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          Comment on Blog Entry #8 Actually, We Can’t Keep It by candle deep web search      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
<strong>candle deep web search</strong> [...]we like to honor quite a few other net internet sites on the internet, even though they aren?t linked to us, by linking to them. Beneath are some webpages worth checking out[...]
          What Can I Do With a VPN? 7 Cool Things to Do With Your VPN Server      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
VPNs are private servers that encrypt your data. But they’re even cooler than that! If you’re wondering, what can I do with a VPN, here are 7 cool ways to use your VPN server. We’ve all heard of the Dark Web, the Deep Web, etc. The type of computers and software that only extremely adept […]

          Yazidi Slavery, Child Trafficking, Death Threats To Journalist: Should Turkey Remain In NATO?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Authored by Uzay Bulut via The Gatestone Institute,

August 3 marked the fourth anniversary of the ISIS invasion of Sinjar, Iraq and the start of the Yazidi genocide. Since that date in 2014, approximately 3,100 Yazidis either have been executed or died of dehydration and starvation, according to the organization Yazda. At least 6,800 women and children were kidnapped by ISIS terrorists and subjected to sexual and physical abuse, captives were forced to convert to Islam, and young boys were separated from their families and forced to become child soldiers, according to a report entitled "Working Against the Clock: Documenting Mass Graves of Yazidis Killed by the Islamic State." Moreover, 3,000 Yazidi women and girls are believed to remain in ISIS captivity, but their whereabouts are unknown.

One Yazidi child recently sold in Ankara, Turkey, and then freed through the mediation efforts of Yazidi and humanitarian-aid organizations, according to a report by Hale Gönültaş, a journalist with the Turkish news website Gazete Duvar. On July 30, three days after Gönültaş's article appeared, she received a death threat on her mobile phone from a Turkish-speaking man, who told her that he knew her home address, and then shouted, "Jihad will come to this land. Watch your step!"

This is not the first time that Gönültaş has been threatened for writing about ISIS atrocities. In May 2017, she received similar telephone threats after posting two articles: "200,000 children in ISIS camps," and "ISIS holds 600 children from Turkey."

In addition, a video of Turkish-speaking children receiving military training from ISIS was sent to her email address. In the video, in which one of them is seen cutting off someone's head with a knife, the children are saying, "We are here for jihad."

Gönültaş, whose lawyer has filed a criminal complaint about the threats, told Gatestone:

"A child has been sold, and this is a crime against humanity; and I do not think the sole perpetrator is ISIS. There is a larger organized network involved in this. My report has further exposed this reality. I have been a journalist for 22 years and have been subjected to similar threats many times. I do not live in fear or worry. I will continue reporting facts."

In her article, Gönültaş conducted an interview with Azad Barış, founding president of the Yazidi Cultural Foundation, who said that a Yazidi girl, who was taken captive during the ISIS invasion of Sinjar in 2014, was sold for a fee determined by ISIS through "intermediaries" in Ankara:

"To restore the child to liberty, the Yazidi community and humanitarian aid organizations -- the 'reliable intermediaries' who stepped in to save the child -- contacted the intermediaries who acted on behalf of ISIS.... The child was then taken out of Turkey quickly with the help of international organizations and reunited with her family. As far as I know, Turkish security forces were not informed of the incident. The priority was the life of the child and to take her to safety swiftly. And the child did get safely reunited with her family."

Barış also said that Yazidi women were exposed to mass rapes at the hands of ISIS terrorists who called them "spoils of war" and claimed that it was "religiously permissible" ("jaiz" in Arabic) to rape them:

"Women were taken from one cell house to another and were exposed to the same sexual and psychological torture in every house. According to witness statements, women were mass raped by ISIS militants three times every day. Dozens of women ended their lives by noosing and strangling themselves with their headscarves.

"Slave markets have been formed on an internet platform known as the 'deep web.' Not only women but also children are sold on auctions on the deep web... When the selling is completed on the internet, the intermediaries of those buying the women and the intermediaries of ISIS meet at a place considered 'safe' by both parties. Women and children are delivered to their buyers. Some Yazidi families have liberated their wives, children and relatives through the help of the reliable persons that joined in the auctions on the deep web on their behalf. The price for liberating the women and children ranges between 5,000 and 25,000 euros... Our missing people are still largely held by ISIS. Wherever ISIS is, and wherever they are effective, the women and children are mostly there. But selling women is not heard of very often anymore."

Also according to Barış, the second largest Yazidi group held captive by ISIS are boys under the age of nine:

"[they] receive jihadist education at the hands of ISIS; are brainwashed, and have been made to change their religion. Each of them is raised as a jihadist. But we are not fully informed of the exact number and whereabouts of our kidnapped children."

This is not the first time that the sale of Yazidis in Turkey was reported in the media. In 2015, the German public television station ARD produced footagedocumenting the slave trade being conducted by ISIS through a liaison office in the province of Gaziantep in southeast Turkey, near the Syrian border.

In 2016, the Turkish daily Hürriyet reported that the Gaziantep police had raided the Gaziantep office and found $370,000, many foreign (non-Turkish) passports, and 1,768 pages of Arabic-language receipts that demonstrate the transfer of millions of dollars between Syria and Turkey.

Six Syrians were indicted in Turkey for their involvement, but all were acquitteddue to a "lack of evidence." No member of the Gaziantep Bar Association, which had filed the criminal complaint against them, was invited to attend the hearings. According to Mehmet Yalçınkaya, a lawyer and member of the Gaziantep Bar Association:

"The court, without looking into the documents found by police, made the decision to acquit... We learned of the decision to acquit by coincidence. That the trial ended in only 16 days and 1,768 pages of documents were submitted to the court after the decision to acquit shows that it was not an effective trial."

A news report from German broadcaster ARD shows photos of Yazidi slaves distributed by ISIS (left), as well as undercover footage of ISIS operatives in Turkey taking payment for buying the slaves (right).

Addressing the US House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee on December 9, 2015, Mirza Ismail, founder and chairman of the Yezidi Human Rights Organization-International, said, in part:

"We Yezidis are desperate for your immediate help and support. During our six-thousand-year history, Yezidis have faced 74 genocides in the Middle East, including the ongoing genocide. Why? Simply because we are not Muslims. We are an ancient and proud people from the heart of Mesopotamia, the birth place of civilization and the birth place of many of the world's religions. And here we are today, in 2015, on the verge of annihilation. In response to our suffering around the World there is profound, obscene silence. We Yezidis are considered 'Infidels' in the eyes of Muslims, and so they are encouraged to kill, rape, enslave, and convert us."

...

"I am pleading with each and every one of you in the name of humanity to lend us your support at this crucial time to save the indigenous and peaceful peoples of the Middle East."

Three years after this impassioned plea, Yazidis are still being enslaved and sold by ISIS, with Turkish involvement, while the life of the journalist who exposed the crime is threatened. Reuniting the kidnapped Yazidis with their families and bringing the perpetrators to justice should be a priority of civilized governments worldwide, not only to help stop the persecution and enslavement of Yazidis, but also to defeat jihad.

The question is whether NATO member Turkey is a part of the solution or part of the problem. Should Turkey, with the path it is on, be allowed even to remain a member of NATO?


          Yazidi Slavery, Child Trafficking, Death Threats To Journalist: Should Turkey Remain In NATO?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Authored by Uzay Bulut via The Gatestone Institute,

August 3 marked the fourth anniversary of the ISIS invasion of Sinjar, Iraq and the start of the Yazidi genocide. Since that date in 2014, approximately 3,100 Yazidis either have been executed or died of dehydration and starvation, according to the organization Yazda. At least 6,800 women and children were kidnapped by ISIS terrorists and subjected to sexual and physical abuse, captives were forced to convert to Islam, and young boys were separated from their families and forced to become child soldiers, according to a report entitled "Working Against the Clock: Documenting Mass Graves of Yazidis Killed by the Islamic State." Moreover, 3,000 Yazidi women and girls are believed to remain in ISIS captivity, but their whereabouts are unknown.

One Yazidi child recently sold in Ankara, Turkey, and then freed through the mediation efforts of Yazidi and humanitarian-aid organizations, according to a report by Hale Gönültaş, a journalist with the Turkish news website Gazete Duvar. On July 30, three days after Gönültaş's article appeared, she received a death threat on her mobile phone from a Turkish-speaking man, who told her that he knew her home address, and then shouted, "Jihad will come to this land. Watch your step!"

This is not the first time that Gönültaş has been threatened for writing about ISIS atrocities. In May 2017, she received similar telephone threats after posting two articles: "200,000 children in ISIS camps," and "ISIS holds 600 children from Turkey."

In addition, a video of Turkish-speaking children receiving military training from ISIS was sent to her email address. In the video, in which one of them is seen cutting off someone's head with a knife, the children are saying, "We are here for jihad."

Gönültaş, whose lawyer has filed a criminal complaint about the threats, told Gatestone:

"A child has been sold, and this is a crime against humanity; and I do not think the sole perpetrator is ISIS. There is a larger organized network involved in this. My report has further exposed this reality. I have been a journalist for 22 years and have been subjected to similar threats many times. I do not live in fear or worry. I will continue reporting facts."

In her article, Gönültaş conducted an interview with Azad Barış, founding president of the Yazidi Cultural Foundation, who said that a Yazidi girl, who was taken captive during the ISIS invasion of Sinjar in 2014, was sold for a fee determined by ISIS through "intermediaries" in Ankara:

"To restore the child to liberty, the Yazidi community and humanitarian aid organizations -- the 'reliable intermediaries' who stepped in to save the child -- contacted the intermediaries who acted on behalf of ISIS.... The child was then taken out of Turkey quickly with the help of international organizations and reunited with her family. As far as I know, Turkish security forces were not informed of the incident. The priority was the life of the child and to take her to safety swiftly. And the child did get safely reunited with her family."

Barış also said that Yazidi women were exposed to mass rapes at the hands of ISIS terrorists who called them "spoils of war" and claimed that it was "religiously permissible" ("jaiz" in Arabic) to rape them:

"Women were taken from one cell house to another and were exposed to the same sexual and psychological torture in every house. According to witness statements, women were mass raped by ISIS militants three times every day. Dozens of women ended their lives by noosing and strangling themselves with their headscarves.

"Slave markets have been formed on an internet platform known as the 'deep web.' Not only women but also children are sold on auctions on the deep web... When the selling is completed on the internet, the intermediaries of those buying the women and the intermediaries of ISIS meet at a place considered 'safe' by both parties. Women and children are delivered to their buyers. Some Yazidi families have liberated their wives, children and relatives through the help of the reliable persons that joined in the auctions on the deep web on their behalf. The price for liberating the women and children ranges between 5,000 and 25,000 euros... Our missing people are still largely held by ISIS. Wherever ISIS is, and wherever they are effective, the women and children are mostly there. But selling women is not heard of very often anymore."

Also according to Barış, the second largest Yazidi group held captive by ISIS are boys under the age of nine:

"[they] receive jihadist education at the hands of ISIS; are brainwashed, and have been made to change their religion. Each of them is raised as a jihadist. But we are not fully informed of the exact number and whereabouts of our kidnapped children."

This is not the first time that the sale of Yazidis in Turkey was reported in the media. In 2015, the German public television station ARD produced footagedocumenting the slave trade being conducted by ISIS through a liaison office in the province of Gaziantep in southeast Turkey, near the Syrian border.

In 2016, the Turkish daily Hürriyet reported that the Gaziantep police had raided the Gaziantep office and found $370,000, many foreign (non-Turkish) passports, and 1,768 pages of Arabic-language receipts that demonstrate the transfer of millions of dollars between Syria and Turkey.

Six Syrians were indicted in Turkey for their involvement, but all were acquitteddue to a "lack of evidence." No member of the Gaziantep Bar Association, which had filed the criminal complaint against them, was invited to attend the hearings. According to Mehmet Yalçınkaya, a lawyer and member of the Gaziantep Bar Association:

"The court, without looking into the documents found by police, made the decision to acquit... We learned of the decision to acquit by coincidence. That the trial ended in only 16 days and 1,768 pages of documents were submitted to the court after the decision to acquit shows that it was not an effective trial."

A news report from German broadcaster ARD shows photos of Yazidi slaves distributed by ISIS (left), as well as undercover footage of ISIS operatives in Turkey taking payment for buying the slaves (right).

Addressing the US House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee on December 9, 2015, Mirza Ismail, founder and chairman of the Yezidi Human Rights Organization-International, said, in part:

"We Yezidis are desperate for your immediate help and support. During our six-thousand-year history, Yezidis have faced 74 genocides in the Middle East, including the ongoing genocide. Why? Simply because we are not Muslims. We are an ancient and proud people from the heart of Mesopotamia, the birth place of civilization and the birth place of many of the world's religions. And here we are today, in 2015, on the verge of annihilation. In response to our suffering around the World there is profound, obscene silence. We Yezidis are considered 'Infidels' in the eyes of Muslims, and so they are encouraged to kill, rape, enslave, and convert us."

...

"I am pleading with each and every one of you in the name of humanity to lend us your support at this crucial time to save the indigenous and peaceful peoples of the Middle East."

Three years after this impassioned plea, Yazidis are still being enslaved and sold by ISIS, with Turkish involvement, while the life of the journalist who exposed the crime is threatened. Reuniting the kidnapped Yazidis with their families and bringing the perpetrators to justice should be a priority of civilized governments worldwide, not only to help stop the persecution and enslavement of Yazidis, but also to defeat jihad.

The question is whether NATO member Turkey is a part of the solution or part of the problem. Should Turkey, with the path it is on, be allowed even to remain a member of NATO?


          Madre prostituía a su hijo de 10 años y lo ofrecía a pederastas mediante la 'deep web'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Deep Web | Berrin Taha es la mujer alemana que fue condenada a 12 años y medio de prisión junto a su pareja por ofrecer a su menor hijo a pederastas en el bajo mundo del Internet.
          Is Tor Browser Safe? Why should you use it?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Is Tor Browser Safe? Why should you use it?

Tor is a software package and a network which can help you in being anonymous while using the internet. It is very helpful in accessing the dark and deep web websites and you would be able to make your web history totally hidden from the outside world. Tor plays an important role in our day to day internet activities and hides the destination and source of your Internet traffic.

If you want to access some dark sites and you do not want to get identified while accessing those sites, then Tor browser is perfectly for you. This anonymous browser has been in development for several years and is very mature and stable. It is considered as one of the best vital tools available currently and it would not cost you anything. You do not have to pay anything to use it and it is free of cost. This article would help you in educating about the Tor Browser and why you should use it.

Handle your Privacy

Privacy is vital in our life and we need it sometimes for sure. For example, if you are having any serious diseases and you want to search for the information relating to it but you do not want every advertiser and Google to know about your embarrassing medical condition. In this case, Tor can help you in keeping all of your medical information safe and private. It would help you in stopping online tracking more easily without any problem. With the proper use of Tor, you can avoid using third party trackers which most corporations and governments can always use to track your browsing practice and send you irrelevant advertisements. It can handle your data safely from the hackers on your network. You should stop bothering about anything while accessing the Tor browser as it would handle everything efficiently.

Secure and Faster

If you want to make your Tor secure and faster, then one of the best things you should do is setting up a Tor relay. By doing this, the speed and security of Tor would increase and anonymity would be improved. Tor browser is really safe if you are taking into consideration all the vital factors. If you are going to visit the dark web or deep web, then Tor can help in hiding your IP address. Once it is done, nobody would have any power to track your IP address of the system. All the operating systems are supported by the Tor browser.

Truly Anonymous

Tor browser is helpful in maintaining anonymity and your web history would never access by others for sure. Are you interested in accessing any blocked content or destination or resources? If yes, then you can do it with the help of Tor browser by staying anonymous. It is considered to be an effective circumvention tool.

Fully Comfortable

The good news is that Tor browser is compatible with several gadgets and you would not face any problem at all. You would be able to install and use a Tor browser Mac version or Tor browser Android. It would depend upon the device which you are using at that time. There are many people who only prefer Tor browser for the security functions.

Safety

When it comes to safety, Tor browser is really safe for those people who want to access the deep web and dark web without being tracked by the Internet service provider, security agencies and the government. It is also true that it has a dark side which you should be aware of it. It is not related to the software but the places from where it gives access on the internet. You might have heard about the Dark web as it is that portion of the internet which is mainly used for operating illegal activities such as the sales of drugs, prostitution and child pornography. Tor browser is also used by the people to access the dark web and using it would lead you into dark places.

Over to You

Tor has many benefits as it is a vital way to get online anonymity and you should use it if you find it necessary. Make sure you are using in a right way and it is safe and easy to use. It is designed in such a way to minimize the chances of eavesdropping and spying. Tor is the best option what we have right now to access the dark contents. It would be vital for you to understand that you should not touch the Tor’s default setting unless you are fully aware of it. That is mainly because once you enabled plugins and javascript, then it would lead to leaking the IP address.

Finally, it has been cleared that Tor browser is safe and secure to use. So, what are you waiting for? Go for it now and stay tuned with TechnoCodex for more updates

For latest tech news and updates follow TechnoCodex on Facebook , Twitter , Google+. Also, if you like our efforts, consider sharing this story with your friends, this will encourageusto bring more exciting updates for you.


          A Review Of Al-Sadaqah Organization’s Activity On ‎Telegram: Group Updates Its WhatsApp Number, Uses ‎Deep Web-Based Email Service SecMail      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Al-Sadaqah is an “independent charity organization” that appeared online in November 2017. The group is active on Telegram and raises funds for fighters in Syria using Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. The group states that it provides “the mujahideen in Syria with weapons, financial aid and other projects relating to the jihad.” Though the group’s Telegram channel has [&hellip


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