around 96.182 and still over the big figure amidst widespread Dollar gains, bar vs the safest of safe-haven currencies, Jpy as the aforementioned Lira and EM meltdown spills over to majors. Technically, 96.512 is next on the radar, assuming no intervention to stop the rout and/or a major upset for the Greenback independently (weak CPI data?). JPY - As noted, the exception to the rule, as Usd/Jpy trades mostly below 111.00 on risk-off positioning and the Jpy is also boosted by stronger than forecast Japanese GDP data overnight. Chart-wise, 110.53 represents nearest support and bids/stops are likely situated around 110.50.

In commodities, oil is set for its 6th weekly loss as the crude complex is being hit by a rising USD, and risk aversion with both WTI and Brent down ~0.8% on the day, and Brent set for a near 2% and WTI looking at a near 3% fall for the week. In the metals complex, gold is down and straddling the USD 1210/oz level, as the rising dollar is hitting the gold market, which is looking at its 5th consecutive weekly fall. Copper has given up gains seen in early trade and is currently down 1.1% as an 11.3% fall in copper inventories seen by ShFE over the past week has not counteracted the USD hitting 13 month highs. Aluminium is also down 0.5% on the day. IEA raise their 2018 oil demand growth forecast by 110k BPD to 1.49mln BPD, and see risks to 2019 oil demand growth from trade disputes and rising prices if supply is constrained.

Looking at the day ahead, the highlight is likely to be the July CPI report in the US. Prior to that we get the preliminary Q2 GDP reports in the UK. June industrial production data is also due out in France and the UK as well as June trade data in the latter. In the evening we'll also get the July monthly budget statement in the US. Gazprom will report earnings.

US Event Calendar

  • 8:30am: US CPI MoM, est. 0.2%, prior 0.1%; CPI Ex Food and Energy MoM, est. 0.2%, prior 0.2%
  • 8:30am: US CPI YoY, est. 2.9%, prior 2.9%; CPI Ex Food and Energy YoY, est. 2.3%, prior 2.3%
  • 8:30am: Real Avg Weekly Earnings YoY, prior 0.2%; Real Avg Hourly Earning YoY, prior 0.0%
  • 2pm: Monthly Budget Statement, est. $76.0b deficit, prior $42.9b deficit

DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap

Markets are undoubtedly quiet at the moment but there are some big moves still in Turkey and Russia that are preventing everyone from enjoying the summer. Firstly the S&P 500 closed -0.14% after a dip in the last 15 minutes before the bell but the index again traded in a fairly narrow 0.37% range for the day - the 8th lowest this year. Meanwhile the Turkish Lira dropped -5.15% to a fresh record low (YTD -46.2%) and the 13th worst day since 2000. Ankara’s jailing of the America pastor and the associated diplomatic row continues to hurt the country’s assets. Not even the Turkish Treasury and Finance Minister Berat Albayrak’s office saying that the government would curb sovereign borrowing by reducing the GDP growth target to under 4% from 5.5% had an impact beyond a brief and small intra-daytick up in the Lira. President Erdogan speaks today at 2pm local time so it’ll be interesting to see if anything important comes from that. Meanwhile the Russian Ruble fell -1.72% (YTD -15.7%) to the lowest since April 2016 as the prior night’s US sanctions continued to dampen sentiment. Countries that are in a diplomatic battle with the US at the moment (e.g. China, Turkey and Russia) seems to be suffering in the markets.

The main highlight today is US CPI. DB expects core inflation (0.23% month-over-month) to rebound in July after a few softer monthly prints. According to our team, over the past three months, core CPI has risen at an annualized rate of only 1.74%, well below the year-over-year and 6-month annualized rates which are both near 2.3%. Their forecast is supported by recent firmer readings for alternative inflation gauges and expectations for a rebound in a few categories that have been unusually soft in recent months. A print in line with DB’s forecast would lift the YoY rate for core CPI inflation to 2.32%, which would support the long-standing house call for two more rate hikes this year.

Ahead of this, this morning in Asia, markets are retreating modestly with China’s CSI 300 broadly flat (+0.02%) while the Hang Seng (-0.45%), Nikkei (-0.72%) and Kospi (-0.66%) are all down as we type. Meanwhile futures on the S&P are pointing to a softer start while the Chinese Yuan is resuming its decline (-0.2%). Datawise, the rebound in Japan’s Q2 GDP was stronger than expected at 0.5% qoq (vs. 0.3% expected), leading to an annualised growth of 1.9%. Back to other markets performance from yesterday. In the US, the Nasdaq edged up for the 8th straight day (+0.04%), closing in on matching its prior winning streak of 9 days in late September 17. Meanwhile Tesla fell for the second day (-4.83%) and was down -9.0% from its intraday high a few days back, in part as investors scrutinised the potential to take the company back to private ownership.

Notably, Tesla rose c2% in after hour trading though after CNBC reported that its Board of Directors plans to meet with financial advisers next week to explore taking the company private, although Reuters cited unnamed sources which noted the board has not yet received a detailed financial plan from CEO Musk. So one to watch.

In Europe, the Stoxx 600 reversed earlier losses to close +0.09% as consumers stocks benefited from better than expected results from Adidas (+8.6%) and Cineworld (+10.7%). Across the region, the DAX (+0.34%) and CAC  (+0.01%) nudged higher while the FTSE (-0.45%) gave back some of its gains from the prior day. Over in government bonds, core 10y yields were around 2bp lower (Bunds -2.3bp; Gilts -1.9bp) while treasuries outperformed (-3.4bp), in part following a weaker than expected PPI print (more below). Turning to currencies, the US dollar index firmed 0.43% to a fresh 13 month high while the Euro and Sterling fell -0.71% and -0.45% respectively. In commodities, WTI oil softened further (-0.19%) while precious metals were little changed (Gold -0.12%; Silver +0.11%).

In other news, Business Insider reported that some member states in the EU are ready to allow UK to remain in the single market for goods while opting out of the free movement of people if UK agrees to replicate all environmental, social, and customs rules in addition to those set out in her so-called Chequers proposals. The potential trade-off will apparently be discussed at a special meeting of all 28 leaders in Salzburg next month. It doesn’t seem likely that the EU would be this generous at this stage and after a brief spike GBP largely ignored the story and closed -0.45% and -0.27% lower against the USD and EUR.

Finally turning to the latest central bankers speak. The Fed’s Evans, one of the more dovish Fed members seems to be shifting his tone as he noted that “it would not surprise me…if we make a judgement to move to a somewhat restrictive setting” on rates, which he believes could be roughly 50bp above his 2.75% estimate of neutral rates. Nearer term, he believes “it could be one or two more” rate hikes for the year. Meanwhile he pointed to the economy’s “extremely  strong” performance and he thinks “inflation expectations are going to catch up”. Back in the UK, the outgoing BoE policy maker McCafferty told the Guardian that wage growth might “creep up towards 4 percent-ish” in 2019, in part driven by a labour shortage and he sees “another couple” of rate hikes in the next 18 months to two years.

Before we take a look at today’s calendar, we wrap up with other data releases from yesterday. In the US, the July core PPI (ex food & energy) was 0.1ppt below expectations, coming in at 0.1% mom and 2.7% yoy. The weakness was in   part due to the decline in wholesale prices for apparel (-4.4% mom) and furnishings (-3.2% mom). Meanwhile, our US economists noted the healthcare component – used as an input in the core PCE deflator, was up just +0.03% in July leaving its annual growth rate steady at 1.7% yoy. Elsewhere the final reading for the June wholesale inventories was revised one-tenth higher to 0.1% mom. The weekly initial jobless (213k vs. 220k expected) and continuing claims (1,755k vs. 1,730k expected) remain near historic low levels and continue to reflect robust labour market conditions. Back in the UK, the June RICS housing survey reported that a net 4% of surveyors had seen house price increases over the past three months – up slightly from the June survey.

Looking at the day ahead, the highlight is likely to be the July CPI report in the US. Prior to that we get the preliminary Q2 GDP reports in the UK. June industrial production data is also due out in France and the UK as well as June trade data in the latter. In the evening we'll also get the July monthly budget statement in the US. Gazprom will report earnings.


          8/10/2018: FRONT PAGE: Hospitals caught in Saudi feud      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Windsor Regional Hospital must cope with the loss of 10 Saudi Arabian medical residents ordered by their country to leave Canada in an escalating diplomatic crisis. Hospital CEO David Musyj said the vascular/cardiac care and neurosurgery departments...
          8/10/2018: FINANCIAL POST: Saudi investment freeze doesn’t amount to much impact on Canadian economy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The decision by Saudi Arabia to halt new investments and unload assets in Canada is likely to have limited impact, even as the kingdom’s foreign minister threatens further action. Saudi assets in Canada are confined mainly to stakes in upscale hotel...
          8/10/2018: FINANCIAL POST: Official says Canada dispute won’t affect oil sales      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia’s diplomatic dispute with Canada over its arrest of women’s rights activists will not affect the ultraconservative kingdom’s oil sales to Canadian customers, the Saudi energy minister said Thursday. The remarks by Khalid alFalih show the...
          Stephen Tankel, “With Us and Against Us: How America’s Partners Help and Hinder the War on Terror” (Columbia UP, 2018)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
With Us and Against Us: How America’s Partners Help and Hinder the War on Terror (Columbia University Press, 2018) offers readers a fresh, insightful and new perspective on US counterterrorism cooperation with complex countries like Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Egypt, Yemen and Mali. These US partners work with the United States to...
          Ranked! Every Premier League club rated by their summer transfer business      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
All fees are reported and approximate, etc. We don’t hate your club – or at least, we hate all equally.20. TottenhamIN: N/AOUT: Keanan Bennetts (£2m), Anton Walkes (£200,000)You know, Daniel, you should really stop doing this.Levy did what Levy does, engaging in brinkmanship to ensure the best deal for his club. That’s the theory, anyway. Last season, Tottenham’s first summer signing arrived only a week before the transfer deadline; this season, he never arrived at all. Rumours of a £150m war chest were rightly greeted with scepticism, but even so… nothing?While the Levy lols flooded Twitter, some focusing on the irony that the Spurs chairman voted for the earlier transfer deadline, the joke is ultimately on the club’s fans. Ticket prices rose for Tottenham’s move to their still-uncompleted new stadium, some by as much as 50%, yet the supposedly ring-fenced budget for transfers hasn’t been ring-fenced at all. The team needed strengthening and new contracts are not new signings, whatever Mauricio Pochettino says.19. Manchester UnitedIN: Fred (£52m), Diogo Dalot (£19.3m), Lee Grant (£1.5m)OUT: Daley Blind (£14.1m), Sam Johnstone (£6.5m), Joel Pereira, Dean Henderson, Timothy Fosu-Mensah, Axel Tuanzebe, Cameron Borthwick-Jackson, Matty Willock (all loan), Joe Riley (released), Michael Carrick (retired)Given their own manager’s feelings on the coverage of his club, we feel it necessary to declare that it was never our intention to put Manchester United this low in our rankings. They were mid-table until recently, the assumption being that, after a solid start, two more defenders would arrive. Or one. But a really good one. Right?Nope. Despite Jose Mourinho saying a fortnight ago: “I would like two more players; I think it’s possible I’m going to have one,” in a not-so-subtle prod to his boss, Ed Woodward didn’t manage even that andreturnedempty-handed.Mourinho’s belittling of his own players, most notably Luke Shaw, affords him limited sympathy, and he shouldn’t be allowed to forget that he has bought two £30m centre-backs already. Nonetheless, it seems extraordinary that United will enter the 2018/19 season with Alex Ferguson’s old wingers as their first-choice full-backs. Oh well. There’s always Lee Grant.18. BurnleyIN: Ben Gibson (£15m), Matej Vydra (£11m), Joe Hart (£3.5m)OUT: Scott Arfield, Dean Marney, Chris Long (released)Burnley were slow to add to their squad, and the upshot of that hesitancy was almost a premature end to their long-awaited European campaign. The Clarets released two useful squad players in Scott Arfield, who started 15 Premier League games last term, and Dean Marney, yet didn’t bring in anyone until the final few days of the window. By that point, a tiny squad had been dragged into extra time by Aberdeen, while their fans feared Burnley’s Europa League adventure might end in A) tears, B) early August, and C) Scotland.Burnley got there in the end, in the match and the market. However, giving yesterday’s man, Joe Hart, a two-year contract is incredibly short-sighted: Tom Heaton returns soon and Nick Pope later in the year, whereupon Hart will be an expensive – and noisy – third-choice goalkeeper.Meanwhile, Matej Vydra’s transfer raises questions, not answers. He can’t replace Chris Wood or Sam Vokes as the lone striker in a direct team, and is Sean Dyche, having shifted with such success from 4-4-2 to 4-4-1-1, prepared to play Vydra as a No.10 in place of the hard-working Jeff Hendrick? It’s not certain where the Czech will fit in. On a happier note, record signing Ben Gibson is a very shrewd addition in defence.17. WatfordIN: Gerard Deulofeu (£11.5m), Adam Masina (£3.5m), Ben Foster (£2.5m), Ken Sema (£2m), Marc Navarro (£1.8m), Ben Wilmot (£1.5m), Domingos Quina (£1m)OUT: Richarlison (£40m), Nordin Amrabat (£7.5m), Mauro Zarate (£2m), Costel Pantilimon (£1.1m), Jerome Sinclair, Tommie Hoban, Dodi Lukebakio, Daniel Bachmann, Alex Jakubiak (all loan), Brandon Mason (released)Hmm. There are positives: Marc Navarro is a bargain at that price, they’ve taken a lot of low-risk punts and it’s hard to argue with a profit of nearly £30m. Perhaps they could’ve used that windfall to acquire some goals, however.Buying 35-year-old Ben Foster to displace 37-year-old Heurelho Gomes in nets also seems insufficient, unless Javi Gracia plans to throw teenage Sweden international Pontus Dahlberg straight in. None of this screams ‘confidence’ from Watford.£40m (rising to £50m) for Richarlison, though…16. EvertonIN: Richarlison (£40m), Yerry Mina (£27.2m), Lucas Digne (£18m), Andre Gomes (loan), Bernard (free)OUT: Davy Klaassen (£12m), Ramiro Funes Mori (£8m), Henry Onyekeru (loan – £700,000 loan fee), Ashley Williams, Shani Tarashaj, Luke Garbutt, Antonee Robinson, Callum Connolly (all loan), Wayne Rooney, Joel Robles, Jose Baxter, David Henen (all released)Everton needed an injection of pace and they’ve got it in Richarlison, Bernard (one of those transfers where life imitates Football Manager) and the earlier acquisition of Theo Walcott.However, they also needed a striker, a midfielder and a pair of centre-backs, and it took a late scramble to find two of those four players. The inconsistent Yerry Mina shot up in value thanks to his set-piece goals at the World Cup, but at 23 he could still be an asset; the question is whether he, Michael Keane, Phil Jagielka and Mason Holgate represent four reliable centre-back options.The striker didn’t materialise, even though Everton disentangled themselves from Wayne Rooney’s wage asphyxiation and found a buyer for Davy Klaassen, clawing back half of the fee they paid for the Dutchman a year ago. Fans should be excited by the new arrivals, if they ignore the nagging sense that Everton think they’re best mates with Barcelona, while Barcelona see them as the geeky new kid with deep pockets.INTERVIEWRicharlison: “On the day that the guy pointed the gun at my head, he thought I was a drug dealer”15. ChelseaIN: Kepa Arrizabalaga (£71.6m), Jorginho (£50m), Mateo Kovacic (loan), Rob Green (free)OUT: Thibaut Courtois (£31.5m), Jeremie Boga (£3.6m), Jonathan Panzo (£2.7m), Kenedy, Baba Rahman, Mario Pasalic, Kasey Palmer, Lewis Baker, Jamal Blackman, Mason Mount, Fikayo Tomori, Trevoh Chalobah, Todd Kane, Matt Miazga, Eduardo, Jake Clarke-Salter (all loan), Wallace, Matej Delac (both released)It’s all a bit unbalanced. Having a large squad is no skin off Chelsea’s nose – they’ve 25 players out on loan already and another half-dozen will surely join them before that window shuts – but over 30 senior players are at the club. While Maurizio Sarri’s 4-3-3 allows for some rotation between central midfielders, he probably doesn’t need Jorginho (part of a £57m deal with Napoli for player and manager), Mateo Kovacic (part of a hostage negotiation with Thibaut Courtois), N’Golo Kante, Cesc Fabregas, Ross Barkley, Danny Drinkwater, Tiemoue Bakayoko and Ruben Loftus-Cheek (not to mention Ethan Ampadu and Marco van Ginkel).Amid a £90m net spend for not a great deal, the headline is, of course, Courtois’ vanishing act. Losing one of the world’s best goalkeepers for less than half what Liverpool paid for Alisson has to hurt, and ending up £40m out of pocket after finding his replacement doesn’t look goodeither, but it’s the best Chelsea could have hoped for once Courtois had refused to extend his contract beyond next year and then stopped turning up for training. We’re sure Rob Green will push Kepa hard for his place.READKepa Arrizabalaga: Chelsea’s world-record goalkeeper with magnificent reflexes – but still a lot to learn14. NewcastleIN: Yoshinori Muto (£9.5m), Federico Fernandez (£6m), Fabian Schar (£3.5m), Martin Dubravka (£3.5m), Salomon Rondon, Kenedy (both loan), Ki Sung-yueng (free)OUT: Aleksandar Mitrovic (£22m), Mikel Merino (£10.7m), Chancel Mbemba (£7m), Matz Sels (£3.5m), Adam Armstrong (£1.7m), Ivan Toney (£800,000), Dwight Gayle, Jack Colback (both loan), Massadio Haidara, Jesus Gamez, Curtis Good (all released)“Rafa, as always, has my full support, and contrary to some media reports that portray me as a pantomime villain, I will continue to ensure that every penny generated by the club is available to him.” So said Mike Ashley in May.Three months on, Newcastle have predictably ended the summer with a £23m surplus. Shifting Aleksandar Mitrovic to Fulham covered their four cash buys; it’s just that Newcastle sold five other players as well. It’s not hard to see why the fans aren’t happy.And yet, from the business perspective which these rankings have to consider, the situation is this: Newcastle are £20m-plus to the good and don’t look any weaker. The problem is that they weren’t exactly strong to begin with.READWhere does the money go at Newcastle United?13. SouthamptonIN: Jannik Vestergaard (£22.1m), Mohamed Elyounoussi (£16m), Angus Gunn (£10m), Stuart Armstrong (£7m), Danny Ings (loan)OUT: Dusan Tadic (£10.1m), Guido Carillo, Sofiane Boufal, Jordy Clasie (all loan), Stuart Taylor, Florin Gardos, Jeremy Pied (all released)Is there value in Southampton’s under-the-radar summer business? The cop-out answer is ‘only time will tell’, but an early guess might be that it’s questionable. Although Stuart Armstrong is an athletic, attacking and intelligent midfielder, he isn’t at the level of Virgil van Dijk or Victor Wanyama, who trod the same Celtic-to-Southampton path at a younger age.Goalkeeper Angus Gunn still has a lot to learn. Mohamed Elyounoussi and Jannik Vestergaard feel overpriced. Finally, Danny Ings was a last-minute grab that, with Manolo Gabbiadini, Shane Long and Charlie Austin, leaves Saints with four quarters of one fully-functioning Premier League striker (Guido Carrillo, a club record signing seven months ago, has been shipped out on loan).More positively, all five arrivals are of the right age, 22-26, and persuading an Eredivisie club to part with £10m for one player deserves some sort of medal.12. Crystal PalaceIN: Cheikhou Kouyaté (£9.5m), Jordan Ayew (loan), Max Meyer, Vicente Guaita (both free)OUT: Jaroslaw Jach (loan), Yohan Cabaye, Damien Delaney, Bakary Sako, Lee Chung-yong, Diego Cavalieri (all released)Although very little money was spent (and received), Roy Hodgson identified a competent goalkeeper in Vicente Guaita and bolstered his midfield options two-fold, theorising that his team didn’t need much in order to improve on their impressive results under him in 2017/18.Some might argue, though, that Palace needed full spinal surgery and that Vicente Guaita, Cheikhou Kouyaté and Max Meyer are just a few vertebrae. Scott Dann and Mamadou Sakho are injury concerns, yet they and James Tomkins are Palace’s only natural centre-backs, while at the top end, a move back to the wing for Wilfried Zaha would make their striking options Alexander Sorloth, Christian Benteke and Connor Wickham – the mysterious, the misfiring and the missing. A last-minute loan deal for Jordan Ayew doesn’t inspire confidence.Between the two problem positions, Meyer is an eye-catching signing. His star may have fallen at Schalke since he was hailed as Germany’s next wunderkind and made their provisional World Cup squad in 2014, but his ability isn’t in question and he is still only 22.11. Cardiff CityIN: Josh Murphy (£11m), Bobby Reid (£10m), Greg Cunningham (£4m), Alex Smithies (£3.5m), Harry Arter, Victor Camarasa (both loan)OUT: Omar Bogle (loan), Lee Camp, Greg Halford, Matty Kennedy, Frederic Gounongbe, Ben Wilson (all released)It started well: Neil Warnock identified his targets and bought them, all four purchases being made in June. Then six weeks passed with no more arrivals, despite Warnock searching with increasing desperation for a holding midfielder to ensure that Sol Bamba wouldn’t be deputising there on the opening weekend. Whether deadline-day loanees Harry Arter and Victor Camarasa really embody that role is up for debate, but Arter’s energetic all-round game could make him a canny signing.Criticising signings is trickier when they’re the players expressly wanted by the manager – unlike with other clubs here, none of Warnock’s four Championship purchases were fall-back options. Alex Smithies looks the pick of the bunch, provided he can wrestle the underrated Neil Etheridge out of goal, and Greg Cunningham is a good bargain buy.Josh Murphy still has much to prove, however, and while Bobby Reid looks an excellent signing on paper after his 21-goal season for Bristol City, 2017/18 was his first season as a striker (hence it accounting for two-thirds of the goals across the 25-year-old’s career). There are doubts over his natural position, if any, in Warnock’s preferred 4-3-3 system.10. Manchester CityIN: Riyad Mahrez (£60m), Philippe Sandler (£2.2m), Daniel Arzani (£1.3m)OUT: Angus Gunn (£10m), Pablo Maffeo (£8m), Angelino (£5m), Joe Hart (£3.5m), Olarenwaju Kayode (£2.7m), Rodney Kongolo (£800,000), Jack Harrison, Aleix Garcia, Manu Garcia, Mix Diskerud, Luke Brattan, Tosin Adarabioyo, Marlos Moreno, Lukas Nmecha, Brandon Barker, Matt Smith (all loan), Yaya Toure (released)They got Riyad Mahrez. They cast off Yaya Toure and his moods. They raised £30m by selling players they won’t miss. And, of course, Manchester City didn’t need to change much.But why didn’t they buy a midfielder? After all, Pep Guardiola identified Jorginho as a necessary purchase, only to make no alternative arrangements once he chose Chelsea. David Silva and Kevin De Bruyne playing in central midfield means that Fernandinho’s role is arguably the most important in Manchester City’s XI. He absolutely stepped up to the plate, curbing his box-to-box instincts, but for how much longer can a 33-year-old carry the defensive duties of three players?Neither Ilkay Gundogan nor Fabian Delph have convinced in that vital role, and Phil Foden doesn’t suit it, which leaves City with a potential problem that was easily identified and should have been easily avoided. Baffling.9. BournemouthIN: Jefferson Lerma (£25m), David Brooks (£11.5m), Diego Rico (£10.7m)OUT: Benik Afobe (£10m), Lewis Grabban (£6m), Max Gradel (£1.8m), Harry Arter, Brad Smith, Emerson Hyndman, Connor Mahoney(all loan), Adam Federici, Ryan Allsop (both released), Rhoys Wiggins (retired)Somehow, Bournemouth will go into their fourth Premier League season with half of the same starting XI that took them up in 2014/15. That in itself is a worry, although Diego Rico may well replace Charlie Daniels at left-back once his opening three-match suspension is served. Moves have been made to regenerate the midfield, with Lewis Cook playing more of a starring role alongside Bournemouth’s new record signing: the, uh, combative Jefferson Lerma, with his 16 bookings in 26 La Liga appearances last season.David Brooks, 21, is the most exciting new face and Bournemouth need him in an attack that borders on uninspiring. With that in mind, as well as the Cherries having only four options for their occasional back three, is this trio of additions enough?8. HuddersfieldIN: Terence Kongolo (£17.5m), Adama Diakhaby (£9m), Ramadan Sobhi (£5.7m), Florent Hadergjonaj (£5m), Jonas Lossl (£2.5m), Juninho Bacuna (£2.5m), Isaac Mbenza (loan), Erik Durm, Ben Hamer (both free)OUT: Tom Ince (£10m), Scott Malone (£3m), Michael Hefele (£300,000), Sean Scannell (£250,000), Jordy Hiwula (£150,000), Tariq Holmes-Dennis (appearances-based fee), Joel Coleman, Jack Payne (both loan), Rob Green (released), Dean Whitehead (retired)The Terriers made a decent return on their £30m net spend, the coffers boosted by the sale of Tom Ince back to his natural home in the second tier. Turning loans permanent is an excellent strategy – ‘try before you buy’ and all that – and they’ve made very good acquisitions in defender Terence Kongolo, the bargainous goalkeeper Jonas Lossl and, to a lesser extent, the nonetheless useful right-back Florent Hadergjonaj.Potential seems to be the watchword. Six of Huddersfield’s seven outfield signings are 24 or under. The exception is an intriguing one: 26-year-old Erik Durm, World Cup winner, who has joined on a one-year contract in order to prove his fitness.7. ArsenalIN: Lucas Torreira (£26.4m), Bernd Leno (£19.3m), Sokratis Papastathopoulos (£17.7m), Matteo Guendouzi (£7m), Stephan Lichtsteiner (free)OUT: Chuba Akpom (£2m), Jeff Reine-Adelaide (£1.5m), Calum Chambers, Matt Macey, Takuma Asano (all loan), Santi Cazorla, Jack Wilshere (both released), Per Mertesacker (retired)It seems a very long time ago that Arsenal brought in this famous five (if that’s not too generous to 19-year-old Matteo Guendouzi). Extra settling time is no bad thing, however, especially following the wide range of departures from Arsenal’s squad over the past 12 months, not to mention a new manager.Lucas Torreira promises big things in midfield, while defensive thirtysomethings Sokratis Papastathopoulos and Stephan Lichtsteiner offer leadership if not longevity. Bernd Leno could be a real coup: he is 26, racked up 300 appearances in seven years for Bayer Leverkusen and, in stark contrast to headline-makers Alisson and Kepa, cost under £20m to buy.READWhy Lucas Torreira will give Arsenal something they have lacked since Patrick Vieira6. BrightonIN: Alireza Jahanbakhsh (£17m), Yves Bissouma (£15m), Bernardo (£9m), Martin Montoya (£6.3m), Florin Andone (£5.3m), David Button (£4m), Dan Burn (£3m), Percy Tau (£2.9m), Anders Dreyer (£500,000), Leon Balogun, Jason Steele (both free)OUT: Sam Baldock (£5m), Connor Goldson (£3m), Jamie Murphy (£1m), Jiri Skalak (£700,000), Dan Burn, Christian Walton (both loan), Steve Sidwell, Tim Krul, Niki Maenpaa, Rohan Ince, Uwe Hünemeier (all released), Liam Rosenior (retired)It’s initially surprising to see Brighton spend over £60m and yet it’s roughly equivalent with last year’s outlay, with the added bonus of recouping £10m in sales this time. The results are intriguing – a mixture of low-cost experience (Martin Montoya, Leon Balogun), genuinely exciting record signings (21-year-old Yves Bissouma, promptly usurped by Alireza Jahanbakhsh) and lower-league back-ups (Dan Burn, who has gone back to Wigan on loan until January, and David Button).That Button cost £4m and will only compete with Sunderland outcast Jason Steele to be first reserve in goal, rather than third choice, says a lot about today’s market. There’s a potential problem here, too: Mat Ryan will be at the Asian Cup for maybe as long as a whole month later in the season, and there are big questions over the quality of his replacements in Button and Steele, although they’d make for a superb detective duo.Beating competitors to Jahanbakhsh is a real coup, mind, in an otherwise positive window.5. West HamIN: Felipe Anderson (£35m), Issa Diop (£22m), Andriy Yarmolenko (£17.5m), Lukasz Fabianski (£7m), Carlos Sanchez (£4m), Lucas Perez (£4m), Fabian Balbuena (£3.5m), Xande Silva (£1.3m), Jack Wilshere, Ryan Fredericks (both free)OUT: Cheikhou Kouyaté (£9.5m), Reece Burke (£1.5m), Domingos Quina (£1m), Jordan Hugill, Martin Samuelsen, Marcus Browne (all loan), James Collins, Patrice Evra (both released)Recent high-risk, low-reward transactions mean West Ham are rarely high in our rankings, but this season they seemed to have learned their lesson. Instead of signing a 29-year-old flavour of the month for an eight-figure fee, they’ve identified and acquired a range of talented freebies, a reliable goalkeeper in Lukasz Fabianski and, in Felipe Anderson, their second record signing of the summer. It’s a statement that West Ham now look to buy the best – and don’t mind paying for it.Admittedly, West Ham’s owners did slip into old habits at the last. Spending a significant sum on the past-his-best Andriy Yarmolenko was already questionable, but mitigated as a one-off. That was seemingly debunked, however, when the club brought in Carlos Sanchez (32) and Lucas Perez (29) on the final day. Still, with Cheikhou Kouyaté moving across London to Crystal Palace, the experienced Sanchez will cover them for a year should Pedro Obiang leave, as expected, and Perez has plenty to offer on the back of a reasonably low fee.4. LiverpoolIN: Alisson (£67m), Naby Keita (£52.8m), Fabinho (£39m), Xherdan Shaqiri (£13m)OUT: Danny Ward (£12.5m), Danny Ings, Harry Wilson, Ben Woodburn, Adam Bogdan, Ryan Kent, Ovie Ejaria, Allan (all loan), Emre Can, Jon Flanagan, Jordan Williams (all released)Jose Mourinho would have you believe that Liverpool’s transfer business has been so outlandish, they must win the title. We can’t imagine why he’d have an agenda to say such a thing, so he must be right.It has been a good summer for Liverpool, mind. Spending north of £170m naturally brings both expectation and an element of risk, but it was imperative that Jurgen Klopp addressed a goalkeeping problem of five years’ standing and revamped the Reds’ midfield.In 23-year-old Naby Keita and 24-year-old Fabinho, Liverpool should be set for a few years. (Fabinho also offers a fourth option at right-back, and you can never be too careful.) Buying Xherdan Shaqiri with the money raised from selling a reserve goalkeeper isn’t bad business, either.The drawbacks? Allowing Emre Can to wind down his contract and leave for nothing is a blow, when he could have brought in a handy £30m, and the centre of defence still looks vulnerable. On the whole, though, Liverpool have done well.READAlisson Becker: Liverpool's world-record new goalkeeper "who can define an era"3. LeicesterIN: James Maddison (£22m), Caglar Soyuncu (£19m), Ricardo Pereira (£17.5m), Filip Benkovic (£13m), Rachid Ghezzal (£12.6m), Danny Ward (£12.5m), Jonny Evans (£3.5m)OUT: Riyad Mahrez (£60m), Ahmed Musa (£14.8m), Harvey Barnes, George Thomas (both loan), Robert Huth, Ben Hamer (both released)It’s not often that a club’s best signing is also the cheapest, but a cut-price Jonny Evans, in or not long past his prime at the age of 30, might be the pick of a good crop. Two young centre-backs have arrived alongside him, too, meaning Leicester are ready for Harry Maguire’s big-money departure in January (look, it’s going to happen).The good news doesn’t stop there. Ricardo Pereira is one hell of an upgrade on Danny Simpson, while Rachid Ghezzal can help to fill the void left by Riyad Mahrez, a hitherto underused Danny Ward can challenge the waning Kasper Schmeichel for his place, and 21-year-old James Maddison can show why he was so in-demand.On top of all that, the Mahrez windfall and a surprisingly good fee for Saudi Arabia-bound Ahmed Musa means that Leicester’s overall expenditure was only £25m or so; indeed, they were in profit before deadline day. It has been a very good window indeed.READCaglar Soyuncu: Turkey's great defensive hope2. FulhamIN: Andre-Frank Zambo Anguissa (£30m), Jean Michael Seri (£25m), Aleksandar Mitrovic (£22m), Alfie Mawson (£15m), Joe Bryan (£6m), Fabri (£5.4m), Maxime Le Marchand (£5m), Andre Schurrle, Sergio Rico, Luciano Vietto, Calum Chambers, Timothy Fosu-Mensah (all loan)OUT: David Button (£4m), Tayo Edun, Stephen Humphrys (both loan), Ryan Fredericks, George Williams (both released)So, the tweet from a certain betting company that applauded Fulham for being the first promoted club to spend £100m completely missed the point. That in itself should not be celebrated. It’s not the amount spent that matters; the important thing is always to recruit well.But bloody hell, have Fulham recruited well. They started with 14 senior players, such was their reliance on loans last season, and ended with a tightly-packed squad of 25 that has no discernible drop-off in quality. Jean Michael Seri is easily Fulham’s jewel in the crown, the Ivorian midfielder having been only a last-minute administrative U-turn away from joining Barcelona last year.If anything, things got a bit silly on the window’s final day. The Cottagers had already made excellent inroads, buying a whole new spine in Fabri, Alfie Mawson, Seri and Aleksandar Mitrovic.Maxime Le Marchand providesdefensive support, and Calum Chambers and Andre Schurrle have arrived on loan, the latter’s lasting two years.Then came the afternoon of August 9. Sergio Rico on loan? Well, there’s already Fabri and Marcus Bettinelli in goal, but OK. Luciano Vietto as well? Go on then. And still they spent, splashing a club-record £30m fee on a Marseille midfielder, acquiring a new left-back to take their total expenditure past £100m, and finally arranging a fifth loan deal, leaving Fulham with a full XI of signings, plus a substitute goalkeeper. Smiles turned to nervous laughter. Was this overkill?Optimism reigns supreme nonetheless. The question does remain: will these players fight for a place, or just fight? But, with more options added to an already talented squad, Fulham are prepared for battle.1. WolvesIN: Adama Traore (£18m), Diogo Jota (£12.3m), Willy Boly (£10m), Benik Afobe (£10m), Joao Moutinho (£5m), Leo Bonatini (£3.6m), Ruben Vinagre (£300,000), Leander Dendoncker (loan + £13.5m purchase in 2019), Raul Jimenez, Jonny (both loan), Rui Patricio (free)OUT: Benik Afobe (£1m loan fee + £12m purchase in January), Barry Douglas (£3m), Ben Marshall (£1.5m), Priance Oniangue (£500,000), Duckens Nazon (£200,000), Roderick Miranda, Rafa Mir, Harry Burgoyne (all loan), Carl Ikeme (retired)Negatives out of the way first. One: there are question marks over a couple of Wolves’s defenders, although they do have options: Romain Saiss is being retrained to play there, as Conor Coady was before him, and new midfielder Leander Dendoncker can play at centre-back if necessary. Secondly, selling Barry Douglas felt a little needless, unless Nuno is confident that Jonny or Ruben Vinagre can replace the Scot’s attacking threat on the left, not to mention his set-pieces – in all, Douglas contributed 19 goals and assists in 38 appearances at wing-back last season.But it’s very revealing that the biggest doubt at Wolves is how they’ll manage to pack so much talent into their midfield and attack, following one of the most aggressive recruitment drives of any promoted team in recent history. They’ve bought virtually a full XI and added depth across the park, not to mention natural talents in Portugal No.1 Rui Patricio, experienced Champions League campaigner Joao Moutinho and record signing Adama Traore.It’s also hard to ignore the suggestion that Benik Afobe could be the single best bit of business by any club. Wolves bought him for £10m, paid a week of his wages, then loaned him to Stoke for £1m with an obligation to buy for £12m in January. That’s a nice little £3m profit for doing bugger all.New features you'd love on FourFourTwo.com
          Live in Full Time Overseas Nanny      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A High Profile family in Riyadh Saudi Arabia is seeking a Live In Full Time Nanny to help take care of their two toddlers and primary school-aged child The family would (more) p Login for more job information and to Apply
          Associate Legal Counsel - P&G Saudi Arabia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Do you love challenges and would like the experience to become a corporate attorney and provide advice on a breadth of legal topics to the business In short P&G lawyers work (more) p Login for more job information and to Apply
          &1593&1575&1605&1604 &1594&1587&1610&1604 &1587&1610&1575&1585&1575&1578      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Store Supervisor ( Eastern Region )- Saudis Only (Saudi Arabia) Store Supervisor ( Riyadh )- Saudis Only (Saudi Arabia) Store Manager ( Eastern Region )- Saudis Only (Saudi Arabia) (more) p Login for more job information and to Apply
          Salesman in Shop      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Ability to work on IT systems and have computer skills and is presentable at all times Male age below 35 years with salestrading experience in Saudi Arabia Check the stock (more) p Login for more job information and to Apply
          IO Scientific Advisor - Saudi Arabia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Contributes to the development of Local Brand Plans and Strategies by communicating the medical insight and knowledge derived from Expert Physicians other health-care providers (more) p Login for more job information and to Apply
          Purchasing Manager      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Salary 6000 SAR - 7500 SAR Job Location Jeddah Saudi Arabia (more) p Login for more job information and to Apply
          Saudi Arabia and Israel are killing civilians – and Britain is complicit | Owen Jones      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The slaughter in Yemen and the Palestinian territories is happening with British arms and support – and media silence

Will not even the massacre of children in Yemen end the silence over the murderous complicity of the British government? They were little kids on a bus on the way back from a picnic, no doubt laughing and raucous as large groups of children tend to be, and then they were burned to death. At least 29 children were among the 43 slaughtered, an atrocity perpetrated by the aircraft of Saudi Arabia and its Gulf allies.

Related: Dozens dead in Yemen as bus carrying children hit by airstrike

Continue reading...
          Saudi Arabia executes then crucifies man convicted of murder      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For the first time in eight years, Saudi Arabia has crucified a man's body as part of his punishment. Elias Abulkalaam Jamaleddeen of Myanmar was executed on Wednesday in Mecca, the Saudi Press Agency reported, although it didn't specify the nature of his execution. His body was subsequently publicly displayed post-mortem on a cross. Most executions in Saudi Arabia are performed by beheading the condemned with a sword. Although Saudi Arabia has the third-highest number of capital punishments per year in the world, according to Amnesty International, crucifixions remain extremely rare. Only China and Iran execute more people per year. Comment: It would be interesting to see a comparison of the crimes committed with the sentences given: Barbaric: Thousands turn up to watch 10 criminals executed in China Iran abolishes death penalty for minor drug-related crimes Jamaleddeen was convicted of breaking into a woman's home, firing a weapon in it and stabbing her to death, according to the Saudi Interior Ministry, which oversees the directorates of Corrections and Court Services. He was also accused of stealing weapons and trying to kill another man, as well as attempting to rape a woman.
          Is Saudi Arabia acting independently or doing US bidding by sanctioning Canada?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia's sovereignty-supporting sanctions against Canada in response to Ottawa's criticism of the Kingdom's internal affairs are grossly hypocritical but nevertheless in defense of objectively valid principles, though it needs to be considered whether Riyadh's acting independently in this respect or doing so at Washington's urging in order to pile economic pressure on Canada during Trudeau's NAFTA renegotiations with Trump. Background Basics Saudi Arabia surprised most observers by reacting in a disproportionately fierce manner to Canada's criticism of its recent arrest of a women's rights activist last week. The latest developments in this fast-moving spat are that the Kingdom expelled the Canadian Ambassador and ordered all of its students in the North American country to leave as soon as possible, announcing that the government will no longer fund their studies there. It will also stop its medical treatment programs in the country and freeze all trade and investment deals with it as well. Furthermore, Riyadh will halt its purchase of wheat and barley products from the agricultural powerhouse and will suspend all flights to and from Toronto next week. There's also a looming chance that Saudi Arabia might stop selling oil to Canada, too, and that a massive $11,5 billion arms deal between the two will also be jeopardized. Sovereignty Double Standards Riyadh justified its moves in an uncharacteristically harsh response that slammed Canada's "blatant interference in the Kingdom's domestic affairs, against basic international norms and all international protocol" that attempts to "meddle with Saudi sovereignty". The official condemnation of Ottawa's actions also said that Saudi Arabia "categorically rejects any intervention in its domestic affairs and internal relations with its citizens".
          Russia backs Riyadh in Canadian dispute over jailed rights activists      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia, on August 8, came out in support of Saudi Arabia in its dispute with Canada over Riyadh's arrest of women's rights activists, saying it is "unacceptable" for Ottawa to lecture the kingdom on human rights. Saudi Arabia froze new trade and investment with Canada and expelled the Canadian ambassador this week after Canada publicly called for the release of arrested human rights activists. Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said on August 8 that human rights should be promoted, but with respect for specific national customs and traditions. "We believe that Saudi Arabia, having embarked on a path of large-scale social and economic reforms, fully has the sovereign right to decide how to move forward in this important area. We have always said that the politicization of human rights matters is unacceptable," Zakharova said. "What one probably needs in this situation is constructive advice and assistance rather than criticism from a 'moral superior.'" The Saudis have announced an array of sanctions against Canada, from suspending all flights to and from Toronto, to ordering home over 15,000 Saudi students studying in Canada.
          America’s Militarized Economy, by Eric Zuesse      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Donald Trump’s biggest success, thus far into his Presidency, has been his sale of $400 billion (originally $350 billion) of U.S.-made weapons to the Saudi Arabian Government, which is owned by its royal family, after whom that nation is named. This sale alone is big enough to be called Trump’s “jobs plan” for Americans. It...
          Ahmed Musa reveals outrageous reception upon Saudi Arabia arrival      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Ahmed Musa's move from Leicester City to Al-Nassr FC appears to have gone down well with the club's fans, who gave the Nigeria international an outrageous reaction upon his arrival in Saudi Arabia. In a video shared on his @AhmedMusa718 Twitter handle, the former CSKA Moscow forward is seem being mobbed by delirious fans upon his arrival in the country. What a amazing reception here in Saudi Arabia .I want to thank each and every person who came out and welcomed me at the airport. I am really humbled....
          8/10/2018: World: Canadian PM firm on Saudis      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has refused to apologise for calling out Saudi Arabia on its human rights record, after Riyadh said it was considering further punitive measures over Canada’s criticisms of the kingdom. Tensions have been high...
          Ruby Sharma posted a blog post      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Ruby Sharma posted a blog post

The Evolving Recruitment Industry of the Middle East

The Middle East has certainly faced economic and political challenges in recent years, which has led to uncertainty in the recruitment industry.The collapse of oil prices in 2014-15 and reduction in government spending saw many businesses respond with caution and look to reduce costs and gain improvements in efficiency by restructuring, accepting more expatriates, merging roles and indeed redundancies.As a result, although the region has historically seen skills shortages, the changes saw a market where top talent was available and looking for work.Uncertainty surrounding the future of oil prices and in an attempt to try to prevent further limitations on economic growth in the region, governments have begun a drive in the region to involve themselves further in the global economy and create sustainable growth by diversification. This has resulted in a demand for workers with new skill sets, especially in renewable energy and many companies continue to look towards expats to provide the skills they require.Although there is always the ongoing challenge of finding the best talent, retaining them has also become an area of concern. With expatriate recruitment still happening in most areas of the job market, there is an ongoing problem of employees returning home and this attrition rate requires constant levels of recruitment.In addition, historically generous tax-free expat packages, that often-included housing, education, and healthcare, to ensure attraction of the best talent, are being lowered by many businesses to cut costs. This has had an impact on the cost of living in the region for expats, plus when combined with the introduction of VAT in 2018 in some regions, which has dampened consumer spending generally, there are fears that it might impact on the Middle East’s ability to attract top talent.However, there are some clear signs of positivity as well as in some region. According to a recent survey by GulfTalent, there has been an upturn in business optimism driving growth in employment opportunities with one of the most important factors being the recent hike in the Oil and Gas prices. The crude oil price that has been ranging from 30 USD to 50 USD in 2016-17 has risen to 60 USD at the beginning of 2018.The only major areas of concern in the region and one that could impact the recruitment sector heavily overtime are the regions continuing drive to introduce nationalization programs that increase the number of jobs held by Middle Eastern nationals. Saudi Arabia is driving Saudization, which saw a directive issued in January identifying 12 types of retail outlets that only citizens will be able to work in.Kuwait has taken steps to make expatriates less employable, by reducing the number of professions in which expatriates can be employed and has also fired over 1,600 public sector expatriate employees so far this year; almost three times the amount of expatriates it dismissed in all of 2017.Overall, there are clear challenges ahead for the recruitment industry, however as the region continues to see new markets evolve and as a direct result offers new roles and as the region continues to grow and develop, there will still be many opportunities for top talent from around the world.Infographic Source: https://www.imsoneworld.com/infographic/evolving-recruitment-industry-of-middle-east/See More

          Saudi Arabia: Innovation and Loss      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

There are three main operators in Saudi Arabia: STC, Mobily and Zain. All three operators go through a strict approval process before being allowed to operate, and each one competes with the others to offer the best deals. Their services have all been tried and tested by both locals and travelers, so they can be trusted. According to OpenSignal’s connectivity report, Saudi Arabia’s coverage is extremely good around the main highways and developed areas, but it can suffer a great deal the more you head towards the deserts and remote regions. However, it isn’t just a local problem, it will happen on all phones and providers you use there. There are 2G, 3G and 4G plans available on all networks for unlocked GSM phones. Recently a 2.9 per cent drop in mobile users to 39 million has been projected, due to the implementation of economic reforms, which will push down the penetration rate to 123 per cent, compared with a 16 per cent year-on-year decline in 2017, where the penetration rate reached 127 per cent. 

STC as the largest player in the market holds somewhere between 52%-54% of the market, the rest is being shared between Zain and Mobily. Zain in its recent announcement highlighted that its subscribers base at the end of Q1-2018 stood at 8.4mn, depicting a market share of 18%. Leaving Mobily with a market share in the range of 28%to 30%.
STC (Saudi Telecom Company, mostly owned by the state) is the largest provider in Saudi Arabia, and it offers the best network coverage and Internet speeds.The latest STC report revealed that the number of mobile services users reached 40 million subscribers by the end of last year. Prices and packages are extremely competitive, and STC offers many deals and promotions to entice both locals and visitors. It started with LTE in 2010 and covers around 90% of population by 2015, which is only concentrated in a few towns on 1800 MHz (band 3) and 2300 MHz in TD-LTE (band 30).




Mobily, partly owned by Etisalat, is the 2nd provider in Saudi-Arabia. It still gives good coverage and speeds in populated areas. 4G/LTE is in city centers only: coverage check on 1800 in FD-LTE and 2600 MHz in TD-LTE. Mobily has said the introduction of the fingerprint registration rule led to an "erosion" of its customer base. The requirement was introduced last year by the Communications and Information Technology Commission, who instructed all SIM cards issued in Saudi Arabia to be linked to a fingerprint record held at the National Information Center.


Zain is the smallest provider in the country with 2G, 3G and 4G/LTE services on a GSM platform. Network coverage and Internet speeds are good around the main towns and cities, but as with all providers in Saudi Arabia, the signal will struggle as you head toward the desert regions. 4G is on 900, 1800 and 2100 MHz, all on FD-LTE, partly with three-band aggregation like in Jeddah. Zain offers the lowest rates in the Kingdom right now.

However Zain Saudi’s lost around 1.7 million subscribers in the first quarter of 2018, falling 17 percent to 8.4 million. The company said this was in line with a country-wide decrease and as a result of the government’s biometric identification project (which reduced the number of pre-paid SIMs to two per ID).



Zain has selected Ericsson to develop and test selected 5G and Internet of Things (IoT) cases. The new partnership will accelerate digitalization in the region, enabling rapid deployment of innovative services in the Internet of Things (IoT) in the coming years.
The 5G and IoT agreement covers live demonstrations and strengthens technical cooperation between the two companies and will ensure smooth 4G to 5G evolution across Zain’s networks.Bader Al Kharafi, Group CEO of Zain, said: 
“5G will open the door for new applications that will transform consumer behavior and industries. By introducing these new technologies, we will enrich the digital lifestyles of individuals and support the growth and development of businesses.”
In addition to the three main mobile operators, Saudi Operators also host couple of MVNOs. Lebara Mobile Saudi Arabia uses Mobily Network and Virgin Mobile KSA is hosted by STC.

Further Reading:

Related Posts:

          Express Newspaper Jobs ads 10 August 2018 (Friday)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Carpainters and Other Staff Reuqired for UAE Duct Insulators AC Technicians Jobs Electricians Mason Labours and Other Jobs in saudi Arabia Electricians Mason Pipe Fitters Jobs Electricians Plumbers Pipe Fitters Jobs in Saudi Arabia Multiple Jobs – Express Jobs 10 August 2018 Latest Punjab Housing & Town Planning Agency Jobs 2018 Latest Research Associate Required ...

The post Express Newspaper Jobs ads 10 August 2018 (Friday) appeared first on PaperPk.


          8/10/2018: CITY+REGION: Diplomatic spat with Saudi Arabia unlikely to affect Sask. hospitals      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
ANDREA HILL A diplomatic dispute between Canada and Saudi Arabia, which has resulted in the Middle Eastern country pulling thousands of students, including about 750 medical residents, from Canadian institutions, will not disrupt operations of the...
          For Saudi Arabia's Growing Hip-Hop Scene, It's Tricky      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Saudi Arabia is easing its tight grip on popular culture as it tries to diversify the economy, and the kingdom is one of the biggest markets for rap music in the Arab world. Yet it is finding that rap, like other art forms, can be difficult to contain.
          Ahmed Musa reveals outrageous reception upon Saudi Arabia arrival      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Ahmed Musa's move from Leicester City to Al-Nassr FC appears to have gone down well with the club's fans, who gave the Nigeria international an outrageous reaction upon his arrival in Saudi Arabia. In a video shared on his @AhmedMusa718 Twitter handle, the former CSKA Moscow forward is seem being mobbed by delirious fans upon his arrival in the country. What a amazing reception here in Saudi Arabia .I want to thank each and every person who came out and welcomed me at the airport. I am really humbled....
          Global macro overview for 10/08/2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Canadian Dollar has had a roller coaster ride due to oil, after Saudi Arabia comments and leaks from NAFTA negotiations. A lot of confusion arose from the information that as a result of a diplomatic dispute between Canada and Saudi Arabia (Prime Minister Trudeau criticized the arrest of a Saudi activist), Riyad ordered the central bank and the national funds to sell Canadian assets. The amount coming into play is not big and should not have a clear impact on CAD, but the information has become an excuse for the movement fueled by a sell-off of crude oil. However, as the CAD market is unstable, it showed a dynamic retreat to the USD/CAD decline after reports that the US and Mexico have agreed on the trade of cars, which opens the way for further negotiations of the NAFTA agreement. Nevertheless, it does not look like the "Saudi factor" would be sustained for longer, and expectations for NAFTA (and the implications for tightening the BoC policy) in the longer horizon should play a greater role.

Today, the global investor's attention should be focused on another set of Canadain economy data in form of Unemployment Rate, Employment Change, Part-Time Employment Change and Participation Rate.

Let's now take a look at the USD/CAD technical picture at the H4 time frame. The market has tested the 50% Fibo retracement level and hit the technical resistance at the level of 1.3111 before the drop. Currently, the bulls are again trying to rally higher and the same level should be in play. In a case of a breakout higher, the next target for bulls is located at 61% Fibo at 1.3164. On the other hand, the immediate support is seen at the level of 1.3000. Please notice the positive momentum that supports the short-term bullish bias.

analytics5b6d2a9ac2a4f.jpg

The material has been provided by InstaForex Company - www.instaforex.com
          8/10/2018: OPINION: Nothing gained by Canadian tweets      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Pontificating to countries on how to treat their citizens is not only politically and economically very unwise, but lectured nations don’t exactly rush to embrace Canada’s high moral standards — China and Saudi Arabia, for instance. In response to...
          8/10/2018: OPINION: Drop Saudi oil, revive Energy East      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Saudis are punishing Canada’s economy over a human rights issue. Why are we still buying oil from such an unstable trading partner like Saudi Arabia when Canada has plentiful oil reserves of its own, out west? Obviously it’s the cost of moving...
          8/10/2018: FINANCIAL POST: Saudi investment freeze doesn’t amount to much impact on Canadian economy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

TORONTO The decision by Saudi Arabia to halt new investments and unload assets in Canada is likely to have limited impact, even as the kingdom’s foreign minister threatens further action. Saudi assets in Canada are confined mainly to stakes in upscale...
          8/10/2018: FINANCIAL POST: Official says Canada dispute won’t affect oil sales      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
DUBAI, U.A.E. Saudi Arabia’s diplomatic dispute with Canada over its arrest of women’s rights activists will not affect the ultraconservative kingdom’s oil sales to Canadian customers, the Saudi energy minister said Thursday. The remarks by Khalid...
          Saudi trainee doctors set to head home from Canada in diplomatic row      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

TORONTO: Saudi Arabia has told hundreds of trainee doctors to leave Canada with only weeks’ notice in the midst of a diplomatic spat, a move that could disrupt Canadian hospitals and end a 40-year-old program to train specialists for the kingdom. Angered by Ottawa calling for the release of arrested Saudi civil society activists, Saudi […]

The post Saudi trainee doctors set to head home from Canada in diplomatic row appeared first on Newsone.


          Awad Explains Somalia Support For Saudi Arabia In Row With Canada      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Somalia’s minister of foreign affairs, Ahmed Isse Awad has provided more explanations about the country’s decision to support Saudi Arabia in its diplomatic row with Canada. The minister denied reports that Somalia has been pressured to show solidarity for Saudi Arabia’s move to freeze its trade ties with Canada and expel its ambassador. “Somali government makes clear …

The post Awad Explains Somalia Support For Saudi Arabia In Row With Canada appeared first on Saafi Films Production Somali Films Hindi Af Soomaali Musalsal heeso.


          F-15SA Saudi Arabia Program Support Analyst - SAF/IA - Whitney, Bradley and Brown - Arlington, VA      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Secret clearance, SAF/IA, Country Desk, Country Director, SCO, ODC, F-15, Maintenance, Officer, Pilot/WSO, LOA, Acquisition, Logistics....
From Whitney, Bradley and Brown - Mon, 06 Aug 2018 16:21:56 GMT - View all Arlington, VA jobs
          In Saudi'Canada standoff, Riyadh should stand down      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
New York Post, by Jonathan Schanzer and Varsha Koduvayur Posted By: Pluperfect- Fri, 10 40 2018 09:40:02 GMT The last time Canada undertook an act of aggression was in 1999, when it declared war on the United States — in the comedic universe of “South Park,” that is. But few were laughing Monday when Saudi Arabia shockingly cut ties with Canada and enacted severe punitive measures against Ottawa. Riyadh’s gripe? A Canadian Foreign Ministry tweet criticizing the kingdom’s arrests of several human'rights activists. After new arrests last week, the total number of detained activists is now 18. In retaliation for what it described as Canadian meddling, Riyadh divested from its Canadian assets, froze new trade and investment, halted flights
          The Dollar Muscles Higher as Turkey Melts Down      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The US dollar has surged.  The main impetus comes from the dramatic slide in the Turkish