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          LEGO minifigura 16. sorozat - Cyborg - Jelenlegi ára: 900 Ft      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
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LEGO minifigura 16. sorozat - Cyborg
Jelenlegi ára: 900 Ft
Az aukció vége: 2018-08-29 12:50
          Deadpool 2 2018 BRRip [The Super Duper Cut] 875MB nItRo      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Story Line: Foul-mouthed mutant mercenary Wade Wilson (AKA. Deadpool), brings together a team of fellow mutant rogues to protect a young boy with supernatural abilities from the brutal, time-traveling cyborg, Cable....

[Visit Above Link For Continue Reading!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!}
          Comment on Cris Cyborg Willing To Lose To Ronda Rousey In WWE Match by pwnez      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
I didn't think it was. But for some reason they are impersonating you.
          Comment on Cris Cyborg Willing To Lose To Ronda Rousey In WWE Match by Crockydile Dandee      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Really..Think id waste my time? Not me dude.
          Comment on Cris Cyborg Willing To Lose To Ronda Rousey In WWE Match by Surge King      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Lol epic fail. Disregard. I re-read. She’s right. Especially the part about Ronda’s biggest fear would be losing to her, I definitley believe that.
          Comment on Cris Cyborg Willing To Lose To Ronda Rousey In WWE Match by inyo      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Wait, but that was Cyborg’s point. She got beat and basically quit. That’s what Cyborg said.
          Comment on Cris Cyborg Willing To Lose To Ronda Rousey In WWE Match by Surge King      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Cause her stand up is trash. Edmond Tarverdyan Installed in her head that his teachings and methods were improving her boxing....it was not! Big part of her down fall is she didn’t branch out and train with other high level fighters and hire a proper boxing coach. Cyborg said she wasn’t built for MMA. I disagree, otherwise she would have not made it that far; she needed expanded training. Now, if Cyborg were to say she’s “mentally” not built for MMA that’s a whole different story. Because clearly, she is not.
          Why Ford is Using Cyborg Technology to Help Build Cars      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Worker Building Ford Mustangs at Flat Rock Assembly
Ford is creating new technology to help workers be almost superhuman in their work building vehicles.

          #dancelife - isodopecyborg      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Robo thot #dance #dancer #dancelife #beatdropkidz #popping #robot #musicalitymonstaz #cyborg
          James Wan Confirms ‘Aquaman’ Won’t Feature Any Other ‘Justice League’ Characters      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Some un-chill news out of Atlantis: Aquaman (Jason Momoa), the bro-iest DC Comics character, will tragically have to face-off against actual bro King Orm (Patrick Wilson) and former bro Black Manta (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) without the help of his newfound bros from the Justice League. Director James Wan has confirmed that his Aquaman film will not feature the likes of Batman, The Flash, Wonder Woman, or Cyborg. Speaking to EW, Wan made clear he was focusing solely on Arthur Curry's emotional return to his underwater homeland: “I wanted to keep the story to the world …
          Все игроки TI8 получили канадские визы      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Директор Team Secret Мэтью «Cyborgmatt» Бэйли сообщил, что все участники The International 2018 получили канадские визы.
          Cyborg way-station      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
What if cyborg were only a way-station on the road to health? Adding machine to a human body merely adds foreign breakable to an organic body subject to decline, temporary to temporal. What most of us want may in the end not be super powers, rather to taste our possibilities inherent. Maybe we will not […]
           Teen Titans Go! To the Movies > An enjoyable enough adventure featuring the crazy, colorful, cartoonish antics of DC sidekick favorites.      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Teen Titans—Robin the Boy Wonder (voiced by Scott Menville), Beast Boy (Greg Cipes), Cyborg (Khary Payton), Raven (Tara Strong) and Starfire (Hynden Walch)—decide that...
          8/9/2018: BUSINESS INNOVATION: Japan’s ‘mad scientists’ pursue cyborg-friendly future      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Science fiction has warned us, repeatedly and enthusiastically, about men like Shoji Takeuchi. A well-meaning genius creates an innocent-looking invention one minute; cue a genocidal cyborg apocalypse the next. In his lab on Tokyo university’s Komaba...
          8/9/2018: Business Innovation: Japan’s ‘mad scientists’ pursue cyborg-friendly future      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Science fiction has warned us, repeatedly and enthusiastically, about men like Shoji Takeuchi. A well-meaning genius creates an innocent-looking invention one minute; cue a genocidal cyborg apocalypse the next. In his lab on Tokyo university’s Komaba...
          В этот раз без проблем! Все участники The International 2018 по Dota 2 получили визы в Канаду      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Менеджер команды Team Secret по Dota 2 Мэтью «Cyborgmatt» Бейли сообщил, что все команды получили визы в Канаду на The International 2018.&nbs...
          Justice League star Joe Morton says the Cyborg movie is filming in 2020      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Part man, part machine... all hero
          Aquaman won't feature other Justice League members      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Joseph Baxter Paul Bradshaw
Aug 9, 2018

James Wan explains why he's against guest appearances from Aquaman's teammates

Director James Wan and star Jason Momoa appear to be on the verge of successfully reinventing the lame, fish-whispering reputation of DC’s classic maritime superhero in Aquaman. However, while the film has the crossover power of Warner’s DC Extended Universe at its disposal, Wan is adamantly against guest appearances, even from Aquaman’s Justice League teammates.

In an interview with EW, Wan confirms that Aquaman will not feature any appearances from Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, Flash, Cyborg, or, for that matter, any other DCEU characters unrelated to the story of the film. Explaining his need to not be tied to any studio designs for universe-building, Wan states:

“I wanted to keep the story to the world of Aquaman and not have to worry about what other characters are doing in their films and how that would affect us. I just thought the simplest way was to keep it clean – keep it simple and let it be an Aquaman story.”

In the current comic book movie epoch, studio pressure to include crossover characters has long been a notorious wrench in the movie-developing works, especially at Marvel Studios, whose approach yielded industry-revolutionising success while also alienating its early lineup of directors like Jon Favreau, Kenneth Branagh, Joe Johnston, Edgar Wright (who ended up quitting Ant-Man) and even sent would-be Thor: The Dark World helmer Patty Jenkins over to Warner/DC to tackle Wonder Woman. Conversely, Warner/DC gave James Wan a little more leeway on Aquaman, as he explained in a previous interview:

“I told them I understand and respect that it’s part of a bigger universe but at the end of the day I have to tell the story I want to tell, and I want to develop the character as well. It was something the studio was respectful about… In my movie he starts off one way and becomes very different by the end. It’s a classic hero’s journey. I equate our story to The Sword And The Stone, it’s a very Arthurian story about a journey to becoming king.”

Regardless, Aquaman will still see Momoa’s Atlantean prince, Arthur Curry, with his flippers full, tackling Patrick Wilson’s King Orm/Ocean Master and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II’s Black Manta.

Presumably we'll see someone else in the end credit sting too...

The film arrives on December 21.


          Regulating Bots on Social Media Is Easier Said Than Done      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A bot is an automated software program that does something. Beyond this rudimentary description, bots vary tremendously. They moderate chat room discussions, scrape the web to collect information, and provide customer service on websites. They also pose as real people on social media, where they can cause serious mischief. It is this last capability that has made bots a part of our common vernacular.

Both Congress and California are currently considering legislation that would require social media bots to disclose the fact that they’re automated. These bills are designed to respond to serious, well-founded concerns about the use of social media bots to spread misinformation and sow discord online, most infamously during the 2016 election season. It’s a well-intentioned idea, but the proposals face a common challenge in the regulation of new technology: defining the technology itself. While perhaps not the most exciting part of any legislation, the definitions section is critical—it tells us who will be subject to the requirements and prohibitions that follow. While both the federal and state bills have definitions sections, neither tells us precisely what they mean by “bot.”

Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s bill attempts to get around (or at least delay) definitional pitfalls by avoiding the word bot altogether. Instead, it applies to any “automated software program or process intended to impersonate or replicate human activity online” in the social media context. The bill then directs the Federal Trade Commission to define that term “broadly enough so that the definition is not limited to current technology.” If the bill becomes a law—which seems unlikely, given that it’s in the earliest stages of the legislative process—it remains to be seen how the FTC grapples with this challenge.

California’s bill initially defined bot as “an online account that is designed to mimic or behave like the account of a natural person” in early drafts. This definition, by its terms, would sweep in a human parodying another human while excepting a bot impersonating an organization such as the ACLU. Despite this troubling definition, the bill passed comfortably in the California Senate, though it remains to be seen whether this law will make it all the way to enactment after amendments in the state Assembly. The Assembly revised the state bill so as to define a bot as an “automated online account on an online platform that is designed to mimic or behave like the account of a person.” While this is a marked improvement, the new definition still fails to account for the variety of bots, including the gray area between bots and people. As Robert Gorwa and Douglas Guilbeault’s helpful typology of bots shows, a social media account could have automated components but retain some degree of human control, creating a sort of cyborg bot (a “cybot”). Cybots could, for instance, automatically share Instagram posts on other platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. They could also automatically follow or respond to other social media users who mention or follow them.

The prospect of a cybot creates real obstacles to effective enforcement of bot disclosure bills. Imagine a bill requiring the implementation of a familiar tool to identify bot accounts: a CAPTCHA (“I am not a robot”). At most this would slow the cybot down: A human could check that box for her several hundred cybot accounts with relative ease, then allow them to resume their automated activity. A definition of bot broad enough to cover such accounts would also apply to cybots.

How, then, should bot disclosure laws treat these hybrid accounts? Should we require a certain degree of automation in order for the disclosure requirement to apply? What metrics can be used to determine whether something qualifies as a bot for purposes of a disclosure requirement? And regardless of what boundaries we set, whose job will it be to investigate and determine whether a particular account is, in fact, a bot?

On the basis of certain account metrics—how often the account posts, what kinds of language it uses, how many other accounts it follows, etc.—platforms such as Instagram and Twitter have performed “bot purges,” deleting millions of bots in one fell swoop. If the government steps in, however, the rules would have to change: Some kind of appeals mechanism, through which an account wrongly labeled as a bot could petition to have its automated status removed, might be necessary in the name of fairness and due process. Ultimately, determining which accounts really are bots—however the term is defined—will likely be a more labor-intensive undertaking than legislators realize.

In addition to their wide range of applications and varying degrees of automation, bots vary significantly in terms of purpose and subject matter. Some bots are primarily commercial in nature, promoting products and services. Others are primarily political, expressing views on candidates and issues. Finally, there are many artistic, funny, and even useful bots, ranging from poetry bots like @accidental575 and @pentametron to Darius Kazemi’s hilarious @TwoHeadlines to natural disaster alert systems like @earthquakeBot. Some of these creative bots may utilize the unique ambiguity of the bot format to explore the boundaries between human and technology. The question for legislators is whether proposed disclosure requirements should apply to all such bots or only those that “speak” about particular subjects.

While several proponents call for a blanket disclosure requirement for all bots, the First Amendment—which prohibits unnecessary government interference with the right to free expression—generally disfavors broad speech regulation. Instead, laws must be narrowly tailored to address specific harms without sweeping in too much other speech. Noting this, California narrowed its disclosure bill to apply only to commercial bots and to bots intended to influence votes in elections. The federal bill, on the other hand, would require all bots to disclose their automated status. It is difficult to see how concerns about election interference rationalize disclosure requirements for creative bots that are unequivocally apolitical. And it is similarly difficult to envision how California will go about drawing boundaries between bots intended to influence votes in elections and bots that simply “speak” on current events and issues.

As legislators begin regulating social media bots, they should take note of the many ways in which bots vary. If they fail to account for the complexities of bots, they may pass laws at great risk of failure due to ambiguity and inefficacy.


          Dave Meltzer: “WWE no ofrecería a Cyborg lo mismo que a Ronda”      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

En varias ocasiones se ha hablado de que Cris Cyborg podría llegar a WWE, Pero hasta ahora nada se ha concretado. La peleadora continúa su carrera en UFC, manteniéndose desde el pasado año como Campeona Mundial de Peso Pluma. Pero, si comenzaran las negociaciones para que llegara a los encordados, ¿la empresa de lucha libre le […]

The post Dave Meltzer: “WWE no ofrecería a Cyborg lo mismo que a Ronda” appeared first on Superluchas.


          DC Nation #4 annuncia la morte di un personaggio      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

DC Comics ha appena annunciato i contenuti dell’albo DC Nation #4 e ciò che cattura maggiormente l’attenzione è, tra le altre cose, l’annuncio della morte di un personaggio. I supereroi che rischiano di perdere la vita sono ben presenti in copertina e si tratta di Robin, Harley Quinn, Green Lantern, Arsenal, Cyborg e Booster Gold, i quali […]

L'articolo DC Nation #4 annuncia la morte di un personaggio proviene da Videogiochi, Fumetti, Cinema, Serie TV, Tech, Eventi | NerdPlanet.it.


          DOOM PATROL Casts Joivan Wade as Cyborg      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Booyah!  We have a new Cyborg!

Deadline has word that the upcoming DC Universe series Doom Patrol has cast Joivan Wade as Victor Stone, better known to DC Comics fans as the superhero Cyborg.  

According to the article, Vic is described as "the charming and sarcastic half-human, half-machine superhero known as Cyborg.  Vic may be connected to every computer on the world, but he struggles to maintain the connections that make him human.  Desperate to gain acceptance from the outside world, Vic harnesses the curse of his cybernetic body and uses his powers as the ultimate hero for the digital age."

Doom Patrol is a spinoff from the DC Universe series Titans and is a reimagining of one of DC’s strangest group of outcasts: Robotman, Negative Man, Elasti-Woman (April Bowlby) and Crazy Jane (Diane Guerrero).  Led by the mysterious Dr. Niles Caulder, they’re called into action by the ultimate hero for the digital age, Cyborg.  Banding together, these rejects find themselves on a mission that will take them to the weirdest and most unexpected corners of the DC universe.

Wade is an English actor best known as Rigsy in the Doctor Who episodes "Flatline" and "Face the Raven."  He's recently appeared in the films The First Purge and The Weekend, and has appeared in episodes of EastEnders, Youngers, and Casualty.


Created by Marv Wolfman and George Pérez in 1980's DC Comics Presents #26, Cyborg is Victor Stone, the son of Silas Stone and Elinore Stone, scientists who used him as a test subject for various intelligence enhancement projects.  While these treatments are ultimately successful and Victor's IQ subsequently grows to genius levels, he grew to resent his treatment.  He formed a friendship with Ron Evers, a young miscreant who led him into trouble with the law.  This was the beginning of a struggle in which Victor strove for independence, engaging in pursuits of which his parents disapproved, such as athletics and abandoning his studies.  

One day, Victor was gravely injured during an accident at S.T.A.R. Labs, where Silas worked, that also claimed the life of Elinore.  Silas did everything he could to save Victor's life by grafting robotic prosthetics to replace his missing body parts, turning him into a cybernetic organism.  He soon became as a member of the superhero group known as The New Teen Titans. 

In 2011, DC Comics rebooted its fictional universe with the relaunch known as "The New 52" and Justice League writer Geoff Johns gave Cyborg a new origin.  In this version, Victor Stone was a high school football star who was heavily sought after by a number of college scouts, but apparently had a distant relationship with his father, Silas.  After winning a big game, Victor was shown calling his father and angrily telling him that he broke his promise and missed yet another one of his son's games.  Later, Victor appeared at S.T.A.R. Labs where his father works.  The scientists appeared to be working on a Mother Box that Superman came in contact with from a Parademon.  

Victor engaged in another argument with his father and told him that the scouts were there to give him full scholarships to college.  The Mother Box suddenly exploded, killing the other scientists and destroying most of Victor's body while Victor's father looked on in horror.  Silas did everything he could for Victor's survival.  Along with Sarah Charles and T. O. Morrow, he went into "The Red Room" in S.T.A.R. Labs, which contains every piece of technology from around the world.  Silas attempted to treat Victor with something that had never been attempted before and was seen injecting Victor with some type of nanites.  Dr. Morrow placed the robotic pieces on Victor (including such devices as a Promethean skin graft, Doctor William Magnus' responsometer, Anthony Ivo's A-maze operating system, the classified and prototypical B-maze operating system, and Ryan Choi's White Dwarf Stabilizer).  Victor's life was saved and the energies from the Mother Box were incorporated into his new form as Cyborg.  This allowed Victor to access the vast New Gods data library and discover Darkseid's invasion plans.  Using this information, Cyborg soon became a member of the Justice League and assisted them with defeating Darkseid.

Wade will be the third actor to portray the character in live-action, after Ray Fisher in the movie Justice League and Lee Thompson Young appeared in several episodes of the CW television series Smallville.  Other actors, including Ernie Hudson, Khary Payton, Bumper Robinson, Michael B. Jordan and Shemar Moore, have voiced the character for various DC Universe animated projects.

Doom Patrol is expected to debut on DC Universe sometime in 2019.
          DC Universe’s DOOM PATROL Casts Cyborg      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Although the DC Universe streaming service’s upcoming Titans series won’t have long standing member Cyborg in their initial line-up of heroes, the character is confirmed for another DC Universe streaming show: Doom Patrol. Joivan Wade (The First Purge, Doctor Who) has been cast for the series regular role of Victor Stone, a.k.a. Cyborg in the show. Wade will […]
          Joivan Wade Joins DC Universe’s Doom Patrol as Cyborg      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The character will first be seen on DC Universe's Titans series

The post Joivan Wade Joins DC Universe’s Doom Patrol as Cyborg appeared first on ComingSoon.net.


          La tiene en la mira: Cris Cyborg desafió a Ronda Rousey a luchar en el ring de la WWE      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Cris Cyborg, campeona pluma de UFC, aseguró que estaría dispuesta a perder una lucha contra Ronda Rousey en la WWE para complacer a los fanáticos.
          DC’s Live-Action Doom Patrol Series Has Found Its Cyborg      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Joivan Wade of The First Purge is locked in to play Victor Stone (AKA Cyborg) for DC's live-action rendition of Doom Patrol.
          Nexus #8      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Nexus #8Publisher: Amarillo Design Bureau

Silence. I remember the silence the most. – Dennis R. Ricketts, “Patrol.”

It is 1984 and Nexus #8 has just been released. This issue has “History of the Second World War” which is background for a game of the same name and Starfire with a history of their Orions. Of course there is a section on the Star Fleet Universe, too. In that section you will find “Patrol” by Dennis R. Ricketts, an article on names of Federation ships, some scenarios, term papers, and the Academy. These appear along with a Q&A with Steve Cole.  There was also the inevitable (at the time) collection of errata.

Starfire has a good number of articles. There is one on the Khanate of Orion, one on Khanate Military Service, and one on incidents from the first interstellar war. There is also an interesting pair of articles examining balanced design.

For the historical gamer there is the aforementioned background on the forthcoming game History of the Second World War and a timeline of events in the Russian campaigns. There is also a scenario for Battlewagon (“The Last Sortie of the Yamato,” released in PDF as “Battlewagon Article #3”). There are reviews of the computer games Computer Football Strategy, Telengard, Cyborg, and The Pharaoh’s Curse.

This PDF is provided by Amarillo Design Bureau, Inc. with the kind permission of Allen D. Eldridge. It includes ads and offers from 1984; these are no longer valid.

Price: $2.95
          Nexus #8      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Nexus #8Publisher: Amarillo Design Bureau

Silence. I remember the silence the most. – Dennis R. Ricketts, “Patrol.”

It is 1984 and Nexus #8 has just been released. This issue has “History of the Second World War” which is background for a game of the same name and Starfire with a history of their Orions. Of course there is a section on the Star Fleet Universe, too. In that section you will find “Patrol” by Dennis R. Ricketts, an article on names of Federation ships, some scenarios, term papers, and the Academy. These appear along with a Q&A with Steve Cole.  There was also the inevitable (at the time) collection of errata.

Starfire has a good number of articles. There is one on the Khanate of Orion, one on Khanate Military Service, and one on incidents from the first interstellar war. There is also an interesting pair of articles examining balanced design.

For the historical gamer there is the aforementioned background on the forthcoming game History of the Second World War and a timeline of events in the Russian campaigns. There is also a scenario for Battlewagon (“The Last Sortie of the Yamato,” released in PDF as “Battlewagon Article #3”). There are reviews of the computer games Computer Football Strategy, Telengard, Cyborg, and The Pharaoh’s Curse.

This PDF is provided by Amarillo Design Bureau, Inc. with the kind permission of Allen D. Eldridge. It includes ads and offers from 1984; these are no longer valid.

Price: $2.95
          DC Teases One of These Six Characters Will Die      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The characters in question are Robin, Harley Quinn, Green Lantern, Arsenal, Cyborg, and Booster Gold.
          DC's Doom Patrol Series Finds Its Cyborg      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
One of the stars of The First Purge has been cast as DC's small-screen Cyborg in Doom Patrol.
          Bryant Park Movie Nights: The Terminator      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Date: August 20, 2018

Bring a blanket and sit on the lawn to enjoy great food, friends, and a feature film at Bryant Park Movie Nights. The lawn opens at 5:00 p.m., and the film begins at sunset. There will be food items for sale, curated by Hester Street Fair, on the Fountain Terrace.

The Terminator (1984)
A futuristic cyborg is sent to present-day L.A. to assassinate a woman, who will bear the child who will someday save humanity. Rated R.

Photo credit: Angelito Jusay

Start time: 8:00 pm

End time: 10:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Bryant Park Lawn (in Bryant Park)


          Nexus #8      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Nexus #8Publisher: Amarillo Design Bureau

Silence. I remember the silence the most. – Dennis R. Ricketts, “Patrol.”

It is 1984 and Nexus #8 has just been released. This issue has “History of the Second World War” which is background for a game of the same name and Starfire with a history of their Orions. Of course there is a section on the Star Fleet Universe, too. In that section you will find “Patrol” by Dennis R. Ricketts, an article on names of Federation ships, some scenarios, term papers, and the Academy. These appear along with a Q&A with Steve Cole.  There was also the inevitable (at the time) collection of errata.

Starfire has a good number of articles. There is one on the Khanate of Orion, one on Khanate Military Service, and one on incidents from the first interstellar war. There is also an interesting pair of articles examining balanced design.

For the historical gamer there is the aforementioned background on the forthcoming game History of the Second World War and a timeline of events in the Russian campaigns. There is also a scenario for Battlewagon (“The Last Sortie of the Yamato,” released in PDF as “Battlewagon Article #3”). There are reviews of the computer games Computer Football Strategy, Telengard, Cyborg, and The Pharaoh’s Curse.

This PDF is provided by Amarillo Design Bureau, Inc. with the kind permission of Allen D. Eldridge. It includes ads and offers from 1984; these are no longer valid.

Price: $2.95


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