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          Programmer Analyst II - Medical College of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, WI      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The successful candidate will work as part of a collaborative and agile team of biologists, geneticists, and bioinformaticians working on genomic research...
From Medical College of Wisconsin - Mon, 25 Jun 2018 15:07:39 GMT - View all Milwaukee, WI jobs
          biology/py-orange3-bioinformatics - 3.2.0      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
biology/py-orange3-bioinformatics: Update 3.1.1 -> 3.2.0 Reported by: portscout
          Product Owner (Life Science/Cloud) - Thermo Fisher Scientific - Woodlands      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
You like the idea of partnering with both internal & external scientists and bioinformaticians to create outstanding clinical and research solutions....
From Thermo Fisher Scientific - Wed, 27 Jun 2018 10:28:22 GMT - View all Woodlands jobs
          Medical Coding Fresher Jobs For Bioinformatics Graduates and Post Grad      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
AS MEDICAL CODING TECHNOLOGIES - Chennai, Tamil Nadu - / E&M/ In_Patient/ Out Patient/Multi specialty/ ED Requirement : Fresher in Medical Coding (or)Knowledge in Anatomy and Physiology...
          Post-doctoral fellowships (Marie-Curie COFUND program) Various topics      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Institute of Interdisciplinary Research (IRIBHM, https://iribhm.org/) is a large biomedical research department of University of Brussels Medical School (ULB), with state of the art facilities and groups active in biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, development, cancer, neuroscience and bioinformatics.
The IRIBHM is seeking tentative Post-doctoral fellows in different groups of the Institute, in order to apply for fellowships in the frame of a Marie Sklodowska-Curie COFUND program (H2…


          EMBL: Senior Scientific Programmer/Bioinformatician      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Competitive Salary: EMBL: Senior Scientific Programmer/BioinformaticianLocation:EMBL-EBI Hinxton near Cambridge, UK Staff Category:Staff MemberContract Duration:Until 31.05.20 Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, England
          Programmer Analyst II - Medical College of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, WI      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The successful candidate will work as part of a collaborative and agile team of biologists, geneticists, and bioinformaticians working on genomic research...
From Medical College of Wisconsin - Mon, 25 Jun 2018 15:07:39 GMT - View all Milwaukee, WI jobs
          The Cancer Omics Atlas: an integrative resource for cancer omics annotations      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) is an important data resource for cancer biologists and oncologists. However, a lack of bioinformatics expertise often hinders experimental cancer biologists and oncologists from...
          EMBL: Senior Scientific Programmer/Bioinformatician      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Competitive Salary: EMBL: Senior Scientific Programmer/BioinformaticianLocation:EMBL-EBI Hinxton near Cambridge, UK Staff Category:Staff MemberContract Duration:Until 31.05.20 Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, England
          Bioinformatician (Analysis Pipelines)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Bioinformatician (Analysis Pipelines)

Applications are invited for a skilled Bioinformatician to join the Core Bioinformatics Group at the Earlham Institute (EI).

Background:

Earlham Institute is a research institute focused on exploring living systems by applying computational science and biotechnology to answer ambitious biological questions and generate enabling resources.

The Core Bioinformatics Group employs cutting edge technologies and computational approaches to deliver …


          Senior Bioinformatician / Developer (Analysis Pipelines)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Senior Bioinformatician / Developer (Analysis Pipelines)

Applications are invited for a Senior Bioinformatician/Developer to join the Core Bioinformatics Group at the Earlham Institute (EI).

Background:

The Earlham Institute is a research institute focused on exploring living systems by applying computational science and biotechnology to answer ambitious biological questions and generate enabling resources.

The Core Bioinformatics Group employs cutting edge technologies and com…


          Senior Bioinformatician / Developer (Genome Annotation)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Senior Bioinformatician / Developer (Genome Annotation)

Applications are invited for a Senior Bioinformatician/Developer to join the Core Bioinformatics Group at the Earlham Institute (EI).

The role:

This post will focus on developing novel tools and pipelines for large scale annotation of genes and other genomic features across a diverse range of species including plants, mammals and fish.

This role will have responsibility for leading key large-scale annotation projects and …


          Pharmacy/Physiotherapy/Microbiology/Bioinformatics Grad Required For Medical Coding Fresher Jobs      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Achievers Spot - Chennai, Tamil Nadu - Kovilpatti, Tamil Nadu - . Eligibility: Any Life Science, Paramedical, Medical Graduates and Post Graduates (Pharmacy, Physiotherapy, Nursing, , Biotechnology, Plant Biology...
          Paramount Recruitment: Commercial Partnerships Manager      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Negotiable: Paramount Recruitment: Commercial Partnerships Manager Bioinformatics, Genomics, Central London - 100,000 Genomes Project - Commercial Division! Paramount are working in partnership with Genomics England to expand their team in order to deliver success with the 100,000 City of London, England
          Bioinformatician, Plant & Fungal Trees of Life Project (PAFTOL)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

KEW ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS

Bioinformatician, Plant & Fungal Trees of Life Project (PAFTOL)
Full time, Fixed Term (FTA)
Kew Gardens, Richmond

It’s a very exciting time to join Kew Science and in particular, the PAFTOL project; one of Kew Science’s Strategic outputs for 2015- 2020.

This ambitious project aims to complete the tree of life for all plant and fungal genera using high throughput sequencing data, and provide a unifying framework for comparative plant and fungal research.

Ke…


          Bioinformatician (Single Cell Analysis)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Bioinformatician (Single Cell Analysis)

Applications are invited for an enthusiastic and dedicated Bioinformatician to join the Core Bioinformatics Group at the Earlham Institute (EI).

Background:

Earlham Institute is a research institute focused on exploring living systems by applying computational science and biotechnology to answer ambitious biological questions and generate enabling resources.

EI employs cutting edge technologies and computational approaches to deliver high-…


          Functional Target Discovery by Quantitative Chemical Proteomics, Aug 14      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Genome sequencing projects have revolutionized our view of the complexity of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteomes, however, we are also left with a daunting challenge of functionally annotating these large number of predicted proteins. Chemical proteomic methods, such as activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), have been developed aiming at systematically discovering new functional targets directly from native proteomes. In this talk, I will present a couple of projects from my laboratory which combine ABPP-based chemical proteomic, biochemical and computational strategies to uncover functional targets of specific post-translational modifications or bioactive ligands in proteomes. In the first project, we developed a highly efficient chemical probe for profiling target proteins and residue sites of protein carbonylations in proteomes and its application in uncovering endogenous carbonylated targets during the course of ferroptosis, a recently defined non-apoptotic cell death that is heavily dependent on intracellular iron and elevated lipid peroxidation. In the second project, we showed that a flavonoid compound isolated from the Chinese traditional herbal medicine is an effective agent to improve hepatic steatosis. By employing a quantitative ABPP strategy, we discovered the flavonoid binds to key enzymes in the fatty acid metabolic pathway, accelerate the metabolic rate of fatty acids in the liver and ameliorates the symptoms associated with hepatic steatosis.

Dr. Chu Wang obtained his B.S. degree in Biology from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in 2001 and his Ph.D. degree with Professor David Baker in 2007 from University of Washington. He did his postdoctoral training with Professor Benjamin F. Cravatt at The Scripps Research Institute from 2009 to 2013 and was supported by NIH / NIEHS Pathways to Independence (K99/R00) postdoctoral award. He started as an assistant professor at Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University in December, 2013 and is also affiliated with Synthetic and Functional Biomolecules Center (SFBC) and Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences (CLS) as a Principal Investigator. His current research programs focus on the development and application of multi-disciplinary tools in chemoproteomics, biochemistry, bioinformatics and computational structure biology to streamline efforts in the functional annotation of uncharacterized enzymes and drug design in the post-genomic era.
          UoH Structural Biology/Bioinformatics JRF Vacancy      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

          After NEXT 2018: Trends in higher education and research      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

From classrooms to campus infrastructure, higher education is rapidly adapting to cloud technology. So it’s no surprise that academic faculty and staff were well represented among panelists and attendees at this year’sGoogle Cloud Next. Several of our more than 500 breakout sessions at Next spoke to the needs of higher education, as as did critical announcements like our partnership with the National Institutes of Health to make make public biomedical datasets available to researchers. Here are ten major themes that came out our higher education sessions at Next:

  1. Collaborating across campuses. Learning technologists from St. Norbert College, Lehigh University, University of Notre Dame, and Indiana University explained how G Suite and CourseKit, Google’s new integrated learning management tool, are helping teachers and students exchange ideas.
  2. Navigating change.Academic IT managers told stories of how they’ve overcome the organizational challenges of cloud migration and offered some tips for others: start small, engage key stakeholders, and take advantage of Google’s teams of engineers and representatives, who are enthusiastic and knowledgeable allies. According to Joshua Humphrey, Team Lead, Enterprise Computing, Georgia State University, "We've been using GCP for almost three years now and we've seen an average yearly savings of 44%. Whenever people ask why we moved to the cloud this is what we point to. Usability and savings."
  3. Fostering student creativity. In our higher education booth at Next, students demonstrated projects that extended their learning beyond the classroom. For example, students at California State University at San Bernardino built a mobile rover that checks internet connectivity on campus, and students at High Tech High used G Suite and Chromebooks to help them create their own handmade soap company.
  4. Reproducing scientific research. Science is built on consistent, reliable, repeatable findings. Academic research panelists at the University of Michigan are using Docker on Compute Engine to containerize pipeline tools so any researcher can run the same pipeline without having to worry about affecting the final outcome.
  5. Powering bioinformaticsToday’s biomedical research often requires storing and processing hundreds of terabytes of data. Teams at SUNY Downstate, Northeastern, and the University of South Carolina demonstrated how they used BigQuery and Compute Engine to build complex simulations and manage huge datasets for neuroscience, epidemiology, and environmental research.
  6. Accelerating genomics research. Moving data to the cloud enables faster processing to test more hypotheses and uncover insights. Researchers from Stanford, Duke, and Michigan showed how they streamlined their genomics workloads and cut months off their processing time using GCP.
  7. Democratizing access to deep learningAutoML Vision, Natural Language, and Translation, all in beta, were announced at Next and can help researchers build custom ML models without specialized knowledge in machine learning or coding. As Google’s Chief Scientist of AI and Machine Learning Fei-Fei Li noted in her blog post, Google’s aim “is to make AI not just more powerful, but more accessible.”
  8. Transforming LMS analytics. Scalable tools can turn the data collected by learning management systems and student information services into insights about student behavior. Google’s strategic partnership with Unizen allows a consortium of universities to integrate data and learning sciences, while Ivy Tech used ML Engine to build a predictive algorithm to improve student performance in courses.
  9. Personalizing machine learning and AI for student services. We’re seeing a growing trend of universities investigating AI to create virtual assistants. Recently Strayer University shared with us how they used Dialogflow to do just that, and at Next, Carnegie Mellon walked us through their process of building SARA, a socially-aware robot assistant.
  10. Strengthening security for academic IT: Natural disasters threaten on-premise data centers, with earthquakes, flooding, and hurricanes demanding robust disaster-recovery planning. Georgia State, the University of Minnesota, and Stanford’s Graduate School of Business shared how they improved the reliability and cost-efficiency of their data backup by migrating to GCP.
We've been using GCP for almost three years now and we've seen an average yearly savings of 44%. Whenever people ask why we moved to the cloud this is what we point to: usability and savings Joshua Humphrey
Enterprise Computing, Georgia State University



To learn more about our solutions for higher education, visit our website, explore our credits programs for teaching and research, or speak with a member of our team.


          Why the system needs sleep      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Sleep is essential for brain functionality and overall health but understanding how sleep delivers its beneficial effects remains largely unknown. In an article publishing on Aug. 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Shanaz Diessler and Maxime Jan at the University of Lausanne and the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (Switzerland), sleep researchers are exploring new and unbiased approaches that can take sleep to a systems level.
          After NEXT 2018: Trends in higher education and research      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

From classrooms to campus infrastructure, higher education is rapidly adapting to cloud technology. So it’s no surprise that academic faculty and staff were well represented among panelists and attendees at this year’sGoogle Cloud Next. Several of our more than 500 breakout sessions at Next spoke to the needs of higher education, as as did critical announcements like our partnership with the National Institutes of Health to make make public biomedical datasets available to researchers. Here are ten major themes that came out our higher education sessions at Next:

  1. Collaborating across campuses. Learning technologists from St. Norbert College, Lehigh University, University of Notre Dame, and Indiana University explained how G Suite and CourseKit, Google’s new integrated learning management tool, are helping teachers and students exchange ideas.
  2. Navigating change.Academic IT managers told stories of how they’ve overcome the organizational challenges of cloud migration and offered some tips for others: start small, engage key stakeholders, and take advantage of Google’s teams of engineers and representatives, who are enthusiastic and knowledgeable allies. According to Joshua Humphrey, Team Lead, Enterprise Computing, Georgia State University, "We've been using GCP for almost three years now and we've seen an average yearly savings of 44%. Whenever people ask why we moved to the cloud this is what we point to. Usability and savings."
  3. Fostering student creativity. In our higher education booth at Next, students demonstrated projects that extended their learning beyond the classroom. For example, students at California State University at San Bernardino built a mobile rover that checks internet connectivity on campus, and students at High Tech High used G Suite and Chromebooks to help them create their own handmade soap company.
  4. Reproducing scientific research. Science is built on consistent, reliable, repeatable findings. Academic research panelists at the University of Michigan are using Docker on Compute Engine to containerize pipeline tools so any researcher can run the same pipeline without having to worry about affecting the final outcome.
  5. Powering bioinformaticsToday’s biomedical research often requires storing and processing hundreds of terabytes of data. Teams at SUNY Downstate, Northeastern, and the University of South Carolina demonstrated how they used BigQuery and Compute Engine to build complex simulations and manage huge datasets for neuroscience, epidemiology, and environmental research.
  6. Accelerating genomics research. Moving data to the cloud enables faster processing to test more hypotheses and uncover insights. Researchers from Stanford, Duke, and Michigan showed how they streamlined their genomics workloads and cut months off their processing time using GCP.
  7. Democratizing access to deep learningAutoML Vision, Natural Language, and Translation, all in beta, were announced at Next and can help researchers build custom ML models without specialized knowledge in machine learning or coding. As Google’s Chief Scientist of AI and Machine Learning Fei-Fei Li noted in her blog post, Google’s aim “is to make AI not just more powerful, but more accessible.”
  8. Transforming LMS analytics. Scalable tools can turn the data collected by learning management systems and student information services into insights about student behavior. Google’s strategic partnership with Unizen allows a consortium of universities to integrate data and learning sciences, while Ivy Tech used ML Engine to build a predictive algorithm to improve student performance in courses.
  9. Personalizing machine learning and AI for student services. We’re seeing a growing trend of universities investigating AI to create virtual assistants. Recently Strayer University shared with us how they used Dialogflow to do just that, and at Next, Carnegie Mellon walked us through their process of building SARA, a socially-aware robot assistant.
  10. Strengthening security for academic IT: Natural disasters threaten on-premise data centers, with earthquakes, flooding, and hurricanes demanding robust disaster-recovery planning. Georgia State, the University of Minnesota, and Stanford’s Graduate School of Business shared how they improved the reliability and cost-efficiency of their data backup by migrating to GCP.
We've been using GCP for almost three years now and we've seen an average yearly savings of 44%. Whenever people ask why we moved to the cloud this is what we point to: usability and savings Joshua Humphrey
Enterprise Computing, Georgia State University



To learn more about our solutions for higher education, visit our website, explore our credits programs for teaching and research, or speak with a member of our team.


          Postdoctoral position      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A postdoctoral fellow position is available in the Immune Monitoring and Diagnosis Lab, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), led by Dr. Carsten Krieg (https://www.cktherapeutics.com/). The laboratory is interested in discovering new biomarkers that correlate with response to cancer immunotherapy and the underlying mechanisms by combining the newest wet lab technologies such as mass cytometry and single cell sequencing with artificial intelligence-guided bioinformatic analysis https://www


          Product Owner (Life Science/Cloud) - Thermo Fisher Scientific - Woodlands      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
You like the idea of partnering with both internal & external scientists and bioinformaticians to create outstanding clinical and research solutions....
From Thermo Fisher Scientific - Wed, 27 Jun 2018 10:28:22 GMT - View all Woodlands jobs
          Cell Atlas will transform research      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A major UK project will create an Atlas of human cells, it was announced today.

The project will “transform” biological research and medicine, according to Wellcome, which is pumping £7 million into the project.

The project will include a “pilot atlas” of developing human tissues and a highly-detailed atlas of the skin, Wellcome said.

Part of the aim is to compare the properties of cells and tissues at different stages of life. Scientists expect this to give new insights into cancers which exploit development pathways.

Scientists in London, Cambridge, Oxford, Newcastle and the European Bioinformatics Institute will all take part in the project.

Dr Sarah Teichmann, Head of Cellular Genetics at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Cambridge, said: “The Human Cell Atlas will transform our understanding of human health and disease, and we are excited to be able to embark on the next stage of this important project.

“The new funding will bring together scientists from a huge variety of disciplines across the UK to enable the collection of data from millions of cells and drive progress towards this ambitious goal.”

Dr Michael Dunn, from Wellcome, said: “We are really excited to be part of this huge global effort that will have such important implications for medicine and health.”




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