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           North Korea chides U.S. sanctions pressure on...       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
By Haejin Choi and David BrunnstromSEOUL/WASHINGTON, Aug 9 (Reuters) - North Korea on Thursday denounced U.S. calls for enforcing international sanctions ...
          Trump(ed) up deal      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The announcement of president Trump last week expressing his willingness to hold a summit with Iran with ‘no preconditions’, after a chain of threatening exchanges between him and president Rouhani, for a new model of US-Iran Nuclear deal indicates yet another flip flop in US policies. It is unlikely to be taken seriously so easily, after witnessing US withdrawal from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA) of 2015 with Iran (Commonly known as Iran Nuclear Deal) even at the cost of differing with its allies and strategic partners, who have critical trade relations with Iran.

Can any future US – Iran nuclear deal succeed?

The intent of JCPoA in 2015 in which the United States and allies agreed to reduce sanctions on Iran, was that it will give up the means to make nuclear weapons. This remains unchanged, when president Trump says that Iran cannot be allowed to go nuclear. The Republicans were not too happy with its clauses at that time and made it an election issue, which president Trump delivered by walking out of it. I do not think that the intent of US has changed even now. President Trump duly supported by Israel has managed to raise the temperatures by rhetoric, provocative speeches, renewed sanctions on Iran, and tried to curtail their oil exports, but it has not worked. US knows that it cannot up the ante beyond economic, diplomatic and information warfare domain, because further pressure is likely to push Iran towards nuclear bomb even faster than what US expects. While US may be ready for summit, it will have to struggle very hard to find a workable replacement deal to the existing deal, which can be devoid of risks of failure, with no change of intention expressed in JCPoA, 2015, and may eventually find that the previous deal was not too bad to meet their strategic interests.

Additional complexities, but compromise is possible

The situation is much more complex in this case because none of its allies, who were part of JCPoA, 2015, have walked out of it so far. This has also raised doubts over the reliability, credibility and stability of policies of US to continue with a signed commitment, which can have repercussions on complete denuclearisation of North Korea, which may think twice before complete verifiable, irreversible denuclearisation. The emergence of a pro-Iran lobby to include Russia, Turkey, Qatar and China to oppose anti-Iran lobby including USA, Israel, Saudi Arabia and some other neighbours, is another major change in international environment, which can speed up nuclear ambition of Iran, if pushed to wall. It is not easy to pressurise Iran which has great strategic significance due to its location as well as oil export, which concerns US allies, strategic partners and China. If Iran sustains sanctions and goes nuclear, it will encourage others like Saudi Arabia also to go nuclear creating further instability in the region.  An ill-defined meeting with Iran is not likely to yield much, in such an environment. I sincerely feel that compromises are possible; because of some of US allies are still honouring JCPoA, 2015, so far, and the inclination of president Trump to talk to Iran. In case US tries to strike a US centric deal with Iran in isolation, its acceptability by others may be doubtful. Having two concurrent deals (JCPoA, 2015 with EU and new arrangement with US) will cause utter confusion, and may not be to lead to any workable solution.

Impact on India: is CAATSA waiver on Iran possible after S-400?

As a strategic partner of India, US is aware that India has historic, cultural, and oil centric relations with Iran, which are deep rooted. Iran has jumped one notch up by becoming the second largest crude oil supplier to India and energy security is core interest for India. Connectivity with CAR and Chabahar port is another strategic compulsion of India.  US has understood the need of S-400 missiles for India, based on Indian threat perception, and have agreed to give a waiver on CAATSA for its purchase from Russia. A similar waiver/understanding with US on the critical strategic issues of India with Iran including energy security is a fair expectation/ possibility. 

I visualise that US sanctions on Iran may continue, but US may have to rethink about CAATSA, or modify it to suit fast changing strategic and economic global dynamics to make it more flexible.  On the issue of Iran and Russia, it cannot afford to put EU, China, Russia and other strategic partners on sanctions together, and expect to make ‘America Great’. A rigid CAATSA may lead ‘America First’ to ‘America Alone’ hence it needs modifications to suit changing geopolitical environment.

 (The writer is chief instructor, USI of India)

Trump(ed) up deal

          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, meaning people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea, and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception: waivers.
          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, meaning people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea, and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception: waivers.
          Trouble Ahead After DPRK’s FM Visit To Tehran      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
By: Denise Simon | Founders Code So, it appears there is more to the teaming up between Tehran and Pyongyang. The Iranian President Rouhani told the North Korean Foreign Minister in a recent confab to NOT trust the United States. Meanwhile, SecState, Mike Pompeo issued a proposal to North Korea calling for a timeline that would mandate […]
          McAfee and Intezer find links among North Korea’s malware families      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

North Korea’s cyberattacks have been well documented over the years. But a collaboration between McAfee and Intezer security researchers has shown previously undiscovered links among the various North Korean malware families and some of the most successful cyberattacks to date. Jay Rosenberg of Intezer and Christiaan Beek of McAfee are talking about their discovery at […]


          North Korea chides U.S. for pressing sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

SEOUL/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - North Korea accused the United States on Thursday of pushing for international sanctions despite goodwill moves by Pyongyang and said progress on denuclearisation promises could not be expected if Washington continues to follow an "outdated acting script." A foreign ministry spokesman said in a statement on state-run KCNA that North Korea was still willing to implement a broad agreement made at the landmark June 12 summit in Singapore between U.S.

The post North Korea chides U.S. for pressing sanctions appeared first on Firstpost.


          Two Koreas to discuss next summit at high-level talks on Monday | NK News - North Korea News      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Two Koreas to discuss next summit at high-level talks on Monday | NK News - North Korea News: High-level officials from North and South Korea will meet on the Northern side of the Panmunjom peace village on August 13, the South’s Ministry of Unification (MOU) announced on Thursday. The talks will reportedly focus on preparations for the next inter-Korean summit, widely expected to take place in the coming month in Pyongyang, as well
          North Korea: U.S. following 'outdated script'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

          A Bold Foreign Policy Platform for the New Wave of Left Lawmakers      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

ACROSS THE COUNTRY, A NEW COHORT OF PROGRESSIVES IS RUNNING FOR—AND WINNING—ELECTIONS. The stunning victory of democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in the Democratic congressional primary in New York is perhaps the most well-known, but she is far from alone. Most of these candidates are young, more than usual are people of color, many are women, several are Muslims, at least one is a refugee, at least one is transgender—and all are unabashedly left. Most come to electoral politics after years of activism around issues like immigration, climate and racism. They come out of a wide range of social movements and support policy demands that reflect the principles of those movements: labor rights, immigrant and refugee rights, women’s and gender rights, equal access to housing and education, environmental justice, and opposition to police violence and racial profiling. Some, though certainly not all, identify not just with the policies of socialism but with the fundamental core values and indeed the name itself, usually in the form of democratic socialism.

Rashida Tlaib, a Palestinian-American woman in Detroit, just won the Democratic primary for the legendary Congressman John Conyers’ seat. Four women, two of them members of Democratic Socialists of America and all four endorsed by DSA, beat their male incumbent opponents in Pennsylvania state house primaries. Tahirah Amatul-Wadud is running an insurgent campaign for Congress against a longstanding incumbent in western Massachusetts, keeping her focus on Medicare-for-All and civil rights. Minnesota State Rep. Ilhan Omar, a former Somali refugee, won endorsement from the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party, and is running for Keith Ellison’s former congressional seat as an “intersectional feminist.” And there are more.

Many highlight their movement experience in their campaigns; they are champions of immigrant rights, healthcare, student debt organizing and the fight for $15. Intersectionality has grown stronger, as the extremism of Trump’s right-wing racist assault creates significant new gains in linking separate movements focused on racism, women’s rights, immigrant rights, climate, poverty, labor rights and more.

But mostly, we’re not seeing progressive and socialist candidates clearly link domestic issues with efforts to challenge war, militarism and the war economy. There are a few exceptions: Congressional candidate and Hawaii State Rep. Kaniela Ing speaks powerfully about U.S. colonialism in Hawaii, and Virginia State Rep. Lee J. Carter has spoken strongly against U.S. bombing of Syria, linking current attacks with the legacy of U.S. military interventions. There may be more. But those are exceptions; most of the new left candidates focus on crucial issues of justice at home.

A progressive foreign policy must reject U.S. military and economic domination and instead be grounded in global cooperation, human rights, respect for international law and privileging diplomacy over war.

It’s not that progressive leaders don’t care about international issues, or that our movements are divided. Despite too many common assumptions, it is not political suicide for candidates or elected officials to stake out progressive anti-war, anti-militarism positions. Quite the contrary: Those positions actually have broad support within both our movements and public opinion. It’s just that it’s hard to figure out the strategies that work to connect internationally focused issues, anti-war efforts, or challenges to militarism, with the wide array of activists working on locally grounded issues. Some of those strategies seem like they should be easy—like talking about slashing the 53 cents of every discretionary federal dollar that now goes to the military as the easiest source to fund Medicare-for-all or free college education. It should be easy, but somehow it’s not: Too often, foreign policy feels remote from the urgency of domestic issues facing such crises. When our movements do figure out those strategies, candidates can easily follow suit.

Candidates coming out of our movements into elected office will need clear positions on foreign policy. Here are several core principles that should shape those positions.

A progressive foreign policy must reject U.S. military and economic domination and instead be grounded in global cooperation, human rights, respect for international law and privileging diplomacy over war. That does not mean isolationism, but instead a strategy of diplomatic engagement rather than—not as political cover for—destructive U.S. military interventions that have so often defined the U.S. role in the world.

Looking at the political pretexts for what the U.S. empire is doing around the world today, a principled foreign policy might start by recognizing that there is no military solution to terrorism and that the global war on terror must be ended.

More broadly, the militarization of foreign policy must be reversed and diplomacy must replace military action in every venue, with professional diplomats rather than the White House’s political appointees in charge. Aspiring and elected progressive and socialist office-holders should keep in mind the distinction between the successes and failures of Obama’s foreign policy. The victories were all diplomatic: moving towards normalization with Cuba, the Paris climate accord and especially the Iran nuclear deal. Obama’s greatest failures—in Libya, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and Yemen—all occurred because the administration chose military action over robust diplomacy.

Certainly, diplomacy has been a tool in the arsenal of empires, including the United States. But when we are talking about official policies governing relations between countries, diplomacy—meaning talking, negotiating and engaging across a table—is always, always better than engaging across a battlefield.

A principled foreign policy must recognize how the war economy has distorted our society at home—and commit to reverse it. The $717 billion of the military budget is desperately needed for jobs, healthcare and education here at home—and for a diplomatic surge and humanitarian and reconstruction assistance to people of countries devastated by U.S. wars and sanctions.

A principled foreign policy must acknowledge how U.S. actions—military, economic and climate-related—have been a driving force in displacing people around the world. We therefore have an enormous moral as well as legal obligation to take the lead in providing humanitarian support and refuge for those displaced—so immigration and refugee rights are central to foreign policy.

For too long the power of the U.S. empire has dominated international relations, led to the privileging of war over diplomacy on a global scale, and created a vast—and invasive—network of 800-plus military bases around the world.

Now, overall U.S. global domination is actually shrinking, and not only because of Trump’s actions. China’s economy is rapidly catching up, and its economic clout in Africa and elsewhere eclipses that of the United States. It’s a measure of the United States’ waning power that Europe, Russia and China are resisting U.S. efforts to impose new global sanctions on Iran. But the United States is still the world’s strongest military and economic power: Its military spending vastly surpasses that of the eight next strongest countries, it is sponsoring a dangerous anti-Iran alliance between Israel and the wealthy Gulf Arab states, it remains central to NATO decision-making, and powerful forces in Washington threaten new wars in North Korea and Iran. The United States remains dangerous.

Progressives in Congress have to navigate the tricky task of rejecting American exceptionalism. That means recognizing that it is often a good thing when U.S. global military and economic efforts fail, because they are generally aimed at maintaining domination and control. Without that U.S. domination, the possibility arises of a new kind of internationalism: to prevent and solve crises that arise from current and potential wars, to promote nuclear disarmament, to come up with climate solutions and to protect refugees.

That effort is increasingly important because of the rapid rise of right-wing xenophobic authoritarians seeking and winning power. Trump is now leading and enabling an informal global grouping of such leaders, from Egypt’s Abdel Fattah el-Sisi to Victor Orban in Hungary and others. Progressive elected officials in the United States can pose an important challenge to that authoritarian axis by building ties with their like-minded counterparts in parliaments and governments—possibilities include Jeremy Corbyn in the United Kingdom and Andrés Manuel López Obrador in Mexico, among others. And progressive and leftist members of Congress will need to be able to work together with social movements to build public pressure for diplomatic initiatives not grounded in the interests of U.S. empire.

In addition to these broad principles, candidates and elected officials need critical analyses of current U.S. engagement around the world, as well as nuanced prescriptions for how to de-escalate militarily, and ramp up a new commitment to serious diplomacy.

GEOPOLITICAL POWER PLAYS

RUSSIA: Relations with Russia will be a major challenge for the foreseeable future. With 90 percent of the world’s nuclear weapons in U.S. and Russian hands, and the two powers deploying military forces on opposite sides of active battlefronts in Syria, it is crucial that relations remain open—not least to derail potential escalations and ensure the ability to stand down from any accidental clash.

Progressives and leftists in Congress will need to promote a nuanced, careful approach to Russia policy. And they will face a daunting environment in which to do so. They will have to deal with loud cries from right-wing war-mongers, mainly Republicans, and from neo-con interventionists in both parties, demanding a one-sided anti-Russia policy focused on increased sanctions and potentially even military threats. But many moderate and liberal Democrats—and much of the media—are also joining the anti-Russia crusade. Some of those liberals and moderates have likely bought into the idea of American exceptionalism, accepting as legitimate or irrelevant the long history of U.S. election meddling around the world and viewing the Russian efforts as somehow reaching a whole different level of outrageousness. Others see the anti-Russia mobilization solely in the context of undermining Trump.

But at the same time, progressive Congress members should recognize that reports of Russian efforts to interfere with the 2016 and 2018 elections cannot be dismissed out of hand. They should continue to demand that more of the evidence be made public, and condemn the Russian meddling that has occurred, even while recognizing that the most serious threats to our elections come from voter suppression campaignsat home more than from Moscow. And they have to make clear that Trump’s opponents cannot be allowed to turn the president’s infatuation with Vladimir Putin into the basis for a new Cold War, simply to oppose Trump.

CHINA: The broad frame of a progressive approach should be to end Washington’s provocative military and economic moves and encourage deeper levels of diplomatic engagement. This means replacing military threats with diplomacy in response to Chinese moves in the South China Sea, as well as significant cuts in the ramped-up military ties with U.S. allies in the region, such as Vietnam. Progressive and socialist members of Congress and other elected officials will no doubt be aware that the rise of China’s economic dominance across Africa, and its increasing influence in parts of Latin America, could endanger the independence of countries in those parts of the Global South. But they will also need to recognize that any U.S. response to what looks like Chinese exploitation must be grounded in humility, acknowledging the long history of U.S. colonial and neocolonial domination throughout those same regions. Efforts to compete with Chinese economic assistance by increasing Washington’s own humanitarian and development aid should mean directing all funds through the UN, rather than through USAID or the Pentagon. That will make U.S. assistance far less likely to be perceived as—and to be—an entry point for exploitation.

NATO: A progressive position on NATO flies straight into the face of the partisan component of the anti-Trump resistance—the idea that if Trump is for it, we should be against it. For a host of bad reasons that have to do with personal enrichment and personal power, Trump sometimes takes positions that large parts of the U.S. and global anti-war and solidarity movements have long supported. One of those is NATO. During the Cold War, NATO was the European military face of U.S.-dominated Western anti-Communism and anti-Sovietism. With the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union, peace activists from around the world called for the dissolution of NATO as an anachronistic relic whose raison d’etre was now gone.

Instead, NATO used its 50th anniversary in 1999 to rebrand itself as defending a set of amorphous, ostensibly “Western” values such as democracy, rather than having any identifiable enemy—something like a military version of the EU, with the United States on board for clout. Unable to win UN Security Council support for war in Kosovo, the United States and its allies used NATO to provide so-called authorization for a major bombing campaign—in complete violation of international law—and began a rapid expansion of the NATO alliance right up to the borders of Russia. Anti-war forces across the world continued to rally around the call “No to NATO”—a call to dissolve the alliance altogether.

But when Trump, however falsely, claims to call for an end to the alliance, or shows disdain for NATO, anti-Trump politicians and media lead the way in embracing the military alliance as if it really did represent some version of human rights and international law. It doesn’t—and progressives in elected positions need to be willing to call out NATO as a militarized Cold War relic that shouldn’t be reconfigured to maintain U.S. domination in Europe or to mobilize against Russia or China or anyone else. It should be ended.

In fact, Trump’s claims to oppose NATO are belied by his actions. In his 2019 budget request he almost doubled the 2017 budget for the Pentagon’s “European Deterrence Initiative,” designed explicitly as a response to “threats from Russia.” There is a huge gap between Trump’s partisan base-pleasing condemnation of NATO and his administration&rdqou;s actual support for strengthening the military alliance. That contradiction should make it easier for progressive candidates and officeholders to move to cut NATO funding and reduce its power—not because Trump is against NATO but because the military alliance serves as a dangerous provocation toward war.

THE WAR ON TERROR

What George W. Bush first called “the global war on terror” is still raging almost 17 years later, though with different forms of killing and different casualty counts. Today’s reliance on airstrikes, drone attacks and a few thousand special forces has replaced the hundreds of thousands of U.S. and allied ground troops. And today hardly any U.S. troops are being killed, while civilian casualties are skyrocketing across the Middle East and Afghanistan. Officials from the Bush, Obama and Trump administrations have repeated the mantra that “there is no military solution” in Afghanistan, Syria, or Iraq or against terrorism, but their actions have belied those words. Progressive elected officials need to consistently remind the public and their counterparts that it is not possible to bomb terrorism out of existence. Bombs don’t hit “terrorism”; they hit cities, houses, wedding parties. And on those rare occasions when they hit the people actually named on the White House&rdqou;s unaccountable kill list, or “terrorist” list, the impact often creates more terrorists.

The overall progressive policy on this question means campaigning for diplomatic solutions and strategies instead of military ones. That also means joining the ongoing congressional efforts led by Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.) and others  to challenge the continued reliance on the 2001 and 2002 Authorizations for the Use of Military Force (AUMF).

In general, privileging diplomatic over war strategies starts with withdrawing troops and halting the arms sales that flood the region with deadly weapons. Those weapons too often end up in the hands of killers on all sides, from bands of unaccountable militants to brutally repressive governments, with civilians paying the price. Congress members should demand an end of massive arms sales to Saudi Arabia, the UAE and other U.S. allies carrying out brutal wars across the Middle East, and they should call for an end to the practice of arming non-state proxies who kill even more people. They should call for a U.S. arms embargo on Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Qatar, Iraq, Afghanistan, Egypt, Turkey, Pakistan, Jordan and Israel (which presents a whole other set of arms-related challenges), while urging Russia to stop its arms sales to Syria, Iran and Pakistan. Given the power of the arms industries in the United States, arms embargoes are the most difficult—but perhaps the most important—part of ending the expanding Middle East wars.

Progressives in Congress should demand real support for UN-sponsored and other international peace initiatives, staffing whole new diplomatic approaches whose goal is political solutions rather than military victories—and taking funds out of military budgets to cover the costs. The goal should be to end these endless wars—not try to “win&rdqou; them.

ISRAEL-PALESTINE: The most important thing for candidates to know is that there has been a massive shift in public opinion in recent years. It is no longer political suicide to criticize Israel. Yes, AIPAC and the rest of the right-wing Jewish, pro-Israel lobbies remain influential and have a lot of money to throw around. (The Christian Zionist lobbies are powerful too, but there is less political difficulty for progressives to challenge them.) But there are massive shifts underway in U.S. Jewish publicopinion on the conflict, and the lobbies cannot credibly claim to speak for the Jewish community as a whole.

Outside the Jewish community, the shift is even more dramatic, and has become far more partisan: Uncritical support for Israel is now overwhelmingly a Republican position. Among Democrats, particularly young Democrats, support for Israel has fallen dramatically; among Republicans, support for Israel’s far-right government is sky-high. The shift is particularly noticeable among Democrats of color, where recognition of the parallels between Israeli oppression of Palestinians and the legacies of Jim Crow segregation in the United States and apartheid in South Africa is rising rapidly.

U.S. policy, unfortunately, has not kept up with that changing discourse. But modest gains are evident even there. When nearly 60 members of the House and Senate openly skipped Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech when he came to lobby Congress to vote against President Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran, the sky didn’t fall. The snub to the Israeli prime minister was unprecedented, but no one lost their seat because of it. Rep. Betty McCollum’s bill to protect Palestinian children from Israel’s vicious military juvenile detention system (the only one in the world) now has 29 co-sponsors, and the sky still isn’t falling. Members of Congress are responding more frequently to Israeli assaults on Gaza and the killing of protesters, often because of powerful movements among their constituents. When Trump moved the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, the Israeli daily Ha’aretz acknowledged the divide: “While members of the Republican Party overwhelmingly expressed support for the move, Democrats were split between those who congratulated Trump for it and those who called it a dangerous and irresponsible action.”

That creates space for candidates and newly elected officials to respond to the growing portion of their constituencies that supports Palestinian rights. Over time, they must establish a rights-based policy. That means acknowledging that the quarter-century-long U.S.-orchestrated “peace process” based on the never-serious pursuit of a solution, has failed. Instead, left and progressive political leaders can advocate for a policy that turns over real control of diplomacy to the UN, ends support for Israeli apartheid and occupation, and instead supports a policy based on international law, human rights and equality for all, without privileging Jews or discriminating against non-Jews.

To progress from cautiously urging that Israel abide by international law, to issuing a full-scale call to end or at least reduce the $3.8 billion per year that Congress sends straight to the Israeli military, might take some time. In the meantime, progressive candidates must prioritize powerful statements condemning the massacre of unarmed protesters in Gaza and massive Israeli settlement expansion, demands for real accountability for Israeli violations of human rights and international law (including reducing U.S. support in response), and calls for an end to the longstanding U.S. protection that keeps Israel from being held accountable in the UN.

The right consistently accuses supporters of Palestinian rights of holding Israel to a double standard. Progressives in Congress should turn that claim around on them and insist that U.S. policy towards Israel—Washington’s closest ally in the region and the recipient of billions of dollars in military aid every year—hold Israel to exactly the same standards that we want the United States to apply to every other country: human rights, adherence to international law and equality for all.

Many supporters of the new crop of progressive candidates, and many activists in the movements they come out of, are supporters of the increasingly powerful, Palestinian-led BDS (boycott, divestment and sanctions) movement, that aims to bring non-violent economic pressure to bear on Israel until it ends its violations of international law. This movement deserves credit for helping to mainstream key demands—to end the siege of Gaza and the killing of protesters, to support investigations of Israeli violations by the International Criminal Court, to oppose Israel’s new “nation-state’ law—that should all be on lawmakers’ immediate agenda.

AFGHANISTAN: More than 100,000 Afghans and 2,000 U.S. troops have been killed in a U.S. war that has raged for almost 17 years. Not-Yet-President Trump called for withdrawal from Afghanistan, but within just a few months after taking office he agreed instead to send additional troops, even though earlier deployments of more than 100,000 U.S. troops (and thousands more coalition soldiers) could not win a military victory over the Taliban. Corruption in the U.S.-backed and -funded Afghan government remains sky-high, and in just the past three years, the Pentagon has lost track of how $3.1 billion of its Afghanistan funds were spent. About 15,000 US troops are still deployed, with no hope of a military victory for the United States.

Progressive members of Congress should demand a safe withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Afghanistan, acting on the long-held recognition that military force simply won’t work to bring about the political solution all sides claim to want.

Several pending bills also would reclaim the centrality of Congress’ role in authorizing war in general and in Afghanistan in particular—including ending the 2001 AUMF. Funding for humanitarian aid, refugee support, and in the future compensation and reparations for the massive destruction the U.S.-led war has wrought across the country, should all be on Congress’ agenda, understanding that such funding will almost certainly fail while U.S. troops are deployed.

IRAN: With U.S. and Iranian military forces facing each other in Syria, the potential for an unintentional escalation is sky-high. Even a truly accidental clash between a few Iranian and U.S. troops, or an Iranian anti-aircraft system mistakenly locking on to a U.S. warplane plane even if it didn’t fire, could have catastrophic consequences without immediate military-to-military and quick political echelon discussions to defuse the crisis. And with tensions very high, those ties are not routinely available. Relations became very dangerous when Trump withdrew the United States from the multi-lateral nuclear deal in May. (At that time, a strong majority of people in the United States favored the deal, and less than one in three wanted to pull out of it.)

The United States continues to escalate threats against Iran. It is sponsoring a growing regional anti-Iran alliance, with Israel and Saudi Arabia now publicly allied and pushing strongly for military action. And Trump has surrounded himself with war-mongers for his top advisers, including John Bolton and Mike Pompeo, who have both supported regime change in Iran and urged military rather than diplomatic approaches to Iran.

Given all that, what progressive elected officials need to do is to keep fighting for diplomacy over war. That means challenging U.S. support for the anti-Iran alliance and opposing sanctions on Iran. It means developing direct ties with parliamentarians from the European and other signatories to the Iran nuclear deal, with the aim of collective opposition to new sanctions, re-legitimizing the nuclear deal in Washington and reestablishing diplomacy as the basis for U.S. relations with Iran.

It should also mean developing a congressional response to the weakening of international anti-nuclear norms caused by the pull-out from the Iran deal. That means not just supporting the nonproliferation goals of the Iran nuclear deal, but moving further towards real disarmament and ultimately the abolition of nuclear weapons. Progressives in and outside of Congress should make clear that nuclear nonproliferation (meaning no one else gets to have nukes) can’t work in the long run without nuclear disarmament (meaning that the existing nuclear weapons states have to give them up). That could start with a demand for full U.S. compliance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, which calls for negotiations leading to “nuclear disarmament, and on a treaty on general and complete disarmament.”

SYRIA: Progressive candidates and elected officials should support policies designed to end, not “win” the war. That means withdrawing troops, ceasing airstrikes and drone attacks, and calling for an arms embargo on all sides of the multiple proxy war. The civil war component of the multiple wars in Syria is winding down as the regime consolidates its control, but the sectarian, regional and global components of that war have not disappeared, so continuing a call for an arms embargo is still important. The first step is to permanently end the Pentagon’s and the CIA’s “arm and train” policies that have prolonged the war and empowered some of its most dangerous actors.

There will also need to be negotiations between the regional and global actors that have been waging their own wars in Syria, wars that have little to do with Syria itself, but with Syrians doing the bulk of the dying. That means support for the UN’s and other internationally-sponsored de-escalation efforts, and serious engagement with Russia towards a permanent ceasefire, as well as the arms embargo. U.S. policy should include absolute prohibitions on Washington’s regional allies—including Saudi Arabia and Turkey—sending U.S.-provided arms into Syria. And progressive supporters of diplomacy should also maintain pressure on the United States to back multi-lateral diplomatic processes organized by the UN and others—on humanitarian issues in Geneva, and political issues in Astana. Cutting the United States’ multi-billion dollar arms sales to Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Jordan, Turkey and other U.S. allies involved in the Syrian wars would also lend legitimacy to U.S. efforts within those diplomatic processes to press Russia to stop providing arms to the Assad regime.

IRAQ: Congress has largely abrogated its responsibilities even as the 15-year war initiated by the United States continues. Progressive policymakers would do well to join the existing efforts to end—not replace, but cancel—the 2002 Authorization for the Use of Military Force against Saddam Hussein's government in Iraq, and reopen congressional debate, with the goal of ending funding for war in Iraq once and for all. When President Obama withdrew the last troops from Iraq at the end of 2011, stating that “war in Iraq ends this month,” many assumed that the authorization ended as well. But it was never officially repealed and had no expiration date, and three years later Obama claimed that the then-12-year-old authorization justified the war against ISIS in Iraq. While Trump has relied primarily on the 2001 AUMF, the Iraq-specific authorization of 2002 remains in place and should be withdrawn. 

In the meantime, progressives in Congress should support many of the same policies for Iraq as for Syria: withdraw the troops and special forces, stop the assassination program that is the heart of Washington’s “counter-terrorism” campaign and cease sending arms. Congress should end funding to force the closure of the network of small “forward operating bases” and other U.S. military bases that may remain in U.S. hands in Iraq despite earlier agreements to turn them over to the Iraqi government. The U.S. must figure out new ways to provide financial compensation and support to the people whose country and society has been shredded by more than a dozen years of crippling U.S.-led economic sanctions bookended by two devastating wars (Desert Storm, starting in 1991, and the Iraq War, starting in 2003)—while somehow avoiding the further empowerment of corrupt and sectarian political and military leaders.

YEMEN AND SAUDI ARABIA: The ongoing Saudi-led war against Yemen reflects the most deadly front of Saudi Arabia’s competition with Iran for regional hegemony. The United States is providing indirect and direct support, including U.S. Air Force pilots providing in-air refueling so Saudi and UAE warplanes can bomb Yemen more efficiently, and Green Berets fighting alongside Saudi troops on the border, in what the New York Times called “a continuing escalation of America’s secret wars.”

The U.S.-backed Saudi war against Yemen has also created what the UN has declared the world’s most serious humanitarian crisis. Congress’ first action must be to immediately end all U.S. involvement in the war. Next, Congress must reject all approvals for arms sales to Saudi Arabia and the UAE as long as they continue to bomb and blockade Yemen.

Ending these arms sales may be a serious challenge, given the power of the arms manufacturers’ lobby, Israel’s strong support of Saudi Arabia against Iran and the fact that Saudi Arabia remains the top U.S. arms customer. But recent efforts and relatively close votes in both the House and Senate, while not successful, indicate that challenging the longstanding process of providing the Saudis with whatever weapons they want may be closer to reality than anticipated. The House called the U.S. military involvement in the Saudi war in Yemen “unauthorized.” Reps. Ro Khanna, Marc Pocan and others have introduced numerous House bills in recent months aimed at reducing U.S. arms sales and involvement in the Saudi-led assault. In the Senate, a March resolution to end U.S. military involvement in the Yemen war failed by only 11 votes, a much narrower margin than anticipated. Progressive candidates and new members of Congress should support all those efforts, and move further with a call for ending the longstanding U.S. alliance with Saudi Arabia, especially military sales and support for the Saudi-Israeli partnership against Iran.

A QUICK GLANCE AT SOME OTHER POLICY QUESTIONS

NORTH KOREA: Progressive elected officials will need to support Trump’s diplomatic initiatives, challenging mainstream Democrats willing to abandon diplomacy because Trump supports it (however tactically or temporarily). Progressives will also need to condemn U.S. military provocations that undermine that same diplomacy, and build public and congressional support for the inter-Korean diplomatic moves already underway. That should include pushing for exemptions in the U.S.-imposed sanctions that would allow inter-Korean economic and other initiatives to go forward. Progressives in Congress can also play a major role in supporting people-to-people diplomacy with North Korea, and they can lead the way in replacing the current armistice with a peace treaty finally ending the Korean War.

AFRICA: Across the continent, there is an urgent need to reverse the militarization of foreign policy, including reducing the size, breadth of responsibilities and theater of operations of AFRICOM.  The wide-ranging but unauthorized and largely secretive special operations and other military actions across the continent violate not only international law, but U.S. domestic law as well.

LATIN AMERICA: In Latin America, there is an urgent need for a new anti-interventionist policy, not least to stop the current attempts to take advantage of serious domestic crises in Venezuela, Nicaragua and elsewhere. Progressives will need to challenge the U.S. economic and foreign policies that create refugees from Central America in particular (including the consequences of the U.S. wars of the 1980s), even while fighting to protect those migrants seeking safety in the United States as a result of those earlier policies. Regarding Mexico, Congress needs to fight for a U.S. position in trade negotiations that is not based on economic nationalism, but rather on making sure that Mexican workers and U.S. workers are both equally lifted up. Left policymakers will also have the chance to play a leading role in forging a new relationship with Mexico’s just-elected progressive President Lopez-Obrador. 

All of the areas where U.S. wars are or were underway, as well as places where U.S. economic and climate policies have helped create crises threatening people’s lives, also become areas from which migrants are forced to flee their homes. U.S. policymakers must acknowledge that U.S. policies are direct causes of the refugee crises that exist in and around the war zones and climate crisis zones of the Middle East, Africa and elsewhere—and that the refugees seeking asylum in Europe, and the far fewer trying to come to the United States, are a consequence of those policies. So progressive candidates and policymakers should support massive expansion of funding for these victims of war, including humanitarian support in their home regions and acceptance of far greater numbers of refugees into the United States. They must directly challenge the xenophobic policies of the Trump administration that include the Muslim Ban, the separation of children from their families at the border and the vast reduction in refugees accepted into this country. In Congress, that might include introducing bills to cut funding for ICE or eliminate the institution altogether.

Finally, progressive candidates and elected officials will need to continue to craft policy proposals that recognize what happens when the U.S. wars come home. This requires more voices in Congress challenging the military budget because it’s used to kill people abroad and because the money is needed for jobs, health care and education at home. It means challenging Islamophobia rising across the United States because of how it threatens Muslims in the United States and because it is used to build support for wars against predominantly Muslim countries. It means exposing—on the floor of the House and beyond—the fact that the Muslim bans targeted primarily countries the United States was bombing, sanctioning or stationing soldiers in. And it means being clear that protecting refugees, asylum seekers and other migrants has to include ending the wars that create refugees in the first place.

Certainly, we shouldn’t expect every progressive or even every socialist running for national office to become an instant expert on every complicated piece of U.S. foreign policy. And for those running for state and local office, there may seem to be even less urgency. But we’ve seen how the Poor People’s Campaign, with its inclusion of militarism and the war economy as one of its four central targets (along with racism, poverty and environmental destruction), has demonstrated to all of our movements the importance of—and a model for—including an anti-war focus within multi-issue state and local mobilizations. The Movement for Black Lives has created one of the strongest internationalist and anti-war platforms we’ve seen in years—including calls for cutting the military budget, supporting Palestinian rights, stopping the Global War on Terror and the so-called War on Drugs, ending the militarized U.S. interventions across Africa, and linking U.S. military and economic policies with the rise in Haitian and other—predominantly Black—immigration.

Immigrant rights activists are linking movements for sanctuary (and against ICE) with opposition to the wars that create refugees. Campaignsare underway to reject the training of U.S. police by Israeli police and military forces. Battles are being waged to get local law enforcement agencies to refuse Pentagon offers of weapons and equipment left over from U.S. wars in Afghanistan and elsewhere. These campaigns all play out at the local and state level.

So especially for those running for Congress, but really for all candidates at every political level and venue in this country, there is a clear need for a strong, principled position on at least a few key foreign policy issues. And the key to making that happen still lies with our movements.


          Intelligence Testy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
obama, obama jokes, political, humor, cartoon, conservative, hope n' change, hope and change, stilton jarlsberg, trump, intelligence, hacking, Russia, Putin, report
There are two related stories to discuss today, both on the subject of Intelligence. A word which, needless to say when referring to Washington, refers to "spying" instead of anything remotely like "smartness" or "proper brain function."

Specifically, President-elect Donald Trump has made it clear that he doesn't consider US intelligence agencies to be 100% reliable, especially when it comes to their consensus accusation that Vladimir Putin interfered with our election by disguising himself with a pair of Groucho glasses, then driving a schoolbus filled with Cossacks to various polling places in key electoral states.

But before Hope n' Change dives into the details of the "Russian hacking" story, let's look at Barack Obama's recent claim of advising Trump - strictly as a professional courtesy - that as President he should always trust the US intelligence community.

"There are going to be times," the miserable stain on the Oval Office said, "where the only way you can make a good decision is if you have confidence that the process is working, and the people that you put in charge are giving you their very best assessments."

Really, Barry? Is that how you've conducted your presidency? Not according to the Hope n' Change vault...






Let's review a few fun facts. As president, B. Hussein skipped the majority of his intelligence briefings including the one immediately following the debacle in Benghazi. Barry also had nothing but foreign policy failures, and repeatedly placed the blame on his intelligence agencies.

So why should Trump - or the rest of us - invest our trust in the intelligence agencies who failed to see the rise of Isis? Who missed nuclear weapons development by Iran during our negotiations? Who were unable to connect the dots preceding Putin's many successful aggressions - as well as those of China and North Korea.

These are the intelligence agencies whose keen insights helped bring about nightmare scenarios in Syria, Libya, and pretty much every other country which has mosques. Intelligence agencies which failed to flag September 11th as a potentially meaningful day for terrorists to attack in Benghazi.

Intelligence agencies which, at least according to the administration, found it "no big deal" that Hillary (as freaking Secretary of State) put all of our national secrets on an unguarded personal server just so she could dodge future Freedom of Information Act demands to see documents rightfully belonging to the American people.

All of which brings us back to the "Election hacking" story. The intelligence agencies have now offered up their (ahem) official report on this alleged election-changing, super-sophisticated act of cyber terror, and have found that (cue the shower-stabbing music from "Psycho") Vladimir Putin personally ordered a monumental campaign to undermine our election and put his personal buddy, Donald Trump, into office!

But there's one little problem. While the declassified report is happy to draw this apocalyptic conclusion, it offers virtually no proof. We're asked to accept this poppycock on sheer trust, which would be a lot easier if the Obama administration and intelligence agencies had even an iota of credibility anymore.

But let's look at a couple of important things the report says that we can agree with: there was no hacking or interference with any voting or vote-tallying machines, and the intelligence agencies do not assert that the alleged Russian campaign had any influence on voters or the election. Wow.

It is also noteworthy that the intelligence agencies were able to draw such detailed conclusions considering the DNC failed to cooperate with the investigation, and wouldn't grant the FBI access to their computers. And interestingly, the report fails to note that the sensitive emails eventually released by Wikileaks (again, without direct evidence of Russian involvement) weren't even obtained by "hacking," but rather by a simple "phishing" email sent to John Podesta, in which he revealed that his password (and the key to all of the DNC's documents) was..."password."

The report also states that Putin's evil plan to overthrow our election involved schemes like having Russian newscasts criticize Hillary Clinton more than Donald Trump. Which apparently made a huge impact on the many voters whose primary source of information was Russian newscasts.

We could go on and on (and already have!) but our point is this: thanks to the Obama administration our intelligence agencies no longer have a whit of credibility, nor does their preposterously politicized "Russian hacking" report.

Considering 8 years of wall-to-wall failures, it's not surprising that Americans have decided to turn their backs on alleged "Intelligence" in favor of Donald Trump's promise of common sense.


          North Korea Praises Trump, Slams Other US Officials for Sabotaging Peace      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The North Korean Foreign Ministry accused “high-level officials within the US administration” of “going against the intention of President Trump to advance the DPRK-US relations” in a statement Thursday. Meanwhile, the socialist state renewed calls for a permanent peace treaty so that “a mood will be created for creating trust."
          Examining Code Reuse Reveals Undiscovered Links Among North Korea’s Malware Families      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

This research is a joint effort of Christiaan Beek, lead scientist & sr. principal engineer at McAfee, and Jay Rosenberg, senior security researcher at Intezer, and can be found in the McAfee Labs blog as well.

Attacks from the online groups Lazarus, Silent Chollima, Group 123, Hidden Cobra, DarkSeoul, Blockbuster, Operation Troy, and 10 Days of Rain are believed to have come from North Korea. But how can we know with certainty? And what connection does a DDoS and disk-wiping attack from July 4, 2009, have with WannaCry, one of the largest cyberattacks in the history of the cyber sphere?

From the Mydoom variant Brambul to the more recent Fallchill, WannaCry, and the targeting of cryptocurrency exchanges, we see a distinct timeline of attacks beginning from the moment North Korea entered the world stage as a significant threat actor.

Bad actors have a tendency to unwittingly leave fingerprints on their attacks, allowing researchers to connect the dots between them. North Korean actors have left many of these clues in their wake and throughout the evolution of their malware arsenal.

This post reflects months of research; in it we will highlight our code analysis illustrating key similarities between samples attributed to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, a shared networking infrastructure, and other revealing data hidden within the binaries. Together these puzzle pieces show the connections between the many attacks attributed to North Korea and categorize different tools used by specific teams of their cyber army.

Valuable context

This article is too short to dig deeply into the history, politics, and economic changes of recent years. Nonetheless, we must highlight some events to put past and present cyber events into perspective.
The DPRK, like any country, wants to be as self-sufficient and independent as possible. However, for products such as oil, food, and foreign currency for trading, the country lacks resources and has to find ways of acquiring them. What can a nation do when legal international economics are denied? To survive, it must gain foreign currency for trading. One of the oldest ways to do this is to join the worlds of gambling (casinos) and drugs. In 2005, the United States wanted to shut down North Korean enterprises involved in illegal operations. They investigated a couple of banks in Asia that seemed to have ties with North Korea and operated as money laundering sites. One bank in particular is controlled by a billionaire gambling mogul who started a casino in Pyongyang and has close ties to Pyongyang. That bank, based in Macau, came back into the picture during an attack on the SWIFT financial system of a bank in Vietnam in 2015. The Macau bank was listed twice in the malware’s code as a recipient of stolen funds:

 SWIFT code in malware.

Code reuse

There are many reasons to reuse malware code, which is very common in the world of cybercrime. If we take an average ransomware campaign, for example, once the campaign becomes less successful, actors often change some of basics such as using a different packer to bypass defenses. With targeted campaigns, an adversary must keep its tools undetected for as long as possible. By identifying reused code, we gain valuable insights about the “ancestral relations” to known threat actors or other campaigns. Our research was heavily focused on this type of analysis.

In our years of investigating cyber threats, we have seen the DPRK conduct multiple cyber campaigns. In North Korea, hackers’ skills determine which cyber units they work for. We are aware two major focuses of DPRK campaigns: one to raise money, and one to pursue nationalist aims. The first workforce gathers money for the nation, even if that means committing cybercrime to hack into financial institutions, hijack gambling sessions, or sell pirated and cracked software. Unit 180 is responsible for illegally gaining foreign currency using hacking techniques. The second workforce operates larger campaigns motivated by nationalism, gathering intelligence from other nations, and in some cases disrupting rival states and military targets. Most of these actions are executed by Unit 121.

We focused in our research on the larger-scale nationalism-motivated campaigns, in which we discovered many overlaps in code reuse. We are highly confident that nation-state–sponsored groups were active in these efforts.

Timeline

We created a timeline of most of the malware samples and noticeable campaigns that we examined. We used primarily open-source blogs and papers to build this timeline and used the malware artifacts as a starting point of our research.


Timeline of malware and campaigns.

Analysis and observations

Similarities

During our research, we found many malware family names that are believed to be associated with North Korea’s cyber operations. To better understand this threat actor and the similarities between the campaigns, we have used Intezer’s code similarity detection engine to plot the links between a vast number of these malware families.

The following graph presents a high-level overview of these relations. Each node represents a malware family or a hacking tool (“Brambul,” “Fallchill,” etc.) and each line presents a code similarity between two families. A thicker line correlates to a stronger similarity. In defining similarities, we take into account only unique code connections, and disregard common code or libraries. This definition holds both for this graph and our entire research.

We can easily see a significant amount of code similarities between almost every one of the attacks associated with North Korea. Our research included thousands of samples, mostly unclassified or uncategorized. This graph was plotted using a dataset of only several hundred samples, so there might be more connections than displayed here.

Deep technical analysis

During our research, we came across many code similarities between North Korean binaries that had not been seen before. Some of these attacks and malware have not been linked to one another, at least publicly. We will showcase four examples of reused code that has been seen only in malware attributed to North Korea.

1. Common SMB module

The first code example appeared in the server message block (SMB) module of WannaCry in 2017, Mydoom in 2009, Joanap, and DeltaAlfa. Further shared code across these families is an AES library from CodeProject. These attacks have been attributed to Lazarus; that means the group has reused code from at least 2009 to 2017.

Code overlap of a MYDOOM sample

In the next screenshots we highlight the exact code block that reflects the SMB module we found in campaigns other than WannaCry and Mydoom.

An SMB module common to several attacks.

A lot has been written about WannaCry. As we analyze the code against our databases, we can draw the following overview:

WannaCry code comparison overview.
For our research we compared the three major variants of WannaCry. An early release, called a beta, from February 2017, one from April, and the infamous one that hit the world in May.

2. Common file mapping 

The second example demonstrates code responsible for mapping a file and using the XOR key 0xDEADBEEF on the first four bytes of the file. This code has appeared in the malware families NavRAT and Gold Dragon, plus a certain DLL from the South Korean gambling hacking campaign. These three RATs are thought to be affiliated with North Korea’s Group 123. NavRAT and the gambling DLL share more code, making them closer variants.

Code overlap in a NavRAT sample

3. Unique net share

The third example, responsible for launching a cmd.exe with a net share, has been seen in 2009’s Brambul, also known as SierraBravo, as well as KorDllBot in 2011. These malware families are also attributed to the Lazarus group.

Code overlap of a SierraBravo (Brambul) sample.

A code block reused in the malware families Brambul/SierraBravo and KorDllBot.

4. Operation Dark Hotel

In 2014, Kaspersky reported a more than seven-year campaign against Asian hotels, in which the adversaries used an arsenal of tools to break into the computers of hotel visitors. Zero days and control servers were used, along with the malware family Tapaoux, or DarkHotel, according to the report.

While we examined the DPRK samples, we noticed a hit with the Dark Hotel samples in our collections. By going through the code, we noticed several pieces of code overlap and reuse, for example, with samples from Operation Troy.

Figure 11: Code overlap in a Dark Hotel sample.

Identifying a group

By applying what we learned from our comparisons and code-block identifications, we uncovered possible new links between malware families and the groups using them.

With the different pieces of malware we have analyzed, we can illustrate the code reuse and sharing between the groups known to be affiliated with North Korea.

Groups and families linked by code reuse.

The malware attributed to the group Lazarus has code connections that link many of the malware families spotted over the years. Lazarus is a collective name for many DPRK cyber operations, and we clearly see links between malware families used in different campaigns.

The malware (NavRAT, gambling, and Gold Dragon) possibly created by Group 123 are connected to each other but are separate from those used by Lazarus. Although these are different units focusing on different areas, there seems to be a parallel structure in which they collaborate during certain campaigns.

MITRE ATT&CK

From our research of these malware samples, we can identify the following techniques used by the malware families:

When we zoom in on the Discovery category in the MITRE model, for example, we notice that the techniques are typical for first-stage dropper malware. The adversary drops these samples on victims’ machines and collects information on where they landed in the victims’ networks and which user/access rights they gained.

In 2018, we saw examples of campaigns in which attackers used PowerShell to download and execute these droppers. Once information has been sent to a control server, the adversary determines the next steps, which often include installing a remote access tool to enable lateral movement on the network and pursue the goals of the campaign.

Final words

Security vendors and researchers often use different names when speaking about the same malware, group, or attack. This habit makes it challenging to group all the malware and campaigns. By taking a scientific approach, such as looking for code reuse, we can categorize our findings. We believe our research will help the security community organize the current “mess” we face in relation to North Korean malware and campaigns.

We clearly saw a lot of code reuse over the many years of cyber campaigns we examined. This indicates the North Koreans have groups with different skills and tools that execute their focused parts of cyber operations while also working in parallel when large campaigns require a mix of skills and tools.

We found our months of research, data gathering, and analysis very satisfying. By combining our skills, data, and technology, we were able to draw connections and reveal links that we had not seen before. The cybersecurity industry would greatly benefit from more collaboration and sharing of information, and we hope that this effort between McAfee and Intezer will inspire the community to work together more often.

The authors thank Costin Raiu for providing them with samples they did not have in their collections.

Sources

Glenn Simpson, Gordon Fairclough, and Jay Solomon, “U.S. Probes Banks’ North Korea Ties.” Wall Street Journal, last updated September 8, 2005.

Christiaan Beek, “Attacks on SWIFT Banking system benefit from insider knowledge.” https://securingtomorrow.mcafee.com/mcafee-labs/attacks-swift-banking-system-benefit-insider-knowledge/

Atif Mushtaq, “DDOS Madness Continued…” https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2009/07/ddos-madness-climax.html

Ryan Sherstobitoff and Jessica Saavedra-Morales, “Gold Dragon Widens Olympics Malware Attacks, Gains Permanent Presence on Victims’ Systems.” https://securingtomorrow.mcafee.com/mcafee-labs/gold-dragon-widens-olympics-malware-attacks-gains-permanent-presence-on-victims-systems/

Alex Drozhzhin, “Darkhotel: a spy campaign in luxury Asian hotels.” https://www.kaspersky.com/blog/darkhotel-apt/6613/

Warren Mercer, Paul Rascagneres, and Jungsoo An, “NavRAT Uses US-North Korea Summit As Decoy For Attacks In South Korea.” https://blog.talosintelligence.com/2018/05/navrat.html

Sergei Shevchenko and Adrian Nish, “Cyber Heist Attribution.” https://baesystemsai.blogspot.com/2016/05/cyber-heist-attribution.html

Mydoom code reuse report. https://analyze.intezer.com/#/analyses/113ba80f-1680-43d7-b287-cc62f3740fad

NavRAT code reuse report. https://analyze.intezer.com/#/analyses/4f19fd5a-a898-4fdf-96c9-d3a4aad817cb

SierraBravo code reuse report. https://analyze.intezer.com/#/analyses/8da8104e-56e4-49fd-ba24-82978bc1610c

Dark Hotel code reuse report. https://analyze.intezer.com/#/analyses/c034e0fe-7825-4f6d-b092-7c5ee693aff4

Kang Jang-ho, “A foreign currency earned with a virtual currency … What is the life of a North Korean hacker?” http://m.mtn.co.kr/news/news_view.php?mmn_idx=2018062517065863930#_enliple

Awesome work by the team responsible for the “Operation Blockbuster” report.
https://www.operationblockbuster.com/resources/

By Jay Rosenberg and Christiaan Beek

About the Authors

Jay Rosenberg, senior security researcher at Intezer Labs, leads the research behind Intezer’s code reuse detection technology. From the young age of 12, he began programming and reverse engineering. He has spoken at various conferences internationally, identified new threats, and published his threat intelligence research on some of the largest cyber attacks.

Christiaan Beek, lead scientist & sr. principal engineer is part of Mcafee’s Office of the CTO leading strategic threat intelligence research within Mcafee. He coordinates and leads passionately the research in advanced attacks, plays a key-role in cyberattack take-down operations and participates in the NoMoreRansom project. In previous roles, Beek was Director of Threat Intelligence in McAfee Labs and Director of Incident Response and Forensics at Foundstone, McAfee’s forensic services arm. At Foundstone, he led a team of forensic specialists in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa during major breaches. Beek develops threat intelligence strategy, designs threat intelligence systems, performs malware and forensic analysis, pentesting and coaches security teams around the globe. He is a passionate cybercrime specialist who has developed training courses, workshops, and presentations. He speaks regularly at conferences, including BlackHat, RSA, BlueHat and Botconf. Besides conferences, he is also frequently teaching at universities, Police Academies and public schools to recruit, mentor and train the next generation of cyber-security specialists. Beek contributed to the best-selling security book “Hacking Exposed.” and has two patents pending.


          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, meaning people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea, and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception: waivers.
          Department Press Briefings : Department Press Briefing - August 9, 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Heather Nauert
Spokesperson
Department Press Briefing
Washington, DC
August 9, 2018



Index for Today's Briefing
  • INDONESIA
  • DEPARTMENT
  • ZIMBABWE
  • YEMEN
  • IRAQ
  • TURKEY
  • ISRAEL/PALESTINIANS
  • RUSSIA
  • NORTH KOREA/SOUTH KOREA
  • CHINA

    TRANSCRIPT:

     

     

     

    3:00 p.m. EDT

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Hi, everybody. How are you today? And why are so many of you showing up on an August afternoon? You’re supposed to all be on vacation or something, but I notice a few empty seats. But Gardiner’s back from vacation. Gardiner, welcome.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Thank you.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: How’ve you been?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: I’ve been good.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Good. A couple announcements to start before we get started with your questions today.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    First, I would like to express our condolences to the victims of the recent earthquakes and also the aftershocks in Indonesia. The United States has experts and partner organizations on the ground. We’re consulting with the Government of Indonesia at this time. We’re closely monitoring the situation, and we stand ready to provide additional aid to the Government of Indonesia. Our U.S. consulate personnel are assisting affected U.S. citizens. At this time, we do not have any reports of U.S. citizen casualties associated with the earthquakes. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the Indonesian people. As many of you know, we were recently on the ground in Indonesia and had some terrific meetings with government officials there.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Next, I have some staffing news to bring you now. And I’m really excited about this one, because it affects our Bureau of Public Affairs and specifically the folks that you will working with. Today I’d like to announce that Robert Palladino will be joining our press team as the State Department’s deputy spokesperson. Robert is a career Foreign Service officer and I believe known well to some of you or perhaps many of you.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Over the past year, Robert has served as director of press and acting National Security Council spokesperson. In that role he’s helped to prepare Sarah Sanders for her briefings at the White House. He was also a spokesperson to the White House press corps and worked as NSC communications lead for both Asia and Europe. Robert’s Foreign Service career has included postings in Washington, where he worked for our Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, and the Office of the Under Secretary for Public Affairs and Public Diplomacy, and also on Capitol Hill. Overseas, he’s worked in Milan, Italy; Guangzhou, China; and also Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Prior to joining the State Department, he practiced law in Asia and Europe in the Army JAG Corps. His service included deployment to Rwanda. He is a graduate of Notre Dame University, Washington and Lee School of Law, the U.S. Army War College, and he also speaks Chinese and Italian. Pretty impressive.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    We are delighted that he is coming back to the State Department from the White House. I know you will enjoy working with him. For those of you who have not met him, he is a terrific guy. We’ve worked closely together for the past year or so. I asked him what his children thought, because he has two young girls – I asked him what they thought of his job, and I love these quotes. His youngest daughter said, “I’m proud of America and I’m proud of you, Dad, but it sounds really boring.” And then his older daughter said this – and you’ll appreciate it – “But wait a minute, everybody yells questions and they’re angry. That’s the worst job in the world.” That actually might be the White House press corps, not you all. But we look forward to welcoming Robert when he joins us on the 20th of August. But try not to bug him between now and then; he’s on vacation with his family. So another addition to our press family.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    And that’s it. With that, I’d be happy to take your questions.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay, thanks. We’ll try not to be so angry.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I said not you all.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Let’s – me, yes me. I just wanted to ask you briefly before I ask you about Yemen. I noticed the statement that you guys put out about Zimbabwe, the Zimbabwe elections and the Zambian decision to deport the opposition leader.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Right.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: And in that statement it said that you are reviewing certain aspects of your cooperation with the Zambian Government. Can you be a little bit more specific? What aspects of --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Some of those will be conversations that will be had privately with both governments. But my understanding is that there are certain agreements in which that government was taking steps that the Zimbabweans weren’t completely familiar with and weren’t supportive of, and there were some concerns related to that. But let’s just --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: No, I understand, but I was just --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: But let’s just back up a couple steps for folks who’ve not been following this perhaps as closely as you have. Elections on July the 30th – those were promising, very promising. We thought it was a historic chance to sort of move beyond the political and economic crises of the past and toward a more democratic change and better dialogue in that country. People turned out massively in those elections. We put out a statement just after those elections complimenting them on those elections.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    However, the success in delivering an election day that was peaceful and open to international observers was then marred by violence, which we’ve been seeing and has been heavily reported, at least in the international press, over the past about week and a half. We’ve seen a disproportionate use of deadly force against protestors by the security forces, which is a great concern of ours. We’re concerned by those numerous reports of human rights violations since the elections had taken place about a week and a half or two ago. We have received credible allegations of detentions, of beatings, and other abuses of the people of Zimbabwe, particularly targeting opposition activists.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Now, the latest news today is the foreign – excuse me, the former minister of finance had left to go to Zambia. Zambia returned him to Zimbabwe, we understand. And some of this is still fresh so we don’t have all the details at this point. But I understand he was detained and possibly let go.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    So I’m going to pause there because some of this is still unfolding, and I don’t want to give you any inaccurate information since it’s still developing.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: I get that. I just wanted to know is this a threat to withhold or suspend some aid to Zambia when you say you’re reviewing certain aspects of our cooperation?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Matt, I’m not going to get into that at this point, but we’re watching the situation carefully.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: All right. Let me ask you about this airstrike in Yemen, which appears to have killed dozens of children. The Saudis obviously are the ones who conducted this, but they do that with weapons supplied by the U.S., with training supplied by the U.S., and with targeting information, targeting data, supplied by the U.S. How can something like this happen?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: How can something like that report happen?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Well, I think we would start by saying --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: It’s more than a report. I mean, it’s – they admitted that it happened.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah. How can situations like this happen? We don’t have the full details about what happened on the ground. We’ve certainly seen the news reports of what has been reported happened, okay? I can’t confirm all the details because we are not there on the ground.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    We can say that we’re certainly concerned about these reports that resulted – that there was an attack that resulted in the deaths of civilians. We call on the Saudi-led coalition to conduct a thorough and transparent investigation into the incident. We take all credible accounts of civilian casualties very seriously. We call on the parties to take appropriate measures to protect civilians in accordance with international law and urge all parties to investigate all reported incidents of civilian casualties.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay. Well, they say – already the coalition says that they acted in accordance with international law. But if you look at the photographs, the video that come from the scene, it doesn’t look like that’s a really – that that’s a credible answer. So are you okay with the coalition on its own doing an investigation, or would you like to see some kind of an international component to it or an international investigation?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Well, I think I just answered that and we said that we would call upon the Saudi Government --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So you’re --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: -- to do a full and thorough investigation, as we always do. And we call upon all parties in any kind of situation like this to take appropriate measures to try to mitigate the risk of civilian casualties.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So you don’t think --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: DOD and other entities put out reports on this after the fact as they all start to investigate, and so we will look forward to any information on that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Right. But my question is you don’t see a need for there to be something other than a coalition investigation, you don’t see a need for an independent --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Matt, I’m not going to get – this is something that is fresh, that just happened, so I’m not going to get ahead of any kind of investigation that may take place. Okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: It’s only the latest in a huge number of civilians killed during these operations though.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I would encourage you to take a look – and that is we regret any loss of civilian life. That is something that the United States Government – in particular, any time you talk to the Department of Defense about civilian casualties, they will say the same thing --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: -- that – I’m not finished, okay? And they will say the exact same thing, that all parties take very strong responsibility and measures to try to protect against the loss of civilian life. As we have seen – and you all very rarely ask about the issue that has been unfolding and the devastation that has taken place in Yemen – let’s look at some of the things that have been happening in Yemen.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    You have the Houthi rebels who continue to attack Saudi Arabia. They continue to do that with Iranian weapons, missiles, and rockets. They continue to try to attack civilian infrastructure in Saudi Arabia, for example, and that is part of the reason why these actions are being taken.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Let me go back and remind you what I just said a moment ago, and that is we call for an investigation and we anticipate that a thorough investigation will be done. I don’t have anything more for you on that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: The Secretary isn’t planning on having a conversation with --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have any information for you on that. Okay.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Hi, Nick.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Is this – hey, Heather. Is this latest incident or the previous incidents causing the U.S. to re-evaluate in any way the role that it’s playing in the situation, in terms of its relationship with Saudi Arabia?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Look, we provide a tremendous amount of humanitarian assistance in Yemen to try to support civilians in Yemen and try to mitigate against the devastation that’s taken place there in that country. I don’t have anything more for you on that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But you also supply a tremendous amount of weaponry and the data for targeting to the Saudis.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Well, then – sorry.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Right? No?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: No.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Am I wrong? Is that wrong?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: That’s not wrong.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Sorry, these ladies over here are laughing. On that I would refer you to the Department of Defense that is involved with that, but as you know, Saudi Arabia is an important strategic partner in the region to the United States.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Okay. Hi, Gardiner.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Just a follow-up on that. Hey. So obviously, there’s growing concerns in Congress about the toll this war is taking within Yemen. It’s the worst humanitarian disaster on the planet. Aren’t you concerned that incidents like this will further erode congressional support and lead to further support for legislation that could cut off Saudi Arabia from arms sales and the rest?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I mean, I think that is an entirely hypothetical question and we don’t comment on congressional proposals in any event, but I would ask – all of you have been very silent on the issue of Yemen, and times --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Although Said has asked. You’ve been the one reporter who’s asked a lot about Yemen and the situation there.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well I would suggest that if you had more than two briefings a week and they lasted for longer than a half an hour or 40 minutes that you might get questions about something other than the actual main topic of the day.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Matt, I think you and I talk every single day.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Yes, we do.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: You have my phone number. You have all my numbers, and anytime you want to talk about Yemen, I’d be more than happy to answer your questions and provide you additional expert briefings --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: -- on Yemen anytime anyone is interested, but I have not seen a major level of interest on the part of our press corps, with the exception of Said, on the issue of Yemen.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Why does that matter, though? There’s news today, so --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Can you request an expert on Yemen?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, certainly, I’d be happy to. Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Wait, so first of all, I think that when there have been attacks against Saudi installations or missiles and stuff, I think you’ve seen that there have been just as vigorous of reporting.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t – I disagree, but --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well, I mean, that’s – it’s not our job to, like, sit here and go back and forth on that. We’re asking today. The U.S. has tried to increase its target training with – to try and improve the targeting of the Saudi coalition. Is that still continuing?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Elise, I think that would be a DOD issue, so I’d encourage you to talk with my --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But these are foreign – okay, but these are foreign military financing.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Which is out of the State Department.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: And I would encourage you to talk to DOD about that. So some --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well, maybe --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Some of this – some of this is a State Department equity, but much of this is Department of Defense, so I’d encourage you to talk with them about it.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Hey, Laurie.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Hi. On Iraq, the road between Erbil and Kirkuk, which was cut as a result of fighting last October, is being rebuilt, but Baghdad has said that it will establish a customs border on that road and collect revenues. Is that consistent, a customs border in the middle of the Erbil-Baghdad road, in which one party, the Iraqi Government, is going to collect revenues? Is that consistent with your view of a unified Iraq?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I would – there are other countries that have done this in the past, including our own country years ago in which this type of thing has been done. I think this is largely an internal matter for the Government of Iraq, between Iraq and Erbil, to try to work out. We do encourage them to resolve any remaining issues between Baghdad and Erbil.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: You don’t have a position beyond that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Look, we believe that a strong KRG government within a unified and federal Iraq is something that’s essential to Iraq’s long-term stability and the enduring defeat overall of ISIS.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay, if I could ask you about Turkey. So the deputy foreign minister was here; it seemed there was no progress. Is that the case? And was pastor – were the American hostages the only issues that were discussed or were there other questions like the Turkish purchase of the S-400 discussed as well?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah. I mean, obviously you all know that we have a very broad relationship with Turkey and a host of issues that we talk about with the Turkish Government whenever we do meet. Yesterday we had a wide-ranging conversation with Turkish Government officials. We made it clear that Pastor Brunson needs to be returned home. Much of this, though, we’re not going to negotiate in public.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Can you tell us --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Go ahead. Hi.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Can you tell us if you made any progress about the situation of Pastor Brunson?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, I would say we would define progress as Pastor Brunson being brought home.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So in other words, no.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: And so progress is --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Until he – until he’s --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Progress is Pastor Brunson being brought home to the United --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So until he’s home there is no progress?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: -- to the United States.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Did you give any --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Did you give any deadline? Did you give Turkish officials any deadline?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have any information for you on that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Thanks. Hi.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: I think progress is kind of coming closer towards an agreement, like you’re not – you don’t have full North Korean denuclearization but you say that there is progress in working towards that goal. So is there progress in coming to some kind of deal with the Turks or are you still as far apart as you were the day that he was being hospitalized?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, I’m not going to characterize it that way. As you know, we had – we met yesterday. They had wide-ranging meetings at the State Department and with other departments here in Washington. I’d refer you to those other departments that met with the Turkish Government. The progress that we want to be made is to have Pastor Brunson return home. And I’ll leave it at that. Okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So is that saying you will not engage with the Turks anymore on this issue until Pastor Brunson comes home?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I’m not going to speculate on that, and I’m not going to get ahead of the administration on that issue. Hey, Said.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Hi. Thank you, Heather. Could we move – could you comment on the escalation in Gaza? There has been escalation in Israeli bombardment of Gaza as we speak.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I’m sorry, start that over again.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: There is an escalation as we speak of Israeli bombardment of Gaza. They said that they killed a 23-year-old woman, pregnant, with her toddler. Do you have any comments on that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah. I mean, overall we’ve been watching this as it has been unfolding, and it’s a very concerning situation that has taken place in Gaza. Overall, we condemn the launching of missile attacks into Israel and call for an end to the destructive violence. We’ve seen reports that 180 or so rocket attacks have taken place, shot from Gaza into Israel, and we fully support Israel’s right to defend itself and to take actions to prevent provocations of that nature.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But this last round of bombardment, Israeli bombardment, actually began by the Israelis. It was not Hamas that started this latest round.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Look, I’m not going to get into how this thing started. Let’s not forget that Hamas bears ultimate responsibility for the dire humanitarian situation in Gaza. It’s a tremendous concern of ours.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay. Let me ask you about the peace efforts that are taking place. Now, there are reports that the unveiling of the plan, the deal of the century, has been pushed back. Can – do you have any comment on that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I would object to the premise of the question, your statement in that question. We have not unveiled the peace plan at this time. That will be unveiled by Mr. Kushner and Mr. Greenblatt when it is ready. And when it’s ready to be unveiled, they will unveil it.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: And lastly, last week you guys released some funds or some aid to the Palestinian Authority. I believe it was sent to the security forces. Can you share with us the amount of that aid? Is that a one-time thing, or is it part of the sort of unfreezing of the funds to the Palestinian Authority?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I’m going to have to get back to you on that issue. I don’t have any information for you on that today. Okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Russia?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Hi.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Russia?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay, two quick questions. First of all, on the sanctions that were announced yesterday, one of the requirements for Russia to avoid further sanctions is to allow inspections to make sure that they’re not using chemical weapons. Does the State Department have any reason to think that Russia is going to allow that? And is the U.S. expecting Russia to allow that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I mean, that’s asking us to look into the future, and we don’t know what the future holds. I think that’s a hypothetical question, so I don’t have an answer for you.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But the U.S. is fully expecting to have some kind of inspections take place, then, according to this law?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have anything for you on that today, and I’m not going to get ahead of anything that happens in the near future. Okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Okay, well, that’s what the law says.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yep.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But my other question is on the – is the U.S. then currently preparing for this next round of sanctions, then?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: As you well know, we don’t forecast sanctions. We have complied with the law in announcing those sanctions just yesterday, and we will comply with the law going forward, of course, as we always would. Okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Heather, just to get a follow-on on that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, sure. Hi, Gardiner.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So you – in the case of Iran, you have this 12-point plan of what behavior you want the government to implement in order to lift sanctions. You have a whole series of sanctions that are now revolving around Russia having to do with CAATSA, Magnitsky, now weapons. Can you give us some global sense of what these sanctions are trying to achieve from an American foreign policy perspective? What are you looking for from Russia? Why do we have sanctions on them? What’s your goal? And when’s the – when’s the periodicity of these things?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Sure. I think I would start by answering that question with this: That we approach every country very differently. Every country that we have a relationship or even countries that we don’t have relationships with are viewed through a separate lens. So what may be appropriate for one country is maybe not necessarily appropriate for another country.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The United States Government has determined that sanctions can be a very effective tool in trying to bring various governments to the table to negotiate with us or try to encourage countries to comply or to return to a better set of behaviors. So this is one tool that we have in a very big toolkit. The State Department works closely with Treasury and OFAC and other entities to implement, study, and enforce sanctions, and that is part of what you’ve seen yesterday. Let’s remember that one of the things that has brought North Korea to the table is sanctions. And we have found sanctions to be very effective in many cases around the world. So the U.S. Government looks at that as an overall tool.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Right, so North Korea is a great example. Sanctions – as a result, you want to get rid of their nuclear program. Again, Iran, you’ve got a list of 12 things. Venezuela, you’ve got sort of a clear list. I’m trying to understand what your policy is with Russia. You’ve got a variety – myriad now of sanctions. What’s your goal?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Well, I think the President has addressed this and so has Secretary Pompeo. We’d like to have a better relationship with the Russian Government, recognizing that we have a lot of areas of mutual concern. It is a major country; we are a major country as well. And so when you have that, you are forced to have to have conversations with other governments. And sanctions is a way that we can try to encourage better behavior on the part of government. Now, I’m speaking in a broad-based sense, but that’s one way that we can encourage better behavior. Okay.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Same topic?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Could I ask a follow-up on that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: (Off-mike)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Sure. What is your name, miss?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: My name’s Emily, I’m from Buzzfeed News.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Emily, hi.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So if these sanctions are in part meant to encourage better behavior with Russia, Russia today came out and said that these sanctions – sort of as was expected – that these sanctions are not in keeping with the spirit of Helsinki. So – and I understand these sanctions were – they’re in keeping with the law, et cetera, but does this – or to put it a different way, is the cooperation that was sort of established at Helsinki – is the U.S. Government still planning on having that with Russia after yesterday’s sanctions?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: We tend to believe that dialogue is always an important issue. I think I had just addressed this with Gardiner, and that is trying to build a better relationship with countries that we need to cooperate with or we need to be able to have relations with, and that would be one example.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: And then just on the other point on the second tranche, and I don’t mean to get you into hypotheticals, but yesterday at the briefing they did say that if Russia doesn’t do certain things, including sort of admit wrongdoing and say that they weren’t going to do it again, that there would be second tranche. And today, Russia said this is ridiculous, we didn’t do that. So if they keep that position for the next 90 days, won’t there – won’t there, under the law, have to be a second tranche?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: And that’s why I would go back and say that we will comply with the law. We are well aware of what the law contains; we will comply with the law. But I’m not going to get ahead of what could happen 90 days from now. Okay.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: The same topic – same topic?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: (Off-mike)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Janne, go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Thank you, thank you, Heather. On North Korean and South Korean issues.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Okay.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: And – recently, South Korea imported North Korean coal. What is the U.S. position on the smuggling of North Korean coal into South Korea? Is that – do you think this is the – South Korea has violated sanctions?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I think – we’d say this: that we have a great relationship with the Government of South Korea. My understanding is that they are looking into reports of this. We encourage all countries to maintain sanctions, and to not skirt sanctions and make sure that sanctions are adhered to.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But two days ago, John Bolton, national security advisor, and South Korean national security advisor Chung Eui-yong, they had telephone conversation and John Bolton said that he trust or believe in the South Korean Government. What does it mean that you trust the South Korean Government, so --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Well, the Government of the Republic of Korea is an ally and longstanding partner of ours, and we closely coordinate with that government.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But allies – but they do something behind the United States is smuggling something else, so how you going to trust them?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Look, we trust when they say that they will investigate that they will investigate. We closely coordinate with them. They’ve been longstanding allies and partners, and we have a strong relationship with them.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Are you still investigations or waiting --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have anything more for you on that, okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: All right, thank you.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Thanks.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: (Off-mike.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Kylie, go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So there’s been discussion of potentially having another meeting with North Korea. Has there been any progress on that that --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: We have no meetings, no travel plans to announce today, and by the way, we just got back from a long flight, which I will remind you was a very long flight. Headed over to Asia, a long flight back. We’re okay with being here for a while.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: All right.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: (Off-mike.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Okay. Hi. Go ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Well wait, can I just follow up real quick on that?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Just hold on, hold on, hold on. He asked first. Go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Oh, I’m sorry.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Yes. So about the North Korean coal, yeah. And South Korean Government is going to announce the result of investigation about North Korean coal smuggling maybe later today. So now the issue is that – whether the United States is going to apply the second boycott to the Korean companies, which it appears to be violated the sanctions. So I just wonder whether you are going to apply the secondary boycott to the companies.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I think I just answered that, that the investigation was initiated by the Government of South Korea, and we will wait to hear from them on any announcements with regard to that, okay?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    And we’re going to have to wrap it up in just a minute. Elise, go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Just on the – you said there’s nothing new to announce. Are the delegations trying to get another negotiating session? Like your team in Asia, are they trying to get another negotiating session together with the North Koreans?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Look, I mean, I can tell you we continue to have conversations virtually every day, every other day or so --

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: With the North Koreans?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: -- with the North Koreans, and when I say “conversations,” that can be by phone, that can be my message, that can be by email. Those are – they take different forms, those conversations do. So we continue to have conversations with the government. When – if and when we have travel announcements to make, I will certainly let you know, but we have nothing yet.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: But I mean, obviously that you’ll make those announcements, but I’m just wondering if like – if there is efforts being made to put together another negotiating session.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have anything for you on that right now.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Can I have one question on the sanctions?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Okay? Okay. Sir, go right ahead.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Yeah. Just to follow up, you said you have nothing planned, but Mr. Bolton mentioned that in the letter that Secretary Pompeo gave to Foreign Minister Ri, there was an offer to meet. Has North Korea responded to that offer yet?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I don’t have any information for you on that. This was a letter from the President to Chairman Kim, so I don’t have any visibility on what was actually in that letter or what conversations the White House may or may not be having. I’d have to refer you to the White House for anything on that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: So you can confirm that there was an offer?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: I can confirm there was a letter. Anything that the White House has said about that or Ambassador Bolton has said about that, I’d refer you back to them on those matters. When I have something to let you know, I certainly would be happy to.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Okay, last question.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: (Off-mike.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    QUESTION: Two days ago, President Trump claimed most Chinese students in the United States are spies. I’m not asking you to comment on what he said, but State Department as a agency to issue visa to Chinese students, do you share the view – do you think most Chinese students in the United States are spies?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    MS NAUERT: Yeah, I don’t have the President’s comments in front of me. I have not seen those comments, so I would hesitate to comment on his comments without having read it and had the full context. As you are well aware, we have many Chinese students studying in the United States. We have strong people-to-people ties with the Government of China, but of course there are concerns with some who might come into the United States and try to pick up some of our technology and other information and bring it back home for reasons that the United States Government would be concerned about. But we have a strong relationship with China and we enjoy having students studying in the United States from China, and I’ll just leave it at that.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Okay, thanks. We’ve got to go, guys. We’ll see you soon.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    (The briefing was concluded at 3:28 p.m.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    # # #

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
    External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.


          IOC disappointed after UN reject demand for sporting equipment to be sent to North Korea      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach has expressed disappointment after co...

          North Korea chides US sanctions pressure on denuclearization process - Reuters      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Reuters

North Korea chides US sanctions pressure on denuclearization process
Reuters
SEOUL/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - North Korea on Thursday denounced U.S. calls for enforcing international sanctions despite its goodwill moves and said progress on denuclearization promises could not be expected if Washington followed an “outdated ...
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          Seoul: Rival Koreas to meet to prepare for leaders' summit      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Seoul: Rival Koreas to meet to prepare for leaders' summitSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The rival Koreas will meet Monday for high-level talks meant to prepare for a summit between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, South Korea said, the third such meetings between the leaders in recent months.



          ✌ North Korean Malicious Cyber Activity | US-CERT      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
✌ North Korean Malicious Cyber Activity | US-CERT:

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) have identified a Trojan malware variant—referred to as KEYMARBLE—used by the North Korean government. The U.S. Government refers to malicious cyber activity by the North Korean government as HIDDEN COBRA.


          North Korea blames Trump aides for backsliding on summit deal      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

North Korea is expressing fresh frustration with the U.S. over the follow-up to the historic June summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, complaining in a new government statement Thursday that some high-level members of the Trump administration are hindering the president's desire for renewed diplomacy ...

          REPORT: North Korea threatens to end ‘stability’ on Korean peninsula      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The DML News App offers the best in news reporting.

The post REPORT: North Korea threatens to end ‘stability’ on Korean peninsula appeared first on Dennis Michael Lynch.


          Security Council backs US plan for humanitarian aid in North Korea      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Security Council backs US plan for humanitarian aid in North Korea
- United Nations Security Council agreed on Monday to a series of guidelines that would ease the entry of humanitarian aid into North Korea, the ...

          North Korea's foreign minister visits Iran as US reimposes sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea's foreign minister visits Iran as US reimposes sanctions
- Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif welcomed his North Korean counterpart, Ri Yong Ho, to Tehran on Tuesday, hours after the ...

          North Korea leader Kim Jong-un inspects things – in pictures      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea leader Kim Jong-un inspects things – in pictures
- Images of the dictator on tour offer insights on the life of one of the world's most secretive rulers – and serve to bolster the cult of personality ...

          George Galloway: Showdown over Iran looms as Trump turns up the heat on Tehran      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Showdown over Iran looms as Trump turns up the heat on Tehran

George Galloway
George Galloway was a member of the British Parliament for nearly 30 years. He presents TV and radio shows (including on RT). He is a film-maker, writer and a renowned orator.
Showdown over Iran looms as Trump turns up the heat on Tehran
Operation Boot is back. The new American plan for regime change in Iran dawns this week with a re-imposition of economic sanctions against Tehran and the threat of more to come.
American exceptionalism in action as the whole world (minus Trump satrapies) rejects the move putting the EU on a collision course with Washington.
For nearly 50 years economic sanctions have been the default position of western countries seeking to bring others to heel, make them succumb, or in the most extreme circumstances roll over, cry "Uncle Sam" and be "regime changed".
The fact that quarantine - or siege - is an act of war rather than an alternative to war is easily elided with a compliant media.
For most of my life I have struggled to explain that the US embargo on Cuba for example –still more the claimed extra-territoriality of that embargo– as a result of which gigantic US fines are levied on foreign companies doing business with Cuba entirely legally under their own countries’ law. That the embargo on Cuba is lawless brigandry need hardly detain us. Perhaps St. Augustine said it best in his book "The City of God".
Describing an encounter on the high seas between Alexander the Great and a pirate ship, Alexander demands:
"How dare you terrorize these waters as a thief?"
The Pirate captain answers:
"How dare you terrorize the whole world? You with your great Navy, can call yourself an Emperor, and call other men as you please."
I lived up close and personal enough to smell it, the long devastating regime of economic sanctions against Iraq which killed 1.7 million of Iraqis, according to UN figures (not to be confused with the deaths during the invasion and subsequent occupation from 2003).
Among them were many children and I helped put their little white coffins into the baked earth amidst the wailing of their parents on many occasions when I was the only British politician travelling to Iraq.
The monstrous Secretary of State Madeleine Albright - now reborn as a critic of Trump's policy of "separating children from their families" - was in no doubt when she told Lesley Stahl on CBS News of the value of separating Iraqi children from their families forever for political purposes.
When asked about the policy she was implementing on Iraq which (at that time) had killed half a million Iraqi children she replied:
“I think this is a very hard choice. But the price, we think, the price is worth it.”
Neighboring Iran has endured endless twists and turns in western policy. Given that the country grows oil and gas rather than avocados is of course the reason. As Donald Rumsfeld reportedly said, in terms, "It’s not our fault God put America’s oil under other people's countries."
Under the dark reign of the self-declared emperor Pahlavi the Peacock Shah of Persia, Iran was the West's best friend. Indeed Britain and the United States had actually put Pahlavi on his ‘Peacock Throne’ overthrowing the elected premier Mosaddegh in Operation Boot in 1953. The moderate socialist Mosaddegh had made the fatal error of nationalising his own country’s oil, taking it from the big western oil companies. His fate was sealed.
Iran then became a byword for torture and repression until the 1979 overthrow of the whole regime by millions of Iranians on the streets - far too many to shoot.
Iran has been ostracized, invaded, subverted and sanctioned ever since.
The first rays of light in this dark story appeared with the P5+1 Nuclear deal the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) with Iran in which Iran undertook to so verifiably limit its nuclear energy industry as to preclude forever the creation of a nuclear bomb (this despite the fact that most of Iran's adversaries in the region and beyond bristle with nuclear weapons or live under the military promise of defense by the nuclear weapons of others.
It was a good deal. But it was negotiated by Barack Obama on the American side and one of President Trump's primordial obsessions is to destroy anything with Obama's signature on it.
But there was a major problem in Trump's determination to wreck the Iran Nuclear Deal. This was a solemn and binding Treaty not between the US and Iran but between Iran the US, Russia, China and the EU.
A major test immediately loomed - would after token protests the European Union tamely bow down to Trump, the bull in the China shop?
Not yet at any rate. Indeed all the signs are that this is the first pan-European revolt against US hegemony, more significant in fact than the refusal of France and Germany to join the Bush and Blair invasion of Iraq.
The EU has enforced its "Blocking Statute" to protect its firms from the latest round of US Sanctions on Iran which came into effect at midnight eastern standard time Tuesday. Even harsher sanctions will be imposed by Trump in November - giving rise to widespread speculation in Iran that the Islamic Republic will preempt it with an "October surprise" rather than go quietly into that goodnight.
The Blocking Statute has never been used by the EU before (though it has existed more than 20 years). It is thus a significant assertion of European rejection of an American policy almost bereft of support outside Israel and Saudi-Arabia.
But it may be more symbolic than real. First, all 27 EU countries will have to incorporate specific rejection of the US sanctions on Iran into their domestic rules. Time consuming, and wide-open to US subversion of the process. There are plenty of US satrapies in the EU. Moreover European companies themselves (as is the case in trade with Cuba) are quite likely to roll-over and cry uncle for fear of losing their markets in the US.
Symbolic or not though it is a further sign of American isolation on foreign policy issues and a further stick for the US Democrats to beat President Trump with in the run-up to the mid-term elections in November. The Democrats prefer war with North Korea and peace with the Islamic Republic of Iran. As the Americans say "Go figure"...
Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!
Subscribe to RT newsletter to get stories the mainstream media won’t tell you.

          North Korea and the Dynamics of U.S.-South Korea-Japan      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

SPEAKERS

Glen S. Fukushima
Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress; Former President, American Chamber of Commerce in Japan; Former Deputy Assistant United States Trade Representative for Japan and China

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on August 7th, 2018


          North Korea is still producing ballistic missiles after summit      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Satellite photos and U.S. intelligence show North Korea continues to work on its missile program, even after Trump and Kim Jong Un's meeting in Singapore.
          Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N.: diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said.

          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, meaning people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea, and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception: waivers.
          Sony reveals post-Venom Spider-Man Universe plans; More Marvel crossovers?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
After a tumultuous run with THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 1 & 2 and a few e-mail troubles courtesy of North Korea, Sony found its footing again with one of their prime properties when they struck a deal with Marvel to see the web slinger come back to life in a place that felt genuine. Making his debut in CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR, then in a new solo effort jointly produced with Marvel (SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING)... Read More...
          Sri Lanka says alleged sanctions-breaking imports were reporting error      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Sri Lankan government on Wednesday refuted recent media reports claiming the country imported North Korean textiles between October 2017 and March 2018, in breach of UN resolutions. UN Security Council (UNSC) measures prohibit member states from importing DPRK-produced textiles, formerly one of Pyongyang’s top-earning sources of foreign trade revenue. According to a notice from the […]

The post Sri Lanka says alleged sanctions-breaking imports were reporting error appeared first on NK PRO.


          Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N.: diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said.

          The C.O.W.S. Global Sunday Talk on Racism 04/23/17      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Context of White Supremacy hosts our monthly Global Sunday Talk On Racism. This program is uniquely crafted to encourage participation from Victims of Racism outside the United States and/or non-white people who are not able to join during our typical program time. Enforcement officials in Paris, France killed a non-white, non-black male. Chinese-French citizens protested and charge that the shooting was an act of Racism. Marine Le Pen remains Gus T.'s pick for the winner of the looming presidential election in France. Her campaign is a menagerie of gay Whites, conservative Whites and young Whites aligned to preserve White Power in France. We'll get our international listeners' views on the United States' military action in Syria as well the increased concern directed at North Korea. #AnswersForMiriamCarey INVEST in The COWS - http://paypal.me/GusTRenegade CALL IN NUMBER: 641.715.3640 CODE: 564943# The C.O.W.S. archives: http://tiny.cc/76f6p
          The C.O.W.S. Global Sunday Talk on Racism 09/17/17      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Context of White Supremacy hosts our monthly Global Sunday Talk On Racism. This program is specifically designed to encourage participation from Victims of Racism outside the United States and/or non-white people who are unable to join us during our normall broadcast time. Gloobal attention is focused on London, where an explosive device was detonated on a subway. It reported that more than two dozen people were injured. ISIS has allegedly claimed responsibility for the bombing. We'll get our British listeners thoughts on how this event will impact non-whites across Europe and how this will alter English politics. We'll also discuss how Hurricane Irma devastated the Caribbean islands. Many of our Black Britons have familial ties to the region. We'll also discuss the reported North Korean missile launch. We've had discussions about how whites in the US propagandize North Korea as a clear and present danger, while European countries discuss them as a joke. #AnswersForMiriamCarey INVEST in The COWS - http://paypal.me/GusTRenegade CALL IN NUMBER: 641.715.3640 CODE: 564943# The C.O.W.S. archives: http://tiny.cc/76f6p
          The C.O.W.S. Global Sunday Talk on Racism 10/15/17      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Context of White Supremacy hosts our monthly Global Sunday Talk On Racism. This broadcast is uniquely constructed to encourage participation from Victims of Racism outside the United States and/or non-white people who are unable to join us during our usual broadcast time. Prime Minister Theresa May gave an elegant speech this week about the a report detailing widespread racism in England. The report confirmed the usual array of educational, economic, and employment disparities between Whites and non-whites. We'll ask our British listeners how talking points and perspectives have changed since September's terrorist attack in London. We'll also get our international listeners' views on the conflict with North Korea. Previous listeners outside the U.S. detailed that Kim Jong-un is thought of as a joke more than a threat. The United Kingdom is current celebrating Black History Month. We'll ask our Black Britons what events have transpired or if they're even participating in the festivities. #AnswersForMiriamCarey INVEST in The COWS - http://paypal.me/GusTRenegade CALL IN NUMBER: 641.715.3640 CODE: 564943# The C.O.W.S. archives: http://tiny.cc/76f6p
          The C.O.W.S. Compensatory Call-In 06/16/18      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Context of White Supremacy hosts the weekly Compensatory Call-In. We encourage non-white listeners to dial in with their codified concepts, new terms, observations, research findings, workplace problems or triumphs, and/or suggestions on how best to Replace White Supremacy With Justice ASAP. We'll use these sessions to hone our use of words as tools to reveal truth, neutralize White people. We'll examine news reports from the past seven days and - hopefully - promote a constructive dialog. #ANTIBLACKNESS President Donald J. Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un held a long awaited summit this week in Singapore, where Whites emphasized the importance of castrating the non-white country's nuclear capacity. Some pundits have questioned how such a meeting would be perceived if President Obama still occupied the White House. This week marks one year since the catastrophic Grenfell Tower fire killed dozens of mostly non-white people. The newly launched inquiry investigates the cause of the deadly fire, while reports admit little has improved over the past dozen months to prevent such a traumatic loss of life from happening again. Speaking of firefighters, 8 NYFD members were suspended after footage showed a drunken riot where a New York Fire Department official allegedly called another firefighter a "nigger." #EndRacism2BeADad INVEST in The COWS - http://paypal.me/GusTRenegade CALL IN NUMBER: 641.715.3640 CODE 564943#
          The C.O.W.S. Global Sunday Talk On Racism 06/17/18      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Context of White Supremacy hosts our monthly Global Sunday Talk On Racism. This broadcast is designed to motivate participation from Victims of Racism beyond the United States and/or non-white people who are unable to join us during our usual broadcast time. This week marks the one year since the the Grenfell Tower fire, which resulted in 72 fatalities - according to the official report. Prime Minister Theresa May met with victims to apologize for having not contacted them immediately after the destruction. Jay Z and Beyonce dedicated the final performance of their London concert to the victims of the blaze. 365 days later, no one remains criminally accountable for the disaster. We'll also discuss the Singapore summit between President Donald J. Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. #GrenfellTowerFire INVEST in The COWS - http://paypal.me/GusTRenegade CALL IN NUMBER: 641.715.3640 CODE 564943#
          Live & Undercover: ‘BlacKkKlansman’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Ron Stallworth lived it, wrote about it and now Spike Lee has filmed it. BLACKkKLANSMAN is Stallworth’s true story of how as a Colorado Springs African-American undercover cop he infiltrated the local Ku Klux Klan chapter in 1979 so successfully they voted him president.  In person during a nearly half-hour interview at the Essex House Stallworth, who was in law enforcement for nearly 40 years until he retired in 2006, emerges as an ideal interviewee. He answers questions as if he’s on the witness stand, answering in complete, direct sentences in a clear measured cadence.  It reminded me of the old Fifties documentary-like TV series DRAGNET where the star-producer Jack Webb’s Joe Friday always said, ‘Just the facts, ma’am.’

Stallworth, 65, was born in Chicago, raised in El Paso, TX and was the first African-American in the Colorado Springs Police Dept. in 1969 as a Police Cadet. In 1979 a local paper’s Want Ad from soldier at Fort Carson announced he was founding a new KKK chapter. Stallworth picked up the phone, called the soldier, impersonating a white recruit.  Thus began the undercover sting operation.  Eventually he talked to the head of the KKK, the Grand Dragon himself David Duke, complaining that he was still waiting to get his membership card. Duke personally signed and mailed it, where it was framed and hung in the police station. The case was kept secret until Stallworth published his memoir in 2014. A revised version with 8 pages of photographs was published in July by Flatiron Books with a movie tie-in cover. The book is subtitled: RACE, HATRED AND THE UNDERCOVER INVESTIGATION OF A LIFETIME.  The interview has been slightly condensed and edited.

 

Q:  If you’re here Ron, you are happy with the movie. What did you think the film got right in the best way?

RON STALLWORTH: The movie captured the essence of me at 25, going thru this investigation. The problems I had internally, initially to launch it. The problems of working within the police department when I first got hired.  They took some liberties there. I was 19 when I got hired and I wasn’t a police officer, I was a police cadet working in the civilian support capacity. They made it a composite for the purposes of the movie, but they captured what was going on in that environment with officers coming to the Records Bureau and asking for a record on a ‘toad.’ Which was a code word for blacks back then.  It captured things like that very well.  The encounters I had with the Klan members, the phone conversations – it captured that very well to the degree that it was touched upon.  All in all Spike did a masterful job putting his piece together.  What I REALLY liked was the fact that he connects the historical thread between the Confederacy, David Duke the Klan leader I was dealing with, the Charlottesville incident and Donald Trump. Masterful connecting that thread – and I applaud him for it.

 

Q: Ron has a great line in the movie about David Duke –

RS: ‘Do you really think there could be somebody like that in the White House?’ That was never said by me. But that was a subtle reference to what we have today.

 

Q: I talked to Washington yesterday and he said there could be a whole other movie about your issues getting into the Colorado Springs police force. In the movie all we see is Frederick Weller’s smarmy racist cop.

RS:  Weller played that character to the extreme – I never encountered anything like that.  It was very subtle. When I got hired at the age of 19 there were no blacks in the department. Period. For about four months I was the only black in the department. So things that were said or done were done very subtlely done. The most overt act, if you will, was the use of the word ‘toad’ when they would come to me in the Record Bureau and ask me to run a record on a ‘toad.’ My form of rebellion was when John David says, ‘There are no toads here.’  Once I figured out – because it took me a while to figure it out – to notice that every time I was checking up on a ‘toad’ the ‘toad’ was black.  That’s when I realized toad was a code word they used for black names.  When I figured it out, I stopped responding to it. If they came in I would ignore the request.  If they said, ‘Speak a little louder,’ I’d ignore it. Finally they’d say, ‘CADET, I’M TALKING TO YOU. GIVE ME A RECORD ON’ – whatever the person’s name is. They’d tell me the date of birth and ethnicity and at that time I’d respond.  If they ordered me, I’d say, ‘I can’t do this. We don’t have any toads here. We have people. If you give me the name of the person that you’re looking for, I can look it up.’  That was my form of rebellion. 

 

Q: What was the reason this was kept secret for 35 years – until you published your memoir?

RS: The investigation? There was no reason.  Other than I didn’t feel like writing the story.

 

Q: But there was never anything in the paper?  It basically was that the Klansman that were in the military were sent elsewhere?

RS:  Two who were at NORAD [their fingers were on nuclear triggers] were transferred out. But there was no publicity because I was ordered to destroy the files when the Klan decided they wanted Ron Stallworth to be the local chapter leader. The chief basically said, ‘Shut the investigation down now. We’ve gone far enough.’ I argued against it; he was adamant. ‘Shut it down.’ Then he told me to destroy all the files that had been generated. He said, ‘I don’t want it to leak out that we had cops in the Klan. Destroy the files. Don’t talk to anybody about it.’

 

Q: And you kept the files?

RS:  First opportunity after being told that, I walked out of the office with two notebooks about three inches thick with reports. That’s why I have my KKK certificate [he takes out his wallet and shows me his Klan membership card].

 

Q: For 1979.  When you retired in Utah from Public Safety chief, that’s when you wrote your memoir?

RS: I retired in 2006. I didn’t start writing until 2013. Why? I talked about writing the story for years but I never had the gumption until 2013. ‘Now’s the time.’

 

Q:  When Spike took on the movie – I know John David said Spike did not want him to meet you until they began filming – did Spike not want to see you as well?

RS: I didn’t meet Spike until they brought me to Brooklyn last October for the cast reading.  That’s when I met John David, Topher Grace [who plays David Duke], Adam Driver, Laura Harrier. I met them all at that time. John David told me then that he was not going to imitate me. He said, ‘I can’t imitate you, I’m just going to try and channel you. Try to capture the essence of you.’  He captures the 25 year old me very well.

 

Q: Did you have an Afro like that?

RS: Maybe an inch shorter. Yes, I did have an Afro similar to that.

 

Q: And did you have a beard?

RS: At various times in my undercover career I had either a full beard, a short-cropped beard, Fu Manchu, a plain simple moustache or just a goatee. We did that – generally we would  have a look that we would maintain for anywhere from 3 to 6 months. Then change our facial features, change our hairstyle, so we would look different and believe it or not it worked. One time I made a drug case against a guy wearing a full beard and 6 months later I trimmed it into a goatee and made another drug bust with the same guy -- and he didn’t recognize me.

 

Q: We don’t say criminals are the smartest people. The movie has your first undercover assignment covering a Stokely Carmichael rally and Ron gets involved with a woman he meets there.  Was that invented for the movie?

RS:  Yes, because the love interest was part of the script.  It didn’t happen in real life. Stokely Carmichael actually happened. 

 

Q: Were you married during this time?

RS:  No.

 

Q: You were free and unattached and could risk your life without upsetting anyone except maybe your parents.

RS:  I didn’t care what anybody thought, I was a grown adult. My mother never liked that I worked undercover.  She always worried.  ‘Don’t worry, it’s my job.’ My aunt who helped raise me, her older sister, was concerned. I told her the same. The woman I was dating and later married, she became my first wife – she deceased now. Cancer.  She knew some of the undercover stuff I did, not all  because I didn’t tell her everything. She never worried about it other than to be careful because she knew I was going to do it anyway. It’s something I wanted to do.

 

Q: Where did this passion to be undercover come from Ron?

RS:  In terms of a police career that’s what I wanted to do. That developed when I was working in the I.D. Bureau – I was 19 at the time – the narcotics officers would come up and ask for records. When I gave them the records, I saw them and the first time this happened I was, WHAT is this long-haired hippie guy coming up to me, asking for a record, for? Who the hell does he think he is! It had to be explained to me: Those are narcs.  They work undercover, that’s why they look the way they do.  They’re cops. Give them anything they need. Don’t recognize them when you see them in public because they may be working a case and your recognition of them could probably jeopardize their lives.  I thought, Damn that’s neat! I’m a 19 year old kid.  I wanted a little bit of that action.  First of all, I don’t like the idea of uniforms. I’ve never been a uniform person.  I wore my uniform with pride and in my opinion I look good in it.  But I never wanted to put the uniform on and make a career as a uniformed cop.  I wanted to be an undercover cop, blending in with the public, looking like a black militant or a long-haired hippie yet having a gun on my hip, a badge in my wallet and able to enforce the law.  To me, that was the neatest thing in the world.  It was also challenging. Police work is very routine.  You get a complaint about a dog barking, you go to the people and tell them to shut their dog’s barking. And you go on to the next thing.  What challenge is there in stuff like that?  I wanted something that would challenge me. And going into a situation and pretending to be something you’re not and your only true weapon is your ability to talk and work your way out of it.  Not only in it, but out of it. Because everybody carries guns and the fact that you carry one is not that important. I liked the challenge of going into those environments and being someone I wasn’t. And being successful and completing it. That’s where I wanted to go from the very beginning.

  

Q: The movie has Adam Driver’s cop impersonate Ron Stallworth when he meets the Klan face to face.  Two things: Your voice when you were on the phone speaking to Klansmen, did you alter it?

RS: No. I have read where reporters have said, ‘He spoke to the Klan in his white voice.’ When I read those reports it pisses me off.  ‘Cuz there was no attempt to disguise my voice. I talked to these guys on the phone just like I’m talking to you. Because when you’re undercover you try to stay as true to your identity as you are. You know who you are and you know how you normally function. If you try to put on a pretense, such as assuming a fake voice, you have to put on that fake voice ALL OF THE TIME. And you can’t afford to slip out of it. It’s too dangerous. So you talk to them just normally in your regular manner. When I would get on the phone I would simply say, ‘Hi, this is Ron Stallworth. Let me talk to the Grand Wizard’  -- or whatever the case may be. But never, ever did I attempt to disguise my voice. 

Q: And the guy who went to the Klan meetings as ‘Ron’ – did he do something to his voice to sound like you?

RS: Same principle. You can’t play with things like that working undercover.  You stay as true to who you are as possible. He did the same thing – and that’s why this investigation was so hilariously funny.  Because it never should have been successful. They should have recognized from the very beginning that the Ron Stallworth on the phone – that voice is totally different from the Ron Stallworth they’re having meetings with.  Chuck, the officer I describe in the book, who played me, Chuck’s voice is very distinctively different than mine.  A deaf person could tell that! These guys didn’t figure it out. Only once was I challenged. I went to a meeting – and this is depicted in the movie.  Chuck went to the meeting that I had set up and then I called, pretending to be the person who had been at that meeting because I wanted to follow up on something.  I called and immediately Ken O’Dell, the local organizer, he said, ‘What’s wrong with your voice?’  So I said [Stallworth coughs twice, assumes a lighter husky voice], ‘I have a sinus infection.’  He said, ‘I get those all the time. Here’s what you need to do.’ He prescribed a remedy for me.

Q: And that’s as far as it ever went?

RS: That’s as far as it ever went in terms of challenging my voice. 

Q: What about your life since you’ve published this book?  You’ve been anonymous your whole life and now you’re 65 years old – congratulations! – and you’re a celebrity.  The original book has been out, what, 4 or 5 years?

RS: The original book was published in 2014. The revised, edited edition came out June 5th by Flatiron Books. I don’t consider myself a celebrity. I’m still the same kid from El Paso, Texas, that I’ve always been. I’ve been blessed with some good fortune as a result of writing this book.  I understand my reality has changed a little bit. I have relatives and friends coming out of the woodwork that I’ve never HEARD OF before!  I have people who think I’m a millionaire – and I’m far from that.  I’m not even remotely close to that.   But they think I’m a millionaire now because I have a book out and a movie’s been made and the money’s just rolling into me. When I tell them that that’s not true, they don’t believe me.  I have people calling me up, messaging me, just to say ‘Thank you for what you did. We appreciate the service you did.’ That I find fascinating, that people would take the time to do that. I got one of those messages last night.  So my reality has changed but I don’t see myself as a celebrity.  I ‘met’ John David on the phone – he called me up to talk to me a few weeks before I flew to Brooklyn for the cast reading.  He called me up to talk to me and I still have his message on my phone because he essentially said, ‘I’m a little intimidated Mr. Stallworth. I’m going to play you and I want to capture your story, your “essence.”’ He said, ‘Wow! I am so intimidated, this is real scary.’ When we met he said, ‘Sir, it’s such an honor to meet you,’ and I said, ‘No, the honor is mine. You’re the celebrity. I should be intimidated to talk to you.’

Q:  Has anybody threatened you? Has anybody said, ‘I’m from the Klan. You’re a dirty dog and humiliated us and we’re going to get even’?

RS:  Not yet! I fully expect at some point in time will come across. But that’s par for the course. You deal with that as an undercover cop. I’ve been threatened before. When I was working narcotics I got threatened on several occasions.  Once in a courtroom testifying at a trial.  I’m accustomed to have people make threats against me. I fully expect at some point in time one of these white supremacists will say something. They can say anything they want just don’t try to mess with my wife.

Q: So you’ve remarried.

RS:  I have. Been married a little over a year now. 

Q: Is that the first time since your wife died?

RS:  Yes, it’s my second marriage.

Q:  And children?

RS: I have two sons by my first wife, 32 and 28.  They’ve known about my work all along. They knew about this story 8 years ago. They’re very excited about the movie coming out and I said, ‘Recognize that it’s your name coming out of the screen. Run with it! Have fun with it. Tell your friends that’s your dad and if it helps your status with your friends, enjoy it.’ 

Q: Are either of them in law enforcement?

RS: No.

Aussie Aboriginal Series: MYSTERY ROAD

Anyone who was first introduced to Judy Davis in her mesmerizing, galvanizing film debut, the 1979 Australian hit MY BRILLIANT CAREER, should not miss the Aboriginal Aussie series MYSTERY ROAD.  This is a chance to see one of the globe’s greatest English-speaking actors in a truly unexpected role.   Davis was last seen as viperous gossip monarch Hedda Hopper, needling Bette Davis and Joan Crawford in Ryan Murphy’s FEUD. In MYSTERY ROAD, which premieres on AcornTV Monday August 20 with its six episodes, Davis is local cop Emma James in dusty one-horse town Patterson where there are many sheep and cattle and little else. This contemporary drama with its Western setting is hardly where anyone might expect to find Davis who nevertheless gives Emma a solidity, common sense and irritability without a trace of campy theatrics. Emma we discover is to the manor born; her equally wealthy brother runs an enormous sheep and cattle station.  When two local boys go missing, the search that is the series’ motor begins. One is a local hero who has disappeared, an aboriginal soccer star. The other, a white drifter recently arrived from who knows where, might have been his mate or his lover. Or drug dealers. Emma is forced to partner with detective Jay Swan (Aaron Pederson) on a twisty road of discovery, which too often is set in the local bar with ever present mugs of beer.  Swan, a solid, almost monumental aboriginal presence, defines ‘speak softly, carry a big stick.’ His ex-wife shows up, looking for their daughter -- who isn’t missing for long but sees MYSTERY ROAD become a domestic drama with gender a telling factor in what has and what will happen to the many characters including a just paroled pedophile rapist. Meanwhile Davis struts, rolls her eyes and commands everyone’s attention with her insistence on pursuing the truth, wherever it may lead.  The scenery, picturesque but so dry you’ll want to grab one of those mugs, looms mightily as its own character.

 

NEW DVDs:

Action and attitude are the hallmarks of STRIKE BACK SEASON FIVE (Blu-ray + Digital, Home Box Office, Unrated). Yes, SEASON FIVE boasts a new troupe of terrorist-busting  commandos engaged in derring do in North Korea. The Cinemax series works as an update on weekly serials with its continuing storyline that usually ends each episode with a cliffhanger.  STRIKE BACK’s rightly won fans who find its mix of bravery, courage, camaraderie and patriotism irresistible.  Here is CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON, CRAZY RICH ASIANS’ legendary Michelle Yeoh, England’s Robson Green (GRANTCHESTER) and the two stars bearded Sullivan Stapleton and square jawed Philip Winchester.

Inspired by the death of a classmate, an Iowa high school’s girls volleyball team captain, THE MIRACLE SEASON (DVD, 20th Century Fox Entertainment, PG) handles tragedy, trauma and regeneration sensitively.  As Iowa City West High returns for a new year, having won the state women’s volleyball championship the previous year, they are devastated when their best and most loved player Caroline ‘Line’ Found (Danika Yarosh) dies in a road accident.  From the title you know going in, that despite a bad start the kids will rally for Line and follow their motto inspired by Caroline’s optimistic, outgoing attitude: ‘Live Like Line.’ Helen Hunt and William Hurt are on hand to give gravitas amid a cast of unknowns. Hunt, who looks wonderful simply because she looks perfectly normal (no weird cosmetic procedures or Botox), is fine as the understanding coach who knows she can’t push her hurting players too much or too soon. Hurt is the anguished father who loses his wife to cancer soon after his daughter’s funeral.  School sports tragedies ironically make for ideal drama – to be so young with so much hope for the future and have it brutally crushed, ended.  And then to rise up as the team channels its sorrow into a positive force and beats the odds to win. A more stirring, similarly themed film is the 2006 WE ARE MARSHALL about the W. Virginia football team wiped out in a 1970 plane crash and subsequent efforts in ’71 to field a team. 

William Witney fans rejoice!  Here in an excellent print is Witney’s 1956 A STRANGE ADVENTURE (Blu-ray, Kino Lorber Studio Classics, Unrated). Set in a snowy hideaway where the good guys are held hostage by ruthless gangsters ADVENTURE is a mix of hotrod teen drama, classic film noir and old fashioned melodrama.  The Republic Pictures production boasts a transparent femme fatale in Liz Taylor lookalike Marla English, first-rate sociopathic villainy from typecast Jan Merlin and Nick Adams, who was in the previous year’s REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE with his good buddy James Dean. Here he’s an asthmatic crook.  Toby Roan and Jay Dee Witney offer an informative audio commentary. 

You won’t get a better look at Sixties’ Swinging London than the satirical SMASHING TIME (Blu-ray, Kino Lorber Studio Classics, Unrated).  This 1967 romp teamed two Bright British Lights – Lynn Redgrave, from the acting dynasty who had won fame as GEORGY GIRL (’66), and Rita Tushingham, the sparrow-like Liverpudlian star of the seminal British working class, kitchen sink dramatic trio, A TASTE OF HONEY, THE LEATHER BOYS and GIRL WITH GREEN EYES.  Thanks to film historian Kat Elinger’s brightly informed audio commentary, SMASHING TIME’s connection to what came before and its suggestion of where Britain was headed becomes clear.  A flop when first released, it’s wonderful mix of slapstick – just seeing the two stars side by side with Redgrave towering a head taller than Tushingham is a visual gag – satire and wish fulfillment plotting as the two lower class mates become celebrated and famous.  On hand, Michael York (Bob Fosse’s Oscar-winning CABARET was in his future).

Tim Robbins devoted himself to live, no-budget, avant garde theater as soon as he graduated from UCLA and CRADLE WILL ROCK (Blu-ray, Kino Lorber Studio Classics, R), a 1999 film revolving around a landmark 1930s agitprop play, reflects that.  As director-actor Robbins is best known for acting in THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION, BULL DURHAM and MYSTIC RIVER and writing and directing the anti-capital punishment drama DEAD MAN WALKING that won his longtime companion Susan Sarandon her Best Actress Academy Award. CRADLE, blessed with Robbins’ audio commentary, is set in New York during the Depression and highlights Orson Welles’ efforts to present his legendary stage production THE CRADLE WILL ROCK uncensored.  Here too is Nelson Rockefeller commissioning Mexico’s proudly anti-capitalist Communist artist Diego Rivera to create Rockefeller Center lobby murals (they’re still there!) which he … censored!  The extraordinary cast includes Bill Murray, Vanessa Redgrave, Sarandon, Hank Azaria, John Cusack, Jack Black, Paul Giamatti and Ruben Blades.

Author(s): 
Stephen Schaefer
Tags Entity: 
Spike Lee

          IOC disappointed UN won't grant North Korea sports exemption      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — IOC President Thomas Bach says he is disappointed the United Nations will not allow sports equipment to be sent to North Korea.

The International Olympic Committee's request was rejected by the U.N. Security Council Sanctions Committee.

Bach says "this makes it more difficult for the IOC to accomplish its mission to bring athletes from all over the world together to promote understanding and friendship regardless of political background or any other differences.

Read more on NewsOK.com


           Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist...       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
UNITED NATIONS, Aug 9 (Reuters) - Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two...
          The Aquariums of Pyongyang [Audiobook]      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Aquariums of Pyongyang [Audiobook]

The Aquariums of Pyongyang [Audiobook] by Chol-hwan Kang, Pierre Rigoulot
English | June 26th, 2018 | ISBN: 1549174533 | kbps | 7 hrs 22 mins | 202.72 MB
Narrator: Stephen Park
The harrowing memoir of life inside North Korea


          South Korea, North Korea may hold talks next week to discuss new summit — reports      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The talks will be held in Panmunjom
          PSYCHOTRONICS AND THE SECRET ORDER      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

 

PSYCHOTRONICS AND THE SECRET ORDER

By Steve Erdmann

(Copyright 2017, Steve Erdmann - All Rights Reserved)

<Edited by Robert D. Morningstar>

 

*******

H.P. Albarelli, Jr.’s journey into the strange quirks and oddities he had discovered about the many people somehow associated with the assassination of President John Kennedy on November 22, 1963 is referred to as “high strangeness and synchronicity.” Michael Petro referred to it as “curious scraps of information.” Indeed, the numerous references to the many faces somehow connected to Kennedy (Lee Oswald, the Central Intelligence Agency [CIA], the Mob, the Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI], and others) were often a bog of facts and comments, though tantalizing and dramatic, still seemed to be a jungle of confusing loose ends.

Click here to enlarge top photo.

Photo credt: http://truedemocracyparty.net/2012/06/mind-wars-new-mind-control-techniques-and-delivery-methods-digital-tv-haarp-gwen-towers-silent-sound-cell-phone-mind-control-technologies/

(A Secret Order: Investigating the High Strangeness and Synchronicity in the JFK Assassination, H.P. Albarelli, Jr.,

Trine Days, LLC, www.trineday.com, publisher@trineday.net, 2013, $19.95.)

To purchase this book from AMAZON.COM simply click on its title: A Secret Order: Investigating the High Strangeness and Synchronicity in the JFK Assassination

PSYCHOTRONICS

The early part of the book was an attempt in tracing the dawn of psychiatry in the 1940s and 1950s leading to Intelligence Programs such as the CIA’s top-secret Projects MK/Naomi, MK/Ultra, and Project Artichoke.

“The CIA and the military, which were quickly drawn to the Program,” said Abarelli, “were becoming intrigued with the possibilities of creating what were then referred to as ‘aggressive soldiers’ and now are called ‘super soldiers.’”

Albarelli outlined a number of covert Intelligence Programs that could have been bedrock for “Manchurian Candidate” experiments of young children and the populace in general. Fort Detrick’s Special Operations (SO) Division is mentioned, the Office of Strategic Operations (OSS), agent George Hunter White, and the Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN).

The author suspected that Oswald could likely have been an early victim of such programs while at a detention center called Youth House. Oswald could have possibly entered into a psychotronic relationship with psychiatrists and covert operations. Doctor Milton Kurian and Dr. Renatus Hartogs were psychiatrists that connected with Oswald at Youth House. Hartogs had previously worked at the Allen Memorial Institute, Montreal, Canada, where Doctor D. Ewen Cameron, in the mid-1950s under a covert MK/Ultra contract with the CIA, “conducted a series of horrific drug and sensory deprivation experiments on unwitting patients.”

 

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MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE

LaurEnce HarvEy, in film,  foreshadows LEE Harvey a whole year before the JFK Assassination

*******

New York Post reporter Joseph Wershba questioned Dr. Hartogs on December 14, 1967 as to whether or not Oswald could have been a "Manchurian Candidate" (referring to a 1962 film on controlled soldiers).

Although his log seemed to dismiss such an allegation, Hartogs moved in circles of covert ML/Ultra and MK/Naomi and the “drug parties” of Dr. Harold A. Abramson.

Dr. Hartogs was an “aficionado” of magic and a covert contractor for the CIA. He was acquainted with magician John Mulholland who wrote a manual for CIA operatives containing instructions on how to “surreptitiously dose unwitting people with drugs, and how to perform other feats of slight-of-hand.” The Hartogs/Freeman book, The Two Assassins, told of Oswald’s comments to his mother Marguerite concerning his return from Russia: “Mother, not even Marina knows why I returned.”

Dr. Hartogs’s sexual scandal with his patient Julie Roy seemed to coincide with the sexual scandal of Canadian psychiatrist Dr. James Tyhurst. Tyhurst associated with neuropsychologist Dr. Donald O. Hebb and “both attended a seminal 1951 meeting,” said Abarelli, “which included participants from the CIA – to discuss early advancements in sensory deprivation and brainwashing.”

Investigator Dick Russell noted Hartogs’s interest in hypnotism (p. 53), as told by Dr. Milton V. Kline, authority on hypnotism and CIA cohort on Project Artichoke and MK/Ultra.

Kline also disclosed that Hartogs, along with Dr. Sidney Malitz (a psychiatrist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute [NYSPI]) and Dr. Paul Hoch (NYSPI research director) were involved in a number of covert contracts with the CIA and the U.S Army “to perform experiments with psychosurgery, electroconvulsive therapy, LSD, mescaline, and other drugs.” Hartogs worked with Malitz on some of these experiments. Dr. Malitz worked with Fort Detrick’s Special Operations Division. These experiments were with unwitting patients, “children and teenagers.”  Harold Blauer died because of such experiments. The CIA selected a group of 100 patients to join in these episodes (p.35). Lee Harvey Oswald was absent from school for at least 50 days while in New York City.

ALLEN DULLES

In the early 1950s, hypnotist George Estabrook wrote to CIA director Allen Dulles about the merits of hypnosis in covert operations.

“The CIA, U.S Army Fort Detrick, the Edgewood Arsenal, and the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) funded many of these contracts. Chief among these physicians were: Drs. Bernard Withens, Harold Esecover, and Harold A. Abramson.”

Dr. Lauretta Bender, a child neuropsychistrist at the New York City Bellevue Hospital, experimented extensively on children using electroshock treatment, “DE patterning” and “annihilation.”  Also involved was Dr. D. Ewen Cameron, who would eventually head the MK/Ultra subproject 68.

Dr. Leon Eisenberg spoke of Bender’s patients in these experiments as “…psychotic and perhaps worse off than before the treatment.”

H.P. Albarelli Jr. (photo on the left) is a writer and investigative journalist who lives in Vermont, Florida, and London (U.K.). He has written numerous feature articles about the 9-11 anthrax attacks; biological warfare; the American intelligence community; the death of Frank Olson; the Cuban revolution; and social and political affairs. Some of his work can be found at the World Net Daily, Cuba net, Counterpunch, and Crime Magazine websites, as well as in numerous magazines and newspapers.

Allbarelli ventured through several interesting episodes that the reader would best explore.  One such incident concerned Marguerite Oswald’s interview by Davis Eugene Boster, a life-long Foreign Service officer and covert CIA operative within the State Department. At one point, he was a staff assistant to Secretary of State John Foster Dulles.

The interview also included State Department employees Denman F. Stanfield and Edward J. Hickey. Part of the conversation went:

Marguerite:  “Now I know you are not going to answer me gentlemen, but I am under the impression that my son is an agent.”

Boster:   “Do you mean a Russian agent?”

Marguerite:   “No, working for our Government, a U.S agent.”

Marguerite also explained to the Warren Commission:

“And this is the way I think, because I happen to know all of the other things that you don’t know

- the life and everything … And I can almost back it up with things…

Yes, sir, I think my son was an agent. I certainly do.” (p. 64.)

 

Lee Oswald, from 1957 to1958, was stationed at Atsugi Naval Air Base, Japan, a huge underground 50-acre CIA-USAF Air Base, conducting air traffic control for U-2s flying over Chna an the Soviet Union, at a time when Operation Artichoke physicians and technicians conducted “enhanced interrogations” <torture> at the base.

 

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 Khigh Dhiegh

 North Korean a psychotronic hypnotist in The Manchurian Candidate

*******

 

MULTIPLE DIMENSIONS OF MEANING

 

Albarelli told of Oswald’s appearances at East Louisiana State Hospital ...  

He also went through episodes involving psychiatrists Dr. Robert G. Heath, Dr. Frank Silva and Dr. Alfred T. Butterworth and their contributions to psychotronics. Albarelli told about the further mysterious workings of Archcha Smith, David Ferrie, Ferrie’s Civilian Air Patrol (CAP), detective Jack S. Martin, CIA operative June Cobb, and a mysterious Rose Cherami who also had been a patient at the East Louisiana State Hospital in 1961.

“The Oswald sighting at the East Louisiana State Hospital seems cut and dry, but as with most events concerning Oswald,” said Albarelli, “the facts surrounding dwell in another realm of ambiguity and interconnectedness, an alternate universe clouded by high strangeness where everything has multidimensions of meaning and truth.”

 

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Rose Cheramie foretold the assassinatio of JFK to doctors

at East Louisana State Hospital

ROSE CHERAMIE

Albarelli had an interesting chapter on Rose Cherami (Melba Christine Marcades), mystery woman, hooker, and drug addict, who was committed to the East Louisiana State Hospital in Jackson, Mississippi following an auto accident on Highway 190. The state hospital was infamous in the annuals of the Kennedy assassination.  Rose Cherami seemed to have been housed in several CIA-infiltrated facilities over the years.

Louisiana detective Lt. Francis Paul Fruge investigated Cheramie the day before the Kennedy assassination.  While in the hospital, Cherami told Dr. Don Bowers that Kennedy was going to be murdered in Dallas.

Cheramie had once worked for Jack Ruby in Dallas as a stripper and “drug courier.”  She said he had seen Oswald with Ruby. She also contended that Ruby was involved in the planned assassination.  Rose Cheramie died from another auto accident on September 4, 1965.

Dallas police were not interested in Cheramie’s testimony (p. 97), but Rose had quite a bit to say about drug trafficking in Texas.

Albarelli continued into her career that connected “to yet another unsolved murder – that of Houston police detective Martin A. Billnitzer – and therefor to the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, George Hunter White, and the CIA…”

The Texas drug-trafficking scenario involved corruption throughout the state, CIA “Executive Action” <5412 Committee) contractor Jean Pierre Lafittie, CIA officials in “hypnotism training,” MK/Ultra, the findings of New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, and the criminal involvement of Sergio Arcacha Smith and Emilio Santana.

“Billnitzer apparently committed suicide (shot himself twice) in his office the morning after being interviewed (by police investigators)…” (p. 115.) “…drugs put back on the street through the back door of the Houston Police Department but Billnitzer expanded his chief objective was to get these drugs off the streets permanently…” (p. 103.)

 

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David Ramirez Morales

 

A KALEIDIOSCOPE OF FACES ...

 

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The book was filled with bits, pieces and history of Intelligence operations and spies galore: A kaleidoscope of faces and bodies merged into each other as mingled smoke from the lanterns of crime:

Drug dealers, corrupt law enforcement, CIA contract assassins, mafia mercenaries, and “shadow government agents” like:

· CIA operative David Sanchez Morales.

· CIA operative Charles William Thomas.

· Dr. Sidney Gottlieb (Mk-Ultra) 

· Operative Vida June Cobb.

· Project Bluebird (Early MK program).

Image result for david atlee phillips

CIA Operative David Atlee Phillips (Lee Oswald's CIA handler)

http://moviephilippines.blogspot.com/2013/11/jfk-in-his-time-and-ours.html

· JM/Wave CIA station in Miami, Florida

· ZR/Alert and ZR/Awake

 (5412 Committee Assasination Teams)

(hypnotically-controlled operations)

· Operative Nicholas Deak

Image result for david atlee phillips

 Others ...

 

Steve Erdmann

St. Louis, MO

June 25th, 2017

 

Article was originally published in The UFO Digest from May and June, 2014 issues.

 

Part II of this article can be seen at http://ufodigest.com/article/psychotronics-0518.

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          Trouble Ahead After DPRK’s FM Visit To Tehran      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
By: Denise Simon | Founders Code So, it appears there is more to the teaming up between Tehran and Pyongyang. The Iranian President Rouhani told the North Korean Foreign Minister in a recent confab to NOT trust the United States. Meanwhile, SecState, Mike Pompeo issued a proposal to North Korea calling for a timeline that would mandate [...]
          Korea remains: Sons receive father's dog tag after 70 years - BBC News      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

BBC News

Korea remains: Sons receive father's dog tag after 70 years
BBC News
Nearly 70 years after he died in combat in the Korean War, a US army medic's dog tag is back home with his two sons. The dog tag was among the 55 boxes of remains that North Korea handed over to American officials on 27 July after a request by ...
Sons feel mixed emotions after North Korea returns dad's dog tagPBS NewsHour
Missing Korean War medic's sons receive dad's dog tagNew York Post

all 42 news articles »

          'Insulting': North Korea hits out at US for call to enforce sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Pyongyang accuses Trump administration of following ‘outdated acting script’ as denuclearisation deal shows few signs of progress

North Korea has denounced US calls for international sanctions to be enforced despite Pyongyang’s goodwill moves, saying progress on denuclearisation cannot be expected if Washington follows an “outdated acting script”.

North Korea’s foreign ministry said on Thursday that Pyongyang had stopped nuclear and missile tests, dismantled a nuclear test ground and returned the remains of US soldiers killed in the 1950-53 Korean war. Yet Washington was still insisting on “denuclearisation first” and had “responded to our expectation by inciting international sanctions and pressure”.

Continue reading...
          'Insulting': North Korea hits out at US for call to enforce sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea has denounced US calls for international sanctions to be enforced despite Pyongyang’s goodwill moves, saying progress on denuclearisation cannot be expected if Washington follows an “outdated acting script”. North Korea’s foreign...
          Laura Ingraham sparks outrage after saying the 'America that we know and love doesn't exist anymore' because of 'demographic changes'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

laura ingraham

  • Laura Ingraham sparked outrage on Wednesday when she said on her Fox News show that the "America that we know and love doesn't exist anymore" because of "demographic changes."
  • Many responded on Twitter, with some describing the "Ingraham Angle" host as racist.
  • The show has been the subject of two advertiser boycotts since it premiered in October. 

Laura Ingraham has come under fire for comments she made about immigration on her Fox News show on Wednesday.

At the top of "The Ingraham Angle," she weighed in on a podcast's recent interview with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a Democratic candidate for a House seat in New York, in which she said the upper-middle-class, moderate Americans many in the Democratic Party try to pander to no longer exist.

Ingraham commented on the number of times Ocasio-Cortez, 28, said "like" in the clip, adding that she was "kind of right in a general sense."

"In some parts of the country it does seem like the America that we know and love doesn't exist anymore," Ingraham said. "Massive demographic changes have been foisted upon the American people. And they're changes that none of us ever voted for and most of us don't like."

She continued: "From Virginia to California, we see stark examples of how radically, in some ways, the country has changed. Now, much of this is related to both illegal and in some cases legal immigration that, of course, progressives love."

Ingraham said "it's not about race or ethnicity" at the end of her monologue. But critics quickly lambasted her on Twitter, saying her comments played into the white-nationalist rhetoric that has sparked tensions across the country.

Some even renewed calls for an advertising boycott. Since "The Ingraham Angle" premiered in October, it has been the subject of two waves of boycotts over controversial comments.

The first boycott came in March, after Ingraham said David Hogg, a gun-control activist who survived the shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida, was "whining" when he spoke about getting rejected by his top college choices. Hogg responded by tweeting a list of companies that advertised on Ingraham's show and encouraging people to contact them to complain.

Advertisers started pulling out almost immediately, and by the following month she had lost more than two dozen.

Hogg called for a second boycott in June after Ingraham described detention centers at the US-Mexico border used to hold immigrant children separated from their parents under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy as being like "summer camps."

The former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke tweeted Wednesday's clip, calling it "one of the most important (truthful) monologues in the history of" mainstream media, then later deleted the tweet, The Daily Beast reported.

Fox News did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Here's a roundup of Twitter criticism:

SEE ALSO: Fox News blasts Parkland survivor's campaign against Laura Ingraham as an attempt 'to silence diverse viewpoints by agenda-driven intimidation efforts'

READ MORE: A Parkland shooting survivor is reigniting his war with Laura Ingraham after the Fox News host compared migrant child detention centers to summer camps. Here are the companies he's urging to stop advertising on her show.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: North Korean defector: Kim Jong Un 'is a terrorist'


          Trump's trade war is already leading to layoffs and pain for American businesses      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

donald trump

  • President Donald Trump is waging a trade war on many fronts, with tariffs on steel, aluminum, Chinese goods, and more.
  • While Trump argues that the tariffs will make the US economy stronger, so far the duties are leading to layoffs.
  • Small businesses across the US are grappling with the increased cost of goods, and some of them are resorting to layoffs to save money.

President Donald Trump's tariffs on imports of steel, aluminum, and some Chinese products have started pushing up prices for many US companies that rely on those items to create final products, forcing many firms to make tough decisions about where to cut costs.

Many large companies have for now decided to pass on those costs to consumers or absorb the losses into their profit margins. But some smaller US businesses have been forced to cut labor costs to offset the higher amounts they're paying for parts.

From Wisconsin to South Carolina, small businesses are starting to lay off employees, and they're citing Trump's tariffs. Many firms have warned that the worst is yet to come.

Some examples:

  • Mid-Continental Nail, the largest US nail producer, laid off 130 workers after steel prices jumped. One of its plant managers said the entire business could shut down over the next few months.
  • Element Electronics, a TV manufacturer, plans to lay off 127 workers from its South Carolina factory as "a result of the new tariffs that were recently and unexpectedly imposed on many goods imported from China."
  • Brinly-Hardy, an Indiana-based maker of lawn-care equipment, laid off 75 workers. "We are collateral damage in this effort," Jane Hardy, the company's CEO, told The Washington Post.
  • The Tampa Bay Times said in April that it was forced to lay off 50 people because of a tariff on Canadian newsprint. Other newspapers in small communities, such as House Speaker Paul Ryan's hometown paper in Janesville, Wisconsin, have also been forced to lay off staff.

Some businesses, such as Moog Music, which manufactures electronic musical instruments, have not taken action but have warned that the tariffs could eventually lead to layoffs. Other small businesses have furloughed workers or paused expansion plans while they wait and see how the trade fights play out. Small operators in industries from lobster fishing to metal shapers have curtailed workers' hours.

While the tariffs are causing acute pain for some companies, more widespread labor-market issues have not yet appeared. Trump's tariffs apply only to a concentrated number of industrial goods, and the total number of US imports hit with tariffs remains low.

The July jobs report showed a steady increase in employment and a strong labor market, but economists have warned that business concerns about tariffs could start to weigh on hiring growth if the trade battles continue to escalate.

According to a study by the Trade Partnership, a free-trade industry group, Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs will result in a net loss of more than 400,000 US jobs. Other estimates of the job losses are somewhat smaller.

Even more effects on jobs could come if Trump follows through on his threat to impose tariffs on imported cars and auto parts:

  • Volvo warned the administration that it could scrap 4,000 planned jobs in South Carolina if the tariff goes into place.
  • Other foreign manufacturers with plants in South Carolina, such as BMW, say they could also be forced to make layoffs.

A study by the Peterson Institute for International Economics found that a 25% auto tariff would lead to the loss of 195,000 US jobs over a three-year period.

SEE ALSO: One map shows why Trump's trade war with China could be a disaster for average Americans

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: North Korean defector: Kim Jong Un 'is a terrorist'


          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          Work Has Begun To Identify Possible Remains Of U.S. Serviceman      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Master Sergeant Charles Hobert McDaniel served as a medic in the Korean War and has been missing ever since. Today, at a hotel near the Pentagon, the agency responsible for recovering the remains of missing service members gave his dog tag to his two sons, Larry and Charles. Though his father's remains have not been identified, Charles McDaniel says he was surprised by his own reaction to just seeing the tag. CHARLES MCDANIEL: I have to say, I didn't think about the emotions that were very deep, even though I was a small boy and have very little memory of my father. But I sat there, and I cried for a while and took a while to compose myself. AILSA CHANG, HOST: The dog tag was included in one of the 55 small wooden boxes North Korea gave to the U.S. last month. According to North Korea, those boxes held the remains of Americans who were killed there decades ago. SHAPIRO: The work to identify those remains has already begun. And
          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          Congress and the White House rein in a flawed chemical security regulation      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Written by Bill Erney, senior director, American Chemistry Council, and Matthew J. Eggars, vice president, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Numerous national security issues dominate the attention of policymakers today – border security, cybersecurity, North Korea, and Iran easily come to mind. While these are weighty subjects, it’s also important that we don’t lose sight of […]
          NYT ‘북 여종업원 기획 탈북’ 상세 보도 큰 파문      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

NYT ‘북 여종업원 기획 탈북’ 상세 보도 큰 파문 -‘이용하고 폐기했다’ 허강일 인터뷰 기사 게재 -유엔 관료 ‘범죄로 간주 될 수 있다’ 박근혜 정권 국정원의 대표적인 무법사태로 손꼽히는 ‘북 여종업원 기획 탈북’에 대해 뉴욕타임스가 그 전모를 상세하게 보도하고 나서 이 사건이 전 세계적인 관심을 피할 수 없게 됐다. 뉴욕타임스는 4일 ‘A North Korean Defector’s Tale ...

The post NYT ‘북 여종업원 기획 탈북’ 상세 보도 큰 파문 appeared first on Newspro Inc..


          CNN, 김정은-트럼프 두 번째 정상회담 열린다      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

CNN, 김정은-트럼프 두 번째 정상회담 열린다 -최근 서신교환 등 긍정적 신호, 올 후반기 열릴 가능성 높아 미국의 뉴스채널인 CNN이 제 2차 북미 정상회담이 올 후반기 즈음에 열릴 것이라고 보도하고 나섰다. CNN은 6일 ‘North Korea hopeful for 2nd Trump-Kim Summit: source-2차 북-미 정상회담 희망하는 북한’이라는 제목의 기사에서 북한을 잘 아는 당국자의 말을 빌어 트럼프와 김정은 사이의 ...

The post CNN, 김정은-트럼프 두 번째 정상회담 열린다 appeared first on Newspro Inc..


          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, meaning people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea, and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception: waivers.
          North Korea chides US sanctions pressure on denuclearization process      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

North Korea chides US sanctions pressure on denuclearization process  Reuters The US says it’s talking with North Korea ‘virtually every day,’

The post North Korea chides US sanctions pressure on denuclearization process appeared first on LIVING STRONG TELEVISION NETWORK.


          Intelligence Testy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
obama, obama jokes, political, humor, cartoon, conservative, hope n' change, hope and change, stilton jarlsberg, trump, intelligence, hacking, Russia, Putin, report
There are two related stories to discuss today, both on the subject of Intelligence. A word which, needless to say when referring to Washington, refers to "spying" instead of anything remotely like "smartness" or "proper brain function."

Specifically, President-elect Donald Trump has made it clear that he doesn't consider US intelligence agencies to be 100% reliable, especially when it comes to their consensus accusation that Vladimir Putin interfered with our election by disguising himself with a pair of Groucho glasses, then driving a schoolbus filled with Cossacks to various polling places in key electoral states.

But before Hope n' Change dives into the details of the "Russian hacking" story, let's look at Barack Obama's recent claim of advising Trump - strictly as a professional courtesy - that as President he should always trust the US intelligence community.

"There are going to be times," the miserable stain on the Oval Office said, "where the only way you can make a good decision is if you have confidence that the process is working, and the people that you put in charge are giving you their very best assessments."

Really, Barry? Is that how you've conducted your presidency? Not according to the Hope n' Change vault...






Let's review a few fun facts. As president, B. Hussein skipped the majority of his intelligence briefings including the one immediately following the debacle in Benghazi. Barry also had nothing but foreign policy failures, and repeatedly placed the blame on his intelligence agencies.

So why should Trump - or the rest of us - invest our trust in the intelligence agencies who failed to see the rise of Isis? Who missed nuclear weapons development by Iran during our negotiations? Who were unable to connect the dots preceding Putin's many successful aggressions - as well as those of China and North Korea.

These are the intelligence agencies whose keen insights helped bring about nightmare scenarios in Syria, Libya, and pretty much every other country which has mosques. Intelligence agencies which failed to flag September 11th as a potentially meaningful day for terrorists to attack in Benghazi.

Intelligence agencies which, at least according to the administration, found it "no big deal" that Hillary (as freaking Secretary of State) put all of our national secrets on an unguarded personal server just so she could dodge future Freedom of Information Act demands to see documents rightfully belonging to the American people.

All of which brings us back to the "Election hacking" story. The intelligence agencies have now offered up their (ahem) official report on this alleged election-changing, super-sophisticated act of cyber terror, and have found that (cue the shower-stabbing music from "Psycho") Vladimir Putin personally ordered a monumental campaign to undermine our election and put his personal buddy, Donald Trump, into office!

But there's one little problem. While the declassified report is happy to draw this apocalyptic conclusion, it offers virtually no proof. We're asked to accept this poppycock on sheer trust, which would be a lot easier if the Obama administration and intelligence agencies had even an iota of credibility anymore.

But let's look at a couple of important things the report says that we can agree with: there was no hacking or interference with any voting or vote-tallying machines, and the intelligence agencies do not assert that the alleged Russian campaign had any influence on voters or the election. Wow.

It is also noteworthy that the intelligence agencies were able to draw such detailed conclusions considering the DNC failed to cooperate with the investigation, and wouldn't grant the FBI access to their computers. And interestingly, the report fails to note that the sensitive emails eventually released by Wikileaks (again, without direct evidence of Russian involvement) weren't even obtained by "hacking," but rather by a simple "phishing" email sent to John Podesta, in which he revealed that his password (and the key to all of the DNC's documents) was..."password."

The report also states that Putin's evil plan to overthrow our election involved schemes like having Russian newscasts criticize Hillary Clinton more than Donald Trump. Which apparently made a huge impact on the many voters whose primary source of information was Russian newscasts.

We could go on and on (and already have!) but our point is this: thanks to the Obama administration our intelligence agencies no longer have a whit of credibility, nor does their preposterously politicized "Russian hacking" report.

Considering 8 years of wall-to-wall failures, it's not surprising that Americans have decided to turn their backs on alleged "Intelligence" in favor of Donald Trump's promise of common sense.


          Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N. - diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said.

          Kim Jong-Un strips down to undershirt in heatwave, leaving wife Ri Sol-ju to hold his grey suit jacket      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea's Korean Central News Agency released a series of pictures of the country's leader, Kim Jong-un, wearing a white undershirt while visiting a factory with his wife, Ri Sol-ju.Kim had originally showed up to the Kumsanpho Fish Pickling F
          Imagining nuclear war with North Korea      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The 2020 Commission Report on the North Korean Nuclear Attacks Against the United States: A Speculative Novel. By Jeffrey Lewis.Mariner Books; 304 pages; $15.99. WH Allen; £9.99.

OPEN-SOURCE intelligence is the art of learning things by procuring and analysing unclassified (if not always very accessible) evidence. Jeffrey Lewis, an expert on arms control and disarmament at the Middlebury Institute in Monterey, California, is a keen exponent of this craft. In “The 2020 Commission Report” he applies it to the near future.

The fiction is framed as an American government report, published in 2023, into the loss of 3m lives—1.4m of them Americans—to North Korean nuclear weapons in March 2020. Like the reports of the Roberts Commission on Pearl Harbour and the 9/11 Commission, it finds that the disaster could have been avoided, but that the evidence of the escalating threat was missed—because the people in charge were misreading the world they...


          Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N. - diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said.

          Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N. - diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said.

          Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N.: diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said.

          Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N.: diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said.
          North Korea chides U.S. sanctions pressure on denuclearization process      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea on Thursday denounced U.S. calls for enforcing international sanctions despite its goodwill moves and said progress on denuclearization promises could not be expected if Washington followed an "outdated acting script."
          Worse than 'Fake News': The Forced Conformity of the Media!      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Helga Zepp-LaRouche giving an interview to an independent news media organization after the Schiller Institute's conference in early summer 2018. (Photo: Michelle Rasmussen / EIRNS)

by Helga Zepp-LaRouche, Chairwoman of the German political party BüSo, the Civil Rights Solidarity Party. You can follow Helga on twitter @ZeppLaRouche.

The following is an English translation of an article appearing in the German newspaper, Neue Solidarität.

Aug. 4—We should have learned from the 1920s and 1930s that the spread of cultural pessimism throughout the population has fatal consequences. But such pessimism is spreading today in many Western societies, and especially in Germany, in the face of uncertain future options, with the result that more and more citizens have completely given up the hope of being able to make a difference through their own participation, or they are joining right-wing parties that provide an outlet for anger but offer no solutions. The culprit in this development is not least the political establishment, which leads us to accept a “TINA” politics—TINA is the acronym for “there is no alternative”—and the forced conformity of the mainstream media, which suppress all messages that point to alternatives.

We are living through what is probably the greatest strategic change of all time. Under the leadership of the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa), the majority of the developing countries are currently focussing on close win-win cooperation, with the aim of achieving the leap to the status of industrialized nations, and a good standard of living for their entire populations as quickly as possible. The 10th BRICS Summit in Johannesburg July 25-27 included some of the largest and most important international organizations of developing countries, such as the Group of 77, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), Mercosur, and the African Union, which were there to join forces with the BRICS in what might be called the Global South initiative.

The New Silk Road is Changing Everything

China’s Belt and Road Initiative, and the idea that relations are no longer based on geopolitical confrontation but on mutual benefit, have changed the political climate in many regions of the world in a completely positive way. For example, the election victory of newly designated Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan has created for the first time the potential to settle the conflict between India and Pakistan. Khan promised to ensure that his country takes two steps toward India for every step that India takes towards Pakistan. The cooperation between the BRICS countries also has its impact on Pakistan; China has traditionally good relations with Pakistan, and just now the Russian and Pakistani navies had a high-level meeting, after the first-ever joint manoeuvres of Russian and Pakistani ground troops took place just one year ago.

The Horn of Africa is also embraced by the new spirit of cooperation. There the hitherto mutually hostile states of Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea and Ethiopia are massively expanding their mutual diplomatic and economic relations, largely thanks to Chinese investment, such as in the construction of the railway from Djibouti to Addis Abeba.

And, in contrast to the consistently negative media coverage of the progress of negotiations between North and South Korea and the United States, this process is on a good track, with the option that a leading North Korean government official may speak in New York before the upcoming UN General Assembly in September.

Meanwhile, the Syrian government has begun the economic reconstruction of the province of Aleppo. The first part of a three-phase program is the reconstruction of the infrastructure, the second step is the specific provisioning of each individual family, and the third phase is the return of people to a safe environment, as the Deputy Governor of the province, Hamid Kenno, stressed. At the same time, the Russian military has helped create a refugee center in Syria that will welcome refugees returning from Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey, and assist them in their return to their homes. An inter-ministerial coordination committee of the Russian Foreign and Defense Ministries has taken over the orderly repatriation of the refugees.

You Aren't Hearing the Good News

One might assume that these developments would dominate headlines, immediately bringing hope to all clear-thinking people that world peace has become more secure, poverty can be overcome, and the refugee crisis can be resolved in a human way. Instead, the media do not say a word about the “Global South” initiative. An article in the German national daily, Die Welt, furnished with much geopolitical spin, cites Xi Jinping’s speech at the BRICS Summit: “Africa has more development potential than any other region in the world.” And what does the author conclude? That “China is working to build its empire” and the upcoming summit between China and the African nations in Beijing this September is just Xi Jinping’s “charm offensive.”

Of course, this censorship of good news has the purpose of depicting the politics of the old neo-liberal paradigm as having no alternative. If China—incidentally, along with India, Russia and Japan—now demonstrates that Africa can indeed be industrialized, and if that were truthfully reported, then someone might think to ask why the African continent, after centuries of colonialism and decades of the IMF’s notorious credit conditionalities, is in its current precarious state, and whether this is not a major cause of the refugee crisis.

Instead of responding to China’s repeated offer to work together with the African states on their industrialization in the context of the New Silk Road, the German government is blocking Chinese investments in Germany, such as the recent acquisition of the precision machinery manufacturer Leifeld Metal Spinning, although various surveys confirm that Chinese investors have always taken care to increase the number of jobs and raise wages. Where was the government’s veto when, in recent years, dozens of American and British hedge funds have taken everything from mid-sized companies to housing companies and infrastructure, carved out the choicest portions to sell, and closed down the rest as socially unacceptable?

It is an absurd idea to think that one could halt the rise of emerging and developing countries—India and China alone account for 2.6 billion people—and impose the neo-liberal model of geopolitics as the only possible option on the rest of the world. Blair’s and Obama’s policies of converting the whole world to Western democracy through regime change and “humanitarian” interventions, as a sort of modern crusade, have clearly failed. Neither China nor Russia wants this model, and more and more developing countries see the Chinese model as the model for their own development.

The reason is that the BRICS offer a form of cooperation that focuses on mutual development, while “the West” prefers the neo-liberal model of profit maximization for the few at the expense of the many. It is also not overlooked in the rest of the world that the EU is slipping into more and more disagreement between its member states, whether in dealing with the refugee crisis; in choosing between greater integration versus emphasis on sovereignty; or in relations with China, Russia and the United States.

Looking at the world through Eurocentric glasses obscures the view that the greater part of humanity, represented by the BRICS and Global South, has drawn from the neo-liberal policies of the West the conclusion that a revision of the current system of global governance is urgently needed, and that this reorganization cannot be left to the West.

Instead of arrogantly continuing to sit on the high horse of egoism in their supposed superiority and soon landing their own populations on the margins of history, the nations of Europe, and the United States, should look to the offers from China and Russia for cooperation and co-creation of the New Paradigm. Despite the punitive tariffs imposed by Trump, China continues to offer cooperation with the United States in order to overcome the trade deficit through joint ventures in third countries. A spokeswoman for China’s Ministry of Commerce has just said, “We always believe that bad things can be turned into good ones and challenges can be turned into opportunities.”

And at the just-ended ASEAN Summit in Singapore, Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov recalled Putin’s words at the 2016 Russia-ASEAN Summit in Sochi, where he called on partner-countries to be aware of the huge geopolitical and geo-economic potential of the Eurasian continent, where the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU), the Shanghai Corporation Organization (SCO) and Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) complement each other. Lavrov stressed that the door remains open to the EU, and no one should doubt that the EU should be interested in it purely for pragmatic economic and business interests.

But one could also find reasons for such cooperation that go beyond the pragmatic. If Europe does not want to completely forget, and lose, its humanistic and classical culture, then we could revive the ideas of Nicholas of Cusa, Leibniz and Schiller, and make our contribution to the development of humanity. You certainly will not read about it in the mainstream media. But you can read it here.

CHECK OUT HELGA'S LATEST REPORT
ON THE WORLD LANDBRIDGE


          North Korea: US not adhering to its side of the bargain since Trump-Kim summit      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea issued a forceful statement Thursday against what it said were elements of the US government which are not adhering to the spirit of the dialogue established by US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the Singapore summit hin June.

          North Korea: US not adhering to its side of the bargain since Trump-Kim summit - CNN      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

CNN

North Korea: US not adhering to its side of the bargain since Trump-Kim summit
CNN
(CNN) North Korea issued a forceful statement Thursday against what it said were elements of the US government which are not adhering to the spirit of the dialogue established by US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the ...
North Korea threatens to stall denuclearization in warning to USFox News
North Korea chides US sanctions pressure on denuclearization processReuters
The US says it's talking with North Korea 'virtually every day,' but they're getting nowhereBusiness Insider
Chron.com
all 999 news articles »

          Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N. - diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said.

          North Korea blasts "shameless and impertinent behavior" from the U.S.      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Thursday's statement from the hermit kingdom calls out "high-level officials within the U.S." who are keeping pressure up against North Korea

          North Korea chides U.S. sanctions pressure on denuclearization process      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea on Thursday denounced U.S. calls for enforcing international sanctions despite its goodwill moves and said progress on denuclearization promises could not be expected if Washington followed an "outdated acting script."

          Trump Weighs In On IG Report, North Korea, Immigration In Impromptu News Conference       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET President Trump, in a freewheeling impromptu news conference in front of the White House on Friday morning, said the Justice Department inspector general's report looking into the FBI's investigation of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server "totally exonerates me." Trump asserted, "I did nothing wrong. There was no collusion, there was no obstruction, and the IG report yesterday went a long way to show that." He continued, "I think the Mueller investigation has been totally discredited." The nearly 600-page report by the Department of Justice inspector general did not look into Trump's campaign activities and is completely separate from independent counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign. It concluded there was no evidence of bias in the FBI investigation of Clinton's use of a private email server but was sharply critical of former FBI Director James Comey, saying he violated policy and practice
          President Trump Says North Korea Summit Still Possible      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Less than 24 hours after President Trump sent notice to North Korea that he was canceling next month's summit with Kim Jong Un, Trump told reporters Friday that the meeting could still happen as planned. Using one of his favorite phrases, Trump told reporters, "We'll see what happens," adding, "it could even be the 12th." The original summit date was June 12. Trump said, "We're talking to them now. They very much want to do it. We'd like to do it. We'll see what happens." Friday evening, Trump reiterated those sentiments on Twitter , writing that "we are having very productive talks with North Korea about reinstating the Summit." Asked by a reporter whether North Korea was playing games with him, Trump responded that "everybody plays games, you know that better than anybody." Trump seemed pleased by the conciliatory tone of a North Korean statement issued after the summit was canceled Thursday, saying Pyongyang was "willing to give the U.S. time and opportunities" to reconsider talks
          What Led To New York City's Legislation To Cap The Number Of Ride-Hailing Vehicles      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          Zimbabwe Cracks Down On Opposition After Disputed Presidential Election      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          California Wildfires Set Off Big Political Fight On Who Should Pay For Damage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          How Tribune Media's $3.9 Billion Merger With Sinclair Fell Apart      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, meaning people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea, and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception: waivers.
          North Korea: US not adhering to its side of the bargain since Trump-Kim summit      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea issued a forceful statement Thursday against what it said were elements of the US govern
          The US says it's talking with North Korea 'virtually every day,' but they're getting nowhere      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Donald Trump Kim Jong UnREUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

  • The US and North Korea are in direct communication "virtually every day," according to a US State Department spokeswoman.
  • Talks appear to have hit a roadblock as both sides are beginning to publicly express their frustration with each other.
  • The US is concerned about reports that North Korea is continuing to advance its weapons programs, while the North is irritated by the perpetuation of sanctions and limited US interest in a peace treaty to end the Korean War.

The US and North Korea are apparently in regular communication, engaging one another by phone, email, or message on an almost-daily basis even as both sides express frustration with the other.

"I can tell you we continue to have conversations virtually every day, every other day or so with the North Koreans," US State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert explained to reporters Thursday, "When I say 'conversations,' that can be by phone, that can be my message, that can be by email. We continue to have conversations with the government," Nauert said.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

NOW WATCH: I spent a day with Border Patrol agents at the US-Mexico border

See Also:


          ‘Very romantic’: Fox News hosts starry-eyed after Kim Jong-un takes wife on date to fish factory      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Preview Fox News, known for its conservative political slant, now appears to be somewhat partial towards North Korea’s leader. Still calling Kim Jong-un a “dictator,” the channel’s hosts noted the “romantic” was showing his “softer side.”
Read Full Article at RT.com
          At Pentagon, Pence pushes for Space Force by 2020      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Preview The Trump administration wants to establish the Space Force as the sixth branch of the US military by 2020, Vice President Mike Pence said, warning about ‘threats’ from Russia, China, North Korea and Iran.
Read Full Article at RT.com
          The US says it's talking with North Korea 'virtually every day,' but they're getting nowhere - Business Insider      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Business Insider

The US says it's talking with North Korea 'virtually every day,' but they're getting nowhere
Business Insider
The US and North Korea are in direct communication "virtually every day," according to a US State Department spokeswoman. Talks appear to have hit a roadblock as both sides are beginning to publicly express their frustration with each other. The US is ...

and more »

          North Korea blasts “shameless and impertinent behavior” from the U.S.      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

North Korea called out the U.S.’ “shameless and impertinent behavior,” according to a press release out Thursday via a foreign ministry spokesperson. It also claims that “high-level officials within the U.S. administration are making baseline allegations against [North Korea] and making desperate attempts at intensifying the international sanctions and pressure.” Relations between North Korea and […]

The post North Korea blasts “shameless and impertinent behavior” from the U.S. appeared first on WCBI TV | Your News Leader.


          North Korea threatens to end ‘stability’ on Korean Peninsula      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea threatened to end the “hard-won atmosphere of stability on the Korean Peninsula” on Thursday, in response to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s efforts to enforce economic sanctions against the regime. The North Korean foreign ministry warned there is no guarantee stability will continue in a message carried by state-run KCNA. Pompeo and other U.S. officials don’t want any international sanctions eased until North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un takes substantial steps to roll back his nuclear weapons and ballistic missile program. Kim’s diplomats have taken offense at this position, which the Trump administration believes is necessary to prevent...
          North Korea condemns new US sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Pyongyang, Aug 10 (IANS) North Korea has condemned the US for placing fresh sanctions on it and called on the country to respond to its efforts to improve bilateral ties. North Korea remains unchanged in its will to implement agreements made by the top...
          N. Korea says US ‘throwing cold water’ on denuclearisation progress      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
N. Korea says US ‘throwing cold water’ on denuclearisation progress#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000Seoul: North Korea on Thursday accused the United States of acting in bad faith, saying Washington’s push for full sanctions pressure against Pyongyang would stall progress on the denuclearisation of the Korean Peninsula. During landmark talks with US President Donald Trump in June, the North’s leader Kim Jong Un signed up to a vague commitment …
          Rival Koreas set Monday meeting to prepare for leaders' summit      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Representatives of the rival Koreas will meet Monday for high-level talks meant to prepare for a summit between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, South Korea said, the third such meeting between the leaders in recent months.

The announcement Thursday by the...


          North Korea threatens to end ‘stability’ on Korean Peninsula      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea threatened to end the “hard-won atmosphere of stability on the Korean Peninsula” on Thursday, in response to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s efforts to enforce economic sanctions against the regime. The North Korean foreign ministry warned there is no guarantee stability will continue in a message carried by state-run KCNA. Pompeo and other U.S. officials don’t want any international sanctions eased until North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un takes substantial steps to roll back his nuclear weapons and ballistic missile program. Kim’s diplomats have taken offense at this position, which the Trump administration believes is necessary to prevent...
          John Bolton, Nikki Haley pressure Trump on North Korea nuke talks      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Two months have gone by since the Singapore summit with no serious steps toward denuclearization by North Korea, a reality that has left the Trump administration offering mixed messages on how it plans to proceed in negotiations amid growing concern that Washington is being played by Pyongyang.

Hard-liners advising President ...

          Russia, China Block U.S. Bid To Blacklist Moscow Bank At UN      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China have blocked a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank and Moscow-based North Korean banker to a UN blacklist, UN diplomats have said.
          Announcing IGNITION 2018 speakers: Don't miss Scott Galloway, Janice Min, Steve Case, and more!      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Prepare for the year ahead with insights from today's brightest minds. Join us at Business Insider's flagship conference, IGNITION: Media, Technology & Transformation, now in its ninth year.

IGNITION 2017_Scott Galloway

This year's speakers are innovators transforming media, technology, and society. The lineup is packed with top executives from some of the hottest tech startups and innovative corporate enterprises. Thought leaders from Dropbox, Hulu, Etsy, and Openwater will be discussing critical topics, from AI and robotics to the future of entertainment, healthcare, finance, and transportation.

Want to hear how Keller Rinaudo is working to build a life-saving drone-delivery service in the most remote regions of the world? Learn how Dropbox CEO and cofounder Drew Houston built his $12 billion company? Hear from AOL cofounder and entrepreneur Steve Case about his investing approach that he calls "Rise of the Rest"?

Check out the remarkable lineup of speakers confirmed so far:

  • Victoria Canal, singer-songwriter
  • Steve Case, chairman and CEO, Revolution; cofounder, AOL
  • Barbara Corcoran of ABC's "Shark Tank"
  • Randy Freer, CEO, Hulu
  • Scott Galloway, founder, Gartner L2; professor of marketing, NYU Stern
  • Drew Houston, cofounder and CEO, Dropbox
  • Dr. Mary Lou Jepsen, CEO and founder, Openwater
  • Janice Min, media consultant, NBCUniversal Cable Entertainment and Valence Media
  • Keller Rinaudo, CEO and cofounder, Zipline
  • Joe and Anthony Russo, codirectors of "Avengers: Infinity War"; cofounders, AGBO
  • Josh Silverman, CEO, Etsy
  • Padmasree Warrior, CEO and CDO of NIO US

One ticket, two days, 50-plus insightful speakers, over 600 executives.

Register now for IGNITION 2018.

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NOW WATCH: North Korean defector: Kim Jong Un 'is a terrorist'


          North Korea Denounces U.S. Officials For ‘Intensifying Sanctions’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Pyongyang called on the U.S. to reciprocate its "goodwill measures" by easing sanctions
          North Korea lashes out at US diplomats over sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Pyongyang says the US is following an "outdated script" which is blocking progress on denuclearisation.
          North Korea Denounces U.S. Officials For ‘Intensifying Sanctions’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Pyongyang called on the U.S. to reciprocate its "goodwill measures" by easing sanctions
          how many haircuts are allowed in north korea       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
how many haircuts are allowed in north korea

          North Korea threatens to stall denuclearization in warning to US      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea on Thursday threatened to stall the denuclearization of its missile program if the U.S. continues to abide by an "outdated acting script" amid Washington's calls to enforce sanctions against the regime.
          North Korea accuses US for pressing international sanctions - Reuters      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A North Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman accused the US on pressing for international sanctions on the North, in a statement on state-run KCNA late-Thursday, Reuters reports.

The spokesman said that the progress on denuclearization promises could not be expected if Washington continues to follow an “outdated acting script.”

North Korea was still willing to implement a broad agreement made at the landmark June 12 summit in Singapore between the US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, he added.

North Korea’s Foreign Ministry noted: it had stopped testing missiles, conducted nuclear tests and dismantled “the nuclear test ground,” yet the United States still insisted on “denuclearisation first.” “However, the U.S. responded to our expectation by inciting international sanctions and pressure against the DPRK.”


          N Korea says U.S. 'throwing cold water' on denuclearisation progress      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea on Thursday accused the United States of acting in bad faith, saying Washington's push for full sanctions pressure against Pyongyang would stall progress on the denuclearisation…
          Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N.: diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N.: diplomatsRussia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said. The United States made the proposal to the 15-member U.N. Security Council North Korea sanctions committee, which operates by consensus.



          North Korea: US not adhering to its side of the bargain since Trump-Kim summit - CNN      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

CNN

North Korea: US not adhering to its side of the bargain since Trump-Kim summit
CNN
(CNN) North Korea issued a forceful statement Thursday against what it said were elements of the US government which are not adhering to the spirit of the dialogue established by US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the ...
North Korea blasts US' "shameless and impertinent behavior" as tensions remain highCBS News
North Korea chides US sanctions pressure on denuclearization processReuters
North Korea threatens to stall denuclearization in warning to USFox News
The Hill -Washington Times -38 North -Channel NewsAsia
all 1,069 news articles »

          Cal Fire Chief Discusses How Firefighters Are Battling California Blazes      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          North, South Korea to begin joint survey on roads next week for cross-border connection      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
SEOUL: North Korea and South Korea have agreed to start a joint survey of cross-border roads next week as part of efforts to modernise and reconnect them across their borders, the unification ministry said Friday (Aug 10).  The decision came after the North called off a planned on-site inspection ...
          Russia, China object to U.S. proposal to blacklist Russian bank at U.N.: diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said.

          North Korea vows to retain nuclear knowledge      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Roadblock over denuclearisation strains Pyongyang-Washington relations Reported by FT.com 16 minutes ago.
          Three South Korean firms imported North Korean coal in breach of sanctions: customs service      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Three South Korean firms imported coal from North Korea disguised as Russian products in violation of U.N. sanctions, South Korea's customs agency said on Friday. Reported by Reuters 20 minutes ago.
          Russia, China Block US Bid To Blacklist Moscow Bank At UN      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
(RFE/RL) — Russia and China have blocked a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank and Moscow-based North Korean banker to a UN blacklist, UN diplomats have said.

Both Russia and China raised objections late on August 9 to a U.S. request that the UN sanctions committee impose an asset freeze ... Reported by Eurasia Review 24 minutes ago.
          Will the immigration issue will affect the midterms?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Political insider Bill Press joins Larry King on PoliticKING to discuss if the immigration issue will affect the midterms and the future of the U.S.-North Korea relations.
          Russia, China Object To Proposed U.N. Blacklist Of Russian Bank      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley walk together to a press briefing at U.N. headquarters in New York City, New York, U.S., July 20, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid The list of proposed designations mirrors new sanctions announced by the U.S. Treasury last week.
          Three South Korean firms imported North Korean coal in breach of sanctions - customs service      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Three South Korean firms imported coal from North Korea disguised as Russian products in violation of U.N. sanctions, South Korea's customs agency said on Friday.

          North Korea slams U.S. calls for 'preemptive denuclearization'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea denounced the United States on Friday while raising the issue of denuclearization at the center of U.S. foreign policy objectives.
          Russia, China object to US proposal to blacklist Russian bank at UN - diplomats      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia and China on Thursday objected to a U.S. proposal to add a Russian bank, Moscow-based North Korean banker and two other entities to a U.N. Security Council blacklist, diplomats said.
          Kim Jong-un tries to stay cool in North Korean heatwave - as he tries to be 'a man of the people'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
none
          North Korea Denounces U.S. Officials For ‘Intensifying Sanctions’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Pyongyang called on the U.S. to reciprocate its "goodwill measures" by easing sanctions
          What Led To New York City's Legislation To Cap The Number Of Ride-Hailing Vehicles      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          Zimbabwe Cracks Down On Opposition After Disputed Presidential Election      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          IOC disappointed UN won’t grant North Korea sports exemption      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
LAUSANNE, Switzerland — IOC President Thomas Bach says he is disappointed the United Nations will not allow sports equipment to be sent to North Korea. The International Olympic Committee's request was rejected by the U.N. Security Council Sanctions Committee. Bach says "this makes it more […]
          North Korea vows to retain nuclear knowledge      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Roadblock over denuclearisation strains Pyongyang-Washington relations
          Hard-Liners Push Trump to Ramp up Pressure on North Koreans Over Slow Pace of Denuclearization Talks      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Two months have gone by since the Singapore summit with no serious steps toward denuclearization by North Korea.
          Iran, N. Korea Grow Stockpile of Ballistic Missiles Capable of Striking U.S. Troops, Allies, Israel      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Iran and North Korea are growing their stockpile of ballistic missiles, including long-range missiles capable of striking U.S. assets, American allies, and even the continental United States, according to new congressional reports that shine a light on efforts by these rogue nations to advance their military capabilities.

The post Iran, N. Korea Grow Stockpile of Ballistic Missiles Capable of Striking U.S. Troops, Allies, Israel appeared first on Worthy Christian News.


           South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
SKorea seeking prosecutions for alleged illegal imports of NKorean coal, pig iron
          Sons of Korean War Vet receive father's dog tags at Arlington ceremony      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korean officials accused Secretary of State Mike Pompeo of upping American demands for denuclearization without sanctions relief in an angry rhetorical blast. Despite the stalemated talks between North Korea and the U.S., one small gesture from Kim's regime is making one family very happy.
          South Korean firms imported coal from North in breach of sanctions, says customs service      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Three South Korean firms imported coal from North Korea disguised as Russian products in violation of UN resolutions in a fresh sign of loosening sanctions, South Korea’s customs agency said on Friday. Seoul has been examining nine cases of potential imports of North Korean coal, which would breach a resolution passed last August by the UN Security Council to choke off funding for Pyongyang’s nuclear and ballistic missile programmes. The customs service did not identify the...
          Press Releases: Previewing the Imposition of Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare Elimination Sanctions on Russia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Special Briefing
Senior State Department Officials
Via Teleconference
August 8, 2018


MODERATOR: Thank you so much. Good afternoon, everyone. And thanks so much for joining us for this background call, conference call on the imposition of Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare Elimination Act sanctions on Russia.

State Department officials joining us today are [Senior State Department Official Number One]. He will be referred to as Senior State Department Official Number One. Also, [Senior State Department Official Two] will be referred to as Senior State Department Official Number Two.

I’ll turn it over to [Senior State Department Official One] who will open up our call, and then we’ll take a few questions. [Senior State Department Official One], go right ahead.

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: Thanks, very much, [Moderator]. Thanks for joining us today, and we appreciate you listening. We’ve got some – we’ve got some things to announce as you will have probably already heard from [Moderator]’s official statement. We are today announcing that we’ve determined under something called the CBW Act, as [Moderator] mentioned, that the Government of the Russian Federation has used chemical or biological weapons against international law or against their own nationals. This is a triggering factor under the CBW Act for the imposition of mandatory sanctions.

We notified Congress today that pursuant to this act we intend to impose sanctions against the Russian Federation in a number of respects, the most significant of which is the imposition of a presumption of denial for all national security sensitive goods or technologies that are controlled by the Department of Commerce pursuant to the Export Administration Regulations. These goods are currently subject to a license – a case-by-case license determination, but we are – henceforth, when these sanctions go into effect, we will be presumptively denying such applications.

We are – in approximately the 22nd of August or so, we anticipate that a Federal Register notice will be put out that will make these official. The congressional notification has gone under the act today. So these things are being set in motion.

There are a number of carve-outs that we are making under the sanctions that are required by the act. Not everything that is mandatory under the act we will be proceeding with at this time. The carve-outs will include a – we will have a waiver for the provision of foreign assistance to Russia and to the Russian people. Our provision of foreign assistance is a tool of U.S. power and influence, and we’re not going to foreswear that just because we have the obligation to impose some sanctions against Russia. So that is going to be a carve-out under this – under these new sanctions.

We are also waiving sanctions with respect to space flight activities, because of course there are space flight actions in which we are engaged with the Russian Federation upon which we depend in some regards. Those will be free to continue on a case-by-case licensing basis. And we are also having a carve-out for safety of commercial passenger aviation because some of these national security sensitive goods in question are ones that perhaps might be important for safety of flight issues, so we are allowing ourselves the ability to continue on a case-by-case basis with those items. And there are a couple of more things like purely commercial end users for civilian end uses will be on a case-by-case basis.

Rather than under that presumption of denial, an export license is also with respect to Russian nationals that work with these sorts of goods while employed by firms in the United States as opposed to elsewhere, as well as exports to wholly-owned subsidiaries of U.S. companies and other foreign companies in Russia.

So there are a few exceptions to this, but the basic rule we will be following the full scope of the mandatory sanctions required by the act. And we’d be happy to take any questions as you like. I should add also, for those of you familiar with the CBW Act, it – there – under its structure, if a series of criteria are not met within, I believe, 90 days from this point – if Russia does meet a series of criteria, it will be – we will have to be in a basis of considering whether or not to impose a second – or what sanctions to impose in a second tranche as specified by the structure of the statute. So hopefully we will not get to that point, but that’s really a question for Russia than for us.

MODERATOR: Okay. And with that we’ll take your questions. And a reminder, this is embargoed until the end of the call. We’ll start with Nick Wadhams from Bloomberg. Hi, Nick.

QUESTION: Thanks for doing the call. [Senior State Department Official One], can you talk a little --

QUESTION: Hi. Can you hear me? Hello?

MODERATOR: Go right ahead, Nick.

QUESTION: Hey. Can you talk a little bit about what the second round of sanctions would look like? And can you also talk about why this is happening now as far as has been reported now by NBC in particular that there had been a two month deadline for the President to make this determination and then impose the sanctions, but that deadline expired a little while ago? So what accounted for the delay? Thank you.

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: I’ll take the first bit first, if I might. These things are just intrinsically complicated and hard. I think we have invoked these sanctions under the act on three – this is the third time over the years. In both previous occasions, both with Syria in 2013 and with the DPRK in connection – or resulting from North Korea’s use of a VX nerve agent in the assassination in Kuala Lumpur. In both of those cases, the deadline was also not met. So unfortunately, it is more the norm than an unusual thing for us to be slightly late. These are complicated pieces of moving equipment, if you will, inside the U.S. bureaucracy, but we took our time to do our homework right, and we are – we have made the determination that you are hearing from us about today.

MODERATOR: Okay. Next question goes to Carol Morello with The Washington Post. Oh, sorry.

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: Forgive me, I forgot to answer the question about the second round of sanctions. My mistake.

Obviously, we don’t forecast sanctions in advance, but simply by virtue of what the statute sets out, you will be able to see in the U.S. code that if the executive branch cannot certify that Russia has met a series of conditions within three months of the initial round of sanctions, the second round must be imposed. Those conditions are pretty demanding, but you can see them for yourself in the statute. They include, for example, that Russia is no longer using chemical or biological weapons in violation of international law, or using lethal chemical or biological weapons against its own nationals; secondly, that Russia has provided reliable assurances that it will not in the future engage in such activities; and also that Russia is willing to allow on-site inspections by United Nations observers or other internationally recognized impartial observers, or other reliable means exist to ensure that the government is not using chemical or biological weapons in violation of international law, et cetera.

So that – those are the criteria. If those criteria are not met – and as I said before, this is not something that we’re in a position to forecast, but certainly is really up to Russia to make that decision, whether they meet this criteria. The second round of sanctions under the CBW Act will require three of a number of sanctions – at least three of a number of sanctions to be imposed. They are in general more draconian than the first round. It’s designed to be a sliding scale of pressure, as I understand the creation of the law. And you can find those in Section 307(B) of the act if you’re curious.

MODERATOR: Okay. Next question goes to Carol Morello from The Washington Post.

QUESTION: Hi. Could you give us some idea about the money, the dollar value of the exports and imports that this will affect? And also can you tell us if you have notified the Kremlin of this already? Thank you.

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: The last question – last bit first. Yes, we have notified the Russians. The items affected, the technologies going to – in fact, we also mentioned to our allies as well; I should make sure that’s also clear. We’ve been doing a good deal of diplomatic engagement before we talk to you today, and don’t take it personally.

The – we’re interpreting these – we are applying these sanctions against essentially all state – Russian state-owned or state-funded enterprises. That’s potentially a very great sweep of the Russian economy in terms of the potentially affected end users. I would – not sure the entire numbers, but you – the specific numbers, but it may be that – something on the order of 70 percent of their economy and maybe 40 percent of their workforce falls within those enterprises. So to the degree that they wish to acquire national security controlled goods that fall within the ambit of our prescription here, those are potentially affected. It is possible that this trade – the trade it affected could reach potentially hundreds of millions of dollars, but it also depends upon what Russia – Russian entities in fact apply to purchase. So if they don’t apply for exports of these goods, of course, we don’t have to presume – we don’t have to use the presumption of denial to deny it.

So really, it’s up to Russia how dramatic the impact is. But let me say that overall, historically something upwards of 50 percent of Commerce Department licenses for Russia have included at least one national security controlled item. So this is a non-trivial set of stuff. By dollar value, the top categories of items historically tend to be things like aero gas turbine engines, electric – electronic devices and components, integrated circuits, test and calibration equipment of various sorts, materials, production, equipment, and various things like that. The list is enormously elaborate.

MODERATOR: Okay. Next question goes to Gardiner Harris with The New York Times.

QUESTION: Hi, thanks for doing the call. Two questions. One is: Is there any new information that you have about the poisoning that led to this? What intelligence are you basing your decision on, or was it the original finding back in March that the Russians were to blame for this poisoning? And second: There has of course been this puzzling disconnect seemingly between the Trump administration writ large, the government, and President Trump himself, who keeps repeating that he wants to make ties with Russia better and that that would be a good thing. And doesn’t this action once again seem to contradict the President’s own stated desire to improve relations with Russia? Thanks.

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: Sorry, remind me again the first bit.

QUESTION: Oh, the first bit was, is there – what was the intelligence that you used to determine that Russia --

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: Ah, right.

QUESTION: -- was guilty of providing this nerve agent? Is there new information? Is this old information? Where are you getting the conclusion that Russia is behind this Skripol poisoning?

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: Certainly. I will leave it to others to characterize the current state of our understanding of the Skripol affair. We’ve been very clear that we agree with the assessment that it was a Novichok agent and that the perpetrator was ultimately the Russian Federation. I’ll leave it to others to give those kinds of details of what we currently understand. Obviously, from reading the press, it appears that their investigation is ongoing in terms of the scope and nature of the details and of its implications. But I’ll leave that to others.

With respect to our position on this, this is a question not of Russia policy per se but of implementing laws that Congress has put in place. The criteria for running the clock under the CBW Act began when we made the call back in March that we agreed that the use of chemical weapons had occurred.

This is not about different bits of the administration going in different directions. We are all one administration and we’re all on the same page here. The State Department is part of the administration, and this is all part of an overall approach that’s quite consistent. We are tough on Russia and at the same time we’re quite committed to working to maintain relations because there are important things at stake here. We work on cooperative things where it is possible to do so, and we cry foul when it’s necessary to do so. That’s been a part of our strategy all along and it’s nothing new here.

MODERATOR: Our next question goes to Nick from PBS. Sir? Okay. Well, I’ll head over to Susannah George from AP.

QUESTION: Can you hear me?

MODERATOR: Yes, we can. Go right ahead.

QUESTION: Hi, Heather, sorry, sorry. Sorry, guys. Thanks for doing this. I just had a question – just had a question about the effect of this or what you want the effect to be and what you want the goal to be. So you said that this list – engines, circuits, materials, production equipment – it’s elaborate. To sum it up, what do you expect the effect of trying to cut all of those things off from Russia to be? And what’s the goal? Is the goal to deter Russia from doing this again, or how would you put what the goal of this action is today?

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: Well I think it was pretty clear when Congress passed this that the objective was to punish egregious acts as defined in the statute. We are trying to faithfully implement that. Hopefully it will have a deterrent effect in the future. You can see from the structure of the act that it is – that the second tranche of sanctions is designed to come into play unless and until Russia has done things that go to issues of remedial behavior, right, allowing – giving reliable assurances that nothing like this will happen again; allowing inspectors to verify that that is, in fact, the case. I believe there are criteria in the act with regard to restitution for victims.

So this is about partly making sure this doesn’t happen again and partly making good in response to the problem that has – to the perpetration of this act in the first place.

MODERATOR: Okay. Next question is Susannah George from AP.

QUESTION: Hey there, thanks for doing this call. Two questions. You said that you notified the Kremlin about this. In your talks with Russia, does Russia express any willingness to allow inspections to show compliance? And then if you could just describe how these sanctions are different from the other sanctions that are already in place against Russia. Thanks.

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: Well, it’s not my place to describe the content of diplomatic encounters, so if they wish to characterize what they think, they’re probably pretty good at doing that themselves. With respect to these particular sanctions, I mean just by way of example, I mean, the current framework for export of the goods – some of the change with respect to these technology control items, the current approach is that these are on a case-by-case basis under normal licensing procedures. That will no longer be the case for these items. They’ll be under what we call a presumption of denial. That’s a significant change, so that is a difference from where the status quo was before.

There are a number of sanctions that are in place under a variety of statutes against Russia right now and executive orders, but I will let others characterize most of those. I mean, certainly the Global Magnitsky human rights sanctions have been in place here. That’s not really my lane in the road here at the State Department, so I’m not so expert on all the other bits and pieces. But this is only one of a number of pieces, a number of instances in which we are faithfully implementing sanctions against Russia as required by U.S. law.

MODERATOR: Next question, Lesley Wroughton from Reuters. Lesley, are you there?

QUESTION: I am – I’m here, sorry. Hello. I’m looking at the actual act, and – which contains the provision for sanctions, and I’m wondering if the President has approved an exemption for Russia’s RD-180 rocket engines which NASA depends on for its Atlas rockets. Do you know – I guess the Russians are the sole supplier of those.

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: (Inaudible) national security-controlled item under the EAR. However, we do have a general carve-out in these sanctions for space flight activities, government space cooperation and commercial space launch. It may be, however, that that particular engine is under a different framework.

MODERATOR: Last question goes to Laura Rozen.

QUESTION: Thank you so much for doing this. Following up on Carol Morello’s question, can you how it was communicated to the Kremlin that you are going to impose these sanctions? Who talked to who or met with who?

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: We informed them this afternoon. That’s about as much as I can say right now.

QUESTION: They often tell us on these backgrounders that the – who met with whom at the embassy or whatever.

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: I don’t know what’s normal. I would just leave it at that.

QUESTION: Thanks.

MODERATOR: Okay, thanks, everybody, for joining the call. As a reminder, this is on background to a senior State Department official. The embargo has now been lifted. Have a great day; hope you’re all well.

SENIOR STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICIAL ONE: Thanks very much, everyone.

MODERATOR: Thanks.


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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
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          North Korea will preserve know-how despite denuclearisation: Foreign Minister      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea will preserve its nuclear know-how despite its promise of denuclearisation to the United States, Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho said during a visit to Tehran, Iranian media reported on Thursday.
          8/10/2018: WORLD: Dog tags of MIA given up by N Korea handed to sons      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The two sons of a US Army soldier who went missing during the Korean War were given his long-lost military identity tag yesterday, after North Korea handed over the remains of dozens of US troops. The chipped, stainless steel “dog tags” belonged to...
          N. Korea's top diplomat visits Iran hours after Trump sanctions kick in      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Iran and North Korea have maintained relations for decades. Tehran has previously warned Kim Jong Un's government not to trust the Trump administration.
          South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of — South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in possible violations of UN sanctions. Reporting on preliminary results from a 10-month investigation, the Korea Customs Service said Friday it is seeking prosecutions of three […]
          South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegallySEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea says a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in possible violations of UN sanctions. The Korea Customs Service said Friday it is seeking prosecutions of three local companies and their executives for smuggling or falsely saying North Korean mineral resources came from Russia. Officials say they are also looking into whether any of the 14 vessels that transported North Korean coal violated sanctions banning such shipments.



          Three South Korean firms imported North Korean coal in breach of sanctions: customs service      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Three South Korean firms imported North Korean coal in breach of sanctions: customs serviceSEOUL (Reuters) - Three South Korean firms imported coal from North Korea disguised as Russian products in violation of U.N. sanctions, South Korea's customs agency said on Friday.



          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
SEOUL, South Korea— South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in possible violations of UN sanctions. Sales of its mineral resources is a cash mainstay for North Korea. Hopes are high for economic cooperation and investment in North Korea once sanctions are lifted.
          Sons feel mixed emotions after North Korea returns dad’s dog tag      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Sons feel mixed emotions after North Korea returns dad's dog tag

WASHINGTON — The lone military identification tag that North Korea provided with 55 boxes of human remains last month belonged to Master Sgt. Charles H. McDaniel, an Army medic from Indiana who was killed in the opening months of the Korean War.

The post Sons feel mixed emotions after North Korea returns dad’s dog tag appeared first on Inquirer News.


          Russia, China block US bid to slap North Korea sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
UNITED NATIONS: Russia and China on Thursday blocked a US request to add a Russian bank to a UN sanctions blacklist along with a North Korean official and two entities, diplomats said. The United States last week asked a UN sanctions committee to slap an assets freeze on Agrosoyuz Commercial Bank for allegedly helping North Korea evade UN-imposed restrictions on financial transactions. The request also targeted Ri Jong Won,
          South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in possible violations of UN sanctions. Reporting on preliminary results from a 10-month investigation, the Korea Customs Service said Friday it is seeking prosecutions of three […]
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          N Korea Blasts US Officials Over Calls for Sanctions 'Against Trump's Intention'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Some high-profile White House officials cling to what Pyongyang called an "outdated acting script." The statement comes shortly after the US envoy to the UN and Trump's top national security aide noted that North Korea lags on denuclearization.
          S. Korean Firms Imported N. Korean Coal in Sanctions Breach      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Three South Korean firms imported coal from North Korea disguised as Russian products in violation of U.N. resolutions in a fresh sign of loosening sanctions, South Korea’s customs agency said Friday. Seoul has been examining nine cases of potential imports of North Korean coal, which would breach a resolution passed last August by the U.N. Security Council to choke off funding for Pyongyang’s nuclear and ballistic missile programs. The customs service did not identify the companies...
          Lone Dog Tag Among Repatriated Remains From North Korea Belonged To A Hoosier      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The lone military identification tag that North Korea provided with 55 boxes of human remains last month belonged to an Army medic from Indiana who was killed in combat in 1950.

          Trouble Ahead After DPRK’s FM Visit To Tehran      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Founders Code So, it appears there is more to the teaming up between Tehran and Pyongyang. The Iranian President Rouhani told the North Korean Foreign Minister in a recent confab to NOT trust the United States. Meanwhile, SecState, Mike Pompeo issued a proposal to North Korea calling for a timeline that would mandate North Korea hand over […]
          Say what? Language hurdles plague two Koreas after years of division      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
When South Korean businessman Kim Yong-tae worked with North Koreans at the Kaesong Industrial Complex before it was closed in 2016, one of the biggest challenges was communicating in what is ostensibly a shared language.

          Three South Korean firms imported North Korean coal in breach of sanctions: customs service      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Three South Korean firms imported coal from North Korea disguised as Russian products in violation of U.N. resolutions in a fresh sign of loosening sanctions, South Korea's customs agency said on Friday.

          North Korea Denounces US Officials For 'Intensifying Sanctions' - TIME      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

TIME

North Korea Denounces US Officials For 'Intensifying Sanctions'
TIME
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The rival Koreas plan to hold high-level talks on Monday to prepare for a third summit between their leaders, as Pyongyang called on the United States to reciprocate its “goodwill measures” by easing sanctions and stopping ...
North Korea blasts US' "shameless and impertinent behavior" as tensions remain highCBS News
S. Korean Firms Imported N. Korean Coal in Sanctions BreachVoice of America
South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegallySFGate
New York Times
all 1,306 news articles »

          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

This summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, meaning people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea, and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception: waivers.


          Say what? Language hurdles plague two Koreas after years of division      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
When South Korean businessman Kim Yong-tae worked with North Koreans at the Kaesong Industrial Complex before it was closed in 2016, one of the biggest challenges was communicating in what is ostensibly a shared language. Reported by Reuters India 5 minutes ago.
          North Korea hits out at US diplomats over sanctions and demands to denuclearise      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Pyongyang accuses senior American officials of 'going against the intention' of Donald Trump in 'foolish act that amounts to waiting to see a boiled egg hatch out' Reported by Independent 28 minutes ago.
           South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year,...
           Say what? Language hurdles plague two Koreas after...       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
By Jeongmin Kim and Josh SmithSEOUL, Aug 10 (Reuters) - When South Korean businessman Kim Yong-tae worked with North Koreans at the Kaesong Industrial ...
           North Korea asks US to ease sanctions       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
           North Korea will preserve know-how despite...       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea will preserve its nuclear know-how despite its promise of denuclearisation to the United States, Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho said during a visit...
           Three S.Korean firms imported N.Korean coal in breach...       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
SEOUL, Aug 10 (Reuters) - Three South Korean firms imported coal from North Korea disguised as Russian products in violation of U.N. sanctions, South...
          Seoul reports on illegal imports of North Korean coal      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in ...
          North Korea Are in Violation of Anti-Nuclear Sanctions, According to the United Nations      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea Are in Violation of Anti-Nuclear Sanctions, According to the United Nations#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000 by Adam Yardley -

Donald Trump’s momentous meeting with North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un was nothing short of historical, if it hadn’t been led up to with so much online bluster and ... Reported by One News Page Staff 11 minutes ago.

          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          North Korea: US not adhering to its side of the bargain since Trump-Kim summit - CNN      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

CNN

North Korea: US not adhering to its side of the bargain since Trump-Kim summit
CNN
(CNN) North Korea issued a forceful statement Thursday against what it said were elements of the US government which are not adhering to the spirit of the dialogue established by US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the ...
How South Koreans Are Reckoning With a Changing American Military PresenceNew York Times

all 1,402 news articles »

          Koreas prepare for summit as North asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The plans by the Korean leaders to meet come as Washington and Pyongyang try to follow through on nuclear disarmament vows made at a U.S.-North Korea summit in June between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          Did Major News Networks Ignore a Story About Korean War Remains Returning to the U.S.?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A widely shared meme suggested that mainstream American news outlets largely ignored North Korea's return of the remains of U.S. soldiers killed during the 1950-53 war.
          Say what? Language hurdles plague two Koreas after years of division      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
When South Korean businessman Kim Yong-tae worked with North Koreans at the Kaesong Industrial Complex before it was closed in 2016, one of the biggest challenges was communicating in what is ostensibly a shared language.

          Say what? Language hurdles plague two Koreas after years of division      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
When South Korean businessman Kim Yong-tae worked with North Koreans at the Kaesong Industrial Complex before it was closed in 2016, one of the biggest challenges was communicating in what is ostensibly a shared language.
          Cal Fire Chief Discusses How Firefighters Are Battling California Blazes      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in possible violations of UN sanctions.
          8/10/2018: REGIONAL NEWS: United States cannot be trusted, Iran’s Rouhani tells North Korea      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

SEOUL/BEIRUT (Reuters) – Iranian President Hassan Rouhani told North Korea’s foreign minister that the United States cannot be trusted, Tehran’s state media said, as the United States seeks a deal to rein in the North’s nuclear and missile...
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          S. Korea firms importing coal, iron from North — Sanctions? What sanctions? — Kim Jong Un is WINNING!      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Trump Gets Mooned Kim Jong Un hugs Moon Jae-in Three South Korean firms were caught importing coal and iron from the North last year, Seoul said Friday, in an apparent violation of UN sanctions imposed in August 2017 on the nuclear-armed state. More than 35,000 tonnes of North Korean coal and iron worth 6.6 billion won […]
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          Say what? Language hurdles plague two Koreas after years of division      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
When South Korean businessman Kim Yong-tae worked with North Koreans at the Kaesong Industrial Complex before it was closed in 2016, one of the biggest challenges was communicating in what is ostensibly a shared language.

          South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in possible violations of UN sanctions.
          North, South Korea to discuss plans for leaders' next summit      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
South and North Korean officials will meet Monday to prepare for a summit between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.South Korea’s Unification Ministry, which handles relations between the two Koreas,...
          Red Cross warns of food crisis in North Korea as crops fail in heat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A heat wave in North Korea has led to rice, maize and other crops withering in the fields, "with potentially catastrophic effects", the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies said on Friday.

          Say what? Language hurdles plague two Koreas after years of division      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
When South Korean businessman Kim Yong-tae worked with North Koreans at the Kaesong Industrial Complex before it was closed in 2016, one of the biggest challenges was communicating in what is ostensibly a shared language.

          Diplomats End Singapore Talks With North Korea, US Trading Barbs      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
By Felipe Villamor Southeast Asian foreign ministers concluded their annual meetings in Singapore this week, with China agreeing to a draft of a code of conduct to govern disputes in the South China Sea topping the talks and North Korea on Saturday expressing alarm over Washington’s ...
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          North Korea condemns new US sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea slammed the US for lacking 'basic decorum' in nuke talks.
          South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in possible violations of UN sanctions. Reporting on preliminary results from a 10-month investigation, the Korea Customs Service said Friday it is seeking prosecutions of three […]
          South Korea firms shipped nearly $6M of North Korea coal, pig iron      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Three South Korean companies illegally imported North Korean coal and pig iron in 2017, violating international sanctions adopted in August of last year.
          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, meaning people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea, and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception: waivers.
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          So You Think You're Smarter Than A CIA Agent       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The morning I met Elaine Rich, she was sitting at the kitchen table of her small town home in suburban Maryland trying to estimate refugee flows in Syria. It wasn't the only question she was considering; there were others: Will North Korea launch a new multistage missile before May 10, 2014? Will Russian armed forces enter Kharkiv, Ukraine, by May 10? Rich's answers to these questions would eventually be evaluated by the intelligence community, but she didn't feel much pressure because this wasn't her full-time gig. "I'm just a pharmacist," she said. "Nobody cares about me, nobody knows my name, I don't have a professional reputation at stake. And it's this anonymity which actually gives me freedom to make true forecasts." Rich does make true forecasts; she is curiously good at predicting future world events. Better Than The Pros For the past three years, Rich and 3,000 other average people have been quietly making probability estimates about everything from Venezuelan gas subsidies to
          Russia, China block US bid to slap N.Korea sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
United Nations, United States (AFP) Aug 10, 2018
Russia and China on Thursday blocked a US request to add a Russian bank to a UN sanctions blacklist along with a North Korean official and two entities, diplomats said. The United States last week asked a UN sanctions committee to slap an assets freeze on Agrosoyuz Commercial Bank for allegedly helping North Korea evade UN-imposed restrictions on financial transactions. The request also
          N. Korea says US 'throwing cold water' on denuclearisation progress      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Seoul (AFP) Aug 9, 2018
North Korea on Thursday accused the United States of acting in bad faith, saying Washington's push for full sanctions pressure against Pyongyang would stall progress on the denuclearisation of the Korean Peninsula. During landmark talks with US President Donald Trump in June, the North's leader Kim Jong Un signed up to a vague commitment to denuclearisation, far from the longstanding America
          NDP 2018: Happy 53rd Birthday Singapore!       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Celebrating a shared Singapore
25,000 spectators celebrate diversity and shared Singaporean past at 53rd birthday bash
By Tan Tam Mei, The Straits Times, 10 Aug 2018

Lifting their heads to the sky, the 25,000 people at Singapore's 53rd birthday bash raised their voices to sing Majulah Singapura as fireworks in the formation of five stars shot up into the night sky.

The triumphant pyrotechnic show that ends every National Day Parade was an emotional coda to a day when Singaporeans celebrated their unity in diversity, their home and country, and felt like the sky, indeed, was the limit.

The ninth parade to be held at the Marina Bay floating platform stoked the exhilaration, utilising the elements that have made it a crowd favourite - of sky, sea and that gleaming downtown backdrop.



Making their aerial debut were divers from the Republic of Singapore Navy, who drew thunderous applause as they jumped out of a plane in freefall, opening their chutes to land in the calm waters with their operational gear and fins on.

The cheers got even wilder with the act that followed them, the skydiving Red Lions, who landed gracefully on the platform.

Sports instructor Debbie Poh was thrilled to see the Red Lions and divers together at the show.

"This couldn't have been done elsewhere because the floating platform is right next to the water," said Ms Poh, 30. "It's the perfect venue."



President Halimah Yacob attended the parade for the first time as Singapore's head of state. The crowd rose to its feet as one, cheering and waving flags at her arrival.

Singapore's first female president, with her trademark warmth, stayed after the parade was over to mingle with fellow Singaporeans.

At home, Singaporeans watching the sundown parade on TV got the best view when spectators in the stands held up red and white placards from their funpacks, to form the sentence "WE (heart) SG".

It was a smart idea, said student Jasdev Singh, 14. "The coordination required is really cool and the results turned out awesome... It shows how each one of us can play our part and contribute."



Also contributing were more than 3,000 participants, who performed in the spectacular mass displays of song and dance that showcased home-grown creativity.

We are Singapore, said the 2018 National Day Parade. It was also the year's theme song - a 1987 classic by Hugh Harrison made new by musician Charlie Lim, but still familiar and beloved.

Ms Doris Lim, 40, who works in the IT industry, said the remade version was refreshing. Of the new lyrics, she said: "They are as meaningful as the old ones."



The affection for a shared Singaporean past was palpable, as the audience sang heartily along with the combined schools choir - back after five years - to National Day favourites such as Chan Mali Chan and Munnaeru Vaalibaa.

Like the parades of previous years, this one melded people's favourite things about Singapore into a satisfying whole.

The past was very much with the present, when Singaporeans planted their feet and stood together, and looked to the future.





































































Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong's 2018 National Day Message






Bold, creative planning key to reimagining the future: PM Lee
He points to Kampung Admiralty, where Govt has transformed delivery of key public services
By Tham Yuen-C, Senior Political Correspondent, The Straits Times, 9 Aug 2018

The work of building Singapore is not done, and in reimagining the future, bold, creative planning is paramount, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said yesterday.

Giving an example of this innovative vision, PM Lee cited Kampung Admiralty, the site he chose to deliver his message for National Day this year.

The estate in Woodlands is Singapore's first retirement community, and is also where the Government has transformed the way it delivers education, healthcare and housing to improve lives, he said, adding that these are the three key concerns of Singaporeans when they fret about the cost of living.

"In Singapore, we ensure these key public services are both of high quality and affordable for all Singaporeans, rich or poor. This is how we have helped families to manage their cost of living and given an extra hand to those who need it. For more than five decades, this approach has worked well," he said.

"We are not done building Singapore yet. By planning boldly and creatively, we can reimagine Singapore, remake our heartlands and rejuvenate our communities."



The 11-storey Kampung Admiralty complex took in its first residents last August, and comprises public housing integrated with healthcare, wellness and eldercare facilities plus a childcare centre.

PM Lee described it as a "high-rise kampung where residents are out and about, socialising with family, friends and neighbours, and yet never too far from home".

It is where education, healthcare and housing policies come together for the residents in a "tangible and holistic way", he said, adding that it is a model for future public housing.

Similarly, across Singapore, childcare centres have been opened to ensure all children can have a good start in life, and community healthcare facilities are in the works to bring quality care to people where they live, he added.

"These services will always be affordable," he said.



As for existing public housing estates, the Housing Board will continue to maintain and upgrade them, he said.

Alluding to the hotly discussed issue of the fate of HDB flats when their 99-year leases run out, he added: "Though the leases still have many years to run, we should think ahead about how we can keep older estates in good living condition, and also start to redevelop them, in order to build new homes and towns for future generations."

Unlike in previous National Day messages, PM Lee did not mention the economy's forecast growth figures for the year. But he noted that the economy has continued to grow steadily, around 3 per cent to 3.5 per cent in recent years.

He cautioned, though, that worsening trade tensions between major economies could have repercussions for Singapore, and may even affect international security.

Though tensions in the Korean peninsula had eased after Singapore successfully hosted the summit between United States President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un two months ago, PM Lee said, there are many more challenges to overcome before denuclearisation and peace can be achieved.

Closer to home, PM Lee said Singapore will "strive for good relations with Malaysia, based on mutual benefit and respect" and "continue to work with Indonesia to further our wide-ranging cooperation".



Wrapping up, he said that building Singapore for the next 50 years will be a massive undertaking that will last more than a generation.

"To sustain this project, we will need a strong economy and sound government finances. Most importantly, we need social cohesion, political stability and good government for many years... to carry out and realise our vision."





























Former president Tony Tan tops National Day 2018 awards list
By Elgin Toh, Deputy Political Editor, The Straits Times, 10 Aug 2018

Former president Tony Tan Keng Yam, 78, has been conferred the nation's highest civilian honour, the Order of Temasek (First Class). He tops this year's National Day awards list of 4,041 civilian and 583 military recipients.

Dr Tan, whose public service career spanned nearly four decades, said he was "deeply humbled and greatly honoured" by the award.

In a statement, he said: "Together with many of my generation, I was privileged to serve my country, to see it grow and thrive. It has been truly rewarding to work for, and alongside, so many Singaporeans who envisioned a better future for their children and grandchildren."



Dr Tan is the ninth Singaporean in history to receive the Order of Temasek (First Class). The last to be given the honour was former minister S. Dhanabalan, in 2015. Other recipients were: former presidents S R Nathan and Wee Kim Wee, former ministers Goh Keng Swee, S. Rajaratnam, Hon Sui Sen and Lim Kim San, and former chief justice Yong Pung How.

Dr Tan earned a first-class honours degree in physics from the University of Singapore. He also has a master's degree in operations research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a PhD in applied mathematics from the University of Adelaide.

In 1979, he left his job as general manager of OCBC Bank to enter politics, winning a by-election for the Sembawang seat. He was MP for Sembawang for the next 27 years.

In his ministerial career, he helmed five ministries, starting with education. He was credited for expanding vocational and technical training opportunities and setting up Singapore's third university, the Singapore Management University.

Dr Tan also helmed the finance, health, trade and industry and defence ministries. In 1995, he became deputy prime minister, a role he stayed in for a decade. He left politics in 2006. He was founding Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's first choice to be Singapore's second prime minister, but he declined the post. Mr Lee once praised him for his quick mind and decisiveness. "He would say 'yes or no' and he would stick to it," said Mr Lee. Dr Tan, who is married and has four children, was elected Singapore's seventh president, and served one term from 2011 to 2017.



Mr Dhanabalan paid tribute to his former Cabinet colleague, noting his significant contribution in running for the presidency. The other candidates in the 2011 election made promises beyond the constitutional role of the president, said Mr Dhanabalan, noting: "Dr Tony Tan entered the fray and brought sanity to the whole process."

Coming after Dr Tan in the awards list are two recipients of the Distinguished Service Order: Singapore University of Technology and Design's former chairman Philip Ng Chee Tat, and National University of Singapore Board of Trustees' former chairman Wong Ngit Liong.

Mr Ng, 59, is chief executive of property giant Far East Organization while Mr Wong, 77, founded and heads Venture Corporation.

Besides recognising individuals who have served the nation, this year's National Day awards also paid tribute to two groups which worked on the Pedra Branca case and the Trump-Kim Summit. Formed from various ministries and agencies, the groups received the President's Certificate of Commendation.

As Singaporeans prepare to celebrate National Day today, Dr Tan called on one and all to continue the task of nation-building, saying: "Our nation remains a work in progress, and Singapore needs the service of men and women from all walks of life to build on our strong foundations to ensure an even brighter future for our nation."
























Related
NDP 2018 Theme Song: We Are Singapore

          South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in possible violations of UN sanctions.Reporting on preliminary results...
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          Iran Says U.S. Can't Be Trusted      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
According to Reuters, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani told North Korea’s foreign minister that the United States cannot be trusted, as the United States seeks a deal to rein in the North’s nuclear and missile programs. Iran dismissed a last-minute offer from Washington for talks this week, ...
          IOC chief Thomas Bach disappointed U.N. won’t approve shipment of sports equipment to North Korea      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
IOC president Thomas Bach said he is disappointed the United Nations will not allow sports equipment to be sent to North Korea.The International Olympic Committee’s ...

          Seoul reports on illegal imports of North Korean coal      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in ...

          The Ballad Of The 13-Year-Old North Korean Capitalist      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: In North Korea, private businesses are illegal - or at least they're technically illegal. People aren't supposed to buy and sell stuff to each other, but they do it anyway. NPR's Zoe Chace, of our Planet Money team, has this story of a young North Korean woman who knew a business opportunity when she saw it, and had no qualms about pursuing it. One word - socks. ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: She's just 23 years old. Easily excited, she wears makeup, a bright pink dress, likes to speak a little bit of English. JOO YANG: OK, my name is Joo Yang. I was born in 1991 and my hometown is Chongjin province in North Korea. CHACE: In North Korea when Joo Yang grew up, there wasn't enough food, there wasn't enough of anything. But still, at 13, she was into clothes and pretty things. There weren't many choices of what to wear in North Korea. Things we'd consider basic necessities became little ways to show off your fashion sense. YANG: (Through
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          Three S Korean Firms Buying N Korean Coal May Have Violated Sanctions – Reports      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
MOSCOW (Sputnik) – Three South Korean companies may have violated the UN Security Council resolutions against North Korea by importing the latter's coal and pig iron, Yonhap news agency reported Friday, citing the Korea Customs Office (KCS).
          North Korea revives 'axis of evil' ties with Iran as denuclearisation talks falter      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

North Korea revives 'axis of evil' ties with Iran as denuclearisation talks falterThe arrival of North Korea's foreign minister in Tehran just hours after Donald Trump had reinstated sanctions against Iran was “no coincidence”, analysts believe, and is designed to send the message that Pyongyang is reinforcing its alliances as denuclearisation talks with the US stall. Ri Yong-ho held talks with Javad Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister, on Tuesday, the same day that economic sanctions went back into force against Tehran. The meeting was held at North Korea’s request, Iranian media reported, and the two officials used the two-day visit to express their “satisfaction” with existing bilateral relations and seek better ties in the future.  “The fact that they are meeting at all comes as no surprise, and of course the timing of these talks is no coincidence”, said Rah Jong-il, a former diplomat who previously served as South Korea’s ambassador to London and Tokyo.  The relationship between the two nations - described in January 2002 by President George W. Bush as two of the three states that made up the “axis of evil” - goes back to the Iran-Iraq war, when Pyongyang sided with Tehran and provided its forces with weapons. That subsequently grew into exchanges of increasingly more sophisticated weapons systems, including missiles, and nuclear technology, Mr Rah said.  Hidden trillions: What if North Korea’s economy opened up? And with talks with the US apparently deadlocked, Pyongyang looks to be returning to its historical allies to underline that it still has friends and will not be bullied, Mr Rah added, pointing out that the North’s foreign minister has also recently visited China, Russia and Cuba.  “The North Koreans were quite optimistic after Mr Kim [Jong-un] met Mr Trump in Singapore because they believed that he would be manageable and that they would be able to get what they wanted from him”, Mr Rah told The Telegraph.  That included rewards for phased denuclearisation and the lifting of sanctions, although the US has since stiffened its position and is demanding that the North completes the abolition of its atomic arsenal before sanctions are removed. “Now Mr Trump has put the sanctions back on Iran, the two countries find themselves in the same situation, so Mr Ri’s visit is likely to be an opportunity to coordinate on policies and emphasise their joint front against Washington”, Mr Rah said.  “It may also be an opportunity to exchange information on military hardware and technology,” he added. At a glance | US sanctions against Iran Kim Hyun-wook, a professor at the Korea National Diplomatic Academy, agreed with that assessment, telling The Korea Herald that, “As North Korea does not hold many cards in negotiations with the US, it appears to be diversifying its diplomatic partners and strengthening its alli2ances with them to increase its leverage”.  The timing and content of Mr Ri’s visit to Tehran will not go overlooked in the US, however, and could serve to further stiffen Washington’s resolve to bring Mr Kim’s regime to heel. That, in turn, could provoke a backlash that negates any progress on the future of the Korean Peninsula made to date.  Yet Mr Rah believes that North Korea still sees Mr Trump as its best hope of being accepted as an equal by the international community and even, potentially, retainings its nuclear weapons.  “Mr Trump is the most favourable opponent they have faced in the White House”, he said. “They still believe they can make progress with him and even though Washington has been firmer recently, the North will be working out ways that they can manipulate him for their own purposes”. 



          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          Russia, China block US bid to slap North Korea sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Russia, China block US bid to slap North Korea sanctions
Russia and China on Thursday blocked a US request to add a Russian bank to a UN sanctions blacklist along with a North Korean official and two entities, diplomats said.
The United States last week asked a UN sanctions committee to slap an assets freeze on Agrosoyuz Commercial Bank for allegedly helping North Korea evade UN-imposed restrictions on financial transactions.
The request also targeted Ri Jong Won, the deputy representative of North Korea’s Foreign Trade Bank and two North Korean front companies.
In a response to the council, Russia raised doubts about the allegations while China told the council that it objected to the proposed sanctions designations put forward by the United States.
“We would like to underline that designation requests submitted to the committee should be adequately substantiated by sufficient information,” said the Russian mission to the United Nations in a message to the council seen by AFP.
The request followed a US Treasury Department decision to impose unilateral sanctions on the Russian bank, the North Korean official and the two entities.
The two companies were named as the Dandong Zhongsheng Industry & Trade Company and the Korea Ungum Corporation.
Russia and China have called on the Security Council to consider easing sanctions to reward North Korea for opening up dialogue with the United States and halting missile tests.
But the United States has called for maintaining “maximum pressure” from sanctions until North Korea has fully dismantled its nuclear and ballistic missile programs.
Earlier Thursday, the North Korean foreign ministry issued an angry statement, denouncing the United States for responding to its overtures by “inciting international sanctions and pressure.”
The council last year adopted three rafts of sanctions targeting North Korea’s economy through export and import bans, as well as restrictions on banking.
It was the second time in three weeks that Russia and China have objected to a US request to tighten sanctions on North Korea.
On July 19, the two countries put a six-month hold on a US request to halt all deliveries of refined oil products to North Korea.
The United States had made the request to the sanctions committee after finding that North Korea had exceeded the cap on fuel imports though illegal ship-to-ship transfers at sea.
UN sanctions resolutions place a ceiling for North Korea of 500,000 barrels of refined oil products per year and four million barrels of crude.
A cut-off of oil and fuel would have to be enforced primarily by China, which supplies most of North Korea’s energy needs, but also by Russia, which delivers some oil to Pyongyang.
          South Korean Companies Accused of Illegally Importing Coal From North      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A South Korean agency said three companies violated sanctions by bringing more than 30,000 tons of North Korean coal into the South, falsely identifying it as Russian.
          Red Cross warns of food crisis in North Korea as crops fail in heat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A heat wave in North Korea has led to rice, maize and other crops withering in the fields, "with potentially catastrophic effects", the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies said on Friday.

          Say what? Language hurdles plague two Koreas after years of division      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
When South Korean businessman Kim Yong-tae worked with North Koreans at the Kaesong Industrial Complex before it was closed in 2016, one of the biggest challenges was communicating in what is ostensibly a shared language.

          Say what? Language hurdles plague two Koreas after years of division      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
When South Korean businessman Kim Yong-tae worked with North Koreans at the Kaesong Industrial Complex before it was closed in 2016, one of the biggest challenges was communicating in what is ostensibly a shared language.

          North Korea heatwave: Kim Jong-un strips to his vest      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

recipesworld4ever posted a photo:

North Korea heatwave: Kim Jong-un strips to his vest

via Blogger ift.tt/2M7zZQp


          What Led To New York City's Legislation To Cap The Number Of Ride-Hailing Vehicles      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          How The Trump Administration's Travel Waiver Program Affected A Yemeni Family      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Earlier this summer, the Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban, which means people from Libya, Iran, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, North Korea and Venezuela cannot get visas to the U.S. But there is an exception called a waiver. Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast is here to talk about that. Hi, Kelly. KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Hey. SHAPIRO: Explain what a waiver is. MCEVERS: So basically if you are from one of these banned countries and you can show to the United States that you are not a security risk and that you would face, quote, "undue hardship" if you stayed in your country, you can apply for one of these waivers. And if you get it, you can come to the U.S. SHAPIRO: That makes it sound like this is not a total travel ban. MCEVERS: That is what the administration says. And, by the way, it's one of the reasons that the Supreme Court upheld the ban. But advocates who work with families in these banned countries
          IOC chief Thomas Bach disappointed U.N. won’t approve shipment of sports equipment to North Korea      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
IOC president Thomas Bach said he is disappointed the United Nations will not allow sports equipment to be sent to North Korea.The International Olympic Committee’s ...
          North Korea chides U.S. for pressing sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea accused the United States on Thursday of pushing for international sanctions despite goodwill moves by Pyongyang and said progress on denuclearisation promises could not be expected if Washington continues to follow an "outdated acting script."

          Red Cross warns of food crisis in North Korea as crops fail in heat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A heat wave in North Korea has led to rice, maize and other crops withering in the fields, "with potentially catastrophic effects", the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies said on Friday.

          North Korea’s foreign ministry hits out at the White House: what we learned      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

On August 9, the DPRK foreign ministry published a press release in which it expressed discontent with the United States and accused Washington of being responsible for the lack of progress in talks. The statement comes after nearly two months of negotiations between the U.S. and the DPRK following the June 12 Kim-Trump summit, negotiations which are […]

The post North Korea’s foreign ministry hits out at the White House: what we learned appeared first on NK PRO.


          The View from Jingshan: Beijing’s silence reflects confidence in North Korea      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

After several turbulent years of bilateral Sino-DPRK relations, Beijing finally appears content with the direction of its relationship with North Korea. Mainland Chinese coverage of North Korea affairs is increasingly limited to diplomatic engagements ranging from commemoration of CCP milestones to sports exchanges: amid a trade war with the U.S., development projects worldwide, growing economic […]

The post The View from Jingshan: Beijing’s silence reflects confidence in North Korea appeared first on NK PRO.


          North Korea will preserve know-how despite denuclearisation: FM      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea will preserve its nuclear know-how despite its promise of denuclearisation to the United States, Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho said during a visit to Tehran, Iranian media reported on Thursday. Despite the agreement to denuclearise the Korean peninsula struck during a landmark summit between North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un and US President Donald […]
          The US says it’s talking with North Korea ‘virtually every day,’ but they’re getting nowhere      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un hold a signing ceremony at the conclusion of their summit at the Capella Hotel on the resort island of Sentosa, Singapore June 12, 2018. Picture taken June 12, 2018.The US and North Korea are apparently in regular communication, engaging one another by phone, email, or message on an almost-daily basis even as each side expresses frustration with the other.
          North Korea heat wave "potentially catastrophic", charities warn as rice and crops wither in fields      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The world's largest disaster relief network warned of a risk of a "full-blown food security crisis" in the isolated country, saying that the worrying situation had been exacerbated by international sanctions imposed due to North Korea's nuclear and missile programmes
          Red Cross warns of food crisis in North Korea as crops fail in heat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A heat wave in North Korea has led to rice, maize and other crops withering in the fields, “with potentially catastrophic effects”, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies said on Friday. The world’s largest disaster relief network warned of a risk of a “full-blown food ...

The post Red Cross warns of food crisis in North Korea as crops fail in heat appeared first on Raw Story.


          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          Korean Comic      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
is it a north korean comic? or a south korean comic? I guess we'll never know
          North Korea asks US to ease sanctions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
It comes as the rival Koreas plan to hold talks in preparation for a third summit between their leaders.
          Lord Rothschild: The New World Order Is At Risk      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Over the past three years, an unexpected voice of caution has emerged from one of the most legendary families in finance: Lord Jacob Rothschild. 

Lord Jacob Rothschild

Readers may recall that as part of the RIT Capital Partners 2014 annual report commentary, the scion of Rothschild family warned that "the geopolitical situation is most dangerous since WWII." One year later, Jacob Rothschild again warned about the outcome of "what is surely the greatest experiment in monetary policy in the history of the world", and then again in August 2017 he cautioned that "share prices have in many cases risen to unprecedented levels at a time when economic growth is by no means assured."

Little did he know that they were only going to keep rising, but related to that, he also made another warning which the market has so far blissfully ignored:

The period of monetary accommodation may well be coming to an end. Geopolitical problems remain widespread and are proving increasingly difficult to resolve.

Fast forward to today when in the latest half-year commentary from RIT Capital Partners, Lord Rothschild has made his latest warning to date, this time focusing on the global economic system that was established after WWII, and which he believes is now in jeopardy.

The billionaire banker pointed to the US-China trade war and the Eurozone crisis as the key problems putting economic order at risk, and the lack of a "common approach" - a reference to the gradual unwind of globalization in the wake of President Trump - that has made "co-operation today much more difficult":

"In 9/11 and in the 2008 financial crisis, the powers of the world worked together with a common approach. Co-operation today is proving much more difficult. This puts at risk the post-war economic and security order."

It wasn't clear if he was referring to the post-war fiat standard that emerged once FDR devalued the dollar relative to gold, and then fixed a price for the yellow metal, a tenuous link that was subsequently destroyed by Nixon who finally took the US off the gold standard, or the primacy of the dollar which emerged as the world's reserve currency after the end of WWII, but whenever one of the people who profited handsomely from the "post war world order" warns it may be on its last legs, it may be time to worry.

With global risks growing, how is Rothschild positioned? The Lord writes that "in the circumstances our policy is to maintain our limited exposure to quoted equities and to enter into new commitments with great caution" and indeed, in the first half, RIT had a net quoted equity exposure of only 47%, historically low. The reason: the iconic banking family is concerned that the 10-year bullish cycle and market rally could finally be ending.

The cycle is in its tenth positive year, the longest on record. We are now seeing some areas of weaker growth emerge; indeed the IMF has recently predicted some slowdown.

While Rothschild noted that "many of the world’s economies have enjoyed a broad-based acceleration not seen since the aftermath of the financial crisis of 2008, with as many as 120 countries seeing stronger growth last year" he also cautioned that "we continue to believe that this is not an appropriate time to add to risk. Current stock market valuations remain high by historical standards, inflated by years of low interest rates and the policy of quantitative easing which is now coming to an end."

One potential risk is Europe, where debt levels have reached "potentially destructive levels":

The problems confronting the Eurozone are of concern – both political and economic – given the potentially destructive levels of debt in a number of countries.

There is also the threat that the global trade war escalates substantially from here, as Chinese stocks have learned the hard way:

The likelihood of trade wars has increased tension and the impact on equities has been marked, for example by early July the Shanghai Composite Index had dropped some 22% from its peak in January.

Rothschild also echoed the recent warning from the head of the Indian Central Bank, warning that the shrinking of global dollar liquidity is hurting emerging markets:

Problems are likely to continue in emerging markets, compounded by rising interest rates and the US Fed’s monetary policy which has drained global dollar liquidity. We have already seen the impact on the Turkish and Argentinian currencies.

Finally, Rothschild remains understandably "concerned about geo-political problems including Brexit, North Korea and the Middle East, at a time when populism is spreading globally."

* * *

Rothschild continued the shift away from US capital markets exposure announced two years ago, noting that his "exposure to absolute return and credit assets continued to generate steady returns and on currencies, the net asset value benefited from the strengthened US Dollar."

Compare the collapse in the fund's USD exposure, which as of June 30 was only 29%, to the 62% as recently as December 31, 2016.

Not surprisingly, RIT's investment portfolio continues do quite well, and has now returned over 2,400% since inception

Below is a snapshot of where every hedge fund wants to end up: the Rothschild investment portfolio:

Finally, for all those wondering where the Rothschild family fortune is hiding, here is the answer


          14 Pictures That Will Freak You Out if You Have Submechanophobia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

If you aren't afraid of partially or fully submerged manmade objects under water yet, then you're about to be. There's something so frightening about a giant dam spill well (am enormous HOLE just sucking water down into a deep abyss) in the middle of a lake, or a sunken ship resting at the bottom of the ocean. These things are just right next to you while you swim and it's like, I don't want anything to do with it, please get it away from me.

It may be fascinating, but it's fascinating in a way that gives us the creeps. 

1. Oh Holey NOPE. 

Submechanophobia: whirlpool

via commentman10

2. Imaging getting stuck in this grate...

Submechanophobia: underwater grate

via 4tunabrix

3. Who knows how deep those support beams go. 

Submechanophobia: oil rig

via Work-Safe-Reddit4450

4. This underwater sculpture garden by artist Jason Decaires Taylor is like The Walkind Dead meets the deep sea. 

Submechanophobia: underwater sculpture garden

Submechanophobia: underwater sculpture garden

via Jason Decaires Taylor

5. Sunken subway car is now a ghost train that we'd prefer to stay far, far away from. 

Submechanophobia: underwater subway car

via expresswatersports

6. What a beautiful NOPE. 

Submechanophobia: diver near giant propeller

via lil_fietspomp

7. Even Samara from "The Ring" is like no fucking thank you. 

undefined

via DutchSupervisor

8. Staircase into the unknown. 

Submechanophobia: night waters

via saxman253

9. "The Hand of Harmony" sculpture reaching out of the ocean in Pohang, North Korea and does not feel harmonious at all, like even a little bit. 

Submechanophobia: ocean hand sculpture

via notathrowaway2708

10. WHY DOES ANYONE NEED A SIGN TO CONVINCE THEM NOT GO INTO THIS?!

Submechanophobia: weir drowning machine

via BananaVenom

11. These are wave chambers that collect the debris in wave pools, aka underwater prison cells from hell.

Submechanophobia: underwater cells

via commercialandspecialiseddiving

12. A Shiva statue submerged in the flood waters of the River Ganges makes us feel nauseous. 

Submechanophobia: statue in the ganges

via SaltMill

13. Somehow it's even more haunting in a grainy vintage black and white, like it's something from another planet.  

Submechanophobia: undersea wreck

via AutismAmmo

14. The animatronic from "Jaws", who they named Bruce, feels like a dystopian nightmare where sharks have gained the power of technology and we're all fucked. 

Submechanophobia: animatronic jaws

via ship_builder

          Why Jeremy Corbyn's anti-Semitism crisis risks a major split in the Labour party      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

jeremy corbyn anti semitism

  • Jeremy Corbyn's Labour party is in crisis and risk a potential split in the party over an ongoing row about the definition of anti-Semitism
  • Corbyn's office remain unmoved on their refusal to recognise the entirety of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) definition.
  • The row has reignited longstanding suspicions by some Jewish people that Corbyn and his allies hold anti-Semitic views.
  • However, with pressure being exerted by key figures such as GMB leader Tim Roache and Momentum founder Jon Lansman, Corbyn is under growing pressure to shift.
  • Failure to do so could cause a major rupture in the party.


LONDON — Jeremy Corbyn's Labour party is facing the most significant chance of a split since the 1980s, with relations between the leader and his MPs now more strained than ever. 

The row centres on Corbyn's refusal to adopt the full International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) definition of anti-Semitism, which the Labour leader believes stifles criticism of Israel.

It escalated significantly after a very public row between Corbyn and the Labour Margaret Hodge, who accused the Labour leader of being an anti-Semite and a racist.

Following the opening of disciplinary procedures against Hodge, the rumours of a potential split increased, with the Express reporting on Tuesday that the Labour MPs Gavin Shuker, Chuka Umunna and Chris Leslie had been in talks about a potential break off. 

With even Corbyn's internal allies speaking out against his position on the IHRA definition, including his shadow chancellor John McDonnell and the leader of the Corbyn-supporting organisation Momentum, Jon Lansman, the Labour leader's position now looks vulnerable.

So why is Corbyn so reluctant to adopt the full definition, who are the main figures in this growing conflict and could the row really cause a fundamental split in the party?

What triggered Labour's anti-Semitism crisis?

2013 05 01T120000Z_81517008_LR1E94U19HSWF_RTRMADP_3_TAX UK GOOGLE.JPG

Labour's anti-Semitism crisis re-ignited this summer following the Labour National Executive Committee's partial recognition of the IHRA definition of anti-Semitism. Three weeks ago, the Labour Party NEC ruled that a decision made by an NEC sub-committee the week before was final, therefore rejecting the full IHRA definition.

In response to this, Labour MP Margaret Hodge branded Jeremy Corbyn "an anti-Semite and racist" in a stand-up row inside the Houses of Parliament, which prompted an investigation from Labour's General Secretary, Jennie Formby. 

Although the investigation was subsequently dropped, the move triggered major anger among Labour MP, with talk of 12 MPs being prepared to resign the whip in response to the crisis. 

Corbyn's senior supporters then sought to double down on their rejection of the full IHRA definition following criticism, sharing a Jon Lansman opinion piece in the Guardian, calling Labour's position on anti-Semitism the 'gold standard'

Since this piece, Lansman has backtracked and has called for the adoption of the full IHRA definition, according to Jewish News

Will Corbyn budge?

GettyImages 539175184

Allies of Corbyn are keen not to back down as they believe the full IHRA definition would prevent effective criticism of Israel. One of the examples included in the definition is that labeling Israel a racist endeavour would be classed as anti-Semitic, something Corbyn opposes adopting.

However, with a vote on the definition expected at Labour's NEC on the 4th September, and at Labour's PLP on the September 5, more pressure is expected to be placed on Labour to adopt the full definition. 

On Thursday the leader of the Labour-supporting GMB union, broke ranks and called on Corbyn to adopt the full IHRA definition. Momentum is also reportedly prepared to speak out on the issue.

However, some figures on the left have branded Momentum and particularly Lansman's change of tune as posturing. "The idea that Laura Parker (Momentum's National Co-ordinator) and a couple of soft left unite officials will be able to take down [the leaders' office] is laughable", one Labour left source told BI. "If forced to vote, even under a split Momentum [the NEC] would still vote with [Corbyn]" another said. 

Sources close to Momentum said that while the organisation did want to take a "more visible, militant stance" against anti-Semitism, they didn't believe it could be counted as breaking ranks with Corbyn. 

So will Labour really split?

Owen Smith

With Hodge's investigation dropped, an immediate split seems less likely.

One factor preventing a split is the lack of any credible alternative to remaining in the party for moderate Labour MPs. This week LoveFilm co-founder Simon Franks launched a new party United for Change, with BBC Political Correspondent Ross Hawkins reporting that their pitch would be in favour of  "long term plans for public services, term limits for MPs signing up [and a] tough message on immigration". 

However, speaking to BI, one leading Labour moderate MP dismissed the new party, saying "lots of business people get involved in politics thinking they can do it better than politicians, but soon find out it’s not like running a business.

"They are pissing in the wind, and are being completely naive."

"The last person to launch a new political party in this country right now is a multi millionaire yacht owner… the alt-left which runs the Labour party and the alt-right in the Tories would have an absolute field day."

So for now at least, the risk of an imminent split in the party looks slim. But with Corbyn still apparently reluctant to budge on the issue, the risk will not fully go away any time soon.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: North Korean defector: Kim Jong Un 'is a terrorist'


          'I think the party has yearned for a fighter': Michael Avenatti confirms he may run as a Democrat against Trump in 2020      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Michael Avenatti

  • Michael Avenatti, the lawyer known to needle President Donald Trump on social media and on TV, says he might run against Trump as a Democrat in the 2020 presidential election.
  • Avenatti first gave that information to the Des Moines Register newspaper on Thursday. He was in the Iowa state capital with several other presidential hopefuls getting a head start on the next race to the White House.
  • "I wanted to come to Iowa and listen to people and learn about some issues that are facing the citizens of Iowa and do my homework," Avenatti told the Des Moines Register.
  • Avenatti has never held public office before, and has no known experience in politics. He made clear he's only exploring a potential 2020 run, but said he believes Democrats "have yearned for a fighter," and said he believes he fits the bill.

Michael Avenatti, the high-profile lawyer to adult-film star Stormy Daniels, and a frequent thorn in President Donald Trump's side, wants you to know he's thinking about a career change.

"I'm exploring a run for the presidency of the United States," Avenatti told the Des Moines Register newspaper on Thursday, "and I wanted to come to Iowa and listen to people and learn about some issues that are facing the citizens of Iowa and do my homework."

Avenatti is not new to the national spotlight. In recent months, he made his trade by taking up Daniels' cause. The actress, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, is Avenatti's most high-profile client. She's suing Trump over a $130,000 nondisclosure agreement she signed to keep quiet about an affair she said she had with Trump in 2006.

As part of the proceedings in that case, and multiple subplots involving Trump's longtime lawyer Michael Cohen and others, Avenatti has become a mainstay on cable news and a frequent agitator of Trump and everyone in the president's orbit on social media.

But Avenatti has never held public office before, and has no known experience in politics. He responded to one person on Twitter late Thursday who said "that's the problem with the current occupant of the White House."

"That is NOT the problem with Mr. Trump," Avenatti replied. "It has NOTHING to do with inexperience. It has everything to do with his ego and a lack of intelligence, empathy, and compassion, coupled with his inability/refusal to listen to others and surround himself with highly qualified people.

While he is entertaining Democratic Party luminaries and other hopefuls in Iowa — the state where the presidential nomination contest begins — he told the Des Moines Register he believes that, above anything else, what the party needs in 2020 is a "fighter."

"I think the party has yearned for a fighter — a fighter for good, if you will — for a significant period of time," Avenatti said.

"And for many, I’m probably seen as that individual."

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: North Korean defector: Kim Jong Un 'is a terrorist'


          Support for a People's Vote on Brexit surges as UK heads closer to a no-deal Brexit      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Theresa May

  • Public support for a second Brexit referendum continues to grow amid fears over possible no deal Brexit.
  • 45% of people support a People's Vote on the final deal, while 34% do not, according to a YouGov poll of over 10,000 people. 
  • The UK would vote to stay in the European Union by 53% to 47% if asked again.
  • Most Brits believe Theresa May will leave negotiations with a bad deal. 

LONDON — A comprehensive new poll has found support for a referendum on the final Brexit deal has surged amid growing concern over the United Kingdom crashing out of the European Union without a deal.

45% of people now believe there should be a referendum on the final Brexit deal, or what campaigners call a People's Vote, while just 34% do not, according to findings of a YouGov poll published on Friday.

This compares to December last year when just 33% were in favour of a second referendum, with 42% opposed.

The poll also found a majority of voters would now back staying in the EU with 53% of people saying they would vote to stay and 47% would vote to Leave.

This support would increases significantly if May fails to secure a deal. In that scenario the poll finds that 56% would vote to stay and 44% would vote to leave.

Yougov pollThis latest poll — one of the biggest surveys of public opinion since the 2016 referendum — comes as Prime Minister May and UK negotiators prepare to resume Brexit negotiations with their EU counterparts later this month.

Unless both sides reach an agreement on the Irish border, the UK faces crashing out with no deal in March 2019, which government analysis says would hit UK GDP by 8% and could cause shortages in food and medicine.

In the event of Brexit talks collapsing and failing to produce an agreement, 50% of people said the public should decide whether to stay in the EU or go ahead with Brexit, while 25% said Parliament should have the final say.

In what will make grim reading for May's government, 68% of people think May will leave Brexit talks with a bad deal, while just 13% disagree. 73% agreed that "many promises made by [the] Leave campaign will be broken."

Reacting to the YouGov findings, Chuka Umunna, Labour MP and leading supporter of the People's Vote campaign, said: "Whether people voted leave or remain two years ago, nobody voted for this chaotic Brexit that will damage our living standards and public services which is being thrust on the country by politicians in Westminster.

"It is now clear that the people are starting to find their voice and they demand a vote on the final Brexit deal as the only way out of this mess."

Layla Moran Chuka Umunna Caroline Lucas People's Vote

Brexit pressure on Corbyn rising

The survey also found that a clear majority of Labour voters want a referendum on the final Brexit deal as leader Jeremy Corbyn comes under increasing pressure to soften his Brexit position. 63% of respondents who support Labour want a People's Vote on the final deal, while just 18% do not.

"The Labour Party must now do what its members and supporters and voters are crying out for: put clear red water between the Opposition and the Government, and provide leadership to the country by backing the People’s Vote campaign," Umunna said.

SEE ALSO: Anti-Brexit politicians from all the main parties are in secret talks about forming a new 'centrist' movement

DON'T MISS: Tory rebel Stephen Hammond says MPs will block Theresa May from crashing out of the EU without a deal

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NOW WATCH: North Korean defector: Kim Jong Un 'is a terrorist'


          Theresa May warned by CBI to keep the door open for EU migrants after Brexit      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

theresa may

  • Theresa May should replace free movement after Brexit with a new immigration system which scraps the government's long-held target to reduce immigration below 100,000, according to the CBI.
  • The "open and controlled" immigration scheme would also introduce compulsory registration for EU citizens and restrict their ability to remain to three months unless they are self-sufficient.
  • "The building blocks of a successful new migration system for the UK begin with an honest and open debate that has been absent from politics. The stakes couldn’t be higher," said the CBI.
  • The government is due to publish a white paper on post-Brexit immigration this Autumn.


LONDON — Theresa May must scrap her long-held aim of reducing immigration to the tens of thousands a year after Brexit and implement a new "open" system of immigration, Britain's leading business leaders insisted today.

A new report from the Confederation for British Industry (CBI) warns the prime minster that while freedom of movement from the EU will end, implementing dramatic cuts to EU immigration would damage the economy.

CBI's deputy director general Josh Hardie said in a statement that any attempt to implement an overly restrictive immigration policy would mean the UK "risks having too few people to run the NHS, pick fruit, or deliver products to stores around the country."

He said: "Freedom of movement will be ending. The building blocks of a successful new migration system for the UK begin with an honest and open debate that has been absent from politics. The stakes couldn’t be higher."

border queue uk

Tougher controls

The CBI accepts that new controls on immigration must be implemented after Brexit including ensuring that any new migrants from the EU "make a positive contribution to the economy."

In practice, the CBI states that this means introducing compulsory registration for EU citizens upon their arrival to the UK, and restricting EU citizens' ability to remain to three months unless they can prove that they are working, studying, or are self-sufficient.

It would also mean introducing a new test linked to local unemployment levels which would force companies and recruiters to prioritise UK residents over EU migrants in certain circumstances.

The report also recommended that the government reform the UK's non-EU immigration system, by simplifying the visa process and scrapping the widely disliked Tier 2 visa scheme which has helped drive NHS staffing shortages.

What's next for EU citizens after Brexit?

eu citizens brexit

Free movement — the policy which allows citizens from member states to live and work freely around the EU — will end after Brexit, according to Theresa May. 

The system which will replace it remains unclear because the government is yet to publish its long-awaited white paper on the highly politically sensitive issue of immigration after Brexit, which is scheduled for Autumn.

The prime minister has offered few clues. However, a leaked Home Office document in 2017 showed that Britain intends to introduce restrictions to deter all but highly skilled EU workers once Britain leaves the EU, a dramatic shift designed to prioritise British workers.

But the CBI warned that a restrictive approach to immigration could be economically damaging, as many sectors are highly dependent on migrant labour.

"The needs are more complex than only ensuring that the UK can attract the 'brightest and best,'" said Josh Hardie.

"Openness and control must not be presented as opposites," he said.

SEE ALSO: Conservative Brexit rebels will block Theresa May from crashing out of the EU without a deal

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          Trump is pushing the military to get ready to fight in space, but the US Army is worried about fighting underground      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Space military

  • The Trump administration wants to move ahead with its plans to create a Space Force.
  • The ultimate structure of that force, and what it will do, remains unclear.
  • Elsewhere in the Pentagon, military planners are focused on another facet of warfare that's much closer to home.

The Trump administration wants to have a force ready to fight in the heavens by 2020, but the US Army is already spending a half-billion dollars to prepare for fighting underground.

In a speech at the Pentagon on Thursday, Vice President Mike Pence described a US Space Force as "an idea whose time as come."

"Our Administration will soon take action to implement these recommendations with the objective of establishing the United States Department of the Space Force by 2020," Pence added.

Critics have said a new Space Force is unnecessary, while an argument for it is that rival powers like Russia and China are growing more able to strike at US assets in space and at US assets from space, missions whose importance necessitate its own dedicated command and even military force.

Mike Pence

The ultimate structure of the Space Force remains unclear, as does what its responsibilities and resources will be.

Elsewhere in the Pentagon, however, officials are looking in the opposite direction to prepare for the future of warfare.

US Army leaders have said that next war will be fought in mega-cities, and the service has started an effort to train troops to fight not just in but also beneath those environments.

An accelerated effort started in late 2017 will devote about $572 million to train and outfit 26 of the Army's 31 active combat brigades for operations in large-scale subterranean facilities, according to a Military.com report in June.

Teams have been activated to train leaders from each of those brigades to operate in large-scale underground facilities. As of June, five BCTs had been trained, and the trainers had a January deadline to finish training the other 21.

US Army soldiers subterranean tunnel air assault

Underground combat will require Army infantry to navigate, communicate, overcome heavy obstacles, and engage enemy forces in facilities that range in size and complexity from relatively small corridors to sprawling subterranean compounds.

"We did recognize, in a megacity that has underground facilities — sewers and subways and some of the things we would encounter ... we have to look at ourselves and say 'OK, how does our current set of equipment and our tactics stack up?'" Col. Townley Hedrick, commandant of the infantry school at the Army's Maneuver Center of Excellence at Fort Benning, Georgia, told Military.com.

"What are the aspects of megacities that we have paid the least attention to lately?" Hedrick said. "And every megacity has got sewers and subways and stuff that you can encounter, so let's brush it up a little bit."

The Army's Asymmetric Warfare Group, which is often asked to assess future threats, has been tasked with developing a training course for underground fighting, relying on modular facilities to simulate such combat.

A portion of the money assigned to the effort will go to acquiring specialized equipment, like radios, breathing systems, or night-vision goggles. An Army source told Military.com that the tactics and techniques of underground fighting are similar to those used to clear buildings, with complicating factors like a lack of light or air.

ISIS tunnel

Underground warfare is nothing new. Special units of US troops, usually engineers, were tasked with exploring tunnels found during the Vietnam War. More recently, US and partner forces have dealt with ISIS fighters operating in underground tunnels in Iraq and Syria.

Villages around Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city, were found to have extensive tunnel networks that were likely used as meeting places and escape routes. In early 2017, the US used its largest nonnuclear bomb, nicknamed the "Mother of All Bombs" against what was said to be a complex of tunnels and caves used by ISIS.

Prior to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, dealing with underground structures was largely the responsibility of special-operations units like the Army's Delta Force or Rangers or the Navy's SEAL Team Six.

But Army researchers have said that special-operations forces alone will not be able to deal with the scale of underground combat in a future conflict with a peer or near-peer adversary. One Army source told Military.com that an estimate made in 2017 found about 10,000 large-scale military facilities that could serve as underground cities.

US Army soldiers subterranean tunnel

More than 4,800 of those underground facilities are in North Korea, which has used such subterranean structures to house nuclear-weapons facilities and, in case of war, could use them to funnel thousands of troops into South Korea.

Moscow and other major Russian cities are replete with undergound bunkers, tunnels, subway lines, and other facilities, many of which were built during the Cold War.

China, home to dozens of densely populated cities, has a vast network of tunnels and underground facilities used to house its missiles and nuclear arsenal. Iran, too, has used underground complexes for its nuclear program.

"I think that modern warfare and modern combat, [it will] occur mainly in urban areas, and urban areas are a place that tunnels and underground facilities can be used, mainly by asymmetric opponents, as something that changes the equation," Brig. Gen. Nechemya Sokal, chief of staff of the Israel Defense Forces IDF Technology and Logistics Branch, said on the Modern War Institute podcast in early 2017.

Sokal said that Hamas' use of tunnels for variety of operations, including infiltrating Israeli territory, created a number of challenges that required new technology and different tactics to address.

"We have to change our doctrine and the way we do things, because underground facilities are not so intuitive as buildings and places we are using to being," Sokal said.

SEE ALSO: The Navy is moving its aircraft carriers to ready them for a potential fight with China and Russia — here's where they're headed

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NOW WATCH: These futuristic floating underwater tunnels could drastically improve transportation in Norway


          The feisty judge in the Paul Manafort trial admitted he made a big mistake that could hurt Mueller's team      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

judge ts ellis rick gates manafort trial

  • US District Court Judge TS Ellis admitted that he made a major mistake in the trial of President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort.
  • Prosecutors filed a motion complaining that Ellis' comments could hurt special counsel Robert Mueller's team.
  • Ellis said it was a mistake to criticize Mueller's team in front of the jury for allowing a witness from the IRS to remain in the courtroom while other witnesses testified.

US District Court Judge TS Ellis admitted on Thursday morning that he made a major mistake in the trial of President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort that could hurt the special counsel Robert Mueller's team, according to Politico.

Witnesses usually aren't allowed to hear other witnesses testify so they don't work together or affect each other's stories. But Ellis gave Mueller's team permission at the start of the trial to let one particular IRS witness stay in the courtroom and watch the proceedings, according to the report.

On Wednesday, Ellis criticized Mueller's team in front of the jury for allowing the witness to remain in the courtroom while other witnesses testified.

"It's my clear recollection .... that I wasn't admitting experts. You need to ask specifically. You're going to go ahead now, I'm going to permit that, but I want you to remember that," Ellis said, according to Politico.

After Mueller's team pushed back on the judge's claims, Ellis said, "Maybe I made a mistake. But I want you to remember don't do that again. When I exclude witnesses, I mean everybody. Now, it may be that I didn't make that clear."

On Thursday morning, Mueller's team filed a motion to protest how Ellis criticized them. They asked him to explain to the jury that the witness was permitted to stay by citing the transcript from the opening day of the trial, which showed that Ellis had approved it, according to Politico.

"The Court's reprimand of government counsel suggested to the jury—incorrectly—that the government had acted improperly and in contravention of Court rules," the prosecutors wrote in the motion. "This prejudice should be cured."

Ellis addressed the jury on the matter before the first witness of the day testified on Thursday.

He said he "may well have been wrong" for his public chastising of the prosecutors and told the jury to ignore what had been said the previous day.

"This robe doesn't make me anything other than human," Ellis said. "You've got to put that aside."

Ellis has made a name for himself for his feisty demeanor in the courtroom and has not shied away from showcasing aspects of his personality during the trial. He has talked to the jury about their lunch options multiple times, and often cracks jokes.

SEE ALSO: Rick Gates admits to stealing nearly $3 million from Paul Manafort to fund an extramarital affair, and the defense tries to cast a political shadow over the trial in a tense Day 6

DON'T MISS: Meet T.S. Ellis, the judge presiding over Paul Manafort's trial, who has challenged Mueller's intentions and earned Trump's praise

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NOW WATCH: North Korean defector: Kim Jong Un 'is a terrorist'


          Trump-endorsed Kris Kobach's lead in the Kansas governor primary was cut in half after a mistake was discovered in the vote tally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President-elect Donald Trump stands with Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach before their meeting at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey, U.S., on November 20, 2016.  REUTERS/Mike Segar/File Photo

  • Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach's lead over Gov. Jeff Colyer in the state’s Republican primary election for governor was cut from 200 to 91 votes on Thursday. 
  • It came after officials learned the listing for one county's results in the state tally was incorrect.
  • Unofficial results posted to the secretary of state's website show Kobach winning Thomas County with 466 votes to Colyer's 422, but it Colyer's total was revised to 522 votes.

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s narrow 200-vote lead over Gov. Jeff Colyer in the state’s Republican primary election for governor was cut in half after a mistake was discovered in the election night’s tally.

The President Donald Trump-endorsed candidate’s lead over Colyer shrunk from 191 to just 91 votes on Thursday when officials learned the listing for one county’s results in the state tally was incorrect.

Unofficial results posted to the secretary of state's website show Kobach winning Thomas County with 466 votes and Colyer receiving just 422 votes.

The Thomas County clerk office website, however, shows Colyer with 522 votes — 100 more than first reported.

The number was confirmed to The Associated Press by a counter clerk.

The discrepancy was discovered on Thursday after a routine request for a postelection check of county tallies by the secretary of state’s office, state elections director Bryan Caskey said.

County officials have not finished counting late-arriving mail-in ballots or provisional ballots provided to voters at polls, so the election's final results remain unclear.

State law allows mail-in ballots to be counted it they arrive up to three days after the election.

"This is a routine part of the process," Caskey said. "This is why we emphasize that election-night results are unofficial."

After officials announced there would be a recount of votes because the election results were so close, Kobach told a campaign event that he would not recuse himself from the recount process, according to the Kansas City Star.

"The recount thing is done on a county level, so the secretary of state does not actually participate directly in the recount," he said. "The secretary of state’s office merely serves as a coordinating entity overseeing it all but not actually counting the votes."

There is no law requiring the secretary of state to recuse him or herself from the recount.

Kobach is a staunch ally of Trump and was endorsed by the president just days ahead of the primary.

"He is a fantastic guy who loves his State and our Country - he will be a GREAT Governor and has my full & total Endorsement! Strong on Crime, Border & Military," Trump tweeted on the eve of the election.

Kobach previously advised the White House and served as a vice chairman on the now-disbanded voter fraud commission.

SEE ALSO: 

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          Brutal numbers show how tough it will be for Republicans to keep control of the House this November      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

donald trump paul ryan

  • This week's too-close-to-call special election in a ruby-red Ohio congressional district has called new attention to a 2018 electoral map that highly favors Democrats — at least in the US House. 
  • The minority party needs to flip 24 Republican-held seats this year to take control of the House. 
  • There are 68 GOP-held House seats that are less conservative than Ohio's conservative 12th district, where Tuesday's special election remains too close to call. 

This week's too-close-to-call special election in a Republican-leaning Ohio congressional district has called new attention to a 2018 electoral map that highly favors Democrats — especially in the US House. 

It looks unlikely that Democrat Danny O'Connor will successfully flip Ohio's 12th district (provisional ballots are still being counted). But the fact that a district President Donald Trump won by 11 points could so quickly turn against the GOP has many predicting a "blue wave" in this year's midterms. 

And the numbers point in Democrats' favor:

  • The minority party needs to flip 24 Republican-held House seats this year to take control of the 435-seat chamber.
  • And Hillary Clinton won 25 districts that are currently represented by Republicans.
  • On top of that, there are 68 Republican-held House seats that are rated as less conservative than Ohio's 12th district, and 119 GOP seats less Republican than the seat Democrat Conor Lamp flipped in western Pennsylvania in March, according to an analysis from the non-partisan Cook Political Report. 
  • Of the 62 races that Cook rated as leaning towards Republicans or Democrats or "tossups," 58 are held by Republicans.  

Boosting Democrats' confidence are the president's relatively low approval ratings and stronger support for Democrats than Republicans in generic ballot polls

But GOP strategist Matt Mackowiak cautioned that midterm turnout can be very different from presidential election year turnout — specifically, midterm electorates are typically less racially diverse

"There's all this chatter about these so-called Hillary districts," he said. "Does that mean the Democrat could win? Yes. Does it mean the Democrat is guaranteed to win? No. ... Traditionally you've seen lower minority participation in midterm years." 

But Mackowiak conceded that the map and political trends are alarming for Republicans.

"It's clear there's tremendous risk if you are in an R+10 district or worse," he said, adding that the "risks to the Trump administration if the Democrats take the House back are profound."

If Democrats win control of the legislative chamber, Republicans fear they'll use their subpoena power to aggressively investigate the president and his administration, kill the GOP's legislative agenda, and attempt to impeach him. 

But the Senate is a different story. Of the 35 senators up for reelection this year, 26 are Democrats and just nine are Republicans. And 10 of these Democrats represent states Trump carried in 2016. On top of that, only two of the GOP-held seats on the ballot are in traditional swing states (Nevada and Arizona).

To flip the Senate, Democrats would need to win 28 of these races — a much more significant challenge than they have in the House. 

SEE ALSO: Alarms bells are starting to ring for the GOP as Democrats have 'the wind at their back' heading into November

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          The man in charge of overseeing global trade says 'the first shots have been fired' in a trade war, and 'the situation is extremely serious'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Roberto Azevêdo

  • Trade tensions are growing around the world, due in large part to President Donald Trump's trade battles.
  • World Trade Organization Director General Roberto Azevêdo warned that current trade tensions risk hurting the world economy and undermining the post-World War II trading order.
  • "Whether or not you call the current situation a trade war, certainly the first shots have been fired," Azevêdo wrote. "This calls for our attention, and most importantly, our action."

One of the most important trade officials in the world is sounding the alarm about President Donald Trump's trade war and the rising tide of protectionism.

Roberto Azevêdo, the director general of the World Trade Organization, warned in an op-ed published Thursday of the shift toward more protectionist trade policies and increased barriers.

"Global trade is under threat," Azevêdo wrote in The Independent. "Whether or not you call the current situation a trade war, certainly the first shots have been fired. This calls for our attention, and most importantly, our action."

Azevêdo also warned that further escalation could result in significant downsides for the economic growth of the US and other nations around the world.

"The situation is extremely serious," he said. "Reciprocal trade restrictions cannot be the new normal. A continued escalation would risk a major economic impact, threatening jobs and growth in all countries, hitting the poorest hardest."

A large percentage of economists agree that increased international trade and a free exchange of goods is generally positive for the countries involved. They also agree that current trade rules prevent certain populations, including parts of the US, from benefitting. Managing these downsides while growing trade is a key challenge for governments.

The danger from a possible slowdown in global trade is already on the rise. The WTO's latest World Trade Outlook Indicator, which measures trade growth, dropped to 100.3 in August's release from 101.8 last month. The report said the index further bolsters the WTO's predictions that world merchandise trade growth is slowing.

"Rising trade tensions continue to pose risks to the trade forecast and will be monitored closely going forward," the WTO said.

Azevêdo acknowledged that the WTO could benefit from reform to make dispute settlement and regulatory functions work better. But he reiterated that reform should come in the spirit of cooperation rather than antagonism.

The WTO plays a key role in the current trade fights between the US and other countries since the organization is the arbiter of international trade rules. As part of the tariff fight, several countries have filed formal WTO complaints regarding Trump's tariffs. The US, in turn, has filed counter-complaints on countries including China and Canada.

The Trump administration has openly weighed the possibility of pulling out of the organization. Such a move would likely cause a collapse of the post-World War II international trading order.

""The world needs this organisation more than ever," Azevêdo said. "Without it, we would face a future of uncertainty, trade war, lower growth, lower salaries and diminished job opportunities everywhere — in both poor and powerful countries alike."

SEE ALSO: Trump's trade war is already leading to layoffs and pain for American businesses

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          Laura Ingraham sparks outrage after saying the 'America that we know and love doesn't exist anymore' because of 'demographic changes'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

laura ingraham

  • Laura Ingraham sparked outrage on Wednesday when she said on her Fox News show that the "America that we know and love doesn't exist anymore" because of "demographic changes."
  • Many responded on Twitter, with some describing the "Ingraham Angle" host as racist.
  • The show has been the subject of two advertiser boycotts since it premiered in October. 

Laura Ingraham has come under fire for comments she made about immigration on her Fox News show on Wednesday.

At the top of "The Ingraham Angle," she weighed in on a podcast's recent interview with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a Democratic candidate for a House seat in New York, in which she said the upper-middle-class, moderate Americans many in the Democratic Party try to pander to no longer exist.

Ingraham commented on the number of times Ocasio-Cortez, 28, said "like" in the clip, adding that she was "kind of right in a general sense."

"In some parts of the country it does seem like the America that we know and love doesn't exist anymore," Ingraham said. "Massive demographic changes have been foisted upon the American people. And they're changes that none of us ever voted for and most of us don't like."

She continued: "From Virginia to California, we see stark examples of how radically, in some ways, the country has changed. Now, much of this is related to both illegal and in some cases legal immigration that, of course, progressives love."

Ingraham said "it's not about race or ethnicity" at the end of her monologue. But critics quickly lambasted her on Twitter, saying her comments played into the white-nationalist rhetoric that has sparked tensions across the country.

Some even renewed calls for an advertising boycott. Since "The Ingraham Angle" premiered in October, it has been the subject of two waves of boycotts over controversial comments.

The first boycott came in March, after Ingraham said David Hogg, a gun-control activist who survived the shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida, was "whining" when he spoke about getting rejected by his top college choices. Hogg responded by tweeting a list of companies that advertised on Ingraham's show and encouraging people to contact them to complain.

Advertisers started pulling out almost immediately, and by the following month she had lost more than two dozen.

Hogg called for a second boycott in June after Ingraham described detention centers at the US-Mexico border used to hold immigrant children separated from their parents under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy as being like "summer camps."

The former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke tweeted Wednesday's clip, calling it "one of the most important (truthful) monologues in the history of" mainstream media, then later deleted the tweet, The Daily Beast reported.

Fox News did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Here's a roundup of Twitter criticism:

SEE ALSO: Fox News blasts Parkland survivor's campaign against Laura Ingraham as an attempt 'to silence diverse viewpoints by agenda-driven intimidation efforts'

READ MORE: A Parkland shooting survivor is reigniting his war with Laura Ingraham after the Fox News host compared migrant child detention centers to summer camps. Here are the companies he's urging to stop advertising on her show.

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NOW WATCH: North Korean defector: Kim Jong Un 'is a terrorist'


          US-CERT warns of new RAT threat from North Korea      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
State-sponsored malware writers sharing code.

The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) has issued a fresh warning that a new piece of malware believed to be created by North Korean government actors is on the lose on networks around the world.

Known as KEYMARBLE, the malware is a Remote Access Trojan (RAT), US-CERT said and cautioned users against opening attachments in emails, even when the sender appears to be known.

The RAT is a 32-bit Windows executable that can access device configuration data, download further files, run commands, modify the Windows Registry configuration and settings database, take screenshots and exfiltrate data, according to the Malware Analysis Report (MAR) by US-CERT.

US-CERT believes KEYMARBLE is disseminated by a North Korean hacking group called Hidden Cobra, which could be linked to other government-sponsored malware authors in the reclusive communist dictatorship, research by security vendors Intezer and McAfee show.

Intezer and McAfee say they have been able to link multiple North Korean hacking groups through significant code reuse in the malware utilised by them for attacks, after months of research and data gathering.

This includes the infamous WannaCry destructive malware, that used the same Windows Server Message Block (SMB) file sharing protocol module as the Mydoom, Joanap and DeltaAlfa malicious programs did.

The above malware has been attributed to North Korean hacking group Lazarus.

Intezer and McAfee said the Lazarus group has reused the SMB module from at least 2009 to 2017.

"From the Mydoom variant Brambul to the more recent Fallchill, WannaCry, and the targeting of cryptocurrency exchanges, we see a distinct timeline of attacks beginning from the moment North Korea entered the world stage as a significant threat actor," Intezer scientist Christiaan Beek and security researcher Jay Rosenberg wrote.

Apart from Lazarus, the security researchers believe Silent Chollima, Group 123, Hidden Cobra, DarkSeoul, Blockbuster, Operation Troy and 10 Days of Rain are North Korean and share code with one another.

Got a news tip for our journalists? Share it with us anonymously here.

          South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in possible violations of UN sanctions. Reporting on preliminary results from a 10-month investigation, the Korea Customs Service said F...
          North Korea Lashes Out At Administration Officials 'Going Against' President Trump      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
North Korea's foreign ministry says improved relations outlined in the Singapore summit are being derailed by "high-level officials" who are "going against the intention of President Trump."
          Friday Hodgepodge      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Blog Roundup

1. At Roots of Progress, Jason Crawford explores the transition, during the nineteenth century, away from the use of biological sources for many common materials. (He provides interesting synopses for ivory, fertilizer, fuels for lighting and smelting, and shellac.)
The humpback whale, an unsustainable source of industrial feedstocks, in either sense of the term. (Image via Pixabay.)
These are just a handful of examples. There are many other biomaterials we once relied on -- rubber, silk, leather and furs, straw, beeswax, wood tar, natural inks and dyes -- that have been partially or fully replaced by synthetic or artificial substitutes, especially plastics, that can be derived from mineral sources. They had to be replaced, because the natural sources couldn't keep up with rapidly increasing demand. The only way to ramp up production -- the only way to escape the Malthusian trap and sustain an exponentially increasing population while actually improving everyone's standard of living -- was to find new, more abundant sources of raw materials and new, more efficient processes to create the end products we needed. As you can see from some of these examples, this drive to find substitutes was often conscious and deliberate, motivated by an explicit understanding of the looming resource crisis.

In short, plant and animal materials had become unsustainable. [bold added, link omitted]
His exploration of the very common misuse of that last word is as timely as the rest of his post is interesting.

2. In "Sully vs Sully," the proprietor of You Can and Did Build That compares the book to the movie and finds the former far more profitable in terms of understanding the heroism of Sully Sullenberger, who famously saved all his passengers by landing his aircraft on the Hudson in 2009.
[T]he passionate pursuit of excellence in a career, the commitment to a lifetime of choices directed at acquiring knowledge and improving one's skills, is as far from "selfless" as could be imagined. Sully's choices (including an awareness of his own motivations and self-critical appraisal of his own near misses) represent the creation of a self. Only devotion to one's own chosen goals over the span of decades could result in a man becoming the kind of person, the kind of character or self, who could accomplish what he did on the Hudson. [emphasis in original]
Although I think I rate the movie higher than he does, I found the discussion of the kind of context required to evaluate an action quite enlightening.

3. At New Ideal, Ben Bayer of the Ayn Rand Institute argues that the "Trump-Kim Summit Betrays Victims of Dictatorship." The entire post is worth reading, but I think presenting two paragraphs of it in quick succession might show why. Bayer opens:
In a video that went viral in October 2014, Yeonmi Park gave an emotional speech about her escape from North Korea. She recounts how she was nine years old when she witnessed the public execution of her friend's mother, thirteen when she saw her mother raped as the price for escaping the country, and fourteen when she had to bury her father secretly in China. [links in original]
Later, comes the following after he notes Ayn Rand's commentary about Richard Nixon's 1972 meeting with Mao Zedong:
Every word of this applies to Trump's meeting with Kim. This time the president has not only shaken hands with the dictator but has gone further by calling him "very talented" and a "funny guy" with a "great personality" who "loves his people." Asked whether it was wise to sit down with a killer, the most Trump could bring himself to disparage about Kim was to say "it is a rough situation over there." Asked how Kim could love his people and oppress them, Trump said "he's doing what he's seen done." [links in original]
Regarding Trump's last remark in light of what Yeonmi Park and other North Koreans have "seen done," this is outrageous. That said, Trump doesn't own all of the blame for it. As unprincipled and coarse as he is, Trump is regurgitating (and acting on) the same kind of garbage leftists have spewed about criminals for the past few decades. But the juxtaposition should illustrate how disgusting this stew of determinism and moral relativism really is. Obscene notions left unquestioned lead to obscene actions.

4. At Separate!, Anders Ingemarson takes the impending Supreme Court nomination battle as his cue to consider an interesting question concerning where Americans stand on abortion:
With the range of views being closer to a bell curve than what media talking heads would like us to believe, is there an opportunity for breaking the supposed deadlock and come to some level of mutual understanding? Perhaps not tomorrow, next year or in a decade, but maybe in a generation? [bold added]
This comes after a quick review of American polling data and a look at a couple of historical instances of religious people accommodating scientific discoveries in the West. I'm not as sanguine as he, but he raises good points to remember should Brett Kavanaugh be named to the Supreme Court.

-- CAV

Updates

Today: For clarity, added "concerning where Americans stand on abortion" to Item 4.  
          S. Korea firms caught importing coal, iron from North      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
S. Korea firms caught importing coal, iron from NorthMore than 35,000 tonnes of North Korean coal and iron were imported into the South via Russia between April and October last year, the Korea Customs Service said, warning that "any ships that are believed to have violated UN sanctions will be impounded or banned from entering South Korean ports".
          Red Cross warns of food crisis in North Korea as crops fail in heat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A heat wave in North Korea has led to rice, maize and other crops withering in the fields, "with potentially catastrophic effects", the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) said on Friday.

          Amid heatwave, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un ditches trademark Mao-style suit for summer clothes, straw hat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Kim Jong Un steps out in summer clothes, straw hat
          Amid heatwave, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un ditches trademark Mao-style suit for summer clothes, straw hat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Kim Jong Un steps out in summer clothes, straw hat
          Amid heatwave, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un ditches trademark Mao-style suit for summer clothes, straw hat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Kim Jong Un steps out in summer clothes, straw hat
          Amid heatwave, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un ditches trademark Mao-style suit for summer clothes, straw hat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Kim Jong Un steps out in summer clothes, straw hat
          Amid heatwave, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un ditches trademark Mao-style suit for summer clothes, straw hat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Kim Jong Un steps out in summer clothes, straw hat
          Amid heatwave, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un ditches trademark Mao-style suit for summer clothes, straw hat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Kim Jong Un steps out in summer clothes, straw hat
          8/10/2018: News: HELLO AND THANKS FOR ALL THE FISH      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

NORTH Korean leader Kim Jong-un put on a happy face — and a floppy straw hat — for his tour of a fish pickling factory. Ditching his usual Mao-style uniform, the Supreme Leader adopted a relaxed look and seemed thrilled to see so much food on display...
          North Korea slows down and the Trump Administration speeds up re denuclearization.      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
AUTHOR. (Photo: North Korea slows down and the Trump Administration speeds up re denuclearization.) http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Twitter: @BatchelorShow North Korea slows down and the Trump Administration speeds up re denuclearization.
          Red Cross warns of food crisis in North Korea as crops fail in heat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A heat wave in North Korea has led to rice, maize and other crops withering in the fields, "with potentially catastrophic effects", the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) said on Friday.

          South Korea: North Korean coal entered its ports illegally      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

SEOUL, South Korea >> South Korea said a total of 35,000 tons of North Korean coal and pig iron worth $5.8 million illegally entered its ports last year, in possible violations of UN sanctions.


          North Korean Coal, Iron Smuggled to the South via Russia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Three South Koreans illegally imported North Korean coal and iron via Russia in violation of sanctions, exposing a crack in the U.S.-led campaign to cut off trade with Pyongyang.
          Fox News First      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Fox News First

Welcome to FOX News First. Not signed up yet? Click here.
Developing now, Friday, August 10, 2018
  • North Korea has threatened to halt the denuclearization of its missile program over the United States' continued encouragement of international sanctions
  • Missing Iowa college student Mollie Tibbetts was likely not kidnapped, but went off with someone she knew the night she disappeared, a profiler tells FOX News
  • NFL player protests during the national anthem resumed, amid unresolved league policies, as the 2018 preseason’s first full week kicked off Thursday night
  • House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte is reportedly preparing to subpoena those linked to the controversial - and discredited - Steele Dossier that was allegedly used to justify government surveillance of Trump's campaign team
  • A judge threatened to hold Attorney General Jeff Sessions in contempt of court Thursday over the attempted deportation of a migrant mother and daughter
THE LEAD STORY - NORTH KOREA GRUMBLES ABOUT SANCTIONS - North Korea has threatened to stall the denuclearization of its missile program if the U.S. continues to abide by an "outdated acting script" amid Washington's calls to enforce sanctions against the regime ... A statement from the nation's Foreign Ministry said that following President Trump's June summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, the North has worked to improve relations between the two countries and "make active contributions to peace, security, and prosperity on the Korean Peninsula and over the world." The foreign ministry said that despite its efforts to work with the U.S. — by stopping missile launches and nuclear tests — America continues to insist on "denuclearization first," and continues to encourage international sanctions against the North.
WHAT REALLY HAPPENED TO MOLLIE? - The night Iowa student Mollie Tibbetts went missing, she likely left her boyfriend’s home with someone she knew ... That’s one leading theory posited by a former FBI profiler, who reviewed the previous reporting on the case at the request of FOX News. “To have a complete stranger to come into a small town like this, someone would have come forward and mentioned that they’ve seen this person,” Mary Ellen O’Toole, a former FBI profiler and director of the forensic sciences program at George Mason University told Fox News. “She was likely not kidnapped. She either got into the car of someone she knew or had a relationship with, or it was someone who had a non-threatening demeanor.”
O’Toole said it was also unlikely that Tibbetts ran away from home. “She doesn’t sound like the type of girl who would run away and start a new life,” the former FBI agent said. “If she is as close to her mom and dad and others, she wouldn’t have just run off. It’s just not seen as something that happens.”
Tibbetts, 20, went missing July 18 from Brooklyn, Iowa, about 70 miles east of Des Moines. She was last seen jogging about 7:30 p.m. in a place where, as one community watch organizer said, “not a lot of big things happen.”
NEW SEASON OF ANTHEM PROTESTS KICK OFF: NFL players continued to protest during the national anthem on Thursday night as the league began the first full week of its 2018 preseason ... Some players held their fists in the air, while others decided to kneel, despite the controversy surrounding the action. Wide receivers Kenny Stills and Albert Wilson, both of the Miami Dolphins, knelt during "The Star-Spangled Banner," ahead of their game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, the Miami Herald reported. Robert Quinn, a defensive end for the Dolphins, raised his fist. Philadelphia Eagles Malcolm Jenkins, who plays safety, and De'Vante Bausby, a cornerback, also raised their fists prior to a game against the Pittsburgh Steelers, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.
STEELE DOSSIER SUBPOENAS COMING? - House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., is preparing to subpoena those connected to the infamous Steele Dossier, according to a report ...  Sources told the Hill that Goodlatte is ready to subpoena Justice Department official Bruce Ohr, his wife Nellie Ohr and Fusion GPS co-founder Glenn Simpson. The House Judiciary Committee also wants testimony from former FBI and DOJ officials Jim Baker, Sally Moyer, Jonathan Moffa and George Toscas, the Hill reported.
SESSIONS THREATENED WITH CONTEMPT: A federal judge in Washington threatened to hold Attorney General Jeff Sessions in contempt of court Thursday after halting the deportation of a mother and daughter who were sent home in the middle of appealing their removal ... U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan learned Thursday that the two were on a plane headed to Central America after the Justice Department and the American Civil Liberties Union agreed Wednesday to delay their deportation until 11:59 p.m. the following day, the Washington Post reported. The woman — identified in court as Carmen — is a plaintiff in an ACLU lawsuit filed this week over efforts to prevent immigrants from seeking asylum due to domestic and gang violence in their home countries.

AS SEEN ON FOX NEWS
DEMOCRATIC BETRAYAL: "President Obama and Nancy Pelosi are traitors to Hispanics." – Maria Elvira Salazar, journalist-turned-Florida congressional candidate, on "Tucker Carlson Tonight, arguing that former President Obama and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi dithered on immigration when Democrats controlled the presidency and both chambers of CongressWATCH
NOT PUTIN'S PUPPET: "I wish the president got more credit for what he has done to punish Russia because he's certainly been virtually brutal to them and anything but a puppet of them." – Mike Huckabee, on "Outnumbered," saying that President Trump doesn't get enough credit for his tough stance toward Russia. WATCH

TRENDING
Pence calls for Space Force to be established by 2020.
Ocasio-Cortez refuses conservative Ben Shapiro's $10,000 invitation to debate, compares offer to catcalling.
Stormy Daniels attorney Michael Avenatti: 'I'm exploring a run for the presidency of the United States.'
Kansas City man told he couldn't vote while wearing a 'Make America Great Again' hat.

THE SWAMP
Kobach says he'll recuse himself from Kansas vote-counting process.
Kavanaugh docs from Bush administration highlight post-9/11 legal challenges.
Former Ohio State wrestler - and UFC legend - backs off claim Jim Jordan knew of sex abuse.
EXCLUSIVE: Nikki Haley blames Venezuelan crisis on leftist president: 'It's time for Maduro to go.'

ACROSS THE NATION
Trump says Chicago shootings are 'absolute and total disaster.'
'Cal 3' proposal to divide California being pulled, billionaire backer says.
New photos show larger cracks in Miami bridge before deadly collapse.
Atlanta school backtracks after dropping Pledge of Allegiance, adding 'Wolf Pack Chant.'

MINDING YOUR BUSINESS
Trump's Space Force may protect assets worth billions of dollars: Neil deGrasse Tyson.
USPS blames financial instability on government.
PGA Championship servers hacked, Bitcoin ransom included: Report.
Millennials ‘destroying’ core beer brands: ‘Bar Rescue’s’ Jon Taffer.
Is the heyday of ride-hailing companies over?
Buffalo Wild Wings could add sports betting to menu.

FOX NEWS OPINION
Marc Thiessen: Democrats have their own foreign espionage problem.
Hannah Scherlacher: Ocasio-Cortez's vision to turn Uncle Sam into Santa Claus poses a threat we can't ignore.
Harry J. Kazianis: Trump's sanctions on Russia show his strategic kindness isn't sign of weakness.

HOLLYWOOD SQUARED
Kanye West defends his support for Trump: 'Liberals can't bully me.'
Several fake Trump stars reportedly appear on Hollywood Walk of Fame.
Casey Affleck addresses sexual misconduct claims: I was 'really unprofessional' and 'I'm sorry.'
'Slender Man' movie will not be shown in Milwaukee-area theaters due to stabbing.

DID YOU HEAR ABOUT THIS?
Archaeologists fear biblical artifacts, monuments won't survive Yemen war.
Video shows camel trapped inside car after collision.
Engagement cookies are the new bridal trend.

STAY TUNED
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On FOX News: 
FOX & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine discusses Trump's Space Force plan. Other special guests include: Texas Gov. Greg Abbott; Trump attorney Jay Sekulow; former acting ICE director Thomas Homan; Geraldo Rivera; Diamond & Silk.  Plus, Cody Johnson visits the All-American Summer concert stage!
FOX News @ Night, 11 p.m. ET: Special guests include: Rep. Adam Kinzinger.
On FOX Business:
Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m. ET: Jon Hilsenrath, Wall Street Journal global economics editor; John Crowley, Amicus Therapeutics CEO; Trae Stephens, Anduril Industries chairman; Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer.
Varney & Co., 9 a.m. ET: Elizabeth Heng, Calif. Republican congressional candidate; Ian Meyers, NewsPicks CEO; Joseph Okpaku, vice president of public policy for Lyft.
Cavuto: Coast to Coast, Noon ET: Gene Munster, Loup Ventures managing partner and tech analyst; Lawrence Jones, editor-in-chief of CampusReform.org; FOX News contributors Ed Rollins and Doug Schoen.
On FOX News Radio:
The FOX News Rundown podcastOn Thursday, Vice President Mike Pence outlined a "Space Force" to be ready for battle by 2020 to "meet the emerging threats on this new battlefield."  FOX News Pentagon producer, Lucas Tomlinson discusses the big plans for President Trump's new branch of the military in space. During his 20-plus years in the ring, Glenn Jacobs, aka WWE wrestler Kane, was one of the most feared men in professional wrestling. Now, he is the newly elected mayor of Knox County, Tenn. Former WWE wrestler and FOX News contributor Tyrus speaks with Jacobs about his plans as mayor, and the two share some stories from the square circle. Don't miss good news from FOX's Tonya J. Powers. Plus, commentary from FOX News medical correspondent Dr. Marc Siegel.
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The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: The latest in Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation and the prospects for a "blue wave" in the midterm elections and more will be covered by the following special guests: Jonah Goldberg; Carley Shimkus; former Trump attorney John Dowd; Shannon Bream; Kennedy; and comedian Jimmie Walker.
On FOX News Weekend: 
Cavuto Live, Saturday, 10 a.m. ET: Guests include: Former White House press secretary Sean Spicer on whether President Trump should sit down for an interview with Special Counsel Robert Mueller; Senate candidate John James on winning the Michigan GOP primary after being endorsed by President Trump; Charles and Larry McDaniel on receiving their father’s dog tag after he went missing during the Korean War.
FOX News Sunday, Sunday, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. ET: Don't miss an exclusive interview with Sen. Lindsey Graham.
OBJECTified, Sunday8 p.m. ET: Recording artist Pitbull talks to Harvey Levin about growing up in the drug-infested slums of Miami and figuring out the formula that allowed him to become an international sensation.
Life, Liberty & Levin, Sunday, 10 p.m. ET: Has China been duping the United States for nearly half a century? Host Mark Levin sits down with Michael Pillsbury, director of the Center for Chinese Strategy for the Hudson Institute, and discovers new insights about China’s tactical maneuvers against the U.S. through its science, technological and military capabilities.

#OnThisDay
1977: Postal employee David Berkowitz is arrested in Yonkers, N.Y., accused of being "Son of Sam," the gunman who killed six people and wounded seven others in the New York City area. (Berkowitz is serving six consecutive 25-years-to-life sentences.)
1949: The National Military Establishment is renamed the Department of Defense.
1921: Franklin D. Roosevelt is stricken with polio at his summer home on the Canadian island of Campobello.
1846: President James K. Polk signs a measure establishing the Smithsonian Institution.
FOX News First is compiled by FOX News' Bryan Robinson. Thank you for joining us! Enjoy your day and weekend! We'll see you in your inbox first thing Monday morning.
          North Korea: US Sanctions Pressure ‘Outdated Acting Script’      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

North Korea: US Sanctions Pressure ‘Outdated Acting Script’  Voice of America How South Koreans Are Reckoning With a Changing American Military

The post North Korea: US Sanctions Pressure ‘Outdated Acting Script’ appeared first on LIVING STRONG TELEVISION NETWORK.


          North Korea’s foreign ministry hits out at the White House: what we learned      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A lack of major concessions from either side could see a breakdown in dialogue in the near future
          The View from Jingshan: Beijing’s silence reflects confidence in North Korea      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache