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          Pennacchio Highlights Dangers of Sex Tourism in Dominican Republic      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Sen. Joe Pennacchio has introduced a resolution that would urge NJ residents to cease travel to the Dominican Republic, unless the country takes action to combat the epidemic of sex tourism within the nation’s borders.
          Seabourn Adds Cuba Itineraries       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Published in: Cruise News

Seabourn Sojourn

Seabourn has received approval to begin sailing to Cuba from Miami and San Juan, Puerto Rico, starting with a 12-day cruise aboard Seabourn Sojourn departing Miami on November 4, 2019.

Seabourn becomes Carnival Corporation's third cruise brand currently approved to sail to Cuba, according to a statement. 

Guests can choose from four separate itineraries with five different departure dates to start.

The addition of Seabourn’s sailings will help meet the growing demand for luxury travel experiences to Cuba, Seabourn said. 

The 11-, 12-, and 14-day sailings will visit five ports in Cuba, calling at three or four on each itinerary.

“For many luxury travelers, they aim to find new places to explore and discover meaningful new cultural opportunities, and Cuba is one of the most sought-after emerging destinations for many of our guests,” said Richard Meadows, president of Seabourn. “We are excited to finally be able to include Cuba in our itineraries, and our guests and travel partners have been anxiously awaiting an ultra-luxury travel experience with a wider selection of destinations in this relatively undiscovered Caribbean treasure. These Cuba itineraries are fresh and sure to satisfy the curiosity of anyone who has considered visiting.”

Specific port details of the Cuba itineraries include:

November 4, 2019, 12-day roundtrip from Miami, includes stops in Havana, Cuba (overnight); Antilla (Nipe Bay), Cuba; Santiago de Cuba (overnight); Port Antonio, Jamaica; West End, Cayman Brac, Cayman Islands; and Cienfuegos, Cuba (overnight).

November 16 & 28, 2019, 12-day Miami to Miami, includes stops in Cienfuegos, Cuba (overnight); West End, Cayman Brac, Cayman Islands; Port Antonio, Jamaica; Santiago de Cuba, Cuba (overnight); Antilla (Nipe Bay), Cuba, and Havana, Cuba (overnight).

December 10, 2019, 11-day Miami to San Juan, Puerto Rico, includes stops in Havana (La Habana), Cuba (overnight); Punta Frances, Isla de la Juventud, Cuba; Cienfuegos, Cuba; West End, Cayman Brac, Cayman Islands; Port Antonio, Jamaica; Santiago de Cuba (overnight); and Isla Catalina, Dominican Republic.

December 21, 2019, 14-day San Juan, Puerto Rico to Miami, includes stops at Gustavia, St. Barthelemy; St. John’s, Antigua, Antigua & Barbuda; Carambola Beach, St. Kitts & Nevis; Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; Port Antonio, Jamaica; Santiago de Cuba, Cuba (overnight); Antilla (Nipe Bay), Cuba; and Havana, Cuba (overnight).


          The C.O.W.S. Compensatory Call-In 09/23/17      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Context of White Supremacy hosts the weekly Compensatory Call-In. We encourage non-white listeners to dial in with their codified concepts, new terms, observations, research findings, workplace problems or triumphs, and/or suggestions on how best to Replace White Supremacy With Justice ASAP. Weâ??ll use these sessions to hone our use of words as tools to reveal truth, neutralize White people. Weâ??ll examine news reports from the past seven days and - hopefully - promote a constructive dialog. #ANTIBLACKNESS Weeks after Hurricanes Irma and Harvey ransacked the Caribbean and coastal regions of the United States, Hurricane Maria battered Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and the US Virgin Islands again. This destruction has caused a number of ad hoc tutorials about colonialism in the Caribbean. In other natural disasters, Mexico was struck by another devastating earthquake, hundreds are reported dead after the 7.1 magnitude quake. Speaking of first responders, a White Ohio fire fighter, Tyler Roysdon, publicized on social media that "if he went inside the burning house of a black man and he had a dog, that he would save the dog first and probably take his time coming back to get the black man.â?? Roysdon was allowed to resign. Down the road in Missouri, enforcement officials continue to clash with protesters a week after a white officer was acquitted for killing a black male. St. Louis police are accused of calling protesters terrorist and posting a meme calling Black Lives Matter "the klan with a tan." In the pacific northwest, a Suspected Race Soldier walked the streets of downtown Seattle harassing black citizens and sporting a swastika. He was punched in the face and given a radio interview. #AnswersForMiriamCarey INVEST in The COWS - http://paypal.me/GusTRenegade CALL IN NUMBER: 641.715.3640 CODE 564943# The C.O.W.S. archives: http://tiny.cc/76f6p
          Encuentran cráneos completos de monos extintos en la isla      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

SANTO DOMINGO. Aproximadamente un año y medio atrás el buzo Oleg Shevchuk vio el cráneo de un primate en una cueva sumergida en la provincia La Altagracia. Lo fotografió y mostró a amigos investigadores. Hace un mes se organizó una expedición para retornar y lo que encontraron sorprendió al equipo. En el lugar había dos cráneos de individuos adultos que se consideran los primeros completos encontrados de un mono extinto en la isla La Española de la especie Antillothrix bernensis.

“Están completos”, afirma Juan Almonte, investigador del Museo Nacional de Historia Natural. “El segundo, que fue el primero que encontramos (por Shevchuk), está completo con todos sus dientes, menos un incicivo, y al otro le hacen falta los incicivos, pero en todas las otras partes están completos”.

Fue el 10 de julio cuando se desarrolló la expedición con personal de la Dominican Republic Speleological Society (DRSS) y del Museo. Ese día extrajeron de la cueva un aproximado de 1,450 huesos que conformaron los cuerpos de al menos seis primates de la especie Antillothrix bernensis, de 10 perezosos, siete roedores, 106 murciélagos, 29 insectívoros, cinco aves, nueve reptiles y seis anfibios.


          Argentina's Senate trashes bill to legalise abortion      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

[Argentina], August 9 (ANI): Argentina's Senate on Thursday rejected a proposed bill on legalising elective abortion in the country.

The bill would have allowed women to terminate their pregnancy in the first 14 weeks. According to current Argentine laws, abortions can be carried out only when the mother's health is at risk or in rape cases, CNN reported.

The Senate voted against the bill, 38 to 31, with two abstentions and one absentee. As the outcome of the vote was announced, demonstrators got engaged in clashes with the police outside the National Congress building in Buenos Aires.

In June, Argentine Chamber of Deputies or the lower house of Congress narrowly passed the bill 129 to 125 with one abstention.

The proposed abortion bill, which was a raging issue in Argentina in the past few months, saw protestors, both in favour and against abortion taking to the streets. While the anti-abortion demonstrators protested under blue coloured "save both lives" banners, pro-abortion protestors flashed banners and wore green bandanas, loosely wrapped and tied around their necks, as per the CNN report.

Most Latin American countries permit abortions for medical reasons. There is a blanket ban on abortion in many countries such as Chile, Suriname, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic, Sputnik reported.

In Mexico, abortion is legal only in the nation's capital Mexico City. The voluntary termination of pregnancy is legal only in Cuba, Uruguay, Guyana and Puerto Rico. (ANI)


          Cancun Riviera Maya Sargassum Seaweed Mexico      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Cancun Riviera Maya Sargassum Seaweed Mexico

The Mexican has invested $200 Million Pesos to clean the Cancun´s beaches at all. 


Credits : Oscar Cadena

With an investment of 200 million pesos, this Wednesday begins work to install the first barrier in Punta Nizuc, in Cancun, which aims to divert the sargassum into the sea and redirect it with the help of wind and natural marine currents. The objective is to avoid massive coverage of the coastline, and generate greater environmental and economic impacts to the Mexican Caribbean. As before, the sargassum that remains on the shore of the beaches will be manually removed and deposited in places of final disposal. The sargasso will be removed with seven structures that the government of Quintana Roo hired from the Goimar Goimsa Group, and the collection will be carried out through amphibious bands or suction bands, explained to El Universal the titutal of the Secretariat of Ecology and Environment of Quintana Roo (Semaqroo), Alfredo Arellano Guillermo. The first fence will serve as a pilot, the other remaining will be placed later in Tulum, Playa del Carmen, Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. Yesterday, during the private meeting that members of the state cabinet held with hoteliers, and in a second open meeting with social sectors, academics and organized civil society, the project to contain sargassum was announced. They explained that the problem is not going to be solved, because it depends on the currents and the winds, but it can reduce the amount (of sargassum) that reaches the beach. They are plastic barriers, canvas, buoys to float, with a width to the bottom of 50 centimeters, to retain the sargasso & quot ;. Also, the owner of Ecology and Environment clarified that "the type of mesh does not threaten the fauna, which can go under it, without any problem. & Quot; For his part, the coordinator of advisers to the state government, Felipe Ornelas said that the work of collecting on land will be maintained along with the diversion of algae in the sea, to avoid burying sargassum on beaches, under the own sand, otherwise, there would be significant environmental impacts on the ecosystem, for example, it would change the color of the beach, its composition and quality.


We recently reported on the unusual amounts of seaweed or pelagic Sargassum that are washing ashore on beaches throughout the Mexican Caribbean. This is not confined to the state of Quintana Roo, the Caribbean islands and the Gulf coast of the United States, from Texas to Florida, are reporting similar experiences. While it is natural for seaweed to come ashore after storms and for warmer water temperatures in the summer to cause it to breed more quickly (a phenomenon known as a bloom), such large quantities of seaweed are rare.




What is pelagic Sargassum?
Two species of pelagic Sargassum are washing ashore, they are also known as Common Gulfweed (Sargassum natans) and Broad-toothed Gulfweed (Sargassum fluitans). Sargassum comes from the Portuguese word sargaço, which means “little grapes,” a reference to the air-filled bladders that enables it to float on the surface and move with the currents. Unlike other algae that are rooted in the seabed or attached to rocks or corals, it can grow and reproduce as it drifts through the water. And when fragments break off the main plant, they can also reproduce, contributing to the formation of carpets of seaweed.
Pelagic Sargassum is associated with the Sargasso Sea in the Atlantic Ocean where vast beds of this free-floating seaweed are a habitat for many creatures such as microscopic plants, shells, shrimp, tiny crabs, sea horses and eels and are a nursery for four species of baby turtles and fish, including jacks, tuna and mahi-mahi. In fact, 120 species of fish and more than 120 invertebrates make their home among the plants. Migrating schools of fish also use the dense mats of weed as a refuge from predators such as sailfish and marlin, and seabirds and shore birds feed on the seaweed’s bounty.
Ocean currents such as the Gulf Stream, the North Atlantic Current and the North Equatorial Current transport Sargassum and it is found naturally in the northern Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. Yet mats and lines of it are now being seen in areas where it has not been reported before or is very rare, and blooms have been reported in areas of the Atlantic not directly associated with the Sargasso Sea, such as the coast of South America. There may be multiple sources for the seaweed proliferation currently affecting the Caribbean and it may come ashore in different locations at different times during the year.




Where does the seaweed affecting the Mexican Caribbean come from?
To date, the origin of the Sargassum coming ashore on the coast of Quintana Roo and other parts of the Caribbean is unknown, however, marine biologist Rosa Rodriguez Martinez of the National Autonomous University of Mexico Marine Research Field Station in Puerto Morelos told us about one possible theory. It may come from as far afield as the coast of Brazil, thousands of kilometers to the south.
This was the source area for a massive island of seaweed spotted in April 2011 to the north of the Amazon estuary in Brazil where it had never been seen before. By July the same year it had dispersed into smaller patches and tons of it were washing up on beaches in the Eastern Caribbean from Trinidad to the Dominican Republic, where it became known as “the golden tide.” Ocean currents had even taken it across the Atlantic to West Africa, where it affected a stretch of coastline from Sierra Leone to Ghana.
Deforestation continues unchecked in the Amazon Basin and northern Brazil and without tree roots to anchor them tropical soils are easily eroded. It is thought that higher than average rainfall levels in 2010 and 2011 washed greater amounts of soil, organic waste, fertilizers and other chemicals into the sea. This influx of nutrients, which could also have been supplemented by nutrients from upwellings of colder water at sea and dust from the Sahara, may have provided optimum conditions for the alga to thrive.




Why is there so much seaweed at caribbean beaches
Theories abound on what is causing the seaweed to bloom in such huge quantities
Rising water temperatures due to climate change and excessive nutrients from nitrate fertilizers, pesticides and waste that find their way into the ocean are thought to be important factors. The water temperatures in the Caribbean are warmer this year and traces of chemicals can affect the balance of the marine ecosystem in many ways.
Other theories are that the appearance of drifting mats of Sargassum may be due to changes in wind patterns linked to El Niño that affect the ocean currents that circle the Sargasso Sea or that it is an environmental impact that can be traced to the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico or to oil exploration. Other scientists attribute it to the use of certain types of pesticides in southern US, Colombia and Brazil that find their way into rivers and then into the sea.
Different factors may have come into play in different areas affected by Sargassum. Marine biologists do not know yet whether this is a rare event and or whether it will prove to be cyclical.




When seaweed comes ashore
Seaweed has always washed ashore on the Quintana Roo coast; it is a natural occurrence. The fact that this season it is doing so in much larger quantities does not mean that the beaches of the Mexican Caribbean are dirty or polluted. In fact, Cancun was recently awarded the prestigious Blue Flag for six of its beaches, an international standard of excellence for beach cleanliness and many other area beaches in in the process of applying for Blue Flag certification.
When Sargassum is beached, marine creatures that are trapped die and begin to decay; this is what causes the distinctive, short-lived fishy odor, not the seaweed itself.
Although seaweed is completely harmless and does not sting, it is a good idea to shower after swimming in the sea and wash your swimsuit. Sometimes microscopic creatures called hydrozoa, tiny jellyfish or sand flies are trapped in the weed and a few of them may occasionally cause a rash, by rinsing thoroughly you will be eradicating them.




What’s being done?
Beach cleaning is being carried out on a daily basis in Cancun, Puerto Morelos, Playa del Carmen, Cozumel and other resort areas such as Akumal, Tulum and Mahahual. In the third week of July, the Federal Government authorized additional funds for Municipal governments to hire more people to clean the beaches and conservation groups, soldiers and people from all walks of life are also volunteering to help remove the seaweed that washes ashore.
As it is sea turtle season, most cleaning is done manually and there are restrictions on heavy machinery such as bulldozers that could damage nests and their precious eggs. In Cancun, the authorities have given permission for lightweight diggers to be used during the day and only on the sand that is closest to the waves. The methods used will be carefully controlled to prevent damage to the beaches.
Reconnaissance flights and boat patrols will keep track of patches of seaweed as they move north through the Yucatan Channel, identifying those that could make landfall.
All along the coast, turtle guardians are keeping an eye on adult turtles coming ashore to nest on beaches where there may be seaweed and will watch over the hatchlings as they are born later in the season to ensure that they do not become entangled in it.
The local authorities, hotel associations and Mexican environmental agencies SEMARNAT and CONANP are working with local biologists, and experts from the Universidad Autónoma de México on a statewide cleaning and disposal plan for the seaweed.
Once the salt has leached out of seaweed it can be composted and it makes an excellent fertilizer. In Puerto Morelos, some of the seaweed removed from the beaches is already being deposited in an old quarry and it could eventually be used in the parks and gardens.
In other areas of the Mexican Caribbean, although not in Cancun, the seaweed is being buried in the dunes and the soil formed will boost plant growth. Seaweed anchors the sand and helps protect the shoreline from erosion. When seaweed is left to decompose naturally on the sand, it actually contributes to the growth of the beach.
Sargassum is consumed in other parts of the world or given to farm animals as part of a dietary supplement and it is believed to have healing properties. These uses may also be studied as part of the disposal program.




Satellite tracking
Government and tourism officials and local institutions are now in contact with experts from Texas A & M University who are working with NASA to use satellite imagery to track the floating patches of seaweed as they are move through the Caribbean, the Yucatan Channel and the Gulf of Mexico. With more information they can forecast when larger patches of seaweed are approaching the coast and can plan accordingly. This project also monitors the Sargasso situation in the Caribbean islands, from Grenada and Barbados to Puerto Rico.
In another initiative, the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory at the University of Southern Mississippi is collecting reports from all over the Caribbean. Using the information they receive from different parts of the Caribbean, the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico, satellite imagery and the movements of marine currents they can identify Sargassum source areas, track the floating seaweed and try to understand why it is reproducing so quickly.




Beach cleaning at Royal Resorts
At Royal Resorts beach cleaning brigades are out every morning. The fact that they work before the hottest part of the day means that you may not see them but they are doing their utmost to keep the sand looking beautiful.
We will give you further updates on the seaweed and the beach cleaning program as more information becomes available.

Sources and Further Information:
Maestra en Ciencias Rosa Rodriguez Martinez, Unidad de Sistemas Arrecifales del Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Puerto Morelos
Doyle, E and J Franks. 2015

Sargassum Fact Sheet. Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute
RadioFormula
          Argentina says no to legalized abortion as battle moves through region      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000

Very early Thursday morning, the Senate in Argentina voted down a bill that would legalize elective abortion. The vote was 38-31, which included two abstentions and one absentee vote. Current law will remain in place which allows abortion in the case of the mother’s health is at risk or rape. Women can be imprisoned for up to four years if the current law is broken.

The proposal would have legally allowed abortion up to fourteen weeks. After the more liberal lower house, the Argentine Chamber of Deputies narrowly passed the bill by a vote of 129-125. President Mauricio Macri said he would not veto the bill if it passed both chambers.

Pro-abortion supporters were buoyed by the vote to legalize abortion in Ireland, also a predominantly Catholic country, last May. Support for the bill was framed in much the same way it is framed through-out Europe and in America. Those in favor describe abortion as a human right and a health care issue. Both descriptions seem ironic to me, though, as the lives lost in an abortion are denied the ultimate right to life and if the concern is health care, legal abortion is allowed in a hospital in the case of the mother’s health or if the woman has been raped.

As expected, the anticipation of the vote in the Senate Thursday morning brought out protesters from both sides of the argument. A large screen outside the National Congress in Bueno Aires building brought the news to the crowd. A heavy police presence tamped down skirmishes as they emerged. Abortion movement leaders from outside the country weighed in. They vow to continue the fight.

Celia Szusterman, trustee of the UK board of Pro-Mujer and director of the Latin America program at the Institute for Statecraft, told CNN that is was “a step backward for women’s rights and women’s health.”
She says it’s a “sad day… not only because of the way the vote went but the way the campaign for and against went. It was so divisive.”
Activists say they’ll keep pushing the bill, in the hope that it passes one day soon.
“It will happen because that’s the world — to increase rights and this is one of the fundamental rights that is still not available to women in Latin America,” Szusterman said.
While pro-abortion supporters chanted “legal abortion at the hospital” outside the National Congress, the Catholic Church held a “Mass for Life” in Buenos Aires. Pope Francis didn’t weigh in during the battle in his native country but he did issue a statement earlier when the bill passed in the lower house. He issued a letter as the debate began earlier this year.
While Pope Francis hasn’t addressed the legislation directly, he did speak out strongly against abortion just days after the bill was approved by the lower house — comparing abortion to avoid birth defects to Nazi eugenics.
The pontiff also issued a letter in March, as the abortion debate began, urging Argentines to “make a contribution in defense of life and justice.”
The movement for legalized abortion is called the green wave and it is spreading across South America. Supporters wear a green bandana as a symbol of the movement and they are now being spotted in Brazil where the legislation is being considered. Last year Chile voted to ease the country’s strict ban.
Supporters of the bill rallied across the region Wednesday, in Chile, Uruguay, Mexico and Peru, as well as across the Atlantic, in Spain.
The vote in Argentina was important because of the scope of those affected. Argentina’s population is the fourth largest in South America and would have become the largest country to allow legalized abortion. With the green wave moved on to Brazil now, legalized abortion has the potential to be allowed in the continent’s most populated country. In the case of Brazil, the proposed legislation would allow abortion up to twelve weeks.
Despite not passing in the Senate, the bill is significant: Argentina is the fourth most populous country in the region and would have become the biggest country to permit abortions. Brazil, the region’s most populous country, is also in the midst of exploring permitting abortion—the Supreme Court held a hearing earlier this week to decide whether to decriminalize it up to 12 weeks.
This would amount to a potential of 126 million women granted the right to legally end a pregnancy in a hospital. Abortion supporters in Chile, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay, Spain all hoped the vote in Argentina would help their path to legalization.
Currently, only three of the 33 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean allow elective abortions: Cuba, Uruguay, and Guyana. Abortions are also permitted in Mexico City. Meanwhile, six countries—Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Suriname—ban abortion entirely.

As an American woman, I’m struck by the short window being proposed by these bills. Fourteen weeks in Argentina and twelve weeks in Brazil seem quite restrictive compared to U.S. law. Also, these abortions in South America are intended to be performed in hospitals. Argentina is seen as a leader in the region.

Amnesty International’s Argentina director Mariela Belski explained that “Argentina is a country that has shaped the agenda for the region in terms of human rights,” referring to Argentina leading the way in legalizing same-sex marriage. And according to an Amnesty survey, 60% of Argentinians are in favor of abortion. The fight might not be over yet.

The legal battle moves on to Brazil now. Let’s hope for a similar outcome.

The post Argentina says no to legalized abortion as battle moves through region appeared first on Hot Air.


          Comment on Puerto Rico, Dominica and Cuba embrace their Taino Indian heritage by Willlie      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Taino heritage is been in all the islands in the caribbean but in Dominican Republic there’s a higher genetic in African origin .... there’s more blacks in DR than the rest of the caribbean but you can’t tell them that ... kinky hair people say that they’re Indian but they blue black smh
          1/48 Brazilian EMB-314 Super Tucano      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
1/48 Brazilian EMB-314 Super TucanoThis is a plastic model kit, which comes unassembled and unpainted. So glue, model paints and other basic modelling tools are additionally required.

The EMB-314 Super Tucano, also named ALX or A-29 is a turboprop aircraft designed for light attack, counter insurgency (COIN), close air support, aerial reconnaissance missions in low threat environments, as well as providing pilot training. Designed to operate in high temperature and humidity conditions in extremely rugged terrain, the Super Tucano is highly maneuverable, has a low heat signature, incorporates 3th generation avionics and weapons system to deliver precision guided munitions. It is currently in service with the air forces of Brazil, Dominican Republic, Colombia, Ecuador, Chile and Burkina Faso, and has been ordered by Indonesia, Angola, and the United States.

Completed size : Length: 238.4mm Wingspan: 233mm

More features:
the kit consists of over 150 parts , includes clear parts for canopy.
-Detailed fuselage&wing w/accurate design

Buy Now
          TRS CORAL HOTEL ANNOUNCES ITS INCLUSION IN THE EXCLUSIVE ‘THE LEADING HOTELS OF THE WORLD’ COLLECTION      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

by Shrutee K/DNS 

TRS Coral Hotel, the luxurious adults-only property in Costa Mujeres, northeast of Yucatan Peninsula– Mexico, opening in autumn 2018 by Palladium Hotel Group, has announced its inclusion in the exclusive collection of hotels that make up The Leading Hotels of The World, after satisfactorily fulfilling demanding quality and service criteria.

The Leading Hotels of the World is one of the most prestigious collections in the world, made up of more than 375 luxury hotels located in 75 countries with exceptional architecture and design. The hotels that are part of The Leading Hotels of the World share a common passion and commitment to providing extraordinary, unique and incomparable travel experiences.


Located 30 minutes north from Cancun International Airport, Costa Mujeres is an exceptional enclave in the Mexican Caribbean that is home to some of the most beautiful beaches in the world. This unexplored tourist destination will welcome TRS Coral Hotel, as well as Grand Palladium Costa Mujeres Resort & Spa, from November 2018, providing holiday-makers with the utmost in relaxation, freedom and the opportunity to connect with nature among exotic flora and fauna. TRS Coral Hotel has 469 luxurious rooms, each with a balcony or terrace, whirlpool bath, direct access to exclusive swim-up pools and stunning views over the Costa Mujeres landscape, with the aim of offering guests ‘unexplored luxury’. One of the hallmarks of TRS Coral Hotel is its fully personalized services that are tailored to every guest. Its exclusive butler service is available for every guest and is complemented with 24-hour room service to meet and exceed all expectations.


TRS Coral Hotel guests will also be able to enjoy an incomparable gastronomic offering at six themed restaurants, including the spectacular Chic Cabaret & Restaurant, and have access to all the services of Grand Palladium Costa Mujeres Resort & Spa, including its nine à la carte restaurants, through the exclusive Dine Around programme. Leisure facilities include an impressive Rafa Nadal Tennis Centre, which will offer exclusive training programmes based on Rafa Nadal's personal values and adapted to all ages and levels. In addition, Zentropiaby Palladium Spa &Wellness is a wellness oasis of more than four thousand square metres, which will allow guests to relax all their senses and live a physical and mental renewal.

Reservations for TRS Coral Hotel are now being taken for stays from 1 November 2018. For more information, and to book taking advantage of opening promotions, visit www.palladiumhotelgroup.com/en/brands/trs-hotels/trs-hotels-coral/
  
About Palladium Hotel GroupPalladium Hotel Group is a Spanish hotel chain with over forty years of experience. The chain has 44 hotels and more than 14,000 rooms in six countries: Spain, Mexico, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Sicily (Italy) and Brazil and operates 9 brands: TRS Hotels, Grand Palladium Hotels & Resorts, Palladium Hotels, Palladium Boutique Hotels, Fiesta Hotels & Resorts, Ushuaïa Unexpected Hotels, BLESS Collection Hotels, Ayre Hoteles, Only You Hotels, as well as licensed brand Hard Rock Hotels. The Palladium Hotel Group hotels are characterized by their philosophy of offering customers a high standard of quality in its products and services and excellent value. Palladium Hotel Group is owned by Grupo EmpresasMatutes (GEM). www.palladiumhotelgroup.com

About The Leading Hotels of the World, Ltd. (Leading Hotels)Comprised of more than 375 hotels in over 75 countries, Leading Hotels is a collection of uncommon luxury hotels. Rooted in the locations in which they are found, members embody the very essence of their destination. Through varied styles of architecture and design and distinct cultural experiences enhanced by passionate people, the collection is for the curious traveler looking for their next discovery.Established in 1928 by several influential and forward-thinking European hoteliers, Leading Hotels has an eight-decade-long commitment to providing remarkable, authentic travel experiences. The company selects only hotels that meet its high standards for quality and distinctiveness, resulting in a curated portfolio of hotels united not by what makes them the same, but the details that makethem different. Leaders Club is the company’s exclusive two-tiered guest loyalty program, consisting of like-minded travelers seeking uncommon travel experiences. The program provides its members with personalized service and exclusive travel benefits to enhance their stays at any Leading Hotel around the world. For more information visit:www.lhw.com, Facebook at www.Facebook.com/LeadingHotels and Instagram @leadinghotelsoftheworld



          HanesBrands Recognized as One of Most-Admired Companies in Central America and the Caribbean      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Forbes magazine has recognized HanesBrands, a socially responsible manufacturer and marketer of leading everyday basic apparel, as one of the most-admired companies in Central America and the Caribbean. Hanes is the only apparel company included in the region’s inaugural ranking.

To identify and select the 30 most-admired companies, Forbes conducted a survey with stakeholders, students and consumers in seven countries. The survey evaluated company attributes, including brand value; reputation; quality of products and services; environmental commitment; innovation; corporate image; female inclusion; local and global presence; and social responsibility.

“HanesBrands is honored to be recognized for our operations, which have a direct and positive impact on our employees and their families, as well as the communities where we conduct business,” said Javier Chacon, chief global manufacturing operations officer for HanesBrands. “But, most of all, we are incredibly proud of the 30,000-plus employees in our Central America and Caribbean operations who ultimately are responsible for our stellar performance in the region for 45 years.”

Unlike most companies in the apparel industry, Hanes primarily manufactures its garments in company-owned plants in 20 countries across the globe, including in the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Honduras and Puerto Rico. The company’s supply chain operations have earned multiple awards and international acclaim, including:

  • Being named one of the 25 best multinational companies to work for in Latin America by the Great Place to Work Institute in 2015 – the first such ranking for any apparel manufacturer.

  • Earning the Honduran Foundation for Corporate Social Responsibility Seal for eight consecutive years and the Mexican Center for Philanthropy Award five times for socially responsible practices and programs.  

  • Receiving a 2016 Responsible Business Award for best employee engagement from The Ethical Corporation. Hanes’ innovative Viviendo Verde (Green for Good) philanthropic program, which operates in Central America and the Dominican Republic, mobilizes three of Hanes’ corporate social responsibility pillars – environmental commitment, employee volunteerism and community improvement.

    The program utilizes savings from energy-management and landfill-diversion efforts to fund community projects focused on education, health, environmental protection and disaster relief that are conducted by employee volunteers. Since 2010, more than 15,000 Hanes employees have donated 600,000 hours to complete 70 projects supported by $4 million in company funding. Projects have included school and hospital refurbishments, medical clinics, clean water projects, tree plantings and beach cleanups.

For more information, visit www.hanesforgood.com.

HanesBrands

HanesBrands is a socially responsible leading marketer of everyday basic innerwear and activewear apparel in the Americas, Europe, Australia and Asia-Pacific. The company markets T-shirts, bras, panties, shapewear, underwear, socks, hosiery, and activewear under some of the world’s strongest apparel brands, including Hanes, Champion, Maidenform, DIM, Bali, Playtex, Bonds, JMS/Just My Size, Nur Die/Nur Der, L’eggs, Lovable, Wonderbra, Berlei, Alternative, Gear for Sports, and Bras N Things. More information about the company and its award-winning corporate social responsibility initiatives may be found at www.Hanes.com/corporate. Visit our newsroom. Connect with HanesBrands via social media on Twitter (@HanesBrands) and Facebook.

Contacts:

Carole Crosslin
HanesBrands
336-519-3201

Mariana Mora (Spanish language)
O’Malley Hansen Communications
312-377-0630


          Towards a New North American Free Trade Agreement (in Principle)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

After a brief hiatus during the run up to the recent Mexican elections, negotiations on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) are in the news again, with hints of an agreement by the end of August. We have heard talk of an imminent agreement before and the chances of an agreement within the month may not be very high, and even if it does happen it may be more of an “agreement in principle” with many details still to be worked out. Nevertheless, with the renewed interest, we thought it was worth breaking down some of the key remaining issues (there are a lot of them, which helps illustrate the amount of work still left to do!).

Rules of Origin (RoO) for Autos

This is the focus of the current talks taking place between the U.S. and Mexico (Canada does not appear to be actively involved, perhaps because it does not have strong feelings about some of the outcomes here). In essence, the Trump administration wants to tighten the requirements for having trade in autos benefit from zero tariffs. In this regard, the U.S. wants to increase the percentage of content that must be from North American sources (currently the figure is 62.5%; the U.S. proposed raising it to 85%, and press reports suggest that 75% is the figure being discussed now). It also wants a percentage of the autos to be made by workers who make above a certain hourly wage (reports suggest that the current U.S. proposal is that 40% of light-duty vehicles and 45% of pick-up trucks are to be made by workers that make as least $16 an hour).

The Trump administration’s goal here is to provide an incentive to do more production in higher wage Canada and the U.S., although the actual impact will depend on the percentage required and the wage specified, so the effect of this policy is unclear. If the Trump administration gets what it wants, it is likely that free trade in autos in the North American market will be scaled back.  If the requirements are too burdensome to meet, automakers will simply opt for paying the 2.5% MFN tariff instead and just raise the cost of cars for consumers to compensate; and if they do meet the requirements, their costs will go up as a result of doing so. Either way, it will be bad for the industry and for consumers.

Government Procurement

In October, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross suggested that government procurement rules should be made more “reciprocal” by establishing dollar-for-dollar access to each country’s procurement market. This idea prompted some cheekiness from Mexican negotiators who proposed that the U.S. should receive the same level of government procurement contracts in Mexico as Mexico receives in the United States (about $1.1 million dollars, a very small portion of the overall American procurement market). As with auto rules of origin, the Trump administration seems to be looking to take some of the free trade out of NAFTA.

Canadian Agriculture Restrictions.

The U.S. has had its sights on dismantling Canada’s agriculture barriers for quite some time. The 2017 National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers highlights concerns with Canada’s supply management for dairy, and also for the chicken, turkey and egg industries. Another bone of contention has been Canada’s Special Milk Class Permit Program that gives domestic processors milk components for discounted prices. Canada has opposed any changes to its supply management system “on principle” and argued that the U.S. also maintains agricultural protections, such as on sugar.  Canada may ultimately give a little bit here, but it is likely to want something in exchange.

Seasonal Growers

There was some talk early on that the U.S. would push for rules that would make it easier for seasonal growers to bring anti-dumping and countervailing duty cases. Current trade remedy laws require domestic producers to account for at least half of domestic industry to access AD/CVD proceedings. This has been a hotly contested issue even within the U.S., as it has pitted produce growers from different states against each other.

Chapter 11: Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS)

The Trump administration wants to opt-out of the investor-state dispute settlement mechanism for investment protection, based on their own concerns about sovereignty, and also to make the agreement more palatable to various critics of trade agreements. The precise scope of the opt-out is unclear, but it seems likely that some form of it will end up in any new NAFTA.

Chapter 20: State-to-State Dispute Settlement

The Trump administration has said it wants to “soften” dispute settlement, by making the outcomes of dispute settlement “non-binding.” It would be hard to see Congress or Canada and Mexico going along with this.

Chapter 19: Binational Panels on Anti-dumping/Countervailing Duty Disputes

Chapter 19 allows special binational panels, rather than domestic courts, to review domestic anti-dumping and countervailing duty decisions involving the NAFTA parties. Though a similar mechanism appeared in the predecessor to NAFTA, the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (CUSFTA), it has not appeared in any other U.S. trade agreement. There has also been a question of whether Chapter 19 is constitutional. In the first round of negotiations, the U.S. put forward a proposal to completely eliminate Chapter 19. Canada and Mexico want to keep it. Nothing has been said about this issue in recent months.

Sunset Clause/Performance Review

The Trump administration has been pushing for a provision under which NAFTA automatically expires after 5 years unless all three governments affirmatively decide to stay in. Congress, Canada, and Mexico are unlikely to accept this, but there is some possibility that Canada and Mexico would agree to a periodic performance review, so long as it didn’t trigger a lapse in the agreement.

Currency Manipulation

The November 2017 update of USTR’s NAFTA negotiating objectives stated that it would aim to “ensure that the NAFTA countries avoid manipulating exchange rates in order to prevent effective balance of payments adjustment or to gain an unfair competitive advantage” through “an appropriate mechanism.” In the recently renegotiated Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS), the currency side-deal was said to be “historic” even though the provisions are non-binding. The big question in NAFTA is whether there would be a binding and enforceable chapter on currency manipulation.

Intellectual Property

Intellectual property protection has some powerful industries behind it, and some strong advocates in Congress. In the TPP, the United States pushed hard for stronger protections on “biologic” drugs and achieved some but not all of it what it wanted. And the United States has long complained of insufficient Canadian protections for copyrights and patents. There has been little reporting on these issues during the NAFTA renegotiation, but the outcomes are going to be important for generating Congressional support.

Telecommunications

Telecom reform has been a longstanding issue in North America. USTR’s 2017 National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers noted that “Canada maintains a 46.7 percent limit on foreign ownership of certain suppliers of facilities-based telecommunication services” and that Mexico’s “barriers included limitations on foreign investment in telecommunications and broadcasting, a weak regulatory agency, and an uncompetitive market dominated by a near-monopolistic player.” There seemed to be some progress on this issue in the second round of negotiations, but very little has been heard of it since then.

E-Commerce

This is a key component of the “modernizing” elements of a new NAFTA. It was widely suggested that the e-commerce provisions in the TPP would be the starting point for negotiations on this chapter, and would cover issues such as digital trade and data localization.

De Minimis Threshold

The U.S. has been pushing for Canada and Mexico to increase their de minimis threshold for duty-free treatment of express shipments to the higher U.S. standard of $800. Currently, Canada and Mexico have a $20 and $50 threshold, respectively. Christine McDaniel of the Mercatus Center has noted the value to small businesses from raising this limit.

Regulatory Cooperation

Inu talked in detail about the possibility of a regulatory cooperation chapter in the new NAFTA after a proposal was tabled in the second round of negotiations. In March, it was reported that a chapter on Good Regulatory Practices was closed, but it was unclear as to what it would include. Will this go beyond the TPP? How much of the current bilateral regulatory cooperation initiatives would be incorporated? In June 2018, a memorandum of understanding was signed between the U.S. and Canada reaffirming their commitment to the Regulatory Cooperation Council. This could be a signal that this process will remain outside of NAFTA.

State-Owned Enterprises

In the TPP, the United States and others pushed for the most detailed provisions on SOE behavior in any trade agreement. This issue has flown under the radar in the NAFTA talks, but the TPP provisions are likely to be carried over to the new NAFTA.

Labor and Environment

The labor and environment side-letters were brought into the original NAFTA by President Clinton to increase Democratic support. Over the years, many groups have argued that the lack of enforceability has made these chapters little more than symbolic gestures. All parties seemed to be on board to include them as individual chapters in the agreement, but the revised content remains unclear. Will there be, as Canada proposed, some sort of provision on combating climate change? Will Mexico concede in addressing concerns over unions and the minimum wage? Will there be updates to the standard labor chapter language in response to the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) panel ruling related to Guatemalan labor practices? And finally, what will happen to the NAFTA institutions that were created to monitor the labor and environment side letters?

Trudeau’s “Progressive Trade Agenda”

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has made his “progressive trade agenda” a central marketing pitch in his government’s trade policy. What this means in practice, however, has been rather vague. In NAFTA, Canada has pushed for the inclusion of a chapter on trade and gender, as well as on indigenous rights. Questions that remain are: (1) whether the U.S. and Mexico would agree to an indigenous rights chapter at all, and (2) to what extent would a trade and gender chapter be any more than just opening up a dialogue, as it is in the Canada-Chile FTA?

What’s Next?

Given the deadlines set out by Trade Promotion Authority (TPA), it is clear that the current Congress will not vote on a new NAFTA, even if it is completed this month. However, it is possible that the deal can be voted on in Mexico ahead of the presidential transition, as President-Elect Lopez Obrador will assume office in December. His domestic agenda will be ambitious, and it is possible that NAFTA would not get the high-level attention it has received up until this point. What we do know is that we are down to the final grind, and no deal this year may lead to this being dragged out for quite a while.  The Trump administration says it wants to sign many new trade deals, but it is hard to see how they can do anything new if they struggle to update an existing agreement with our closest neighbors.


          Round trip to the Dominican Republic from from LAX for $403 on Copa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fare: $403 round trip, including all taxes and fees, from LAX to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, on Copa Airlines.

Restrictions: The fare is subject to availability. It is for travel Oct. 1-30. You must book by Aug. 31.

Info: Copa Airlines, (800) 359-2672

Source: Airfarewatchdog.com

travel@latimes.com

...
          Round trip to the Dominican Republic from from LAX for $403 on Copa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fare: $403 round trip, including all taxes and fees, from LAX to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, on Copa Airlines.

Restrictions: The fare is subject to availability. It is for travel Oct. 1-30. You must book by Aug. 31.

Info: Copa Airlines, (800) 359-2672

Source: Airfarewatchdog.com

travel@latimes.com

...
          Round trip to the Dominican Republic from from LAX for $403 on Copa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fare: $403 round trip, including all taxes and fees, from LAX to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, on Copa Airlines.

Restrictions: The fare is subject to availability. It is for travel Oct. 1-30. You must book by Aug. 31.

Info: Copa Airlines, (800) 359-2672

Source: Airfarewatchdog.com

travel@latimes.com

...
          Round trip to the Dominican Republic from from LAX for $403 on Copa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fare: $403 round trip, including all taxes and fees, from LAX to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, on Copa Airlines.

Restrictions: The fare is subject to availability. It is for travel Oct. 1-30. You must book by Aug. 31.

Info: Copa Airlines, (800) 359-2672

Source: Airfarewatchdog.com

travel@latimes.com

...
          Round trip to the Dominican Republic from from LAX for $403 on Copa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fare: $403 round trip, including all taxes and fees, from LAX to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, on Copa Airlines.

Restrictions: The fare is subject to availability. It is for travel Oct. 1-30. You must book by Aug. 31.

Info: Copa Airlines, (800) 359-2672

Source: Airfarewatchdog.com

travel@latimes.com

...
          re:Dominican Republic or other Caribbean      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Another place for you to do any crusing is the Parc Saint Pierre in Petion-Ville, Haiti...That is in the mountain....Again a lot of $$$ and be very carefull, you will have so much fun and so much surprises...they are really fat and long and willing....Same as Jacmel, the town in the south of Haiti.......Enjoy
          The International Conference that Paved the Way for the Murder of Millions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
(Jerusalem Post) Ervin Birnbaum - After the German Anschluss (annexation) of Austria on March 15, 1938, the march of German troops to Vienna was hailed by the delirious Austrians as a victory march, showering the German troops with flowers, embraces and kisses, while the bells of the Viennese St. Stephen Cathedral pealed hymns of victory. The next day, the New York Times reported that the Viennese Jewish Quarter, Leopoldstadt, was invaded by triumphant crowds who chased the Jews out of their homes, forcing them on their knees to scrub the sidewalks clean with their toothbrushes. The proceedings were supervised by stormtroopers wearing swastika armbands. 200,000 Austrian Jews were caught in the jaws of the Jew-hating monsters. Reports said suicides by desperate Jews increased to 200 daily. Jewish physicians and other professionals were taken from their jobs to concentration camps. On March 22, President Roosevelt invited 33 states to work out a plan of aiding the political refugees of Germany and Austria at the Evian Conference, convened in France in July 1938. Two weeks before the conference, the London Times reported: "Men and women, young and old, are taken each day and each night from their homes or in the streets and carried off, the more fortunate to Austrian prisons, and the rest to Dachau." From the outset, the president made it clear that the conference would not result in "an increase or revision of U.S. immigration quotas," which stood at an annual figure of 27,370 for Germany and Austria combined. 3,000 Jews waited daily at the American Consulate in Vienna, in vain; more than 10,000 requests lay on the desk of the Australian Consul, unanswered. The U.S. even refused to allow unused quotas from other countries to be made available for refugees. At the Evian Conference, only the Dominican Republic expressed willingness to take in a few thousand Jews. The conference was not only a total failure, it was a disaster - by pointing out to the Nazis that they were eliminating a segment of humanity that nobody wanted. The writer is a retired professor of international relations at City University in New York.
          Round trip to the Dominican Republic from from LAX for $403 on Copa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fare: $403 round trip, including all taxes and fees, from LAX to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, on Copa Airlines.

Restrictions: The fare is subject to availability. It is for travel Oct. 1-30. You must book by Aug. 31.

Info: Copa Airlines, (800) 359-2672

Source: Airfarewatchdog.com

travel@latimes.com

...
          Round trip to the Dominican Republic from from LAX for $403 on Copa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fare: $403 round trip, including all taxes and fees, from LAX to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, on Copa Airlines.

Restrictions: The fare is subject to availability. It is for travel Oct. 1-30. You must book by Aug. 31.

Info: Copa Airlines, (800) 359-2672

Source: Airfarewatchdog.com

travel@latimes.com

...
          CAO MX2 Belicoso      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
-- C.A.O's MX2 (Maduro times two) is a medium-full bodied cigar sporting two maduro wrappers. The first is a dark, oily Connecticut broadleaf wrapper, while the second is a fuller flavored Brazilian maduro wrapper. With a mix of fillers from Honduras, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and Peru, the MX2 provides a sweet array of coffee and bitter chocolate that's soft on the palate, while also bringing a kick of spice.
          CAO MX2 Robusto      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
-- C.A.O's MX2 (Maduro times two) is a medium-full bodied cigar sporting two maduro wrappers. The first is a dark, oily Connecticut broadleaf wrapper, while the second is a fuller flavored Brazilian maduro wrapper. With a mix of fillers from Honduras, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and Peru, the MX2 provides a sweet array of coffee and bitter chocolate that's soft on the palate, while also bringing a kick of spice.
          CAO MX2 Toro      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
-- C.A.O's MX2 (Maduro times two) is a medium-full bodied cigar sporting two maduro wrappers. The first is a dark, oily Connecticut broadleaf wrapper, while the second is a fuller flavored Brazilian maduro wrapper. With a mix of fillers from Honduras, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and Peru, the MX2 provides a sweet array of coffee and bitter chocolate that's soft on the palate, while also bringing a kick of spice.
          CAO MX2 Gordo      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
-- C.A.O's MX2 (Maduro times two) is a medium-full bodied cigar sporting two maduro wrappers. The first is a dark, oily Connecticut broadleaf wrapper, while the second is a fuller flavored Brazilian maduro wrapper. With a mix of fillers from Honduras, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and Peru, the MX2 provides a sweet array of coffee and bitter chocolate that's soft on the palate, while also bringing a kick of spice.
          Round trip to the Dominican Republic from from LAX for $403 on Copa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fare: $403 round trip, including all taxes and fees, from LAX to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, on Copa Airlines.

Restrictions: The fare is subject to availability. It is for travel Oct. 1-30. You must book by Aug. 31.

Info: Copa Airlines, (800) 359-2672

Source: Airfarewatchdog.com

travel@latimes.com

...
          Round trip to the Dominican Republic from from LAX for $403 on Copa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fare: $403 round trip, including all taxes and fees, from LAX to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, on Copa Airlines.

Restrictions: The fare is subject to availability. It is for travel Oct. 1-30. You must book by Aug. 31.

Info: Copa Airlines, (800) 359-2672

Source: Airfarewatchdog.com

travel@latimes.com

...
          Round trip to the Dominican Republic from from LAX for $403 on Copa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fare: $403 round trip, including all taxes and fees, from LAX to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, on Copa Airlines.

Restrictions: The fare is subject to availability. It is for travel Oct. 1-30. You must book by Aug. 31.

Info: Copa Airlines, (800) 359-2672

Source: Airfarewatchdog.com

travel@latimes.com

...
          Can-Am League      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
At A Glance All Times EDT Canam W L Pct. GB Sussex County 52 25 .675 — Quebec 43 35 .551 9½ Rockland 41 36 .532 11 Trois-Rivieres 39 38 .506 13 New Jersey 37 40 .481 15 Hollywood 1 8 .111 17 Dominican Republic 0 9 .000 18 Ottawa 34 44 .436 18½ Salina 3 15 .167 19½
           [BEST BOOKS] Volunteer Vacations by Bill McMillon Free       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Synnopsis : If you re looking for a way to make a difference while on vacation--simultaneously getting away and using your talents to improve the world--this guide shows you how a short-term volunteer stint can transform your life as much as the people, animals, and ecology you choose to help. This fully updated edition is filled with in-depth information and profiles of 150 select organizations, more than 40 new in this edition, running thousands of quality programs in the United States and around the world. Inside, you ll discover ways to Excavate Jurassic Period dinosaur fossils in WyomingWork with women in their own microbusinesses in GhanaStudy wolves with field scientists in SlovakiaHelp Haitians rebuild their homesOrganize activities for orphaned children in the Dominican RepublicLive and work with elephants in Thailand Each listing includes complete contact information with locations, costs, dates, and project details you won t find anywhere else. It lets you know the work volunteers typically do and any special skills needed and highlights projects specifically tailored for families, seniors, and people with disabilities. Stories from recent volunteers and a host of new photographs help you further imagine your volunteer adventure. Author : Bill McMillon Language : English Grade Level : 1-2 Product Dimensions : 8.5 x 0.5 x 9.2 inches Shipping Weight : 15.8 ounces Format : BOOKS Seller information : Bill McMillon ( 2✮ ) Link Download : https://hjhg87.blogspot.com/?book=1569768412
          re:Dominican Republic or other Caribbean      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Another place for you to do any crusing is the Parc Saint Pierre in Petion-Ville, Haiti...That is in the mountain....Again a lot of $$$ and be very carefull, you will have so much fun and so much surprises...they are really fat and long and willing....Same as Jacmel, the town in the south of Haiti.......Enjoy
          Standout Yankees rookie plays against his hero: Rangers 3B Adrian Beltre      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Adrian Beltre has reached the stage of his heralded career with the Texas Rangers in which he is idolized by a opposing third baseman. New York Yankees third baseman Miguel Andujar, speaking through a translator, told Newsday that Beltre was the player he most admired as a youth in the Dominican Republic


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