Next Page: 10000

          Oklahoma’s Congressional Delegation Reacts To Travel Ban Order      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Members of Oklahoma’s congressional delegation have largely been supportive of President Donald Trump’s executive order that temporarily bans travel of certain foreign nationals to the United States. Under the order, citizens of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen would not be allowed to enter the United States for 90 days. Over the weekend, permanent resident visa holders were detained at airports, which led to protests across the country. The White House later said permanent resident visa holders are from those 7 countries will be allowed. The order also places a 120 day freeze on the admission of refugees, and an indefinite halt on resettling Syrian refugees in the United States. Congressman Steve Russell, R-Oklahoma City, says he supports the executive order. Russell is a retired Army Lieutenant Colonel who saw combat in Iraq. He wants to make sure exemptions will be available for military interpreters, informers, and ousted political allies in the seven countries.
          The Uninhabitable Earth      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   


The Uninhabitable Earth
Famine, economic collapse, a sun that cooks us: What climate change could wreak — sooner than you think.

By David Wallace-Wells

In the jungles of Costa Rica, where humidity routinely tops 90 percent, simply moving around outside when it’s over 105 degrees Fahrenheit would be lethal. And the effect would be fast: Within a few hours, a human body would be cooked to death from both inside and out. Fossils by Heartless Machine
July 9, 2017

I. ‘Doomsday’
Peering beyond scientific reticence.

It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible, even within the lifetime of a teenager today. And yet the swelling seas — and the cities they will drown — have so dominated the picture of global warming, and so overwhelmed our capacity for climate panic, that they have occluded our perception of other threats, many much closer at hand. Rising oceans are bad, in fact very bad; but fleeing the coastline will not be enough.

Indeed, absent a significant adjustment to how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth will likely become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century.

Even when we train our eyes on climate change, we are unable to comprehend its scope. This past winter, a string of days 60 and 70 degrees warmer than normal baked the North Pole, melting the permafrost that encased Norway’s Svalbard seed vault — a global food bank nicknamed “Doomsday,” designed to ensure that our agriculture survives any catastrophe, and which appeared to have been flooded by climate change less than ten years after being built.

The Doomsday vault is fine, for now: The structure has been secured and the seeds are safe. But treating the episode as a parable of impending flooding missed the more important news. Until recently, permafrost was not a major concern of climate scientists, because, as the name suggests, it was soil that stayed permanently frozen. But Arctic permafrost contains 1.8 trillion tons of carbon, more than twice as much as is currently suspended in the Earth’s atmosphere. When it thaws and is released, that carbon may evaporate as methane, which is 34 times as powerful a greenhouse-gas warming blanket as carbon dioxide when judged on the timescale of a century; when judged on the timescale of two decades, it is 86 times as powerful. In other words, we have, trapped in Arctic permafrost, twice as much carbon as is currently wrecking the atmosphere of the planet, all of it scheduled to be released at a date that keeps getting moved up, partially in the form of a gas that multiplies its warming power 86 times over.

Maybe you know that already — there are alarming stories in the news every day, like those, last month, that seemed to suggest satellite data showed the globe warming since 1998 more than twice as fast as scientists had thought (in fact, the underlying story was considerably less alarming than the headlines). Or the news from Antarctica this past May, when a crack in an ice shelf grew 11 miles in six days, then kept going; the break now has just three miles to go — by the time you read this, it may already have met the open water, where it will drop into the sea one of the biggest icebergs ever, a process known poetically as “calving.”


Watch: How Climate Change Is Creating More Powerful Hurricanes

But no matter how well-informed you are, you are surely not alarmed enough. Over the past decades, our culture has gone apocalyptic with zombie movies and Mad Max dystopias, perhaps the collective result of displaced climate anxiety, and yet when it comes to contemplating real-world warming dangers, we suffer from an incredible failure of imagination. The reasons for that are many: the timid language of scientific probabilities, which the climatologist James Hansen once called “scientific reticence” in a paper chastising scientists for editing their own observations so conscientiously that they failed to communicate how dire the threat really was; the fact that the country is dominated by a group of technocrats who believe any problem can be solved and an opposing culture that doesn’t even see warming as a problem worth addressing; the way that climate denialism has made scientists even more cautious in offering speculative warnings; the simple speed of change and, also, its slowness, such that we are only seeing effects now of warming from decades past; our uncertainty about uncertainty, which the climate writer Naomi Oreskes in particular has suggested stops us from preparing as though anything worse than a median outcome were even possible; the way we assume climate change will hit hardest elsewhere, not everywhere; the smallness (two degrees) and largeness (1.8 trillion tons) and abstractness (400 parts per million) of the numbers; the discomfort of considering a problem that is very difficult, if not impossible, to solve; the altogether incomprehensible scale of that problem, which amounts to the prospect of our own annihilation; simple fear. But aversion arising from fear is a form of denial, too.

In between scientific reticence and science fiction is science itself. This article is the result of dozens of interviews and exchanges with climatologists and researchers in related fields and reflects hundreds of scientific papers on the subject of climate change. What follows is not a series of predictions of what will happen — that will be determined in large part by the much-less-certain science of human response. Instead, it is a portrait of our best understanding of where the planet is heading absent aggressive action. It is unlikely that all of these warming scenarios will be fully realized, largely because the devastation along the way will shake our complacency. But those scenarios, and not the present climate, are the baseline. In fact, they are our schedule.

The present tense of climate change — the destruction we’ve already baked into our future — is horrifying enough. Most people talk as if Miami and Bangladesh still have a chance of surviving; most of the scientists I spoke with assume we’ll lose them within the century, even if we stop burning fossil fuel in the next decade. Two degrees of warming used to be considered the threshold of catastrophe: tens of millions of climate refugees unleashed upon an unprepared world. Now two degrees is our goal, per the Paris climate accords, and experts give us only slim odds of hitting it. The U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issues serial reports, often called the “gold standard” of climate research; the most recent one projects us to hit four degrees of warming by the beginning of the next century, should we stay the present course. But that’s just a median projection. The upper end of the probability curve runs as high as eight degrees — and the authors still haven’t figured out how to deal with that permafrost melt. The IPCC reports also don’t fully account for the albedo effect (less ice means less reflected and more absorbed sunlight, hence more warming); more cloud cover (which traps heat); or the dieback of forests and other flora (which extract carbon from the atmosphere). Each of these promises to accelerate warming, and the history of the planet shows that temperature can shift as much as five degrees Celsius within thirteen years. The last time the planet was even four degrees warmer, Peter Brannen points out in The Ends of the World, his new history of the planet’s major extinction events, the oceans were hundreds of feet higher.*

The Earth has experienced five mass extinctions before the one we are living through now, each so complete a slate-wiping of the evolutionary record it functioned as a resetting of the planetary clock, and many climate scientists will tell you they are the best analog for the ecological future we are diving headlong into. Unless you are a teenager, you probably read in your high-school textbooks that these extinctions were the result of asteroids. In fact, all but the one that killed the dinosaurs were caused by climate change produced by greenhouse gas. The most notorious was 252 million years ago; it began when carbon warmed the planet by five degrees, accelerated when that warming triggered the release of methane in the Arctic, and ended with 97 percent of all life on Earth dead. We are currently adding carbon to the atmosphere at a considerably faster rate; by most estimates, at least ten times faster. The rate is accelerating. This is what Stephen Hawking had in mind when he said, this spring, that the species needs to colonize other planets in the next century to survive, and what drove Elon Musk, last month, to unveil his plans to build a Mars habitat in 40 to 100 years. These are nonspecialists, of course, and probably as inclined to irrational panic as you or I. But the many sober-minded scientists I interviewed over the past several months — the most credentialed and tenured in the field, few of them inclined to alarmism and many advisers to the IPCC who nevertheless criticize its conservatism — have quietly reached an apocalyptic conclusion, too: No plausible program of emissions reductions alone can prevent climate disaster.

Over the past few decades, the term “Anthropocene” has climbed out of academic discourse and into the popular imagination — a name given to the geologic era we live in now, and a way to signal that it is a new era, defined on the wall chart of deep history by human intervention. One problem with the term is that it implies a conquest of nature (and even echoes the biblical “dominion”). And however sanguine you might be about the proposition that we have already ravaged the natural world, which we surely have, it is another thing entirely to consider the possibility that we have only provoked it, engineering first in ignorance and then in denial a climate system that will now go to war with us for many centuries, perhaps until it destroys us. That is what Wallace Smith Broecker, the avuncular oceanographer who coined the term “global warming,” means when he calls the planet an “angry beast.” You could also go with “war machine.” Each day we arm it more.

II. Heat Death
The bahraining of New York.

In the sugar­cane region of El Salvador, as much as one-fifth of the population has chronic kidney disease, the presumed result of dehydration from working the fields they were able to comfortably harvest as recently as two decades ago. Photo: Heartless Machine
Humans, like all mammals, are heat engines; surviving means having to continually cool off, like panting dogs. For that, the temperature needs to be low enough for the air to act as a kind of refrigerant, drawing heat off the skin so the engine can keep pumping. At seven degrees of warming, that would become impossible for large portions of the planet’s equatorial band, and especially the tropics, where humidity adds to the problem; in the jungles of Costa Rica, for instance, where humidity routinely tops 90 percent, simply moving around outside when it’s over 105 degrees Fahrenheit would be lethal. And the effect would be fast: Within a few hours, a human body would be cooked to death from both inside and out.

Climate-change skeptics point out that the planet has warmed and cooled many times before, but the climate window that has allowed for human life is very narrow, even by the standards of planetary history. At 11 or 12 degrees of warming, more than half the world’s population, as distributed today, would die of direct heat. Things almost certainly won’t get that hot this century, though models of unabated emissions do bring us that far eventually. This century, and especially in the tropics, the pain points will pinch much more quickly even than an increase of seven degrees. The key factor is something called wet-bulb temperature, which is a term of measurement as home-laboratory-kit as it sounds: the heat registered on a thermometer wrapped in a damp sock as it’s swung around in the air (since the moisture evaporates from a sock more quickly in dry air, this single number reflects both heat and humidity). At present, most regions reach a wet-bulb maximum of 26 or 27 degrees Celsius; the true red line for habitability is 35 degrees. What is called heat stress comes much sooner.

Related Stories
Michael Oppenheimer: Only 10 Percent Chance We Meet Paris Targets
Actually, we’re about there already. Since 1980, the planet has experienced a 50-fold increase in the number of places experiencing dangerous or extreme heat; a bigger increase is to come. The five warmest summers in Europe since 1500 have all occurred since 2002, and soon, the IPCC warns, simply being outdoors that time of year will be unhealthy for much of the globe. Even if we meet the Paris goals of two degrees warming, cities like Karachi and Kolkata will become close to uninhabitable, annually encountering deadly heat waves like those that crippled them in 2015. At four degrees, the deadly European heat wave of 2003, which killed as many as 2,000 people a day, will be a normal summer. At six, according to an assessment focused only on effects within the U.S. from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, summer labor of any kind would become impossible in the lower Mississippi Valley, and everybody in the country east of the Rockies would be under more heat stress than anyone, anywhere, in the world today. As Joseph Romm has put it in his authoritative primer Climate Change: What Everyone Needs to Know, heat stress in New York City would exceed that of present-day Bahrain, one of the planet’s hottest spots, and the temperature in Bahrain “would induce hyperthermia in even sleeping humans.” The high-end IPCC estimate, remember, is two degrees warmer still. By the end of the century, the World Bank has estimated, the coolest months in tropical South America, Africa, and the Pacific are likely to be warmer than the warmest months at the end of the 20th century. Air-conditioning can help but will ultimately only add to the carbon problem; plus, the climate-controlled malls of the Arab emirates aside, it is not remotely plausible to wholesale air-condition all the hottest parts of the world, many of them also the poorest. And indeed, the crisis will be most dramatic across the Middle East and Persian Gulf, where in 2015 the heat index registered temperatures as high as 163 degrees Fahrenheit. As soon as several decades from now, the hajj will become physically impossible for the 2 million Muslims who make the pilgrimage each year.

It is not just the hajj, and it is not just Mecca; heat is already killing us. In the sugarcane region of El Salvador, as much as one-fifth of the population has chronic kidney disease, including over a quarter of the men, the presumed result of dehydration from working the fields they were able to comfortably harvest as recently as two decades ago. With dialysis, which is expensive, those with kidney failure can expect to live five years; without it, life expectancy is in the weeks. Of course, heat stress promises to pummel us in places other than our kidneys, too. As I type that sentence, in the California desert in mid-June, it is 121 degrees outside my door. It is not a record high.

III. The End of Food
Praying for cornfields in the tundra.

Climates differ and plants vary, but the basic rule for staple cereal crops grown at optimal temperature is that for every degree of warming, yields decline by 10 percent. Some estimates run as high as 15 or even 17 percent. Which means that if the planet is five degrees warmer at the end of the century, we may have as many as 50 percent more people to feed and 50 percent less grain to give them. And proteins are worse: It takes 16 calories of grain to produce just a single calorie of hamburger meat, butchered from a cow that spent its life polluting the climate with methane farts.

Pollyannaish plant physiologists will point out that the cereal-crop math applies only to those regions already at peak growing temperature, and they are right — theoretically, a warmer climate will make it easier to grow corn in Greenland. But as the pathbreaking work by Rosamond Naylor and David Battisti has shown, the tropics are already too hot to efficiently grow grain, and those places where grain is produced today are already at optimal growing temperature — which means even a small warming will push them down the slope of declining productivity. And you can’t easily move croplands north a few hundred miles, because yields in places like remote Canada and Russia are limited by the quality of soil there; it takes many centuries for the planet to produce optimally fertile dirt.

Drought might be an even bigger problem than heat, with some of the world’s most arable land turning quickly to desert. Precipitation is notoriously hard to model, yet predictions for later this century are basically unanimous: unprecedented droughts nearly everywhere food is today produced. By 2080, without dramatic reductions in emissions, southern Europe will be in permanent extreme drought, much worse than the American dust bowl ever was. The same will be true in Iraq and Syria and much of the rest of the Middle East; some of the most densely populated parts of Australia, Africa, and South America; and the breadbasket regions of China. None of these places, which today supply much of the world’s food, will be reliable sources of any. As for the original dust bowl: The droughts in the American plains and Southwest would not just be worse than in the 1930s, a 2015 NASA study predicted, but worse than any droughts in a thousand years — and that includes those that struck between 1100 and 1300, which “dried up all the rivers East of the Sierra Nevada mountains” and may have been responsible for the death of the Anasazi civilization.

Remember, we do not live in a world without hunger as it is. Far from it: Most estimates put the number of undernourished at 800 million globally. In case you haven’t heard, this spring has already brought an unprecedented quadruple famine to Africa and the Middle East; the U.N. has warned that separate starvation events in Somalia, South Sudan, Nigeria, and Yemen could kill 20 million this year alone.

IV. Climate Plagues
What happens when the bubonic ice melts?

Rock, in the right spot, is a record of planetary history, eras as long as millions of years flattened by the forces of geological time into strata with amplitudes of just inches, or just an inch, or even less. Ice works that way, too, as a climate ledger, but it is also frozen history, some of which can be reanimated when unfrozen. There are now, trapped in Arctic ice, diseases that have not circulated in the air for millions of years — in some cases, since before humans were around to encounter them. Which means our immune systems would have no idea how to fight back when those prehistoric plagues emerge from the ice.

The Arctic also stores terrifying bugs from more recent times. In Alaska, already, researchers have discovered remnants of the 1918 flu that infected as many as 500 million and killed as many as 100 million — about 5 percent of the world’s population and almost six times as many as had died in the world war for which the pandemic served as a kind of gruesome capstone. As the BBC reported in May, scientists suspect smallpox and the bubonic plague are trapped in Siberian ice, too — an abridged history of devastating human sickness, left out like egg salad in the Arctic sun.

Experts caution that many of these organisms won’t actually survive the thaw and point to the fastidious lab conditions under which they have already reanimated several of them — the 32,000-year-old “extremophile” bacteria revived in 2005, an 8 million-year-old bug brought back to life in 2007, the 3.5 million–year–old one a Russian scientist self-injected just out of curiosity — to suggest that those are necessary conditions for the return of such ancient plagues. But already last year, a boy was killed and 20 others infected by anthrax released when retreating permafrost exposed the frozen carcass of a reindeer killed by the bacteria at least 75 years earlier; 2,000 present-day reindeer were infected, too, carrying and spreading the disease beyond the tundra.

What concerns epidemiologists more than ancient diseases are existing scourges relocated, rewired, or even re-evolved by warming. The first effect is geographical. Before the early-modern period, when adventuring sailboats accelerated the mixing of peoples and their bugs, human provinciality was a guard against pandemic. Today, even with globalization and the enormous intermingling of human populations, our ecosystems are mostly stable, and this functions as another limit, but global warming will scramble those ecosystems and help disease trespass those limits as surely as Cortés did. You don’t worry much about dengue or malaria if you are living in Maine or France. But as the tropics creep northward and mosquitoes migrate with them, you will. You didn’t much worry about Zika a couple of years ago, either.

As it happens, Zika may also be a good model of the second worrying effect — disease mutation. One reason you hadn’t heard about Zika until recently is that it had been trapped in Uganda; another is that it did not, until recently, appear to cause birth defects. Scientists still don’t entirely understand what happened, or what they missed. But there are things we do know for sure about how climate affects some diseases: Malaria, for instance, thrives in hotter regions not just because the mosquitoes that carry it do, too, but because for every degree increase in temperature, the parasite reproduces ten times faster. Which is one reason that the World Bank estimates that by 2050, 5.2 billion people will be reckoning with it.

V. Unbreathable Air
A rolling death smog that suffocates millions.


By the end of the century, the coolest months in tropical South America, Africa, and the Pacific are likely to be warmer than the warmest months at the end of the 20th century. Photo: Heartless Machine
Our lungs need oxygen, but that is only a fraction of what we breathe. The fraction of carbon dioxide is growing: It just crossed 400 parts per million, and high-end estimates extrapolating from current trends suggest it will hit 1,000 ppm by 2100. At that concentration, compared to the air we breathe now, human cognitive ability declines by 21 percent.

Other stuff in the hotter air is even scarier, with small increases in pollution capable of shortening life spans by ten years. The warmer the planet gets, the more ozone forms, and by mid-century, Americans will likely suffer a 70 percent increase in unhealthy ozone smog, the National Center for Atmospheric Research has projected. By 2090, as many as 2 billion people globally will be breathing air above the WHO “safe” level; one paper last month showed that, among other effects, a pregnant mother’s exposure to ozone raises the child’s risk of autism (as much as tenfold, combined with other environmental factors). Which does make you think again about the autism epidemic in West Hollywood.

Already, more than 10,000 people die each day from the small particles emitted from fossil-fuel burning; each year, 339,000 people die from wildfire smoke, in part because climate change has extended forest-fire season (in the U.S., it’s increased by 78 days since 1970). By 2050, according to the U.S. Forest Service, wildfires will be twice as destructive as they are today; in some places, the area burned could grow fivefold. What worries people even more is the effect that would have on emissions, especially when the fires ravage forests arising out of peat. Peatland fires in Indonesia in 1997, for instance, added to the global CO2 release by up to 40 percent, and more burning only means more warming only means more burning. There is also the terrifying possibility that rain forests like the Amazon, which in 2010 suffered its second “hundred-year drought” in the space of five years, could dry out enough to become vulnerable to these kinds of devastating, rolling forest fires — which would not only expel enormous amounts of carbon into the atmosphere but also shrink the size of the forest. That is especially bad because the Amazon alone provides 20 percent of our oxygen.

Then there are the more familiar forms of pollution. In 2013, melting Arctic ice remodeled Asian weather patterns, depriving industrial China of the natural ventilation systems it had come to depend on, which blanketed much of the country’s north in an unbreathable smog. Literally unbreathable. A metric called the Air Quality Index categorizes the risks and tops out at the 301-to-500 range, warning of “serious aggravation of heart or lung disease and premature mortality in persons with cardiopulmonary disease and the elderly” and, for all others, “serious risk of respiratory effects”; at that level, “everyone should avoid all outdoor exertion.” The Chinese “airpocalypse” of 2013 peaked at what would have been an Air Quality Index of over 800. That year, smog was responsible for a third of all deaths in the country.

VI. Perpetual War
The violence baked into heat.

Climatologists are very careful when talking about Syria. They want you to know that while climate change did produce a drought that contributed to civil war, it is not exactly fair to saythat the conflict is the result of warming; next door, for instance, Lebanon suffered the same crop failures. But researchers like Marshall Burke and Solomon Hsiang have managed to quantify some of the non-obvious relationships between temperature and violence: For every half-degree of warming, they say, societies will see between a 10 and 20 percent increase in the likelihood of armed conflict. In climate science, nothing is simple, but the arithmetic is harrowing: A planet five degrees warmer would have at least half again as many wars as we do today. Overall, social conflict could more than double this century.

This is one reason that, as nearly every climate scientist I spoke to pointed out, the U.S. military is obsessed with climate change: The drowning of all American Navy bases by sea-level rise is trouble enough, but being the world’s policeman is quite a bit harder when the crime rate doubles. Of course, it’s not just Syria where climate has contributed to conflict. Some speculate that the elevated level of strife across the Middle East over the past generation reflects the pressures of global warming — a hypothesis all the more cruel considering that warming began accelerating when the industrialized world extracted and then burned the region’s oil.

What accounts for the relationship between climate and conflict? Some of it comes down to agriculture and economics; a lot has to do with forced migration, already at a record high, with at least 65 million displaced people wandering the planet right now. But there is also the simple fact of individual irritability. Heat increases municipal crime rates, and swearing on social media, and the likelihood that a major-league pitcher, coming to the mound after his teammate has been hit by a pitch, will hit an opposing batter in retaliation. And the arrival of air-conditioning in the developed world, in the middle of the past century, did little to solve the problem of the summer crime wave.

VII. Permanent Economic Collapse
Dismal capitalism in a half-poorer world.

The murmuring mantra of global neoliberalism, which prevailed between the end of the Cold War and the onset of the Great Recession, is that economic growth would save us from anything and everything.
But in the aftermath of the 2008 crash, a growing number of historians studying what they call “fossil capitalism” have begun to suggest that the entire history of swift economic growth, which began somewhat suddenly in the 18th century, is not the result of innovation or trade or the dynamics of global capitalism but simply our discovery of fossil fuels and all their raw power — a onetime injection of new “value” into a system that had previously been characterized by global subsistence living. Before fossil fuels, nobody lived better than their parents or grandparents or ancestors from 500 years before, except in the immediate aftermath of a great plague like the Black Death, which allowed the lucky survivors to gobble up the resources liberated by mass graves. After we’ve burned all the fossil fuels, these scholars suggest, perhaps we will return to a “steady state” global economy. Of course, that onetime injection has a devastating long-term cost: climate change.

The most exciting research on the economics of warming has also come from Hsiang and his colleagues, who are not historians of fossil capitalism but who offer some very bleak analysis of their own: Every degree Celsius of warming costs, on average, 1.2 percent of GDP (an enormous number, considering we count growth in the low single digits as “strong”). This is the sterling work in the field, and their median projection is for a 23 percent loss in per capita earning globally by the end of this century (resulting from changes in agriculture, crime, storms, energy, mortality, and labor).
Tracing the shape of the probability curve is even scarier: There is a 12 percent chance that climate change will reduce global output by more than 50 percent by 2100, they say, and a 51 percent chance that it lowers per capita GDP by 20 percent or more by then, unless emissions decline. By comparison, the Great Recession lowered global GDP by about 6 percent, in a onetime shock; Hsiang and his colleagues estimate a one-in-eight chance of an ongoing and irreversible effect by the end of the century that is eight times worse.

The scale of that economic devastation is hard to comprehend, but you can start by imagining what the world would look like today with an economy half as big, which would produce only half as much value, generating only half as much to offer the workers of the world. It makes the grounding of flights out of heat-stricken Phoenix last month seem like pathetically small economic potatoes. And, among other things, it makes the idea of postponing government action on reducing emissions and relying solely on growth and technology to solve the problem an absurd business calculation.
Every round-trip ticket on flights from New York to London, keep in mind, costs the Arctic three more square meters of ice.

VIII. Poisoned Oceans
Sulfide burps off the skeleton coast.

That the sea will become a killer is a given. Barring a radical reduction of emissions, we will see at least four feet of sea-level rise and possibly ten by the end of the century. A third of the world’s major cities are on the coast, not to mention its power plants, ports, navy bases, farmlands, fisheries, river deltas, marshlands, and rice-paddy empires, and even those above ten feet will flood much more easily, and much more regularly, if the water gets that high. At least 600 million people live within ten meters of sea level today.

But the drowning of those homelands is just the start. At present, more than a third of the world’s carbon is sucked up by the oceans — thank God, or else we’d have that much more warming already. But the result is what’s called “ocean acidification,” which, on its own, may add a half a degree to warming this century. It is also already burning through the planet’s water basins — you may remember these as the place where life arose in the first place. You have probably heard of “coral bleaching” — that is, coral dying — which is very bad news, because reefs support as much as a quarter of all marine life and supply food for half a billion people. Ocean acidification will fry fish populations directly, too, though scientists aren’t yet sure how to predict the effects on the stuff we haul out of the ocean to eat; they do know that in acid waters, oysters and mussels will struggle to grow their shells, and that when the pH of human blood drops as much as the oceans’ pH has over the past generation, it induces seizures, comas, and sudden death.

That isn’t all that ocean acidification can do. Carbon absorption can initiate a feedback loop in which underoxygenated waters breed different kinds of microbes that turn the water still more “anoxic,” first in deep ocean “dead zones,” then gradually up toward the surface. There, the small fish die out, unable to breathe, which means oxygen-eating bacteria thrive, and the feedback loop doubles back. This process, in which dead zones grow like cancers, choking off marine life and wiping out fisheries, is already quite advanced in parts of the Gulf of Mexico and just off Namibia, where hydrogen sulfide is bubbling out of the sea along a thousand-mile stretch of land known as the “Skeleton Coast.” The name originally referred to the detritus of the whaling industry, but today it’s more apt than ever. Hydrogen sulfide is so toxic that evolution has trained us to recognize the tiniest, safest traces of it, which is why our noses are so exquisitely skilled at registering flatulence. Hydrogen sulfide is also the thing that finally did us in that time 97 percent of all life on Earth died, once all the feedback loops had been triggered and the circulating jet streams of a warmed ocean ground to a halt — it’s the planet’s preferred gas for a natural holocaust. Gradually, the ocean’s dead zones spread, killing off marine species that had dominated the oceans for hundreds of millions of years, and the gas the inert waters gave off into the atmosphere poisoned everything on land. Plants, too. It was millions of years before the oceans recovered.

IX. The Great Filter
Our present eeriness cannot last.

So why can’t we see it? In his recent book-length essay The Great Derangement, the Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh wonders why global warming and natural disaster haven’t become major subjects of contemporary fiction — why we don’t seem able to imagine climate catastrophe, and why we haven’t yet had a spate of novels in the genre he basically imagines into half-existence and names “the environmental uncanny.” “Consider, for example, the stories that congeal around questions like, ‘Where were you when the Berlin Wall fell?’ or ‘Where were you on 9/11?’ ” he writes. “Will it ever be possible to ask, in the same vein, ‘Where were you at 400 ppm?’ or ‘Where were you when the Larsen B ice shelf broke up?’ ” His answer: Probably not, because the dilemmas and dramas of climate change are simply incompatible with the kinds of stories we tell ourselves about ourselves, especially in novels, which tend to emphasize the journey of an individual conscience rather than the poisonous miasma of social fate.

Surely this blindness will not last — the world we are about to inhabit will not permit it. In a six-degree-warmer world, the Earth’s ecosystem will boil with so many natural disasters that we will just start calling them “weather”: a constant swarm of out-of-control typhoons and tornadoes and floods and droughts, the planet assaulted regularly with climate events that not so long ago destroyed whole civilizations. The strongest hurricanes will come more often, and we’ll have to invent new categories with which to describe them; tornadoes will grow longer and wider and strike much more frequently, and hail rocks will quadruple in size. Humans used to watch the weather to prophesy the future; going forward, we will see in its wrath the vengeance of the past. Early naturalists talked often about “deep time” — the perception they had, contemplating the grandeur of this valley or that rock basin, of the profound slowness of nature. What lies in store for us is more like what the Victorian anthropologists identified as “dreamtime,” or “everywhen”: the semi-mythical experience, described by Aboriginal Australians, of encountering, in the present moment, an out-of-time past, when ancestors, heroes, and demigods crowded an epic stage. You can find it already watching footage of an iceberg collapsing into the sea — a feeling of history happening all at once.

It is. Many people perceive climate change as a sort of moral and economic debt, accumulated since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution and now come due after several centuries — a helpful perspective, in a way, since it is the carbon-burning processes that began in 18th-century England that lit the fuse of everything that followed. But more than half of the carbon humanity has exhaled into the atmosphere in its entire history has been emitted in just the past three decades; since the end of World War II, the figure is 85 percent. Which means that, in the length of a single generation, global warming has brought us to the brink of planetary catastrophe, and that the story of the industrial world’s kamikaze mission is also the story of a single lifetime. My father’s, for instance: born in 1938, among his first memories the news of Pearl Harbor and the mythic Air Force of the propaganda films that followed, films that doubled as advertisements for imperial-American industrial might; and among his last memories the coverage of the desperate signing of the Paris climate accords on cable news, ten weeks before he died of lung cancer last July. Or my mother’s: born in 1945, to German Jews fleeing the smokestacks through which their relatives were incinerated, now enjoying her 72nd year in an American commodity paradise, a paradise supported by the supply chains of an industrialized developing world. She has been smoking for 57 of those years, unfiltered.

Or the scientists’. Some of the men who first identified a changing climate (and given the generation, those who became famous were men) are still alive; a few are even still working. Wally Broecker is 84 years old and drives to work at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory across the Hudson every day from the Upper West Side. Like most of those who first raised the alarm, he believes that no amount of emissions reduction alone can meaningfully help avoid disaster. Instead, he puts his faith in carbon capture — untested technology to extract carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which Broecker estimates will cost at least several trillion dollars — and various forms of “geoengineering,” the catchall name for a variety of moon-shot technologies far-fetched enough that many climate scientists prefer to regard them as dreams, or nightmares, from science fiction. He is especially focused on what’s called the aerosol approach — dispersing so much sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere that when it converts to sulfuric acid, it will cloud a fifth of the horizon and reflect back 2 percent of the sun’s rays, buying the planet at least a little wiggle room, heat-wise. “Of course, that would make our sunsets very red, would bleach the sky, would make more acid rain,” he says. “But you have to look at the magnitude of the problem. You got to watch that you don’t say the giant problem shouldn’t be solved because the solution causes some smaller problems.” He won’t be around to see that, he told me. “But in your lifetime …”

Jim Hansen is another member of this godfather generation. Born in 1941, he became a climatologist at the University of Iowa, developed the groundbreaking “Zero Model” for projecting climate change, and later became the head of climate research at NASA, only to leave under pressure when, while still a federal employee, he filed a lawsuit against the federal government charging inaction on warming (along the way he got arrested a few times for protesting, too). The lawsuit, which is brought by a collective called Our Children’s Trust and is often described as “kids versus climate change,” is built on an appeal to the equal-protection clause, namely, that in failing to take action on warming, the government is violating it by imposing massive costs on future generations; it is scheduled to be heard this winter in Oregon district court. Hansen has recently given up on solving the climate problem with a carbon tax alone, which had been his preferred approach, and has set about calculating the total cost of the additional measure of extracting carbon from the atmosphere.

Related Stories
Climate Scientist James Hansen: ‘The Planet Could Become Ungovernable’
The 10-Book ‘Uninhabitable Earth’ Reading List
Hansen began his career studying Venus, which was once a very Earth-like planet with plenty of life-supporting water before runaway climate change rapidly transformed it into an arid and uninhabitable sphere enveloped in an unbreathable gas; he switched to studying our planet by 30, wondering why he should be squinting across the solar system to explore rapid environmental change when he could see it all around him on the planet he was standing on. “When we wrote our first paper on this, in 1981,” he told me, “I remember saying to one of my co-authors, ‘This is going to be very interesting. Sometime during our careers, we’re going to see these things beginning to happen.’ ”

Several of the scientists I spoke with proposed global warming as the solution to Fermi’s famous paradox, which asks, If the universe is so big, then why haven’t we encountered any other intelligent life in it? The answer, they suggested, is that the natural life span of a civilization may be only several thousand years, and the life span of an industrial civilization perhaps only several hundred. In a universe that is many billions of years old, with star systems separated as much by time as by space, civilizations might emerge and develop and burn themselves up simply too fast to ever find one another. Peter Ward, a charismatic paleontologist among those responsible for discovering that the planet’s mass extinctions were caused by greenhouse gas, calls this the “Great Filter”: “Civilizations rise, but there’s an environmental filter that causes them to die off again and disappear fairly quickly,” he told me. “If you look at planet Earth, the filtering we’ve had in the past has been in these mass extinctions.” The mass extinction we are now living through has only just begun; so much more dying is coming.

And yet, improbably, Ward is an optimist. So are Broecker and Hansen and many of the other scientists I spoke to. We have not developed much of a religion of meaning around climate change that might comfort us, or give us purpose, in the face of possible annihilation. But climate scientists have a strange kind of faith: We will find a way to forestall radical warming, they say, because we must.

It is not easy to know how much to be reassured by that bleak certainty, and how much to wonder whether it is another form of delusion; for global warming to work as parable, of course, someone needs to survive to tell the story. The scientists know that to even meet the Paris goals, by 2050, carbon emissions from energy and industry, which are still rising, will have to fall by half each decade; emissions from land use (deforestation, cow farts, etc.) will have to zero out; and we will need to have invented technologies to extract, annually, twice as much carbon from the atmosphere as the entire planet’s plants now do. Nevertheless, by and large, the scientists have an enormous confidence in the ingenuity of humans — a confidence perhaps bolstered by their appreciation for climate change, which is, after all, a human invention, too. They point to the Apollo project, the hole in the ozone we patched in the 1980s, the passing of the fear of mutually assured destruction. Now we’ve found a way to engineer our own doomsday, and surely we will find a way to engineer our way out of it, one way or another. The planet is not used to being provoked like this, and climate systems designed to give feedback over centuries or millennia prevent us — even those who may be watching closely — from fully imagining the damage done already to the planet. But when we do truly see the world we’ve made, they say, we will also find a way to make it livable. For them, the alternative is simply unimaginable.

*This article appears in the July 10, 2017, issue of New York Magazine.

*This article has been updated to provide context for the recent news reports about revisions to a satellite data set, to more accurately reflect the rate of warming during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum, to clarify a reference to Peter Brannen’s The Ends of the World, and to make clear that James Hansen still supports a carbon-tax based approach to emissions.


          Ruman Mohamed Somalia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Ruman washes 11-month old Obah’s hands before she eats her specialized nutrient-dense supplementary food. - Copyright: WFP/Kabir Dhanji
          DHAGEYSO:-Warbixin lagu qoray Forign Policy oo meel ka dhac ku noqtay madaxda somalia & jawaab adag oo laga bixiyay      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Warbixinta Forign Policy lagu daabacay waxay kicisey cid kasta oo Dawlada Xil ka heysa gaar ahaan Sifada uu adeegsaday Eray bixinta Sargaalka AMISOM Ee Warbixinta

Continue Reading »
          Akhriso:-Xoghayihii joogtada ahaa ee wasaaradda Gargaarka Somalia oo is casilay      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Warar soo baxaya ayaa waxa ay sheegayaan in uu iscasilay Xoghayihii joogtada ahaa ee wasaaradda Gargaarka iyo Maareeynta Musiibooyinka mudane Maxamed Cumar Macalin. Xoghayaha ayaa

Continue Reading »
          DHAGEYSO:-Dowladda somalia oo go’aamo aan laga firsan ka qaadata siyaasada arimaha dibada maxay tahay sababtu?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Dad badan ayaa dowladda soomaaliya ku dhaliilay go’aamada ay ka qaadato siyaasada arimaha dibada marka loo fiiriyo arimaha xiligan ay dowladu ku dhaqaaday iyada oo

Continue Reading »
          Zilver voor België op EK atletiek: Abdi wordt tweede op de 10.000 meter      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Bashir Abdi heeft ons land een zilveren medaille bezorgd op het EK atletiek in Berlijn. De in Somalië geboren Gentenaar liep naar een knappe tweede plaats op de 10 kilometer. Abdi ging als leider de laatste rechte lijn in, maar zag de Fransman Morhad Amdouni over zich heen komen. Die andere Belg, Bouchikhi, moest in de laatste rechte lijn de rol moeten lossen en eindigde als zesde.


          Somali Refugee Abdi Nor Iftin: 'I Am Here To Make America Great'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
What does it take to become an American? In 2015, This American Life told the story of a Somali refugee who was finally issued a visa to come and live in the United States. "This big smile was on my face. I've never had such a big smile," Abdi Nor Iftin said at the time. Iftin's long road to the US began when he was only a child in Mogadishu, watching American movies and teaching himself English, while brutality and war raged around him. In his new memoir, Call Me American , he tells his story from the beginning: with his nomadic parents and their now-unimaginably peaceful, pastoral life. "She had no idea that the country she was living in was called Somalia," Iftin says of his mother. "She had always told me, 'You know, Abdi, there's only two days: The day that you're born and the day that you die. Everything else is just grazing and hanging out with the animals.'" Life was so easy, he says, before drought and famine wiped everything out. Interview Highlights On his first memories of
          High-level Group seeks action to close justice gap for women      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
7 Aug 2018

Justice for women is essential to fulfilling a key aspiration of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: ensuring no one is left behind.

Without equal and effective justice for women and girls – more than 50 per cent of the world’s population – sustainable and inclusive development will remain elusive. Many of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including those related to education, health and decent work, cannot be achieved without justice for women.

High-level Group on Justice for Women

The 2030 Agenda has rallied unprecedented political commitment, serving as an opportunity to enhance justice for women and girls. In May 2018, a High-level Group was convened by IDLO, UN Women and the Pathfinders for Peaceful, Just and Inclusive Societies to advocate for the centrality of women’s justice needs in the implementation, monitoring and reporting of SDG 16.

The High-level Group on Justice for Women constitutes a critical channel to inform and enrich the global Task Force on Justice, a Pathfinders initiative established to accelerate progress on the 2030 Agenda’s target 16.3 on access to justice. Tasked with developing concrete recommendations on access to justice for women and girls, the High-level Group acts as a gender-responsive contribution to the work of the Task Force.

The Group met for the first time on May 28-29, 2018 in The Hague to discuss strategies to tackle the unmet need for justice of women in all countries and identify common obstacles and effective solutions to closing the gender justice gap. [read the Inaugural Meeting Report]

The meeting was opened by Sigrid Kaag, Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation of the Netherlands and Co-Chair of the Task Force on Justice, and IDLO Director-General Irene Khan. 

During the meeting, members of the High-level Group – top government officials, academics, civil society actors, and international organization leaders – stressed the Group’s role in generating action and political commitment by expanding partnerships with regional networks, associations and donor organizations.

The Group will now develop a report providing recommendations for action and investment to enhance justice for women, which will be launched during the 63rd session of the Commission on the Status of Women and will contribute to the launch of the report of the Task Force on Justice during the High-level Political Forum in July 2019, as well as the 2019 UN General Assembly. 

A Background Paper was circulated during the inaugural meeting to provide a starting point for the discussion of the Group and to support the drafting of its report.

Members of the High-level Group include (in alphabetical order):

  1. Irene Khan, Director-General, IDLO (Convenor)
  2. Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, United Nations Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director, UN Women (Convenor)
  3. Abubacarr Marie Tambadou, Attorney General and Minister of Justice, The Gambia
  4. Arkel Benitez, Secretary General, Conferencia de Ministros de Justicia de los Países Ibero Americanos
  5. Catherine Harrington, Campaign Manager, Global Campaign for Equal Nationality Rights
  6. Deqa Hagi Yasin, Minister of Women and Human Rights Development, Somalia
  7. Dubravka Šimonovic, United Nations Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences
  8. Frida Gómez, Director-General, Noticias Tiemposmodernos, and National Councillor for the Evaluation and Monitoring of Public Policies on Youth, Mexican Youth Institute
  9. Hilary Gbedemah, Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women
  10. María Fernanda Rodríguez, Under-Secretary for Access to Justice, Ministry of Justice and Human Rights, Argentina
  11. Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah, Director of Information, Communications and Media, Association for Women's Rights in Development
  12. Nathalie G. Drouin, Deputy Minister of Justice and Attorney General, Canada
  13. Nursyahbani Katjasungkana, Head, Association of Indonesian Women for Justice
  14. Patricia Scotland, Secretary-General, the Commonwealth
  15. Rangita da Silva de Alwis, Associate Dean of International Affairs, University of Pennsylvania Law School
  16. Sandie Okoro, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, World Bank Group

The justice gap for women and girls

There is a clear link between gender and justice; between SDG 5 on gender equality and SDG 16 on peace, justice and strong institutions. While gender equality is indispensable for peaceful, just and inclusive societies based on the rule of law, women and girls play a critical role in the emergence of equitable and inclusive institutions. At the same time, effective justice systems are central to enabling women to become equal partners in decision-making and development. The ability to access justice is an essential means to claiming and realizing women’s rights.

Yet there is a huge disparity between the promise of justice under SDG 16 and the lived realities of women and girls; between what women and girls need and want when they seek justice, and the justice they receive.

Gender discriminatory legislation around the world

Worldwide, 104 economies still have laws preventing women from working in specific jobs – such as mining, manufacturing and construction. Only 40 per cent of economies mandate equal remuneration for work of equal value. 45 economies do not have specific laws on domestic violence, and 59 economies have no laws on sexual harassment in the workplace. Male dominance in family relations is also evident in data showing that in many economies, a woman cannot apply for a passport, be head of household or travel outside her home in the same way as a man.

Read the High-level Group Background Paper for more data on the justice gap for women and girls

A growing body of evidence points to serious gaps in ensuring equal legal protections for women and girls, especially those affected by conflict or humanitarian crises. Gender discriminatory legal frameworks and social norms can constitute serious hurdles to the delivery of justice for women. Even in the presence of gender-responsive laws, implementation is often poor due to a variety of technical, financial and political factors. Challenges result from failure to consider the interaction among laws, regulations and implementing institutions, and their collective impact on women’s rights.

For example, regulations often require that a national identity card, birth certificate or deeds from a land registry office be provided to obtain land rights, titling and registration. These certificates and deeds are often inaccessible to rural or poor women who have limited time, money, access to facilities and networks.

Ineffective and unresponsive judicial systems, compounded by gender bias, socio-economic barriers and limited access to information and support, can further result in women being prevented from claiming their rights and accessing redress.

Furthermore, a large proportion of women worldwide access justice through customary or informal justice mechanisms that are frequently biased against them yet adjudicate matters that impact women more than men, such as inheritance, property or domestic violence.

 

Country: 

          Comment on The Abiy Phenomenon by saay7      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Selamat Semere T: How can you make bold predictions and not have anything in caps? Kidding! Everybody is so touchy. Ok, lets see: <blockquote>1. - The current Ethio-Eritrean "warm" relation was was cooked way, way, way back. It was just marketed and sold to the public during Abiy/Isaias visits to Asmara and Addis to maximize the political capital of both leaders and their team.</blockquote> Agree, and I have said as much many times. In facts, Reuters has a report about that: that it started in 2017 during the reign of Hailemariam Desalegn who says that after the death of Meles Zenawi, EPRDF had agreed that it needs to unconditionally accept Algiers Agreement. Then came the UAE and Saudi Arabia with their dinars, for the purposes of blocking out Qatar, Turkey and China. Bribed Ethiopia big bucks; Eritrea was already bought. <blockquote> 2. - Among the many issues that were discussed and agreed upon (border demarcation, trade, movement of people, opposition forces to both Addis and Asmara, the Woyane role in future Ethiopia, Ethiopia's role in the Red Sea Horn region, Eritrea's role in the region as trusted and loyal ally of Ethiopia.....) I truly believe Western and regional powers as brokers and guarantors (a) a blueprint for peaceful transfer of power in Eritrea (b) political immunity (sovereignty) with an ironclad guarantee (assurance) for Isaias Afewerki, the aging and frail top PFDJ leaders, and to the senior PFDJ cadres was agreed by all.</blockquote> Agreed, for the most part. The immunity was for IA only, and it was given by US via UAE and Qatar. Neither IA nor the rest of the countries give a hoot about the "frail top PFDJ leaders." <blockquote>3. - When Isaias Afewerki showed all the emotions when he was with Dr. Abiy, it was an expression of trust he put on on Abiy (his life, the life of his family, his legacy, the life of his friends and colleagues, and the fate of his country). Because the power, influence, and access to the powerful Ethiopia has can't be underestimated. Because Isaias Afewerki, his family, his legacy, the safety and security of his colleagues and friends, the peace and security of the nation is as good as the honest commitment of Ethiopian leaders.</blockquote> Agreed, but I would put it differently. It was the happiness and marvel of a guy who learned that he just got away with it. He was on the path to ICC just a few months ago, and now serious people are talking about MoIbrahim Award and Nobel Peace Prize. <blockquote> 4. - That as an objective to move foreword, Isaias Afewerki has invested heavily on Ethiopia and Ethiopian leaders (since Ghedli years) in all Ethiopian political denominations. And today, outside the Woyane circle, he has earned a lot of respect from all, especially from the Amara and Oromo political brands.</blockquote> Mixed. I agree that he has always been about Ethiopia, but about Ethiopia of his vision: One Ethiopia. That's why he hated TPLF's vision for Ethiopia and that's why he was so comfortable with Gnbot 7 even when it ocassionally said that to it, "One Ethiopia" means Ethiopia with Eritrea and ports. There was an EPLF veteran, the front's representative to Somalia during Ghedli who was interviewed by Assenna a few years ago (I forget his name; iSem will come up with it.) He says he arranged a meeting for the Sidama Liberation Front to meet with Isaias and when they told him their objective included secession from Ethiopia he was so mad and so incensed by this heresy he shouted at them. Some of my oppo comrades have attributed all sorts of heritage-ancestry explanation for this, but it was an ideology for him: Emama Ethiopia must be unified and it must be a unitary state. (And yes I believe Mesfin Hagos' narration: he wouldn't have minded Eritrea being part of Ethiopia if he could rule it and if it could remain a unitary state, which was heretical to TPLF's vision of Ethiopia as a federal system. <blockquote>5. - Soon, the usual will happen (a) world wide PFDJ conference (congress) will take place (b) laws, constitution, policies...... would be revised (c) new PFDJ blood would assume leadership role (d) the new leadership will grant immunity to all Tegadelti and Non-Tegadelti PFDJ top and senior leaders</blockquote> The Front will forgive itself? Or the leaders of the front will forgive themselves and, in the process, forgive those whom they victimized? I don't see it as in the nature of petty Isaias: there will always be someone who want make the cut. And, no, it won't be "the PFDJ' making the decision; but Isaias Afwerki, personally, going over every file of the thousands (I am going to say tens of thousands but please don't faint) of prisoners. <blockquote> 6. - If there is a good consensus on the PFDJ congress, very young leaders with a long term will be elected/nominated. If there is not much consensus, an older guy will take a leadership role with a shorter term limit to help build higher consensus.</blockquote> There is no such thing as PFDJ consensus. There is an IA wish list, and that's all. And yes, as I said, there will be a PFDJ-II. <blockquote>7. - To reward and to honor Isaias, the Ghedli leaders, and the Ghedli generation, Ethio-Eritrean border will be demarcated with a funfair before PFDJ congress and the new leadership.</blockquote> This is creative, something that a PR mastermind would come up with. I will make a bolder prediction: it will happen with TPLF presence and by then TPLF will have shed its decrepit leadership and the PFDJ will declare that one as its victory too:) <blockquote> 8. - Isaias Afewerki, as an ex president of Eritrea, his safety and security protected, will live in Eritrea antil his time of death.</blockquote> Agree, except it will follow the model of another moralizing dictator, Julius Nyerere, who died in Ireland. Isaias will be in a Saudi hospital. Remember, African tyrants never build anything worthwhile, not even a hospital they have enough faith to die in. <blockquote> 9. - The Eritrean opposition, former Tegadeltis and Non former Tegadeltis alike, should stop criminalizing Isaias and PFDJ and join this political venue to stay relevant.</blockquote> Yeah, Eritrean oppositionist, why are you such party-poopers? We arent you celebrating when there is nothing in it for you? Things your boldness got timid on: * The fate of the exiled Eritrean freedom fighters now in opposition * The fate of Eritrean refugees in Sudan, Ethiopia, Israel * The fate of the non-PFDJ prisoners * The fate of National Service. saay
          Ditinggal di Dalam Mobil 8 Jam, Bocah 1 Tahun Tewas Kepanasan      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Liputan6.com, Jakarta - Seorang anak laki-laki berumur satu tahun tewas setelah ditinggalkan di dalam mobil yang panas selama lebih dari 8 jam. Ia ditemukan di dalam mobil ibunya di tempat parkir di Pembroke Pines, Florida, sekitar pukul 5 sore waktu setempat di mana suhu mencapai 33 derajat Celcius.

Orlando Sun-Sentinel melaporkan bahwa ibu bocah itu berangkat kerja pada Jumat pagi dan si bocah ditinggalkan di kursi keselamatan. Paramedis yang tiba di tempat kejadian mencoba memberikan CPR tapi tak berhasil. Bocah itu dinyatakan tewas di tempat kejadian.

 

 

 

Saksikan Video Pilihan di Bawah Ini:

 

Selanjutnya

Ilustrasi parkiran mobil#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000

Kepolisian Pembroke mengatakan pada Mail Online bahwa saat ini mereka belum akan membeberkan nama keluarga tersebut atau apakah akan diajukan tuntutan. Juru bicara kepolisian meminta masyarakat untuk selalu memeriksa kendaraan untuk memastikan tak ada manusia atau hewan peliharaan yang ditinggalkan di tempat parkir.

Pengacara keluarga mengatakan bahwa kematian anak laki-laki itu adalah kecelakaan tragis. Ia meyakinkan bahwa sang ibu adalah orang yang baik dan kali ini dia memang lalai.

Menurut KindsandCars.org, rata-rata 37 anak meninggal setiap tahun di Amerika Serikan karena ditinggalkan di kendaraan. Tambahan lagi Florida adalah tingkat kematian tertinggi untuk anak-anak di dalam mobil.


          Ditinggal di Dalam Mobil 8 Jam, Bocah 1 Tahun Tewas Kepanasan      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Liputan6.com, Jakarta - Seorang anak laki-laki berumur satu tahun tewas setelah ditinggalkan di dalam mobil yang panas selama lebih dari 8 jam. Ia ditemukan di dalam mobil ibunya di tempat parkir di Pembroke Pines, Florida, sekitar pukul 5 sore waktu setempat di mana suhu mencapai 33 derajat Celsius.

Orlando Sun-Sentinel melaporkan bahwa ibu bocah itu berangkat kerja pada Jumat pagi dan si bocah ditinggalkan di kursi keselamatan. Paramedis yang tiba di tempat kejadian mencoba memberikan CPR, tapi tak berhasil. Bocah itu dinyatakan tewas di tempat kejadian.

 

 

 

Saksikan Video Pilihan di Bawah Ini:

 

Selanjutnya

Ilustrasi parkiran mobil#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000

Kepolisian Pembroke mengatakan pada Mail Online bahwa saat ini mereka belum akan membeberkan nama keluarga tersebut atau apakah akan diajukan tuntutan. Juru bicara kepolisian meminta masyarakat untuk selalu memeriksa kendaraan untuk memastikan tak ada manusia atau hewan peliharaan yang ditinggalkan di tempat parkir.

Pengacara keluarga mengatakan bahwa kematian anak laki-laki itu adalah kecelakaan tragis. Ia meyakinkan bahwa sang ibu adalah orang yang baik dan kali ini dia memang lalai.

Menurut KindsandCars.org, rata-rata 37 anak meninggal setiap tahun di Amerika Serikat karena ditinggalkan di kendaraan. Tambahan lagi Florida adalah tingkat kematian tertinggi untuk anak-anak di dalam mobil.


          Dayton Honors Refugee Populations      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The United Nations established World Refugee Day to honor people forced to flee their homes under threat of persecution, conflict and violence. In 2013, there were an estimated 10.4 million refugees around the world. In 2014, with situations in Syria, Somalia, Iraq and other places, those numbers are likely to grow drastically. (Update: According to NPR, "At least 51.2 million people are now living under forced displacement, a U.N. agency says, announcing its tally of people who are seeking refuge or asylum, or who are internally displaced. It's the first time the number has topped 50 million since World War II." ) On Sunday, June 22, 2014, the city of Dayton will celebrate World Refugee Day by honoring its own refugee populations. The city has provided temporary refuge, or become a permanent home, to a number of refugee groups over the years. Sunday they’ll recognize them with music, food, dancing, and other activities at McIntosh Park. Melissa Bertolo, Program Coordinator with
          Revolution is positive and civil war is negative: "Civil Wars" 3 of 3: by David Armitage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
AUTHOR. (Photo: Mass meeting in New York City April 20, 1861, to support the Union.) http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Twitter: @BatchelorShow Revolution is positive and civil war is negative: "Civil Wars" 3 of 3: by David Armitage [](https://www.amazon.com/Civil-Wars-David-Armitage/dp/030745617X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1533779701&sr=1-1&keywords=david+armitage+civil+wars) [https://www.amazon.com/Civil-Wars-David-Armitage/dp/030745617X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1533779701&sr=1-1&keywords=david+armitage+civil+wars](https://www.amazon.com/Civil-Wars-David-Armitage/dp/030745617X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1533779701&sr=1-1&keywords=david+armitage+civil+wars) A highly original history, tracing the least understood and most intractable form of organized human aggression from Ancient Rome through the centuries to the present day. We think we know civil war when we see it. Yet ideas of what it is, and what it isn't, have a long and contested history, from its fraught origins in republican Rome to debates in early modern Europe to our present day. Defining the term is acutely political, for ideas about what makes a war "civil" often depend on whether one is a ruler or a rebel, victor or vanquished, sufferer or outsider. Calling a conflict a civil war can shape its outcome by determining whether outside powers choose to get involved or stand aside: from the American Revolution to the war in Iraq, pivotal decisions have depended on such shifts of perspective.  The age of civil war in the West may be over, but elsewhere in the last two decades it has exploded--from the Balkans to Rwanda, Burundi, Somalia, and Sri Lanka, and most recently Syria. And the language of civil war has burgeoned as democratic politics has become more violently fought. This book's unique perspective on the roots and dynamics of civil war, and on its shaping force in our conflict-ridden world, will be essential to the ongoing effort to grapple with this seemingly interminable problem.
          Is a civil war generative? "Civil Wars" 2 of 3: by David Armitage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
AUTHOR. (Photo:The meeting of the Estates General on 5 May 1789 at Versailles ) http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Twitter: @BatchelorShow Is a civil war generative? "Civil Wars" 2 of 3: by David Armitage https://www.amazon.com/Civil-Wars-David-Armitage/dp/030745617X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1533779701&sr=1-1&keywords=david+armitage+civil+wars A highly original history, tracing the least understood and most intractable form of organized human aggression from Ancient Rome through the centuries to the present day. We think we know civil war when we see it. Yet ideas of what it is, and what it isn't, have a long and contested history, from its fraught origins in republican Rome to debates in early modern Europe to our present day. Defining the term is acutely political, for ideas about what makes a war "civil" often depend on whether one is a ruler or a rebel, victor or vanquished, sufferer or outsider. Calling a conflict a civil war can shape its outcome by determining whether outside powers choose to get involved or stand aside: from the American Revolution to the war in Iraq, pivotal decisions have depended on such shifts of perspective.  The age of civil war in the West may be over, but elsewhere in the last two decades it has exploded--from the Balkans to Rwanda, Burundi, Somalia, and Sri Lanka, and most recently Syria. And the language of civil war has burgeoned as democratic politics has become more violently fought. This book's unique perspective on the roots and dynamics of civil war, and on its shaping force in our conflict-ridden world, will be essential to the ongoing effort to grapple with this seemingly interminable problem.
          How do you know you are in a civil war? "Civil Wars"1 of 3: by David Armitage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
AUTHOR. (Photo: ) http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Twitter: @BatchelorShow How do you know you are in a civil war? "Civil Wars"1 of 3:  by David Armitage [https://www.amazon.com/Civil-Wars-David-Armitage/dp/030745617X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1533779701&sr=1-1&keywords=david+armitage+civil+wars](https://www.amazon.com/Civil-Wars-David-Armitage/dp/030745617X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1533779701&sr=1-1&keywords=david+armitage+civil+wars) A highly original history, tracing the least understood and most intractable form of organized human aggression from Ancient Rome through the centuries to the present day. We think we know civil war when we see it. Yet ideas of what it is, and what it isn't, have a long and contested history, from its fraught origins in republican Rome to debates in early modern Europe to our present day. Defining the term is acutely political, for ideas about what makes a war "civil" often depend on whether one is a ruler or a rebel, victor or vanquished, sufferer or outsider. Calling a conflict a civil war can shape its outcome by determining whether outside powers choose to get involved or stand aside: from the American Revolution to the war in Iraq, pivotal decisions have depended on such shifts of perspective.  The age of civil war in the West may be over, but elsewhere in the last two decades it has exploded--from the Balkans to Rwanda, Burundi, Somalia, and Sri Lanka, and most recently Syria. And the language of civil war has burgeoned as democratic politics has become more violently fought. This book's unique perspective on the roots and dynamics of civil war, and on its shaping force in our conflict-ridden world, will be essential to the ongoing effort to grapple with this seemingly interminable problem.
          Death By a Thousand Cuts      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
In Somalia, the cruel reality is that 98 percent of girls are subjected to FGM.
          Der Tod eines Mädchens bricht in Somalia das Tabu der Genitalverstümmelung      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Zum ersten Mal wird in Somalia die Genitalverstümmelung bei einem Mädchen rechtlich verfolgt. In dem muslimischen Land ist fast jede Frau beschnitten – doch die Praktik ist schon lange vor dem Islam entstanden.
          'Cockpits for War' Being Transformed Through the Spirit Of the New Silk Road      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Over the past months, the strategic results of the primarily economic Belt and Road Initiative have begun to demonstrate for the world what Lyndon LaRouche has known for many years — there is no distinction between the economic and the strategic issues facing mankind. If you want peace, LaRouche said, get the tractors rolling.

When Presidents Trump, Xi Jinping, Putin, and Moon — all four — presented development plans to North Korea, backing each other up on the concept of "peace through development" as well as on sanctions, the supposedly impossible proved possible indeed. When India and Pakistan both joined the SCO, working directly with China and Russia on joint development ideas, the "permanent crisis" created by the British at the time of the partition of India became suddenly resolvable. On the Horn of Africa, with China's Belt and Road proposing a development alternative to each of the three nations of Ethiopia, Eritrea and Somalia, an intractable conflict has turned into joyful peace and cooperation. In Southwest Asia, a similar solution to the century of war is now possible.

This process is active across Africa. The BRICS Summit in South Africa last month saw Russia, China and India joining hands with all the people of Africa in bringing real development — nuclear power, high-speed rail connectivity, water projects to green the deserts — and thus posing a real solution to terrorism and to poverty.

The problem remains, however, that the media in the U.S. and in Europe have carefully isolated their populations from any knowledge of this world-historic transformation, which is sweeping through Asia, Africa and Ibero-America. In the U.S., the LaRouche movement is mobilizing to resolve this problem. A first step is a call for transforming the negotiations between President Trump and President-elect López Obrador of Mexico, from a revision of NAFTA to the higher-ordered concept of NABRI — the North American Belt and Road Initiative. This must become a step forward in uniting the U.S. and China through the New Silk Road, a process of building advanced industrial nations throughout the Americas and beyond, and fulfilling Trump's commitment to restoring America's former industrial power as a primary source of capital exports for nation-building. This, not coincidentally, is the path to resolving the trade imbalance.

But the British and their assets in the U.S. will stop at nothing to prevent such a new paradigm from taking hold in the U.S. The Council on Foreign Relations, the foremost voice for the Empire within the U.S., has published a report entitled, "Is Made in China 2025 a Threat to Global Trade?" It details the supposedly devious intentions of the Chinese effort to develop their domestic expertise in high-tech manufacturing: through "recruitment of foreign scientists, its theft of U.S. intellectual property, and its targeted acquisitions of U.S. firms," the CFR claims, China intends to "control entire supply chains," and eventually "entire industries could come under control of a rival geopolitical power."

Such hysteria is matched by the emergence this week of "Big Brother" frantically shutting down access to social media for multiple voices which have countered the Russiagate madness, and supported President Trump's denunciation of the "Russia hoax." Alex Jones' Infowars was thrown off Facebook and YouTube — a site which has more than 15 million visits per month— while others were thrown off Twitter.

But the New Paradigm exists — it cannot be stopped, other than by world war. China has arisen, and has joined with Russia and India through the BRICS to offer the nations of the Global South an alternative to the poverty imposed upon them as a legacy of colonialism. They have extended this offer, to join the Belt and Road Initiative, to the United States and Europe, as a win-win alternative to the geopolitics of war, economic decay and cultural decadence infecting the West. The patriotic spirit in the U.S. has been awakened through the phenomenon of Donald Trump, rejecting the warmongers and the post-industrial society advocates within both the Republican and Democratic Parties — what LaRouche long ago denounced as the "two-potty system." LaRouche's Four Laws, implemented through the "four powers" of the U.S., Russia, China and India, provide the way forward. The arc of history has reached a branching point, towards either victory or tragedy. The future is in our hands, each and every one.


          UNHCR aids return of over 2,000 Somali refugees from Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Fuente: http://acnur.es Yesterday (Monday, 6 August), a boat carrying 116 Somali refugees arrived in the port of Berbera in Somalia after sailing from Aden in Yemen on Sunday. This is…

Seguir leyendo...


          Somalia: East Africa Key Message Update, August 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
Country: Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen

Key Messages

Protracted conflict drives food insecurity; and flooding in the north affects livelihoods

  • Continued conflict and subsequent displacement have disrupted livelihoods and access to key sources of food and income in South Sudan, Yemen, and parts of Somalia, Sudan, and Ethiopia. Large populations are experiencing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes across these areas, which are likely to persist through January 2019. South Sudan and Yemen remain the areas of greatest concern. In a worst-case scenario, if there is a sustained absence of humanitarian assistance in South Sudan, and in Yemen, if commercial imports decline significantly for an extended period of time and conflict restricts trade and humanitarian assistance, Famine (IPC Phase 5) is possible.

  • From June to early August, there has been above-average rainfall across parts of central and western regions of Ethiopia into Sudan and South Sudan, which has led to flooding, with the greatest intensity in Sudan. While the heavy rainfall has been beneficial for some crop development and pasture regeneration, it has also caused displacement, infrastructure, crop, and livestock losses, and disrupted household livelihoods in affected areas. Given the forecast, there is the likelihood for additional flash floods in these countries.

  • Crisis (IPC Phase 3) outcomes persist over parts of southeastern Ethiopia and southern and central Somalia, but food security continues to improve as livestock production and prices have increased substantially. Somalia Gu production in southern agropastoral areas is expected to be above average, while total Meher production in Ethiopia and marginal production in Kenya is likely to be near average. By January 2019, food security outcomes are expected to further improve to Stressed (IPC Phase 2) or Minimal (IPC Phase 1) across many areas of the Eastern Horn; however, Somalia’s Guban Pastoral Livelihood Zone is likely to remain in Emergency (IPC Phase 4).

  • According to UNCHR as of mid-July, a total of nearly 11.3 million people are internally displaced in Burundi, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, and Yemen, while there are 4.6 million refugees from these countries living in Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Uganda, and Tanzania. The majority of these populations have limited capacities to access food and income and are dependent on humanitarian assistance amidst substantial funding gaps. Current food ration cuts of up to 30 percent for refugees and asylum seekers could lead to a deterioration in food security outcomes if they persist.


          Somalia: 2017-2018 Somalia humanitarian funding analysis (data as of 08 August 2018)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Somalia

The latest projection indicates an improving food security situation in areas that were affected by the 2016-2017 drought, due to the above-average Gu rainy season (April-June) supported by large-scale humanitarian assistance. However, humanitarian needs remain critical with an estimated 5.4 million people in need of assistance. Most areas of the country are currently in Stress (IPC Phase 2), with some in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) – mainly internally displaced person (IDPs) with limited access to tenable livelihoods. The risk of deterioration remains, should aid not be sustained, particularly IDPs who largely depend on aid. The spike in evictions of IDPs, which has affected nearly 205,000 people by July – compared to 200,000 in the entirety of 2017 – is worsening the situation of IDPs.

By the end of July 2018, the Somalia Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) had received $563million. Together with approximately $167 million received outside the plan, the Somalia operation has received $730 million. The funding received by end July 2018 is 76 per cent of the sum reported in the same period in 2017. Similarly, cumulative receipts towards the HRP and non-HRP are 78 and 70 per cent respectively of contributions received by end July 2017. Despite limited resources, humanitarian partners continued to provide life-saving assistance reaching nearly two million people with food assistance every month. Major diseases such as acute watery diarrhoea (AWD), began to decrease by June due to WASH and Health sector control measures. Nutrition partners also scaled up reaching more new cases of severe acute malnutrition with treatment.

While total humanitarain funding received from January this year has been on a positive trajectory similar to 2017, funding sharply increased in July 2017 unlike in 2018 where contribution increments were modest. This was due to the continued threat of famine, spike in major diseases and displacement same time last year. This is in contrast to the same period in 2018, when the food security situation has improved. However, more funding is required to sustain the aid operation to avoid a deterioration in the second half of the year. In addition, the likelihood of an El Niño event occurring in late 2018 requires that humanitarians are prepared to respond to the potential risks and take advantage of the prospects of the above-average rainfall projected for the October to December Deyr season.


          Yemen: Regular Press Briefing by the Information Service, 7 August 2018 - Yemen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: UN Department of Public Information
Country: Ethiopia, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, World, Yemen

Yemen

Tarik Jasarevic of the World Health Organization, updating on what Dr. Salama said on oral cholera vaccination in three districts in Yemen last Friday, said very preliminarily, as they still expected full figures to come, in the first two days, more than 3,000 local health workers had reached more than 200,000 people wither oral cholera vaccine in the three districts. These three districts had been chosen because they were assessed to be the most vulnerable to an escalation of cholera. The figures for the third day of the campaign, yesterday, were now being collected. Oral cholera vaccination normally involved two doses, with the second dose being administered in about six weeks. Some 32 tonnes of vaccines came from the Global Oral Cholera Vaccine stockpile, funded by GAVI, had reached Sanaa in mid-July in response to Yemen facing the worse cholera outbreak with more than 1.1 million cases and more than 2,000 deaths. They wanted to pre-empt a possible new wave to cholera. In response to a question, Mr. Jasarevic said he did not have information on the military situation but the fact was that vaccination teams went into these three districts and administered the vaccinations.

Joel Millman of the International Organization for Migration said that yesterday, IOM and partners launched a regional migrant response plan for the Horn of Africa and Yemen, through which they are appealing to the international community for $ 45 million to support migrants on the move in the Horn of Africa and Yemen from 2018 to 2020. The response plan, developed in coordination with regional and country level non-governmental and intergovernmental partners, was a migrant-focused humanitarian and development strategy for vulnerable migrants from the Horn of Africa, specifically those from Somalia, Djibouti and Ethiopia, moving to and from Yemen. The plan targeted some 81,000 persons.

Irregular migration from the Horn of Africa to the Gulf countries had been steadily increasing over the past few years, with approximately 100,000 people entering Yemen, a major transit point on this route, in 2017. The plan estimated that, like in 2017, up to 100,000 new arrivals from the Horn of Africa would reach Yemen in 2018, while 200,000 migrants and refugees would return from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Yemen to the Horn of Africa countries in the same period. Of these, 150,000 and 50,000 would return to Ethiopia and Somalia, respectively. This issue involved displacement and the conflict in Yemen itself, but also parallel and somewhat related programmes of encouraging citizens of those two nations to come home from Saudi Arabia. Over the weekend, Mr. Millman said IOM assisted both Ethiopian and Somali refugees leaving Yemen to go home, 132 Ethiopian migrants left from Hodeidah and 116 Somalis left from Aden. There were more statistics in the notes.

William Spindler of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees said there had been another movement of 160 Somali refugees who travelled by boat from Aden on Sunday and arrived yesterday in Somalia. This was the latest assisted spontaneous return facilitated by UNHCR, in cooperation with IOM and the authorities of both Yemen and Somalia. With this group, the number of refugees to have returned to Somalia since the programme started in 2017 had surpassed 2,000. So far this year, 1,321 Somalis, including the 116 who left on Sunday, had returned to their places of origin in Somalia. For the past two months, weather conditions had prevented the boats from sailing. Among the refugees were female heads of household looking forward to joining their extended families. Several students were hoping to resume their education. The assisted spontaneous return programme was initiated in 2017 in response to the demand from refugees for UNHCR help in returning home. Yemen currently hosted 270,000 refugees, the vast majority of whom were Somalis. The ongoing conflict in Yemen has affected not just Yemenis but also refugees living among them. There were more details in the briefing notes.


          Turkey: MPM Turkey Migrants' Presence Monitoring - Situation Report, July 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: International Organization for Migration
Country: Afghanistan, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Somalia, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, World

Overview of Migrant Situation in Turkey

According to the latest available figures from the Turkish Directorate General for Migration Management (DGMM) currently there are more than 3.9 million foreign nationals present in Turkish territory seeking international protection.

Most of them are Syrians (3,542,250* individuals) who are granted the temporary protection (TP) status, while according to UNHCR another large group of the foreign nationals requiring Turkish humanitarian and international protection are 360,608** asylum-seekers and refugees consisting of different nationalities, but mainly coming from Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Somalia and other countries.

In addition, there are 718,297* foreign nationals under residence permit holder status including humanitarian residence holders.

*Data Source DGMM, 02.08.2018

**Data Source UNHCR, 30.06.2018 Temporary Protection

Turkey implements a Temporary Protection regime for 3,542,250 indivuals from Syria which grants beneficiaries right to legally stay in Turkey as well as some level of access to basic rights and services. A vast majority of them, 3,335,847 individuals, live outside the camps and are spread across the Turkish border provinces while nearly 206,403 live in 19 camps the majority of which are also located close to the Syrian border.

The number of Syrians under temporary protection decreased for the first time since two years. The decrease was recorded as 20,000 persons comparison to previous month.

*Data Source DGMM, 02.08.2018


          World: WHO EMRO Weekly Epidemiological Monitor: Volume 11, Issue 31 (5 August 2018)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: World Health Organization
Country: Bangladesh, Brazil, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Somalia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen

Current major event

Emergency risk communication in outbreaks

To provide WHO Member States, partners and stakeholders involved in emergency preparedness and response with the most up-to-date best practices on Emergency Risk Communication, this year WHO published “Communicating risk in public health emergencies - A WHO guideline for emergency risk communication (ERC) policy and practice”.

Editorial note

During public health emergencies, ERC informs at-risk people on the health risks they face, and on the actions they can take to protect their health and lives. Proper ERC is a two-way street: it informs at-risk people, while at the same time allowing authorities and experts to listen to the same people and address their concerns and needs so that the experts’ advice remains relevant, trusted and acceptable. Risk communication sits at the center of the risk management cycle, connecting all the other parts. This circular view of risk management has replaced the older, more linear, vision, and emphasizes the central importance of risk communications in every step of the process—and even more so in emergency settings.

As the fields of marketing, communications and public health advanced, so did the practice of ERC. Thus, mobile technology and digital information platforms play an important role in modern-day ERC. Twitter and Facebook have been used with success to spread truthful information and to verify information to dispel rumours and misinformation during public health crises. Services like SMS, WhatsApp and others are increasingly being used to share health-related information, including to track and combat rumours and to communicate with people in quarantined areas, for example during the West African Ebola virus out-break in 2014-2016.

Distinct but related principles underpin WHO’s approaches to effective communications and effective risk communications. For the former, WHO aims to make all communications accessible, actionable, credible, relevant, timely, and understandable. These general principles also support risk communications, but for ERC there is an additional focus on measures that build trust: transparency, rapid announcements, and listening to the at-risk populations. This emphasis is explained by the fact that trust is a central factor in decision-making and a strong indicator for compliance rates among mes-sage recipients, because the more you trust someone, the more you are likely to follow their instructions.

In recent years, two complex issues have emerged determining ERC’s success and failure. First, different perceptions of the same risk by experts and the public mean that for ERC to be effective, the social, religious, cultural, political and economic aspects associated with the event and those at risk must be considered. Second, issues of the trustworthiness of the information and advice that is communicated mean that for practitioners of ERC, be they inter-national organizations, health authorities, or community workers, maintaining and nurturing their audiences’ trust is a key concern.

Because of improving technology and more sophisticated tools from the marketing communications field, monitoring and evaluation in ERC have also improved over the past years. Combining pre-digital tools like in-person surveys with digital analytics facilitates the gathering, analys-ing, and interpreting of emergency risk communication data and feedback, which can then feed into emergency risk communication planning, strategy development, execution and renewed evaluation.

Even so, the new Guidelines identify many areas of further research, including several looking at the effect of ERC, especially in low and middle income countries. A related gap is the lack of sustained funding for ERC modalities as standard part of health project design. Finally, the effects of digital media and the splintering of sources and fields of information, absence of longitudi-nal studies, and research measuring the effect of an intervention, rather than simply describing it, all deserve further investigation.


          Ethiopia: UNICEF Ethiopia Humanitarian Situation Report #6 – Reporting Period January-June 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan

Highlights

▪ The current number of internally displaced people in Ethiopia has increased to 2.4 million from 1.6 million at the beginning of the year. Seasonal flooding from July to September is expected to affect 2.5 million people.

▪ With UNICEF support, more than 111,000 children under five have received treatment for severe acute malnutrition since January.

▪ UNICEF-supported Mobile Health and Nutrition Teams have provided medical consultations to 231,529 people, including 89,798 under five children.

▪ UNICEF has provided access to safe water to 1.9 million people.

▪ The Humanitarian and Disaster Resilience Plan (HDRP) for Ethiopia, costed at US$1.6 billion, will be revised in August with humanitarian asks expected to increase.

▪ Access to affected communities either due to security concerns or lack of infrastructure have been significant challenges to the provision of humanitarian assistance.

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs

Conflict-induced internal displacement has led to significant humanitarian needs in the first half of this year. At the start of the year, there were 1.6 million people displaced by conflict and drought, including just over one million conflict IDPs along the Oromia/Somali regional borders. However, renewed conflict along the border of the Oromia and the Southern Nations Nationalities and Peoples (SNNP) regions has increased the number of IDPs to 2.4 million. Conflict in Moyale in March led to the displacement of over 10,000 people across the border into Kenya. While some have returned to their places of origin, community tensions in Moyale remain high.

The HDRP was launched in March with the expectation that Ethiopia would enter its fourth consecutive year of protracted drought. However, the country has been receiving above average rainfall in most of the country which has led to unexpected flooding and landslides in several regions (SNNP, Somali) and caused extensive damage to homes, livelihoods and infrastructure. In fact, Ethiopia received heavy winds and rain from a first - tropical storm Sagar in May. The flooding is expected to continue through September as the National Meteorological Agency (NMA) has predicted an extended and above normal (Kiremt) season affecting all regions, except Southern Somali region. The NMA currently estimates that 2.5 million people are at risk of being affected, of which 637,000 are likely to be displaced. A national flood contingency planning exercise is underway.

While reported rates of Acute Watery Diarrhea (AWD) have fallen short of last years’ caseload, there have been several reported outbreaks, with an outbreak in Afar yet to be contained. The number of reported cases in Afar has reached 799.

Five woredas have been affected and three are currently reporting active cases. As the Awash river is the source of infection, 16 woredas connected to the Awash river plain are considered high risk. Active AWD outbreaks have also been reported in Tigray and Somali regions.

Following the reported Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia has increased its preparedness levels and is screening travelers at ports of entry. An isolation center has been activated at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa and a treatment unit established at Bole Health Center. A National Task Force led by the Minister of Health is currently reviewing preparedness and response plans. UNICEF Ethiopia has updated its Ebola Contingency Plan.

As of end May, 920,262 refugees were residing in Ethiopia – 48.2 per cent from South Sudan, 27.8 per cent from Somalia, 18.4 per cent from Eritrea, and 4.8 per cent from Sudan. In the first five months of this year, 29, 211 refugees arrived in Ethiopia.


          World: Humanitarian Funding Update July 2018 - United Nations Coordinated Appeals      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, World, Yemen

Funding Required: $25.41B
Funding Received: $9.39B
Unmet Requirements: $16.02B
Coverage: 37.0%

People in need: 134.0M
People to receive aid: 95.8M
Countries affected: 41

As of the end of July 2018, 21 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP) require US$25.41 billion to assist 95.8 billion people in urgent need of humanitarian support. The 21 HRPs and the Syria 3RP were funded at $9.52 billion: 37 per cent of financial requirements for 2018. Humanitarian organisations still require $16.02 billion to meet the needs covered by these plans.

Requirements are $2 billion higher than last year at the same time. Overall coverage is also slightly higher (three per cent), with $1.4 billion more received this year than last.

Pooled funds

Between 1 January and 31 July 2018, the Emergency Relief Coordinator approved $333 million through the Central Emergency Response Fund, including $233 million through the rapid response window and $100 million through the underfunded emergencies window. In July, $24 million was approved in rapid response grants to respond to displacement in Ethiopia, population movement from Venezuela into Colombia, worsening food insecurity in Niger, and a volcanic eruption in Guatemala. The largest allocation was $15 million to provide relief items, safe water, sanitation facilities, and health and nutrition treatment to 800,000 people displaced by inter-communal violence in Gedeo and West Guji in Ethiopia.

Between 1 January and 6 August 2018, 17 country-based pooled funds (CBPF) received $536 million in contributions from 30 donors (including $80 million in pledges). During this period, $369 million were allocated to a total of 663 humanitarian projects, implemented by 443 partners, with the funds in Yemen ($92 million), DRC ($36 million) and Iraq ($34 million) allocating the largest amounts. During July, the funds in Afghanistan, Jordan, Nigeria, South Sudan and Turkey were processing allocations. As for overall CBPF allocations, 58 per cent were disbursed to NGOs, including 19 per cent ($71 million) directly to national and local NGOs. Another 41 per cent ($150 million) was allocated to UN agencies and 1 per cent of funding was allocated to Red Cross/Red Crescent organizations.

Country updates

Yemen is the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. Some 22.2 million people – about 75 per cent of the population – require humanitarian assistance or protection. This includes 8.4 million people who do not know where their next meal is coming from. An unprecedented outbreak of cholera and acute watery diarrhoea has resulted in more than 1.1 million cases since April 2017. Escalating conflict in Hudaydah has displaced more than 350,000 people since 1 June. More than 90 per cent of these people have received emergency relief packages distributed by humanitarian partners. Sustained hostilities in Hudaydah city, interruptions to port operations or a siege would be catastrophic and must be avoided. Humanitarian programmes have expanded significantly across Yemen. In June, partners provided emergency food assistance to 7.5 million people – an increase of 200,000 people since January. Similar increases have occurred in other sectors. As of mid-year, about 60 per cent of people targeted with assistance had been reached. Generous and flexible funding has been key. Donors have provided more than 60 per cent of the HRP’s $3 billion requirements – including an early, unearmarked $930 million contribution from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Partners recently sequenced the HRP to show first-line, second-line and full response activities, and require full funding to deliver all programmes based on this plan.

Needs remain high in Ethiopia with 7.88 million people food insecure, as per the Humanitarian and Disaster Resilience Plan (HDRP) released in March. There has been a major surge in displacement since the beginning of June around Gedeo (SNNPR) and West Guji (Oromia) zones resulting in the release of a response plan which seeks $117.7m to assist the 818,250 recently displaced people. Some funding has already been mobilized by Government and partners, primarily through reallocating resources that were originally intended for important response elsewhere in the country under the HDRP.

Fighting in south-west Syria continued to impact hundreds of thousands of civilians, with 180,000 people remaining newly displaced as of the end of July. Aerial bombardment and artillery shelling resulted in civilian deaths and destruction of civilian infrastructure in many areas. Humanitarian workers and service providers were caught up in the violence, with many displaced alongside other civilians. Humanitarian response continued in Dar’a governorate, building on cross-border prepositioning and subsequently drawing on programming from inside Syria. However more than 100,000 newly displaced people remained largely cut off from sustained assistance in Quneitra governorate. Partners identified priority requirements of $85 million to cover the most urgent protection and assistance needs of 300,000 people across the south-west up until mid-October. Concerns also persist around the threat of further military escalation in the north-west of the country, where the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance in Aleppo and Idleb governorates had increased by close to 600,000 by mid-year, to a total of 4.2 million, of whom half were in acute need. Response across the north-west continues to depend on cross-border assistance delivered from Turkey.

At least 3.4 million people in Cameroon need humanitarian assistance and protection. Six out of ten regions are affected by humanitarian crises related to Boko Haram in the Far North, the conflict in the Central African Republic and the worsening situation in the Anglophone regions. Further, growing levels of food insecurity and malnutrition are affecting over 2.6 million people, including 1.5 million children, and there is an ongoing cholera outbreak in the Center and North regions. The 2018 HRP calls for $319.7 million but is only 23 per cent funded. Additional donor support is critical to ensure life-saving assistance to the most vulnerable populations, especially the newly displaced persons in the Far North and the South-West.

Although the number of IDPs in the Central African Republic (CAR) fell to 608,000 during June, a seven per cent decrease compared to May, this does not indicate an improvement of the situation. The tensions and armed violence that erupted in April continue, and are causing new displacements in areas with very limited access. More than half (354,017) of the IDPs are staying with host families, while some 249,522 are in IDP sites and settlements, and another 4,489 are scattered in the bush, in desperate need of assistance. Increasing insecurity is affecting the delivery of aid, as five humanitarian workers have been killed since the beginning of 2018, making CAR one of the most dangerous countries in the world for the delivery of humanitarian aid. Moreover, underfunding remains one of the biggest impediments to stepping up the humanitarian response. At mid-year, the 2018 HRP had only received 26 per cent of its $515.6 million requirement. Without additional funding, humanitarian actors will be unable to address the needs of 1.9 million people targeted in the Plan.

The Marawi Conflict Response and Resources Overview (Mindanao, Philippines) seeks $61 million to provide essential services, food security, protection, livelihood and early recovery support for 199,000 conflict-affected people in Mindanao, of whom 69,412 are still displaced, from July 2017 to December 2018. While an organized return is underway, the majority of those who were forced to flee during the conflict will continue to require humanitarian assistance until sustainable recovery activities are underway, especially for those from the most affected areas of the city. Some $11 million (18%) has been received to-date.

Afghanistan is in the midst of a drought, the scale of which has not been seen since 2011. It has already resulted in some 84,000 people being displaced to Hirat City in western Afghanistan, with up to 150,000 at risk of being displaced. In 2017, wheat production was at an all-time low (57 per cent under the five-year average) and the expected shortfall in production in 2018 is decreasing further -- from 4.2 million metric tonnes to 3.5 million metric tonnes. This decrease is impacting some two million already food insecure people across two thirds of Afghanistan. The ongoing drought led the Humanitarian Country Team to increase the Afghanistan 2018 Humanitarian Response Plan requirements by $117 million, for a total of $547 million. The HRP is currently only 29 per cent funded. Additional funding is required to provide food security, agriculture, water, sanitation, hygiene and nutritional support. The humanitarian community is currently conducting a multi-sectoral humanitarian-development assessment, led by OCHA and UNDP, to examine both humanitarian needs and the wider, long-term complexities underpinning the drought crisis, that would need structural support through development programming.

Four years of conflict have put a tremendous strain on the civilian population in eastern Ukraine. Disrupted access to critical facilities and diminished livelihoods mean that some 3.4 million people are without basic supplies and services and need assistance for protection and survival. Some 200,000 people live under constant fear of shelling every day. One and a half million Ukrainians have been displaced across the country and cannot return home due to hostilities or lost livelihoods. Over 1 million civilians cross the “contact line” every month through operational checkpoints, which lack required shade, cooling spaces and healthcare facilities. Under these conditions, coupled with prolonged waiting hours and summer heat, civilians—many of them elderly—suffer health-related complications. Funding for the Humanitarian Response Plan is urgently needed, as only 27 per cent of the required $187 million has been received so far to respond to the urgent needs of 2.3 million vulnerable Ukrainians with assistance and protection throughout 2018.

Haiti is well into the hurricane season and increased international support for emergency preparedness efforts is required. Haitians are still recovering from consecutive natural disasters, including a major earthquake, hurricanes, floods and drought, and need sustained support. This support is not only to obtain life’s basic necessities, but also to move beyond recurring disasters and build sustainable livelihoods and live in resilient communities that are prepared for future shocks. Humanitarian actors aim to provide humanitarian assistance and protection services to the 2.2 million most vulnerable Haitians, but they have received only 9 per cent of the required $252 million this year.


          Somalia: Somalia - Newsletter, No. 4, Supporting self-reliance and reintegration      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Somalia

UNHCR provides livelihood initiatives and infrastructure development to vulnerable families. In the first half of 2018, UNHCR provided livelihood opportunities to over 3,500 people and rehabilitated 36 public buildings with the help of returnees, IDPs and members of the host community.

Enhanced livelihood and community support

Somalia is characterised by instability, food insecurity, natural hazards and limited livelihood opportunities. As part of its interventions, UNHCR provides livelihood initiatives to vulnerable families. In the first half of 2018, UNHCR provided livelihood opportunities to over 3,500 people and with their help rehabilitated 36 public buildings.

Livelihood opportunities for 3,500 persons

Between January and June 2018, UNHCR enrolled 3,551 people in 27 livelihood activities in nine locations across Somalia. These persons included 1,568 returnees, 978 IDPs, 533 refugees and asylum-seekers and 472 members of the host community and the activities took place in: Afmadow (100), Baidoa (390), Bossaso (222), Dhobley (200), Galkayo (165), Garowe (43), Hargeysa (211), Kismayo (520) and Mogadishu (1,700). The activities include: Technical and Vocational Trainings, Income Generating Activities through rehabilitation of public infrastructure (Cash-for-Work) and training on entrepreneurship (Small-business Enterprise).


          Al-Shabaab Detonate IED in Kenya Targeting Army Patrol. S.I. SITUATION REPORT      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
On 8th of August 2018 at around 0845HRS EAT, The Al-Qaeda branch in Somalia, Shabaab Mujahideen (HSM) detonated an remote controlled improvised explosive device (RCIED) targeting a Kenya Defense Forces…
          President Al-Bashir Affirms Sudan Keenness To Continue Support To Somalia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

President of the Republic, Field Marshal Omer Al-Bashir, has affirmed the keenness of Sudan to support Somalia in all fields until it becomes ready to realize development and stability for its people. During his meeting, Tuesday at the Guest House with the visiting Somali Prime Minister, Hassan Somali Prime Minister, Hassan Ali Khayre, has appreciated …

The post President Al-Bashir Affirms Sudan Keenness To Continue Support To Somalia appeared first on Saafi Films Production Somali Films Hindi Af Soomaali Musalsal heeso.


          Five Killed As IED Hits AMISOM Military Convoy In Mogadishu      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A roadside bomb blast struck a military convoy carrying African Union [AU] peacekeepers in Mogadishu, the Somalia capital on Wednesday morning, witnesses and police said. A witness, speaking on condition of anonymity confirmed to Radio Shabelle that an Improvised explosive device [IED] ripped through the AU convoy at SOS junction. In the aftermath of the …

The post Five Killed As IED Hits AMISOM Military Convoy In Mogadishu appeared first on Saafi Films Production Somali Films Hindi Af Soomaali Musalsal heeso.


          'Cockpits for War' Being Transformed Through the Spirit Of the New Silk Road      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Over the past months, the strategic results of the primarily economic Belt and Road Initiative have begun to demonstrate for the world what Lyndon LaRouche has known for many years — there is no distinction between the economic and the strategic issues facing mankind. If you want peace, LaRouche said, get the tractors rolling.

When Presidents Trump, Xi Jinping, Putin, and Moon — all four — presented development plans to North Korea, backing each other up on the concept of "peace through development" as well as on sanctions, the supposedly impossible proved possible indeed. When India and Pakistan both joined the SCO, working directly with China and Russia on joint development ideas, the "permanent crisis" created by the British at the time of the partition of India became suddenly resolvable. On the Horn of Africa, with China's Belt and Road proposing a development alternative to each of the three nations of Ethiopia, Eritrea and Somalia, an intractable conflict has turned into joyful peace and cooperation. In Southwest Asia, a similar solution to the century of war is now possible.

This process is active across Africa. The BRICS Summit in South Africa last month saw Russia, China and India joining hands with all the people of Africa in bringing real development — nuclear power, high-speed rail connectivity, water projects to green the deserts — and thus posing a real solution to terrorism and to poverty.

The problem remains, however, that the media in the U.S. and in Europe have carefully isolated their populations from any knowledge of this world-historic transformation, which is sweeping through Asia, Africa and Ibero-America. In the U.S., the LaRouche movement is mobilizing to resolve this problem. A first step is a call for transforming the negotiations between President Trump and President-elect López Obrador of Mexico, from a revision of NAFTA to the higher-ordered concept of NABRI — the North American Belt and Road Initiative. This must become a step forward in uniting the U.S. and China through the New Silk Road, a process of building advanced industrial nations throughout the Americas and beyond, and fulfilling Trump's commitment to restoring America's former industrial power as a primary source of capital exports for nation-building. This, not coincidentally, is the path to resolving the trade imbalance.

But the British and their assets in the U.S. will stop at nothing to prevent such a new paradigm from taking hold in the U.S. The Council on Foreign Relations, the foremost voice for the Empire within the U.S., has published a report entitled, "Is Made in China 2025 a Threat to Global Trade?" It details the supposedly devious intentions of the Chinese effort to develop their domestic expertise in high-tech manufacturing: through "recruitment of foreign scientists, its theft of U.S. intellectual property, and its targeted acquisitions of U.S. firms," the CFR claims, China intends to "control entire supply chains," and eventually "entire industries could come under control of a rival geopolitical power."

Such hysteria is matched by the emergence this week of "Big Brother" frantically shutting down access to social media for multiple voices which have countered the Russiagate madness, and supported President Trump's denunciation of the "Russia hoax." Alex Jones' Infowars was thrown off Facebook and YouTube — a site which has more than 15 million visits per month— while others were thrown off Twitter.

But the New Paradigm exists — it cannot be stopped, other than by world war. China has arisen, and has joined with Russia and India through the BRICS to offer the nations of the Global South an alternative to the poverty imposed upon them as a legacy of colonialism. They have extended this offer, to join the Belt and Road Initiative, to the United States and Europe, as a win-win alternative to the geopolitics of war, economic decay and cultural decadence infecting the West. The patriotic spirit in the U.S. has been awakened through the phenomenon of Donald Trump, rejecting the warmongers and the post-industrial society advocates within both the Republican and Democratic Parties — what LaRouche long ago denounced as the "two-potty system." LaRouche's Four Laws, implemented through the "four powers" of the U.S., Russia, China and India, provide the way forward. The arc of history has reached a branching point, towards either victory or tragedy. The future is in our hands, each and every one.


          WAR HOOSE: Mursal oo damacsan qorshe baarlaman oo uu Kheyre ku lug leeyahay      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Warar hoose ayaa sheegaya in Guddoomiyaha Golaha Shacabka ee Baarlamaanka Federaalka Soomaaliya Maxamed Mursal Sheekh C/raxmaan uu wado qorsho lagu soo koobayo fadhiyada baarlamaanka Somalia. Guddoomiye Mursal ayaa la sheegay inuu doonayo in aad loo yareeyo kulamada baarlamaanka si xukuumada Somalia ay uga badbaado Mooshino iyo khilaafyo kaga imaada dhank Xildhibaanada baarlamaanka. Waxaa la xaqiijiyay […]

The post WAR HOOSE: Mursal oo damacsan qorshe baarlaman oo uu Kheyre ku lug leeyahay appeared first on warkii.com.


          W/arimaha dibadda oo ka hadashay sababta Sucuudiga loo taageeray      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Wasiirka Wasaaradda Arrimaha Dibada Xukuumadda Soomaaliya Axmed Ciise Cawad Ayaa Sharaxay Muhiimada Warsaxaafadeed Maalin Ka Hor Wasiiradiisu Ay Soo Saartey. Warsaxaafadeed Ayaa Waxaa Qeyb Ka Ahaa In Xukuumadda Soomaaliya Ay Adkeyneyso Mowqifka Sacuudiga Ee Khilaafka Kala Dhaxeeyo Dowladda Canada,Waxaana U Muuqatay In Dowladdu Taageertay Sacuudiga. Wasiirka Wasaaradda Arrimaha Dibada Xukuumadda Soomaaliya Axmed Ciise Cawad Ayaa […]

The post W/arimaha dibadda oo ka hadashay sababta Sucuudiga loo taageeray appeared first on warkii.com.


          Best Practices for the Protection of Information Assets, Part 2      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

In Part 1 of this article series , we discussed Information Security Management, or ISM. This second installment will cover the implementation and monitoring of security controls, including logical access controls, remote access controls, network security, controls/detection tools against information system attacks, security testing techniques and controls that prevent data leakage.

Implementation and Monitoring of Security Controls

Security controls should focus on the integrity of data, the data classification system, and the policies in places that ensure that data is handled properly.

Logical Access Controls

Ensure there are policies in place on access and access controls logical access controls at both operating system level and the application level are designed to protect information assets by sustaining policies and procedures. The management override is akin to a fail-safe mechanism. Overall, these controls manage the identification, authentication and restriction of users to authorized functions and data.

Types and Principles of Access

Types and principles of access include subject access (identification of individual having an ID), service access (data passing through an access point), least privilege, segregation of duties and split custody.

Example:Target may have avoided their notorious 2013 breach if they had not failed to follow the principle of least privilege. An HVAC contractor with a permission to upload executables broadens the attack surface for cybercriminals.

Example:As an example of Edward Snowden’s revelations, the NSA decided to apply the principle of least privilege and revoked higher-level powers from 90% of its employees.

Passwords

Ensure there are occasional or event-driven change and recovery policies reactivation with a new password so long as the user identity can be verified. People often use weak passwords, tend to share them or transmit/store them in cleartext; a succession of failed attempts to login with a password should result in locking out the account.

Biometrics can replace passwords in future by creating a system that can restrict access based on unique physical attributes or behavior. Issues with this approach include false reject rate (FRR), false accept rate (FAR) and crossover error rate (CER), and privacy.

Example:To unlock mobile devices, the scientist in Yahoo’s Research Labs are experimenting with utilizing ears, knuckles, and fingertips as biometric passwords.

Single Sign-On (SSO)

This technique consolidates access operations among various systems into one centralized administrative function. SSO interfaces with client servers (local and remote users) and distributed systems, mainframe systems and network security, including remote access mechanisms.

Access Control Lists

Access control lists (ACLs) are the equivalent of a register in which the system enlists users who have permission to access and use a given system resource. ACLs can store information on users’ type of access.

Example: To illustrate the usefulness of access control lists, consider a medical research experiment where the files that contain experimental results have an ACL that permits read-and-write access to all members of a research group except for one member, who is working on another experiment whose results should not be influenced by the results of the first one.

System Access Audit Logging

Almost all access control software automatically logs and report access attempts, which forms an audit trail to observe any suspicious activities and potential hacking attempts (e.g., brute-force attack on a specifically-targeted high-profile logon ID). Recording all activities may be useful in the context of digital investigations

Access to the logs should be restricted.

Tools for Log Analysis include, but are not limited to: audit reduction tools, trend/variance detection tools, attack-signature detection tools and SIEM systems.

Actions an Auditor Should Undertake When Evaluating Logical Access Controls

An auditor should identify sensitive data/systems, document, evaluate and test controls over potential access and access paths, and evaluate the adequacy of the security environment.

Controls and Risks Associated With Virtualization of Systems

Moving away from a physical medium towards a virtual one, there are many important aspects one should consider: physical and logical access validation (because many virtual machines may be running in one physical system), proper configuration and network segregation (no interference among various VMs).

A 2015 Kaspersky Labs survey proved that recovery costs in the wake of a cyberattack on a virtualized infrastructure are twice as high as an attack on a physical environment. Moreover, only 27% deployed defensive mechanisms specifically designed to protect virtual environments.

Configuration, Implementation, Operation and Maintenance of Network Security Controls

Perimeter security controls such as firewalls and IDS/IPS ward off most cyberattacks against the enterprise’s network. The auditor needs to know the effectiveness of these security controls and the policies and procedures that regulate network incidents.

Other important matters are network management, legal complications with respect to online activities, network administrator procedures and service legal agreements with third parties.

Internet use, remote access and networks will all require auditing. Network infrastructure security and general network controls will require additional attention.

LAN Security Issues

An auditor should identify and document LAN topology and network design, signs of segmentation, LAN administrator and LAN owner, groups of LAN users, applications used on the LAN, and procedures for network design, support, and data security.

Wireless Security Threats

Security requirements include: authenticity, non-repudiation, accountability and network availability.

There are many forms of malicious access to WLANs. These include but are not limited to: war driving/walking/chalking, passive attacks and sniffing.

Detection Tools and Control Techniques Malware

Countermeasures against various types of malware include but are not limited to: policies, education, patch management, anti-virus software, and procedural/technical controls.

Detection Tools

Antivirus software, regular updates, layered systems (e.g., inner, perimeter, and BOYD), and honeypots and are useful detection tools and deterrents against malware.

Employee education is equally important and should not be ignored. Simple common sense on the part of employees can close multiple attack vectors, such as email phishing attempts.

Ethical Hacking Training Resources (InfoSec)

Security Testing Techniques

Begin by knowing your tools. You’ll need tools to evaluate network security and possible risks, as well as suitable mitigation techniques. Be sure to check lists of known network vulnerabilities.

Third parties may be able to provide testing services such as penetration testing. Penetrating testing, also called intrusion testing or ethical hacking, is where outside pentesters use every technique or source a potential attacker could use (open-source gathering, searching for backdoors, guessing passwords, using known exploits) to test your security. This is especially good for testing firewalls.

You should also be aware of social engineering testing. This gives you a chance to see how your staff holds up in case of a social engineering attack, such as a phone scammer trying to get people’s passwords.

Controls and Risks Associated with Data Leakage

Data leakages occur when there is a risk of sensitive information becoming public, typically by accident. The IS auditor needs to ensure that there are effective data classification policies, security awareness training and periodic audits with respect to data leakage prevention.

Note that data leakage has a totally different meaning when it comes to machine learning. Information from outside the training set could corrupt the learning capabilities of the model because it may introduce something that the model otherwise would not know.

Encryption-Related Techniques

Anyone handling or testing encryption should be familiar with encryption algorithm techniques and key length: note that complex algorithms and large keys are somewhat impractical for everyday use. Be aware of cryptographic systems, such as AES 128/256-bit and old 64-bit DES.

Other areas of interest include encryption in communications; secure socket layer (SSL)/transport layer security (TLS); secure HTTP (HTTPS); IPSec Internet protocol security; Secure Shell (SSH);and secure multipurpose Internet mail extensions (S/MIME).

Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) Components and Digital Signature Techniques

PKI establishes a trusted communication channel where parties can exchange digital keys in a safe manner. It’s widely used in e-commerce and online banking.

PKI is based on digital certificates (public key and identifying information) that are issued and cryptographically signed by a certificate authority. Validation is through the certificate authority, while a registration authority ensures third-party validation. When dealing with PKI, watch for digital certificates’ expiration dates, and be certain to check the certificate revocation list (CRL).

Controls Associated with Peer-to-Peer Computing, Instant Messaging and Web-Based Technologies

P2P computing may result in fast dissemination of viruses, worms, Trojans, spyware and so on directly among computers, as there is no central server. Meanwhile, social media risks include inappropriate sharing of information about sensitive data, staffing issues and organizational data; URL spoofing; cyberstalking; using vulnerable applications; phishing; downloading malicious attachments and clicking on malicious links.

Example:In 2016, the Facebook “fake friend” phishing scam rose to prominence. Users received a Facebook message claiming that they had been mentioned by a friend in a comment, but upon clicking on this message, it would automatically download malware onto their computers in the form of a malicious Chrome browser extension. After the installation, this malware snatched users’ Facebook account so that it could steal their data and propagate further.

To control this, implement a P2P computing policy which includes social network use and instant messaging. Corporate messaging boards are more secure than Facebook. Promote monitoring, education and awareness, and ban some types of peer-to-peer communications to narrow the net.

Controls and Risks Associated with the Use of Mobile and Wireless Devices

When dealing with mobile and wireless devices, secure Wi-Fi is required, because most of these devices communicate via a Wi-Fi network.

Implement mobile device controls, including stringent data storage, remote wipes, and theft response procedures. Clarify your workplace’s policy regarding employees bringing their own devices to work.

Voice Communications Security (PBX, VoIP)

In these cases, voice communications have been translated to binary code. This means they are still digitally-based

Increasingly common these days is VoIP or Voice over IP. VoIP boasts lower costs compared to traditional phone services; however, they tend to have worse security than ordinary phones, and one needs to protect both the data and the voice. Wiretapping is a possibility. Security measures include encrypting communications and ensuring that all software is up-to-date and patched.

Alternately, private branch exchange or PBX is a phone system that can operate for both voice and data. It provides simultaneous calls through multiple telephone lines

Example:In 2014, cybercriminals broke into the phone network of Foreman Seeley Fountain Architecture and managed to steal $166,000 worth of calls from the firm via premium-rate telephone numbers in Gambia, Somalia and the Maldives. Typically, hackers pull off such a scheme over a weekend when nobody is at work, forwarding sometimes as many as 220 minutes’ worth of calls per minute to a premium line. The criminals withdraw their cuts usually through Western Union, moneygram or wire transfer.

Conclusion

This concludes our look at best practices for the implementation of monitoring and security controls. Some of our sources are listed below, for your perusal. Join us soon for Part 3, when we’ll be examining physical and environmental protection of information assets.

Sources

What is Least Privilege & Why Do you Need It ?, Beyond Trust

Data-drained Target hurries to adopt chip-and-PIN cards , Naked Security

Yahoo ‘Bodyprint’ Turns Smartphone Touchscreens Into Biometric Sensors , Gadgets 360

NSA to cut system administrators by 90 percent to limit data access , Reuters

Security of Virtual Infrastructure , Kaspersky Lab

Facebook ‘fake friend’ phishing scam uncovered watch for these red flags , Komando

IBM Security Services 2014, Cyber Security Intelligence Index , IBM Global Technology Services


          Kongelige språkferdigheter      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Vi har i etterkrigsårene gradvis vent oss til å høre nye varianter av norsk talemål: pakistanernorsk, filippinernorsk, somalianorsk, polsknorsk osv. Tidligere var det fortrinnsvis nabonorsk vi hørte (f.eks. svensknorsk og dansknorsk). Min egen svenske farmor, som kom til Norge i 1906.  bar livet igjennom en karakteristisk svensk brytning. Håkon VII (1872-1957) kom til Norge i […]
          Somalia is a different story from Somaliland      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
none
          Uganda: East, Horn of Africa and the Great Lakes region - Refugees and asylum-seekers by country of asylum | as of 30 June 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Burundi, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania


          Somalia: East, Horn of Africa and Yemen - Displacement of Somalis: Refugees, asylum-seekers and IDPs, as of 30 June 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Uganda, Yemen


          World: Humanitarian Access Overview (August 2018)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: Assessment Capacities Project
Country: Afghanistan, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

OVERVIEW

This report compares current humanitarian crises based on their level of humanitarian access. Affected populations in more than 40 countries are not getting proper humanitarian assistance due to access constraints. Out of 44 countries included in the report, nearly half of them are currently facing critical humanitarian access constraints, with four countries (Eritrea, Syria, Venezuela, and Yemen) being considered as inaccessible. Moderate humanitarian access constraints are an issue in eight countries, and 15 face low humanitarian access constraints.

METHODOLOGY

Our methodology groups 9 variables under 3 dimensions:

  1. Access of humanitarian actors to affected population comprised of 4 variables:

• Impediments to entry
• Restriction of movement
• Interference with activities
• Violence against personnel

  1. Access of people in need to humanitarian aid comprised of 2 variables:

• Denial of needs
• Restriction of population’s access to aid

  1. Security and physical constraints comprised of 3 variables:

• Active hostilities
• UXO and mines
• Physical constraints Each indicator is given a score from 0 to 3, and marked with an X when there is an information gap identified.

The overall access score by country is ranked according to the following scale: 0 - No constraints 1 - Accessible with low constraints 2 - Accessible with moderate constraints 3 - Accessible with high constraints 4 - Nearly inaccessible 5 - Inaccessible We are providing analytical narratives for countries scored between level 3 to 5.


          Comment on Top 10 Most Dangerous Countries To Visit by Tim      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Ridiculous, ignorant article. You lose all credibility by having Ukraine and Colombia in the same league as dangerous war zone countries in Africa and the Middle East. You don't even have Somalia, Iraq, Syria or North Korea??? Lol. My wife is from Colombia and I've been there many times. Never once have I felt unsafe or unwelcome. We bring our children there. Yes there is violence in certain areas. But it doesn't hold a candle to Chicago or St. Louis. Please don't write about things you are clearly beyond ignorant of. Travel to Colombia! Its safe and beautiful.
          A bubbling Islamist insurgency in Mozambique could grow deadlier      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

RESIDENTS of Naunde village were woken by gunshots at around 2am on June 5th. Two of the attackers carried guns. The other three, armed with machetes, set houses on fire. Then they chased down a local chief and hacked off his head in front of horrified neighbours. They also killed six others, including an Islamic leader whom they beheaded in a mosque.

The attack, documented by Human Rights Watch, a pressure group, is one of several dozen carried out by jihadists in Cabo Delgado—a mostly Muslim, coastal province in Mozambique’s far north—since October 2017. Recently many have followed a similar pattern: hit-and-run raids during which attackers torch houses, steal supplies and behead victims. In May terrorists decapitated ten people, including children. Officials have tried to brush off the violence as mere banditry. But the attacks appear to be increasing.

Who the killers are and what they want is not entirely clear. Uncertainty surrounds even their name. They are known as Ahl al-Sunnah wal-Jamaah (Arabic for “followers of the prophetic tradition”), though locals also refer to them as al-Shabab (“the youth”). They have no known ties to the jihadist group in Somalia, which is also called al-Shabab, but some researchers think the jihadists in Mozambique have received training abroad.

Beyond touting a strict form of...


          The Irony of Somalia With 7 Ministers , 9 MPs and 9 Senators With Canadian Citizenship Backing Saudi Arabia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Dalsan Radio] Somalia's Foreign Affairs Ministry on Tuesday issued a statement to support Saudi Arabia in the diplomatic row between the Gulf state and Canada.
          Somalia Backs Saudi Arabia in Canada Diplomatic Row      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Dalsan Radio] Somalia's Foreign Affairs Ministry on Tuesday issued a statement to support Saudi Arabia in the diplomatic row between the Gulf state and Canada.
          Actually Yes, the Left Can Defeat The United States Militarily      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

by Dr. Bones, via Gods and Radicals

“That cult would never die till the stars came right again, and the secret priests would take great Cthulhu from His tomb to revive His subjects and resume His rule of earth. The time would be easy to know, for then mankind would have become as the Great Old Ones; free and wild and beyond good and evil, with laws and morals thrown aside and all men shouting and killing and revelling in joy. Then the liberated Old Ones would teach them new ways to shout and kill and revel and enjoy themselves, and all the earth would flame with a holocaust of ecstasy and freedom. Meanwhile the cult, by appropriate rites, must keep alive the memory of those ancient ways and shadow forth the prophecy of their return.”

– H.P. Lovecrat, Call of Cthuhlu

“A swamp suggests mysterious and uncanny places, half lights, and weird creatures in noiseless activities, bent upon the fulfillment of their varied destinies. Here indeed is life in its fullest intensity, without the disturbing human element.”

– J. C. Bradley, Cornell University entomologist

IMG_20180803_182537

Now this is living.

I am far outside of town, hidden somewhere along the Florida trail and dangling gleefully above freshly flooded soil. The rain here is warm, and what once was a forest now returns to swampland. Deer are not far away, and by dusk the air will be so thick with mosquitos they can drain your eyes of jelly. That’s not even mentioning the wild hogs, the two-headed birds, or even the strange lights that float across unsolid ground. Hairy, dangerous turf. But I’ve got plenty of spray, a damn fine tarp, bugnet, and an eighteen case worth of utility beer ready to be drunk. Drank. I’ll be drunk.

Swamplands always touch me in a certain way. They are not built for humans. Much like the high desert they are dangerous, uncharted, openly hostile to all manner of control. You do not walk into a marsh spanning miles and miles and expect it to do what you want.

Mosquitos for instance. They never go away. Where I’m from the first settlers had to wear full body gowns just to keep them at bay, smoke pots in front of every house to ward the beasts off. Cows actually used to choke on the clouds and die.

Swat all you want, kill one hundred. They couldn’t be intimidated.

Floridians learned to adapt, live on the terms of the mosquito. Most transplants and newcomers to the state refuse to do that. Instead they pretend these wild, untamed places no longer exist, remaining locked inside the world of Mickey Mouse and bumper-to-bumper traffic.

The American media is having a similar issue, trying to ignore the fact that the United States has entered ceasefire discussions with the Taliban.

“A meeting between a senior U.S. diplomat and Taliban representatives in Doha last week to discuss a possible ceasefire ended with ‘very positive signals’ and a decision to hold more meetings, people with knowledge of the talks said on Sunday.

The meeting between a delegation led by Alice Wells, deputy assistant secretary in the State Department’s Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs, and Taliban representatives…

The move comes as the Afghan government and the United States have stepped up efforts to end the 17 year-war in Afghanistan following the unprecedented three-day truce during last month’s Eid al-Fitr holiday.”

Remember how Americans used to joke about their one-time-best-buds? Ignorant savages out in tents, no match for the supreme power of the greatest military on Earth? AK’s against drones, satellites against caves. It was the cultural trope the United States has built so many genocidal campaigns on: the idea that we, the smart and technically savvy, could easily wipe out the primitive forces unyielding to our might.

Remember just one month ago? How wrapped up this whole thing looked?

“As part of an announcement on a new South Asia Strategy last August, Trump said the U.S. would focus on a conditions-based approach rather than timeline-based. Pompeo said Monday that the U.S. had begun to see signs of success, touting results on the battlefield where the Taliban’s momentum was slowing and pointing to the progress of Afghan-led elections this fall.”

Odd thing to negotiate now with a plan that supposedly works. But we can tell that’s bullshit. In that same article last month it was noted that:

“Pompeo declined to characterize in what way the U.S. was already engaged with the Taliban but the administration has said in the past the U.S. will not have direct talks despite the Taliban’s request.

And yet this month?

“The meeting in Doha, where the Taliban maintains a political office, followed two earlier meetings between U.S. officials and Taliban representatives in recent months, the sources said.

…The talks had been held without the presence of Afghan government officials at the insistence of the Taliban.”

When you lie that blatantly, when a gonzo reporter currently eyeballing what appears to be some kind of prehistoric bird from a camping hammock in the middle of absolutely nowhere can catch this shit, you have to wonder just how bad are things really are.

The war is far from unsettled. Even the most unhinged, flag-waving, slack-jawed optimist admits the Taliban controls or contests 45 percent of Afghanistan’s districts and has successfully maintained free movement across the entire fucking country. At a cost of over $1 trillion the Taliban “now controls . . . more territory than at any point since the U.S.-led invasion.” It is in no danger of being defeated, none whatsoever, and the sheer fact the most expensive technological playthings can’t stop them should give would-be revolutionaries pause.

They have done the unthinkable. They have become the mosquito.

What’s the secret? How has the Taliban survived three armies, airstrikes, special forces teams, invasions, drone bombings, and heat-seeking missiles? How could people with not many more supplies than I currently have in this marsh have brought the United-fucking-States to the goddamn bargaining table? How have they done what every boot-worshipping liberal, every piss-stained pacifist, every party-worshipping dolt dead set on unions and dead organizing….how could they have achieved the military victory everybody said was impossible?

It can’t be their loathsome ideology. There’s tactics here, physical maneuvers. Something beyond ideology we should pay attention to.

So what is it?

Look Ma! Actual Military Tactics Instead of Religious Fantasies!

Seminole-Indian-War_11-24-15

(Seminole Warriors Ambushing Americans. Source)

Your average right-leaning whacko will assure you the Taliban is winning because we weren’t mean enough, that somehow if we just killed or mutilated enough corpses victory would be ours.

That kind of thinking failed us in Vietnam, and even failed the US as far back as the Seminole Wars.

Others attribute it simply to the terrain, as if the people living there had nothing to do with it. It also conveniently makes it appear the United States hasn’t so much been DEFEATED as simply been unable to unleash its full potential. If that sounds like an opinion slowly poured out of the halls of power into the mouthes of ignorant parrots, that’s because it is.

The Taliban victory is much deeper than any mere “advantage,” and it is THAT fact the United States does not want being widely known.

Afghanistan is a classic case of asymmetric warfare.

The key to success in Afghanistan involves insurgents hiding among the population and launching attacks on soft targets (Afghan state institutions; international NGOs) as well as hard targets (less frequently) such as US/NATO militaries. When the US/NATO seek to retaliate, they find themselves handicapped because it is hard for them to identify and separate the insurgents from the population where they find support and shelter. Combat is almost secondary to the insurgent. The goal is to draw the government forces into an over-reaction to “activate” latent insurgents:

“Ordinary civilians may turn into insurgents under the right circumstances. The transition decision rule for the civilian agents is that if a civilian is more angry than afraid, and if the civilian’s anger passes a threshold propensity to use violence, then this civilian becomes a latent insurgent. This is a civilian who is angry enough, and is not so afraid of the government, that they will attack a government target (a soldier) if given the opportunity.”

When the US military fights back and creates civilian casualties, or even simply puts the civilian population under more domination in the name of tighter security, the population is pushed to increase its support for the insurgents.

“The circumstance of low effectiveness and low accuracy might be seen as the nightmare scenario for most governments. In this case, soldiers are not effective at capturing insurgents, and they also cause widespread injury when they counterattack.”

This incredible feedback loop is damn near impossible to stop once it starts. “Even under best case assumptions,” writes The Department of Operations Research at the Naval Postgraduate School we show that the government cannot totally eradicate the insurgency by force. The best it can do is contain it at a certain fixed level.”

It’s easy to see why:

“One of the greatest small unit commanders and unconventional warfare experts in modern times, Richard Marcinko, described three things needed to win in combat: speed, surprise, and violence of action. When transferred to the strategic and operational levels, the insurgency possesses these attributes. The greatest advantages of the insurgency are:

Mobility: The refusal to stay in a static location negates technologically advanced weapons systems.

Initiative: The insurgency is able to choose the time and place of most of the battles they fight.

Surprise: Because the insurgents have the ability to choose the time and place of the fight, they can select moments when the opposition is weakest.

Camouflage: The insurgent does not wear a uniform. As the father of modern insurgency, Michael Collins, said: ‘Our uniform will be that of the man on the street and the peasant in the field.’ This makes distinguishing between friend and foe difficult for the opposition.

Unpredictability: A force that is unpredictable on a battlefield is dangerous. Field commanders train to fight conventional wars, in which both sides attempt to take and hold territory, the insurgent seeks destabilization of the opposition’s government, not land. Tactics designed to defeat a conventional army are useless against an enemy that doesn’t seek to hold territory.

Factional divides: In a conventional military setting, a force should function like a well-oiled machine and have clear command and control. Insurgencies typically operate with loose alliances between factions who follow a particular commander. Sometimes they work together, sometimes they don’t. Just when the opposition gains a feel for the tactics and strategy of an insurgent commander, a new one arises. This leads to unpredictable actions being taken by the various factions, which increases their overall effectiveness.”

This is wild shit, something everyone from Egoists to Maoists should be discussing in earnest. That last one is particularly intriguing: just imagine the idea that the bitter infighting on the Left could somehow be a tactical advantage. It’s almost too good to pass up.

But before we get out into the possibilities we should return to the Terror of the Gods.

You’re Goddamn Right This Shit Will Kill You

kidnapped

(Federal agents captured by Jalisco New Generation Cartel.
It uh…it did not go well for them)

Out here there are no hospitals. There can often be spotty cellular reception. If I get bit by one of the many venomous snakes in the area I am truly fucked. I will not make it back out to the car.

Death waits behind every corner.

Driving between Walmarts we’ve forgotten the Terror of the Gods, the idea that there are forces or things lurking out there in the murky water that can easily drag us down to drown.

That’s after, of course, they tear our arms off.

The victory of the Taliban is somewhat of a double-edged sword. Let’s look at the negative implications, the swamp lizard’s lurking in the shadows.

For one, I think we can use the success of the Taliban as a gigantic warning sign for any lefty dreams of some grand Red Republic. As I’ve covered elsewhere the United States is home to a large section of the population that has absolutely zero interest in living under whatever flavor of the week feels its closest to revolution.

So let’s say the DSA somehow manages to win all three branches of government. Hell, I’ll take it a step further: let’s say, by some cosmic miracle directly ordained by a strange and unknowable god, some Leninist revolt captures State power. Let’s say they even get a nice little New Red Army.

A few hours from where I am now, out on the St. John’s, wild folks with yellow eyes live in absolute defiance of the law. They are well armed, they live off the land, they are extremely violent, and will not hesitate to kill at the slightest drop of a hat. Fish and Wildlife officers give them a wide berth.

The United States has given up on them. They have already won their war. Those people are not going to come out of the woods and, let me assure you, they already hate most of you reading these words.

The resulting violence kicked off by them, or any of the fascist militias slowly capturing territory, is never going to end. It can be contained, but the newly minted Soviet of whatever is going to be bled dry by bombings, IED’s, snipers, intense urban combat. This is not WW2. These people will be motivated by blind hatred and ideology. There will be no grand fascist council to issue a stand down order or to negotiate with.

Any national army will find itself unable to compete against this kind of warfare. What’s the DSA going to do? The Leninists? Call Russia in to help you put down the rebellion, like in Syria? Maybe call China?

Sweet JESUS! Can you imagine how THAT would whip people up? Foreign troops rounding up citizens, performing house inspections? Shooting at them? Every prepper from the Atlantic to the Pacific would hole up and start killing anything that looked vaguely unfamiliar. The great American fantasy of repelling some “foreign” invader would be fulfilled, and the insurgents would line up to die en masse for near-orgasmic gratification.

Some areas might never come under control, effectively reducing the United States into a nuclear-armed Somalia. Or Ukraine. Or Venezuela. Once this shit pops off it does not stop and life is irrevocably altered.

Which is why perhaps we should step ahead of the curve.

Entropy is Your Friend! Surf the Tides of Instability!

Midday. Intense heat, though under the tarp I’m nice and cool. I feel like lying out in the sun with my mouth open, hoping a bird might come by and pick my teeth.

Things are different out here, much more alive. Invisible powers all the more clear. You can walk in certain places and feel your hair stand on end, natural vortexes and portals picked up by your skin. Shadows move that aren’t there. Spirits are as common, as tangible, as the mosquito hordes you’ll be running from. You learn much more is possible than might appear back in town.

The hint of death rises in the air. True. But there’s also this feeling…this sense that you stand just as much a chance of killing something as it might you. Cottonmouth’s at your feet can be obliterated with a shotgun, you wind up dreaming about cutting alligator throats and drinking the blood. Florida bestows her blessings on the most persistent and clever predators, and given the proper tools even we can find a home in her most inhospitable regions.

It’s about sheer, unfaltering zeal. The atavistic desire to be alive and remaining moving at all costs. Here, in the marshes, there is no creature immune to this. Even the most iconic.

Back in town with the traffic laws, and the strict lines between drinking and driving, authority and power seems…inescapable. Undefeatable. We look at the Golden Corral’s, the time clocks, the legions of tanks and drones and satellites and think that somehow we’ve come to a dead-end. That rebellion, armed and violent and In The Way of the Old Ones, is a long gone ancient cult.

That not dead which can eternal lie. We forget we too can become the vessel for the Terror of the Gods.

The times we live in our ruled by entropy. Everything is falling apart. Mars and Saturn rule the day and structures wash away. Humid air rots wood and if my skull falls in this mud it will be reduced to nothing.

This is not the time of national armies. Describing a “nightmare” for any government on planet Earth the Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation doesn’t describe some vanguard or organized army but “fighting an urban counterinsurgency campaign, where insurgents have many places to hide, and where non-insurgent civilians are densely packed.”

We live in an era where the governments of the world are practically pissing themselves at the idea of an elemental chaos armed with guns roaming the streets; we could become that chaos. Many people have. Once a force seeks to dissolve, to discredit, to simply destroy the host organism and feed on the rotting corpse…there’s no stopping it. We can actually win a military conflict, provided we’re dedicated and smart enough. Our differing groups and sects can unite without ever having met. That tactic is working right now in Europe and South America as I write these words.

This new world might mean the death of the “revolution” as envisioned by Maoists, Leninists, and other card-carrying party members. This is not 1917. Nations are an old idea that is quickly becoming outdated. Fight against chaos and you’ll be torn to pieces like a cheap-ass trailer in Ft. Pierce during a category 5 hurricane.

But in an Egoist sense, a claimed zone of territory made lawless and effectively ungovernable, too chaotic for any one force to hold the upper hand…much promise in that. Disrupt. Discredit. Militias and communes defining themselves town by town, street by street, aligning and breaking apart as they see fit. No one person to corrupt, arrest, or even kill. Put that on a generational track. Such zones could become infection points, cancerous bulbs on the body politic spreading “no-go” zones and destabilization. Bring Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya home. Read shit like this and start putting it to use where you live. Carve out new lives, new dreams, from the rotting carcass of a continent-spanning “society” and never look back. As long as insurrectionists remain popular and willing to continue the fight until the last breath(as the Seminoles did) they’re guaranteed a chunk of territory.

But are we prepared for that?

Is the Left willing to sacrifice the United States for a free but chaotic territory across a few states? Could we study sniper tactics, small arms maintenance, and urban/rural survivalism right alongside economic and gender theory? Are we willing to selfishly demand our right to live as we see fit? Are we willing to struggle, fight, and even commit violence…for a decade? Two? How bad do we really want this?

Do we really, really want to win…and are we prepared to pivot towards what that might mean?

Difficult questions, ones I don’t have the answer for. We have nowhere near the training, or the infrastructure, or even the popular support we’d need anyway.

But we could. And that’s why we need to start thinking about it.

Because if we don’t someone else will. We have to come to terms with what combat, what military strategy really is in this day and age. Even if you refuse…you best be prepared. If the Taliban is any indication, your brand new Red Army is going to come home needing a lot of prosthetics and alot of therapy.

And they might never win.

All I know is, out here among the sawgrass, life is chaotic, beautiful, and supremely deadly. The civilized world with its rules, employers, prisons, and slums can’t penetrate the multi-pronged resistance of the bogs, swamps, and marshes.

Yes. The mosquito swarm. A million bites from a million different mouths, a cloud you can never fully remove from the land underneath them.

Much wisdom in that.


DR. BONES

20171014_152252Dr. Bones is a Hoodoo-slingin’ Florida native and Egoist-Communist spitting pure vitriol and sorcerous wisdom at a world gone mad. He lives with his loving wife, a herd of cats, and a house full of spirits.

His poltergasmic politics and gonzo journalism can be found at Gods & Radicals and The Conjure House. He can be reached by email, twitter, or facebook. Want to do him a favor? Help keep him alive for as little as $4.99 a month.


category: 

          Joven de éxito lo deja todo para evangelizar en Etiopía: Ahora soy feliz de verdad      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   


ROMA, 09 Ago. 18 (ACI Prensa).- Lo tenía todo: éxito profesional, dinero, amigos y una buena familia, pero aún así no era feliz del todo. Es la experiencia de Belén Manrique, una joven española de 33 años misionera en Etiopía, que lo dejó todo para evangelizar en este país.

“Siempre digo que la misión no tiene nada de aburrida. Es mil veces mejor de lo que podemos imaginarnos. Es una vida llena de sorpresas si uno se pone en manos del Señor”, dice al inicio de su entrevista con ACI Prensa durante una visita que realizó a Roma.

“Vivo en Adís Abeba, la capital de Etiopía, y mi misión es ser testigo del amor de Dios allí donde Él me pone, construir la Iglesia porque allí es muy pobre. La comunidad cristiana es muy débil, por lo que es muy importante ayudar a gente a conocer a Jesucristo”, explica.

Sobre su vocación, relata que “la vida que llevaba no me llenaba, el plan que Dios tenía para mí era otro, y cuando descubrí que lo que quería era que yo llevase el amor de Dios a la gente que no le conoce no lo dudé, no me costó dejar el trabajo de periodista, ni dejar Madrid”.

En Etiopía su primer destino fue el desierto de Somalia, “donde la mayor parte son musulmanes”. “Me di cuenta de que era necesario que la Iglesia llegara allí para llevar el Evangelio a esas personas que no lo conocen y lo necesitan, como lo necesitamos todos nosotros”.

La joven periodista de profesión pertenece al Camino Neocatecumenal: “gracias a este crecimiento de la fe, pude encontrarme con Jesucristo y darme cuenta de que es el único que da la felicidad al hombre. Fui ahí donde encontré la misión que el Señor tenía pensada para mí”.

“Etiopía es un 50% de mayoría musulmana y un 50% de mayoría cristiana, pero cristianos ortodoxos la mayor parte. La Iglesia católica no llega al 1% de la población”, explica Belén sobre la realidad religiosa del país.

“Estamos construyendo una missio ad gentes en las afueras de Adís Abeba, en un barrio donde no la Iglesia católica no tiene presencia. Además de ortodoxos hay muchos protestantes”.

Además, subraya que “no se trata de ganar adeptos sino de ser testigos y de dar a conocer a Jesucristo”.

“Cuando digo en Etiopía que no estoy casada y que de alguna manera estoy ‘prometida’ con Jesucristo, y que he dejado un trabajo y a mi familia por la misión se ríen y no se lo creen, no lo conciben. Se sorprenden también de ver a una chica joven, sin hábito religioso y que diga estas cosas”.

“Hace poco un chico me preguntó: ‘¿se puede ser católico sin ser monja o sacerdote?’. La mayoría de católicos que han llegado a Etiopía son religiosas y sacerdotes y tienen ese pensamiento”.

Son muchos también los etíopes que dejar su tierra en busca de un futuro mejor. Belén detalla que “hay dos tipos de inmigrantes: los que huyen de la guerra o de la falta de paz en su país y otros que quieren llegar por ejemplo a Europa seducidos por lo que ven en televisión, la imagen que ellos se crean de lo que es este mundo que aparentemente es algo maravilloso, perfecto, de lujos. Ellos tienen una vida precaria, muy dura, en la que trabajan mucho”.

“Cada vez más abandonan el mundo rural, para vivir en la capital buscando así mejorar. Todos los días hay alguno que me pide que le lleve a mi país, y yo les digo que la que no va a regresar a su país soy yo. Les cuento que yo vivía en ese mundo idílico al que ellos quieren ir y he renunciado a él. Explico que las riquezas no dan la felicidad, que yo tenía todo eso que ellos anhelan y no me daba la felicidad. Soy mucho más feliz porque la felicidad la da Dios y el amar al otro”.








          Request for Proposal for Baseline Assessment – UN-Habitat/ Youth Political Empowerment Programme/RFQ/18/08/001- Deadline 4 September 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Regional Office for Africa Somalia Programme Date: 7th August 2018 Reference: UNHabitat/ Youth Political Empowerment Programme/RFQ/18/08/001; Subject: Request for Proposal for Baseline Assessment. UNHabitat requests your company to submit a proposal for provision of services to carry out the Baseline Assessment on the Youth Empowerment Programme as further described in the Terms of Reference attached […]
          A bubbling Islamist insurgency in Mozambique could grow deadlier      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

RESIDENTS of Naunde village were woken by gunshots at around 2am on June 5th. Two of the attackers carried guns. The other three, armed with machetes, set houses on fire. Then they chased down a local chief and hacked off his head in front of horrified neighbours. They also killed six others, including an Islamic leader whom they beheaded in a mosque.

The attack, documented by Human Rights Watch, a pressure group, is one of several dozen carried out by jihadists in Cabo Delgado—a mostly Muslim, coastal province in Mozambique’s far north—since October 2017. Recently many have followed a similar pattern: hit-and-run raids during which attackers torch houses, steal supplies and behead victims. In May terrorists decapitated ten people, including children. Officials have tried to brush off the violence as mere banditry. But the attacks appear to be increasing.

Who the killers are and what they want is not entirely clear. Uncertainty surrounds even their name. They are known as Ahl al-Sunnah wal-Jamaah (Arabic for “followers of the prophetic tradition”), though locals also refer to them as al-Shabab (“the youth”). They have no known ties to the jihadist group in Somalia, which is also called al-Shabab, but some researchers think the jihadists in Mozambique have received training abroad.

Beyond touting a strict form of...


           US Citizen Somali/Arabic Interpreter (Deployment)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Employer: LIS Solutions Location:  Somalia Salary:  87,000.00 Clearance Level: ...

This is content summary, for full job details visit : http://internationalsecurityjobs.blogspot.com .

          Margalit: Investigating Civilian Casualties in Time of Armed Conflict and Belligerent Occupation      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Alon Margalit has published Investigating Civilian Casualties in Time of Armed Conflict and Belligerent Occupation: Manoeuvring between Legal Regimes and Paradigms for the Use of Force (Brill | Nijhoff 2018). Here's the abstract: In Investigating Civilian Casualties in Time of Armed Conflict and Belligerent Occupation Alon Margalit discusses the appropriate State response to civilian casualties caused by its armed forces. Various legal and practical challenges, arising when investigating the fatal consequences of the use of force, are examined through the practice of the US, the UK, Canada and Israel during military operations in Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia and the occupied Palestinian territory. Alon Margalit considers this topical and sensitive issue within a broader context, namely the public scrutiny of State behaviour and influence of human rights law during armed conflict. The debate over the scope of the duty to investigate reflects competing approaches looking to…
          World: Record number of forcibly displaced people lived in sub-Saharan Africa in 2017      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: Pew Research Center
Country: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda, World

By Phillip Connor and Jens Manuel Krogstad

The total number of people living in sub-Saharan Africa who were forced to leave their homes due to conflict reached a new high of 18.4 million in 2017, up sharply from 14.1 million in 2016 – the largest regional increase of forcibly displaced people in the world, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees data.

The world’s displaced population has increased dramatically since 2012, reaching its highest levels since World War II. The Middle East drove much of the increase between 2012 and 2015 due to conflicts in Syria, Iraq and Yemen, but in 2017, the vast majority of growth has come from displaced populations living in sub-Saharan Africa. Since 2015, the region’s displaced population has jumped by 42%, with most of this increase taking place in 2017 alone. By comparison, the number of displaced people living in the Middle East-North Africa region fell 8% between 2015 and 2017, though it remains the world’s largest total overall.

Due to these trends, the geography of the world’s displaced population has started to shift: Some 30% of forcibly displaced people globally lived in sub-Saharan Africa in 2017, up from 23% in 2015. Meanwhile, the Middle East-North Africa share dropped from 41% of the world’s total in 2015 to 35% in 2017.

Most of the increase in sub-Saharan Africa has come from a wave of internally displaced persons – those forced from their communities due to conflict and who remain within their home country. In sub-Saharan Africa, this population grew to 12.5 million in 2017, a 40% increase from the previous year, when the population was 8.9 million.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has the largest internally displaced population within sub-Saharan Africa, due to the country’s many conflicts. In 2017, its internally displaced population reached 4.4 million, almost double the 2.2 million reported the year before. Meanwhile, in Ethiopia, border disputes between ethnic groups helped push the country’s internally displaced population from near zero in 2016 to more than a million people in 2017.

The number of displaced people who have left their home country due to conflict or persecution and received international protection – otherwise known as refugees – has grown more modestly within sub-Saharan Africa. The region’s number of refugees reached 5.4 million in 2017, up 16% over 2016 but short of the record 6.5 million refugees reported in 1994 during the Rwandan genocide.

Uganda hosted the highest number of sub-Saharan refugees (nearly 1.4 million) in 2017, mostly from South Sudan. Nearly 900,000 refugees lived in Ethiopia, with nearly half from South Sudan, and many of the rest from Somalia and Eritrea. The Democratic Republic of the Congo had more than 500,000 refugees from various neighboring countries, including Rwanda, Central African Republic and South Sudan.

Sub-Saharan African countries hosted a relatively small number of asylum seekers – people who have left their home country and asked for protection. There were about 500,000 asylum seekers living in the region in 2017, with the vast majority coming from other sub-Saharan African countries.

Another way to view displacement is to look at the home countries for all displaced people, whether forcibly displaced within their home country or living in other countries. Nearly four-in-five displaced persons (79%) living in sub-Saharan Africa came from just five nations in 2017: Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, Somalia, Nigeria and Central African Republic. (Many refugees from these origin countries also belong to long-term refugee populations – communities that have had 25,000 or more refugees for five or more years.)

With more than a billion people living in sub-Saharan Africa, the number of displaced people in the region made up just 1.8% of the region’s population in 2017. Nonetheless, this share has increased in recent years and is at its highest level since records on displaced persons began in 1993. In 2017, only the Middle East-North Africa region had a higher share of its population living as internally displaced persons, refugees or asylum seekers (3.8%).

Note: See details on our regional grouping of countries (PDF).

Phillip Connor is a senior researcher focusing on demography and migration studies at Pew Research Center.

Jens Manuel Krogstad is a senior writer/editor focusing on Hispanics, immigration and demographics at Pew Research Center.


          Jordan: Jordan INGO Forum Newsletter Newsletter May - June | Issue 9      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: Jordan INGO Forum
Country: Iraq, Jordan, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

In this issue

  1. Humanitarian & Development Overview
  2. Partners activities in Camps
  3. Partners activities in Host Community
  4. Advocacy 5. Changing the narrative 6. Voice from Jordan

Humanitarian and Development Overview

During the second half of June, an escalation in military activity that included ground clashes and aerial bombardments led to the displacement of hundreds of thousands of civilians in the south of Syria. By the end of the month, 46 civilian deaths were documented, with many more injured. Some 20,000 individuals were estimated to have displaced towards the Nasib border crossing with Jordan. The area would see a surge of IDPs (up to 59,000 IDPs) and then a large decrease in the first ten days of July.

Despite several INGOs, the UN, and Human rights organizations calling for the opening of the border, the Government of Jordan announced in June that it would not let additional Syrian refugees cross into Jordan. Meanwhile, amidst growing insecurity, access to humanitarian assistance rapidly deteriorated. The last UN cross-border convoy from Jordan was sent on June 25th and humanitarian actors on the ground faced increasing risks while trying to deliver aid. Living conditions of IDPs stranded in the two border areas (near Jordan and the Occupied Golan Heights) became extremely difficult, with IDPs lacking adequate shelter, WASH facilities and sufficient amounts of basic assistance, particularly health.

The situation in Rukban, at the north-eastern border between Jordan and Syria, remained unchanged and no agreement to transport assistance from Damascus has been reached. UNOSAT’s latest satellite image from June located 11,702 shelters in the area, a 12% increase from the last image in January. Security clearance for medical admission for the most serious cases remain largely insufficient compared with the needs: in May and June, only 124 referrals were admitted in Jordan’s hospitals (See Health analysis report of Rukban clinic)

At the end of June, Azraq camp was hosting 36,480 individuals, including 9,465 individuals in Village 5 (V5). The screening process allowing V5 residents to transfer out of the fenced areas of the camp was still ongoing, albeit slowly.

Approximatively two third of the residents had been stranded in V5 for more than two years and the situation of the forcibly relocated from host community to V5 (approximatively one third) remained unsolved, as no access to legal recourse had been granted to them.


          In peace between Ethiopia and Eritrea, UAE lends a helping hand      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Eritrea's President, Isaias Afwerki receives a key from Ethiopia's Prime Minister, Abiy Ahmed during the Inauguration ceremony marking the reopening of the Eritrean Embassy in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Tiksa Negeri 


In peace between Ethiopia and Eritrea, UAE lends a helping hand

By Maggie Fick, Alexander Cornwell | Reuters

But the rapprochement was, in fact, the culmination of a year of back-channel talks, sources with knowledge of the matter told Reuters.

One of the drivers behind that process was the United States, which has been a major player in the Horn of Africa for decades.

More surprising was the role played by a much smaller nation: the United Arab Emirates.

The oil-rich Gulf state has gained increasing influence in the region in recent years, according to UAE and Ethiopian officials and diplomats.

Driven in part by a desire to tap Ethiopia’s growing economy and in part by a fear that rivals such as Iran and Qatar could gain a foothold in the Horn of Africa, the UAE has pushed into the region for more than a decade.

Its newfound assertiveness underscores the shifts underway in the continent, where China now challenges the historic power of western nations and where Russia, Brazil and the UAE and its Gulf States are growing in prominence.

Publicly, the UAE downplays its influence. Minister of State for International Cooperation, Reem al-Hashimy, told an event in Washington last month that her country had “played a humble role in trying to bring these two countries together”.

But two diplomats in the Gulf told Reuters that the UAE has privately taken credit for the peace agreement.

The Ethiopian prime minister’s chief of staff, Fitsum Arega, acknowledged meetings with UAE officials, but said the leaders of Ethiopia and Eritrea were responsible for ending the war.

Eritrea’s information minister, Yemane Ghebremeskel, was not available for interview when Reuters visited the country’s capital, Asmara, last month.

OPPORTUNITY

The UAE has enjoyed virtually unchallenged influence in Eritrea for at least a decade.

Eritrea is the most diplomatically isolated state in Africa. The United Nations imposed sanctions including an arms embargo in 2009, accusing the government of supporting Islamist militants in neighboring Somalia - a charge it denies.

But Abu Dhabi has a military base there which it uses to help prosecute the war in Yemen, located just across the Red Sea.

Earlier this year, Hashimy, the UAE minister, met with Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s predecessor, Hailemariam Desalegn, in Ethiopia.

When Abiy took office in April, Abu Dhabi ramped up that effort. The timing was fortuitious: the UAE’s relationship with Somalia, another nation in the Horn of Africa, was falling apart and Abu Dhabi was looking for a new partner.

“After years of investing in Somali security forces, the UAE saw its gains swept away by what it perceived to be an axis of Qatari and Turkish influence,” said Elizabeth Dickinson of the International Crisis Group.

A month after taking office, Abiy visited the UAE capital Abu Dhabi to meet Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan. The new Ethiopian leader offered to mediate between Abu Dhabi and Somalia, two diplomats in the Gulf said.

Officials from the UAE affiliate of the Red Crescent society, Emirates Red Crescent, later visited Ethiopia to discuss aid projects with Abiy.

Those visits complemented efforts by Washington to move toward a restoration of relations between Ethiopia and Eritrea.

The United States has been conducting shuttle diplomacy for more than a year, according to regional diplomats. In 2017, Eritrean officials visited Washington twice and again once this year, leaving messages that the Americans passed to Ethiopian officials.

In late April this year, Donald Yamamoto, then the top U.S. official on Africa, met Eritrean President Isaias Afwerki in Asmara – the first visit by a U.S. official of that rank in more than a decade – before meeting Abiy in the Ethiopian capital.

With the promise of financial support from the Gulf and with Washington’s backing, Abiy made his move.

“Neither Ethiopia nor Eritrea benefit from a stalemate,” he said on June 6, a day after his ruling coalition, the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF), announced it would implement a peace deal with Eritrea dating back to 2000.

“We need to expend all our efforts towards peace and reconciliation and extricate ourselves from petty conflicts and divisions and focus on eliminating poverty.”

Nine days later, Sheikh Mohammed visited Addis Ababa with officials including Sultan Ahmed al-Jaber, the head of the state-owned oil company.


The prince announced a $3 billion support package, made up of a $1 billion deposit in Ethiopia’s central bank and a pledge of $2 billion in investments.

Ethiopian officials said the deposit, plus an offer from Saudi Arabia of a year’s supply of fuel with payment delayed for 12 months, helped ease a foreign exchange crisis that had caused shortages of medicine and a slowdown in manufacturing.

“[The UAE’s] good relationship with both parties helped with re-establishing the relationship between Ethiopia and Eritrea and we see that as a positive thing,” Saad Ali Shire, Foreign Minister in the semi-autonomous state of Somaliland told Reuters.

DECISION

It’s been a long time coming.

Ethiopia and Eritrea are linked by blood and history. An Eritrean secessionist movement helped overthrow a military regime in Addis Ababa in 1991 and the new Ethiopian government then gave Eritrea its independence.

For a few years the two countries co-existed peacefully. Landlocked Ethiopia depended on Eritrea’s main port, which sits on one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes.

But in 1998, the two went to war after a border dispute. Two years of brutal fighting left at least 80,000 dead. A shaky ceasefire followed.

Things finally began to change after the death of Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi in 2012. Members of his ruling coalition began quietly discussing how to approach Isaias Afwerki in Eritrea.

“It became clear to us that normalization was not only beneficial to Ethiopia but for the entire region,” said Hailemariam, who succeeded Meles before resigning in February.

Ethiopia’s ruling coalition agreed in principle during Hailemariam’s tenure to accept the peace deal and withdraw Ethiopian troops from a border town awarded to Eritrea in 2002, he said. His story was confirmed by other senior politicians and diplomats in Ethiopia.

But it was the appointment of Abiy that really encouraged Eritrea, Ethiopian officials, politicians and diplomats in the region say.

Preaching forgiveness and an end to the Ethiopian state’s preoccupation with security, Abiy cuts a very different figure from his two predecessors.

“The PM made it clear he will work to ensure lasting peace and ... he proved himself through real gestures like releasing political prisoners,” said his chief of staff Arega.

Abiy was able to act because his party had seen off the Tigrayan People’s Liberation Front, long the dominant force within the ruling coalition and traditionally opposed to Eritrea.

When Isaias, the Eritrean leader, accepted the olive branch, he praised Abiy and welcomed the TPLF’s weakening grip on power.

When Abiy and Isaias embraced last month, some in Africa likened the moment to the fall of the Berlin Wall.

A few weeks later the two leaders traveled to Abu Dhabi. A photo from that meeting shows the two men holding hands with the crown prince as he led them up a palace staircase.



          Comment on Nefertiti by 1tawnystranger      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
@ Paige, You're not far off. The ancient Egyptians said they originated from a land called Punt (or Pwenet, depending on transliteration), which likely corresponds with what is now Somalia (or the region of east Africa in which Somalia is situated).
          Teka-teki Mobil Terbakar Saat Salat Jumat di Boyolali      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Boyolali - Polisi akhirnya berhasil mengungkap kasus pembakaran mobil di Dusun Kliwonan, Desa Cangkringan, Banyudono, Boyolali, Jumat lalu, 3 Agustus 2018. Ternyata, Honda Brio berpelat B 1472 SIT itu merupakan mobil hasil perampokan.

Polisi pun sudah mengantongi identitas para pelaku curas ini. Dalam waktu dekat, para pelaku yang diperkirakan berjumlah 15 orang itu akan segera ditangkap.

"Penyidikan kami sudah mengarah siapa pelakunya. Kami masih melakukan penyelidikan lagi sebelum menangkap para pelaku," ujar Kapolres Boyolali AKBP Aries Andhi melalui Kasat Reskrim AKP Willy Budianto, Rabu, 8 Agustus 2018.

Willy mengatakan, mobil milik Heri Anto (26), warga Dusun Ponco Widodo, Desa Blagung, Kecamatan Simo itu diambil paksa oleh para pelaku di sebuah kos di wilayah Boyolali Kota, Jumat dini hari. Pemilik mobil juga sempat dipukul dengan gagang pedang.

"Si korban sempat disuruh masuk mobil dan dipukuli di dalam mobil itu, lalu dia dikeluarkan dari mobil dan mobil dibawa lari para pelaku," ujarnya.

Korban selanjutnya melaporkan kejadian ini ke Polres Boyolali. Namun, mobilnya keburu dibakar terlebih dahulu oleh para pelaku di pinggir jalan saat warga tengah melaksanakan ibadah Salat Jumat.

Willy menyayangkan peristiwa anarkistis ini. Boyolali yang saat ini sangat nyaman ditinggali dinodai orang yang beraksi premanisme. Polisi kini mengusut hingga tuntas kasus ini.

"Harapannya tidak ada lagi kasus-kasus semacam ini," kata Willy.

Heri Anto kepada polisi mengaku, sebelum pembakaran mobil terjadi, dia bersama kekasih dan dua temannya sedang nongkrong di sekitar alun-alun kidul kompleks perkantoran terpadu Pemkab Boyolali, Kamis malam, 2 Agustus 2018. Saat itulah, ada orang yang tengah berkelahi di dekat mobilnya.

Baca berita menarik JawaPos.com lainnya di sini.

 

Korban Salah Sasaran

Ilustrasi Mobil Terbakar (iStockphoto)#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000

Takut terjadi apa-apa, Heri dan teman-temannya itu langsung pergi meninggalkan kawasan alun-alun tersebut. Keesokan harinya, dia yang tengah berada di kos digeruduk oleh belasan orang dengan membawa senjata tajam.

Heri pun dipaksa menyerahkan kunci mobil dan dipukul kepalanya lalu membawa kabur mobil tersebut. Akibat kejadian ini, korban mengalami kerugian hingga ratusan juta rupiah.

"Saya menduga saya ini menjadi korban salah sasaran," imbuh kasat mengulang keterangan korban.

Sebelumnya, warga di Dusun Kliwonan, Desa Cangkringan, Kecamatan Banyudono, Boyolali digemparkan dengan terbakarnya sebuah mobil di pinggir jalan desa setempat, Jumat siang, pekan lalu.

Tidak ada yang tahu penyebab terbakarnya mobil sedan tersebut. Api tiba-tiba membesar dan melalap hingga habis mobil tanpa penumpang itu.

Warga juga tak tahu pasti penyebab kebakaran tersebut. Saat kejadian, tak ada warga yang melihatnya karena bersamaan salat Jumat.

Saksikan video pilihan berikut ini:




Next Page: 10000

Site Map 2018_01_14
Site Map 2018_01_15
Site Map 2018_01_16
Site Map 2018_01_17
Site Map 2018_01_18
Site Map 2018_01_19
Site Map 2018_01_20
Site Map 2018_01_21
Site Map 2018_01_22
Site Map 2018_01_23
Site Map 2018_01_24
Site Map 2018_01_25
Site Map 2018_01_26
Site Map 2018_01_27
Site Map 2018_01_28
Site Map 2018_01_29
Site Map 2018_01_30
Site Map 2018_01_31
Site Map 2018_02_01
Site Map 2018_02_02
Site Map 2018_02_03
Site Map 2018_02_04
Site Map 2018_02_05
Site Map 2018_02_06
Site Map 2018_02_07
Site Map 2018_02_08
Site Map 2018_02_09
Site Map 2018_02_10
Site Map 2018_02_11
Site Map 2018_02_12
Site Map 2018_02_13
Site Map 2018_02_14
Site Map 2018_02_15
Site Map 2018_02_15
Site Map 2018_02_16
Site Map 2018_02_17
Site Map 2018_02_18
Site Map 2018_02_19
Site Map 2018_02_20
Site Map 2018_02_21
Site Map 2018_02_22
Site Map 2018_02_23
Site Map 2018_02_24
Site Map 2018_02_25
Site Map 2018_02_26
Site Map 2018_02_27
Site Map 2018_02_28
Site Map 2018_03_01
Site Map 2018_03_02
Site Map 2018_03_03
Site Map 2018_03_04
Site Map 2018_03_05
Site Map 2018_03_06
Site Map 2018_03_07
Site Map 2018_03_08
Site Map 2018_03_09
Site Map 2018_03_10
Site Map 2018_03_11
Site Map 2018_03_12
Site Map 2018_03_13
Site Map 2018_03_14
Site Map 2018_03_15
Site Map 2018_03_16
Site Map 2018_03_17
Site Map 2018_03_18
Site Map 2018_03_19
Site Map 2018_03_20
Site Map 2018_03_21
Site Map 2018_03_22
Site Map 2018_03_23
Site Map 2018_03_24
Site Map 2018_03_25
Site Map 2018_03_26
Site Map 2018_03_27
Site Map 2018_03_28
Site Map 2018_03_29
Site Map 2018_03_30
Site Map 2018_03_31
Site Map 2018_04_01
Site Map 2018_04_02
Site Map 2018_04_03
Site Map 2018_04_04
Site Map 2018_04_05
Site Map 2018_04_06
Site Map 2018_04_07
Site Map 2018_04_08
Site Map 2018_04_09
Site Map 2018_04_10
Site Map 2018_04_11
Site Map 2018_04_12
Site Map 2018_04_13
Site Map 2018_04_14
Site Map 2018_04_15
Site Map 2018_04_16
Site Map 2018_04_17
Site Map 2018_04_18
Site Map 2018_04_19
Site Map 2018_04_20
Site Map 2018_04_21
Site Map 2018_04_22
Site Map 2018_04_23
Site Map 2018_04_24
Site Map 2018_04_25
Site Map 2018_04_26
Site Map 2018_04_27
Site Map 2018_04_28
Site Map 2018_04_29
Site Map 2018_04_30
Site Map 2018_05_01
Site Map 2018_05_02
Site Map 2018_05_03
Site Map 2018_05_04
Site Map 2018_05_05
Site Map 2018_05_06
Site Map 2018_05_07
Site Map 2018_05_08
Site Map 2018_05_09
Site Map 2018_05_15
Site Map 2018_05_16
Site Map 2018_05_17
Site Map 2018_05_18
Site Map 2018_05_19
Site Map 2018_05_20
Site Map 2018_05_21
Site Map 2018_05_22
Site Map 2018_05_23
Site Map 2018_05_24
Site Map 2018_05_25
Site Map 2018_05_26
Site Map 2018_05_27
Site Map 2018_05_28
Site Map 2018_05_29
Site Map 2018_05_30
Site Map 2018_05_31
Site Map 2018_06_01
Site Map 2018_06_02
Site Map 2018_06_03
Site Map 2018_06_04
Site Map 2018_06_05
Site Map 2018_06_06
Site Map 2018_06_07
Site Map 2018_06_08
Site Map 2018_06_09
Site Map 2018_06_10
Site Map 2018_06_11
Site Map 2018_06_12
Site Map 2018_06_13
Site Map 2018_06_14
Site Map 2018_06_15
Site Map 2018_06_16
Site Map 2018_06_17
Site Map 2018_06_18
Site Map 2018_06_19
Site Map 2018_06_20
Site Map 2018_06_21
Site Map 2018_06_22
Site Map 2018_06_23
Site Map 2018_06_24
Site Map 2018_06_25
Site Map 2018_06_26
Site Map 2018_06_27
Site Map 2018_06_28
Site Map 2018_06_29
Site Map 2018_06_30
Site Map 2018_07_01
Site Map 2018_07_02
Site Map 2018_07_03
Site Map 2018_07_04
Site Map 2018_07_05
Site Map 2018_07_06
Site Map 2018_07_07
Site Map 2018_07_08
Site Map 2018_07_09
Site Map 2018_07_10
Site Map 2018_07_11
Site Map 2018_07_12
Site Map 2018_07_13
Site Map 2018_07_14
Site Map 2018_07_15
Site Map 2018_07_16
Site Map 2018_07_17
Site Map 2018_07_18
Site Map 2018_07_19
Site Map 2018_07_20
Site Map 2018_07_21
Site Map 2018_07_22
Site Map 2018_07_23
Site Map 2018_07_24
Site Map 2018_07_25
Site Map 2018_07_26
Site Map 2018_07_27
Site Map 2018_07_28
Site Map 2018_07_29
Site Map 2018_07_30
Site Map 2018_07_31
Site Map 2018_08_01
Site Map 2018_08_02
Site Map 2018_08_03
Site Map 2018_08_04
Site Map 2018_08_05
Site Map 2018_08_06
Site Map 2018_08_07
Site Map 2018_08_08
Site Map 2018_08_09