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          Young Catholics release open letter on McCarrick, call for investigation      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Washington D.C., Aug 8, 2018 / 02:30 pm (CNA).- A group of young Catholic writers, intellectuals, and activists released an open letter Aug. 8 calling for an independent investigation into the alleged crimes of Archbishop Theodore McCarrick. The letter also calls Catholic leaders to recommit themselves to the Church’s teaching on sexuality.

The letter was published Wednesday on the website of First Things.

Matthew Schmitz, senior editor at First Things and a signatory of the letter, told CNA that it was written by a “diverse group of Catholics from a whole host of backgrounds.”

The letter’s signatories said their letter was written in part to respond to a Vatican request that young people offer reports on their faith and the role of the Church in their lives, in advance of an upcoming Church synod on young people and vocations. 

The letter noted the the signatories were all children in the decades before the public sexual abuse scandals of 2002, and that they are now faithful adult Catholics.

“We ask you to agree to a thorough, independent investigation into claims of abuse by Archbishop McCarrick, both of minors and of adults. We want to know who in the hierarchy knew about his crimes, when they knew it, and what they did in response. This is the least that would be expected of any secular organization; it should not be more than we can expect from the Church,” the letter said.

In June, the Archdiocese of New York deemed an allegation that McCarrick serially sexually abused a minor to be “credible and substantiated.”

Since that initial allegation became public, additional accusations have surfaced concerning McCarrick’s alleged misconduct with adult seminarians, including confirmation of two out-of-court settlements reached with adult-aged accusers by dioceses previously led by McCarrick. Pope Francis accepted Archbishop McCarrick’s resignation from the College of Cardinals July 28.

Schmitz told CNA that the letter was a call for transparency and accountability by the hierarchy.

“We'd like to see light come in. We want an investigation. We want a new attitude on the part of the bishops.”

Such an investigation would be carried out by people not directly connected to McCarrick, and would report to both the Vatican as well as the Catholic faithful, Schmitz said.

Schmitz said the letter addresses a problem that goes beyond the McCarrick allegations. The signatories called for renewed emphasis on the Church’s teachings on sexuality and chastity, as well as “acts of public penance and reparation” by bishops to begin to restore trust among the Catholic faithful.

“I think over the last 50 years in our culture, with the sexual revolution, there's been a sense that the Church needs to broadly accommodate itself to sexual sins,” said Schmitz.

“McCarrick, I think, shows one of the possible outcomes of that accommodation.”

Schmitz warned of a slippery slope if the Church were to change or ignore her teachings on sexuality, bringing up the example of St. Peter Damian, an eleventh-century Benedicte monk, who confronted sexual sins in his own community. The saint recognized that sexual sins compound on another, explained Schmitz, suggesting there exists such a possibility in the contemporary Church.

"I don't think that this crisis would have happened had the Catholic community not succumbed to various sins and made compromises with the flesh," he said.

The letter emphasized this point: “As Catholics, we believe that the Church’s teaching on human nature and sexuality is life-giving and leads to holiness. We believe that just as there is no room for adultery in marriages, so there is no room for adultery against the Bride of Christ. We need bishops to make clear that any act of sexual abuse or clerical unchastity degrades the priesthood and gravely harms the Church.”

Schmitz also cited the recent accusations of widespread sexual abuse and misconduct in Honduras’ national seminary, as well as claims from former seminarians in the United States.

He said that there is a prevailing attitude among bishops to mitigate or dismiss the severity of abuse against adult men, and that this also must change, and that the laity have a duty to make their objections to this behavior known. 

"I think the laity should make itself heard and let the bishops know that it is an act of abuse for a bishop to molest the seminarians,” said Schmitz.

“Even if any of these acts were perfectly consensual, they are contrary to the Church's teaching and so profoundly scandalize the faithful."

The letter expressed gratitude for “the way good priests and bishops lay down their lives for us day after day. They say the Mass, absolve us from sin, celebrate our weddings, and baptize our children. Through their preaching, teaching, and writing, they remind us that Jesus Christ has conquered evil once and for all. Their daily sacrifices give us blessings of infinite worth. For all of this, we are profoundly thankful.”

However, Schmitz said an investigation should consider those clerics who have been negligent in uncovering sexual sins among the clergy, along with those who know about misconduct and failed to act. An investigation is needed to ensure a focus on individual responsibility, said Schmitz, and it should not simply result collective statements of fault and regret, as that would dilute the failings of those most responsible.

It is not acceptable for a bishop to plead ignorance, he said, as they are part of the Church hierarchy and must be accountable.

"A shepherd is supposed to protect his sheep, and if the wolves come and attack them, he can't simply say, 'well, I was asleep.'"


          As Border Crossings Tick Up, Migrants Bring Children, Take More Dangerous Routes       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The number of immigrants illegally crossing the southern border plummeted when Donald Trump took office. But the number is again on the rise. In response, the president plans to deploy up to 4,000 National Guard troops. In West Texas, immigrant shelters are overflowing with recent arrivals and some migrants are trying more dangerous routes to evade capture. The intake room at Annunciation House, an immigrant shelter in downtown El Paso, is packed these days. Parents and squirming children sit with their travel bags. They are the aggravations of Donald Trump. Thirteen-year-old Leslie Morán, with a ponytail and a Minnie Mouse shirt, says she and her father, Daniel, left Honduras because there was so much crime, and she couldn't attend school anymore. "They threaten you and rob you," she says. "We came here so I'd have a new opportunity to study." Her journey north, and thousands like it, have bedeviled the Trump administration, just as they did President Obama. New figures show a mini
          Colombia and Honduras lead the way in tackling devastating coffee rust disease      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Coffee rust disease has devastated coffee output throughout Latin America, and some countries have been unable to bounce back. But Colombia and Honduras have both resiliently emerged from their slumps. Here's why.
          Argentine Abortion Campaigners Brace for Crucial Senate Vote      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
After Ireland voted to legalize abortion in May, will Argentina, another traditionally Catholic country, do the same? The country’s senators will make the decision Wednesday, amid fiercely polarized campaigns on both sides of the hot-button issue. The bill was passed by Congress’ lower house in June by the narrowest of margins, but it is widely expected to fall short of the votes needed to pass in the Senate — 37 of the 72 senators have made it known they will say no. If the measure does fail, lawmakers must wait a year to resubmit the legislation. As the lawmakers settled in for what was expected to be a marathon session that could stretch past midnight, demonstrators on both sides rallied outside Congress. Abortion rights supporters wore green scarves while anti-abortion activists donned baby blue. A partition was set up to keep them separated. Scores of buses have brought people into Buenos Aires from other parts of Argentina, city hall said. Despite the negative projections and strong opposition from the highly influential Catholic Church in the homeland of Pope Francis, abortion rights proponents are not giving up hope. “We’re doing everything so that the initiative passes. We have faith in the street movement,” leading campaigner Julia Martino told AFP. “We believe many senators will show their support when the vote happens.” Currently, abortion is allowed in Argentina in only three cases, similar to most of Latin America: rape, a threat to the mother's life or if the fetus is disabled. If passed, the bill would legalize abortion during the first 14 weeks of pregnancy and see Argentina join Uruguay and Cuba as the only countries in Latin America to fully decriminalize abortion. It’s also legal in Mexico City. Only in the Central American trio of El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua does it remain totally banned. With the tide seemingly flowing against legalization, abortion rights groups tried to amend the bill to reduce from 14 to 12 weeks the period in which it would be permitted, but that move failed. What activists can count on, though, is huge support from citizens. Question of rights  Demonstrations were held in Buenos Aires, with other rallies taking place around the world in front of Argentine diplomatic missions. One abortion rights protester in Buenos Aires, 20-year-old Celeste Villalba, said keeping abortions illegal would not prevent them from happening. “This debate is whether it should be legal or done in secret. It’s not about being in favor of abortion or not,” she said. She said she feared that “social machismo and a patriarchal and retrograde Church” would block adoption of the bill in the Senate. Various charities estimate that 500,000 illegal, secret abortions are carried out every year in Argentina, resulting in around 100 deaths. But opponents of abortion are not lacking support and held their own demonstrations. Priests and nuns have been joined by rabbis, imams and members of other Christian churches to oppose the bill. One of them, Federico Berruete, a 35-year-old priest, joined anti-abortion demonstrators holding up slogans reading “Life starts at conception.” “There is a big display of faith, a lot of people have turned out for a more humane country. Children about to be born need to be defended,” he said. In mid-June, the lower house voted in favor by just 129 to 125 thanks in part to the nonetheless anti-abortion President Mauricio Macri’s insistence in pushing the bill through the legislature. The conservative president released a letter Wednesday welcoming the debate and saying this is about more than legalizing abortion or not. “As a society, it presents a peaceful scenario to promote and carry out change,” the president wrote. Senator Norma Durango from the Justice Party said she would work “until the last minute so that this becomes law,” warning that those who vote against the bill would be “responsible for continuing deaths.” The Catholic Church has appointed a bishop, Alberto Bochatey, to handle dialogue with Congress on the issue. Last month, Bochatey, 62, told AFP that “you cannot make a law to justify the elimination of human life,” but said the Church was against locking up those who carried out illegal abortions.
          El Heraldo, Honduras, Lunes 06 de agosto de 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
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          La Prensa, Honduras, Lunes 06 de agosto de 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
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          A Journey Through Contested Lands: Honduras      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Susan Meiselas

Real estate investors are violating the hard-fought land rights of the Garífuna, an Afro-Caribbean community in Honduras whose unique and endangered culture has been recognized by UNESCO.


          Feds Charge Illegal Who raped child after release from sanctuary city (liberals enabled child rape)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Department of Justice is prosecuting a previously deported illegal alien from Honduras for illegal re-entry while he is in prison for raping a small child after release by the city of Philadelphia. Illegal alien Juan Ramon Vasquez was previously deported in May 2009 and resurfaced on the radar of U.S. authorities in May 2014 after an arrest in Philadelphia. ICE agents were unable to detain Vasquez and re-deport him, however, because he was released by the city, which has a sanctuary policy for illegal aliens. Vasquez committed the rape of the child after his release. “The facts of this...
          Previously deported illegal, raped child after being given a 'free pass' (Philadelphia)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A previously deported illegal immigrant from Honduras who raped a little girl in Philadelphia after being let loose by police instead of being handed over to ICE has pleaded guilty to illegally reentering the US. Juan Ramon Vasquez, also known as Ramon Aguirre-Ochoa, was first deported from the US in 2009
          Crónica para sordos.      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   












Ando hablando como cabro chico, mi mujer me mira insultante, se “chorea”, me quita una servilleta que tengo ahorcada en la mano y dice:

“No se con quien” miechica” estoy hablando, con un niño, a mi  marido, un  imbécil o un chalao”

No alcanzo a decirle que yo tampoco lo sé, se da media vuelta  y me deja ver sus piernas que se alejan…

Siento un triste grande, hormonas viejas, arrinconadas sin memoria.

Tengo una mujer hermosa…

Tengo miedo Carajo… más de 50 años que me pongo la misma ropa y uso las mismas herramientas…las herede de otro que también fue congraciado de otro…y ese de otro…

Historia y dialéctica colectiva…

En las grandes capitales, ciudades del mundo, en toda Europa  se chorrean con:

“Estado de Derecho, soberanía, Constitución, desempleo, solidaridad, refugiados, inmigrantes, igualdad de género, terrorismo, medio ambiente, torturas, desaparecidos, democracia, crímenes, policías, matar de géneros, seguridad, exilio, Putin, Maduro, Da Silva, Síndrome Trump, Irán, Corea del Norte, China, socialismo, política de alianzas, educación política, enseñanzas revolucionarias, Independencia, Dictadura del proletariado, Social Demócrata, Ignorancia, pobreza, incomunicación, petróleo,  huelgas, fascismo, Reyes ladrones, amantes de la Monarquía, Litio, Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua, Bolivia, mi paisito”

“Alicia va en el coche carolin”

El Estado de Derecho que conozco es un Estado policial que controla el hacer de las organizaciones de los trabajadores…En los escaños legislativos, la mayoría, la tiene los representantes de la clase alta y de los vasallos…sobre todo de los ignorantes…lo legislativo se abriga en la ignorancia del 60%.

Lo judicial, fue el único poder del estado permitido  vivir  y en paños menores por el fascismo chileno…más de 5000 Habeas Corpus fueron presentados a sus Usías…en 10 años fueron recibidas solamente 10…Hoy, dejan en libertad a violadores de los derechos humanos…

Soberanía…se come?  Mi pueblo no ha tenido nunca  la oportunidad de poseer el lápiz para escribir su país…Una vez lo tuvo, le saco punta, la mina era chiquitita…no se puedo ni zurcir hojas de papel.

Defender la supuesta soberanía la practicaron matándose bolivianos, peruanos y chilenos…el Imperio Anglo sajón reía.

El terrorismo ha sido para los Imperios “ orden para matanza”…

A Grecia la tienen en llamas, de la misma manera que tuvieron el centro y sur de mi paisito…  Incendios inventados que dejaron Irak arrodillado…

Los aromas de eucaliptus que detienen la sequedad y el avance de la arena, no pueden detener las fauces de cemento, de ripio, de fierro, del “pilatreros parceleros”..

Ando hablando como cabro chico, me pille cantando “los tres chanchitos desobedientes”

Perforan la tierra, la piedra…chupan todo…hasta mis encías se esconden, los dientes se asoman disfrazados, mi vientre se chupa pá fuera…Todo será un Atacama, un Tamarugal, un pimiento mustio,  testigo del hacer del trabajador, testigo de matanzas, de injusticias aberrantes..

Nos venden antes de escribir  nuestra historia…nos pasan “gatos por liebre”,  nos lleva una vida  adobar conejos… estamos transferidos…

Los medios manipulan el intelecto, el conocimiento, el sentido común es un chicle…

El polvo amargo de las Torres gemelas tiene el mismo origen que los escombros de Trípoli, Kabul, Gaza, Damasco…

“Hasta el viejo hospital de los muñecos”

La muerte que acecha en Damasco contamina traidora y cobarde en Nicaragua, Venezuela, Ecuador, Brasil, Argentina…

No supimos, no pudimos entender, el golpe de Estado en Honduras…país Chapulin colorao, que le abrió al Imperio, otra vez el  “patio trasero”.

Pocazo nos sirve ahora, hablar de Internacionalismo.

Honduras fue el comienzo de cuetes mexicanos.

“El que no salta es momio”…

Educación política, enseñanzas de las revoluciones…Conquistar el poder a través de una encarnizada lucha de clases.

Para que exista “lucha de clases”, el campo de batalla tiene que ser por supuesto disparejo, pero no tanto que nos obligue estar las 24 horas en funerales propios…siento que el socialismo no significa ganar a toda costa…No hay más importante que la vida en general…por eso la importancia vital en las políticas de alianzas…

Hay que ser sabio…como lo fue Ho Chi Min…El partido Comunista vietnamita era tan pequeño como la estatura de sus militantes…pero lograron aunar todas las fuerzas, argumentando las usurpación milenaria de su propia identidad…

China…estando en guerra  con Japón y en plena guerra civil, después de 22 años de lucha, el Ejército Rojo vence a los Nacionalistas que estaban apoyados por el Imperio gringo e Europeo….Y China es grande…era tan precaria la vida, que no se comieron entre ellos porque les daba arcadas. Lo digo de esta manera, para que se entienda lo que puede suceder en una guerra…Guerra maldita.

La Revolución de Octubre en Rusia, tuvo derroteros parecidos…

Cuba…El Granma sabía lo que podía ser su embarcadero…Han pasado muchos años…”Que la revolución tenía que estar en manos del proletariado…No, del Campesinado…Tendremos que maestrear las abejas… ¿Tenemos a todo el 26 de julio? …”

Interrogantes, ideas, dudas…pero se logró una unidad de acción, se logró la identificación del enemigo inmediato.

Los tiempos son diferentes y las realidades, desigualdades  más iguales que nunca…el hambre se multiplica.

Mi creencia esta de “Conferencia”…se tomaran problemáticas trascendentales…yo salto como loco e invito a mi exilio que lo haga también. En una de esos, nos ven y reconocen las pilchas de la Unidad Popular.

Quien soy yo para criticar esto o aquello, si arranque a los 5 años después del golpe…pero, no puedo callarme me escuece la lengua…

No me entra, sacando a Cuba, que nuestro Sur, tenga que decir…”Hoy estarás conmigo en el paraiso”…

El Imperio es infernal, criminal.

Uno se pone muy complicado, tenemos que estar en un continuo “puesto al día”, de lo contrario nos sobrepasaría la historia…

El Foro de Sao Paulo, las elecciones en Cuba, la “juvenizacion” de su Constitución son un sembradero de desafíos que se tiene que enfrentar…se tiene que tener las herramientas para ello.

Eso se consigue  con la comunicación, la organización, el dialogo, el enfrentamientos de las ideas, las revoluciones, las traiciones, nuestra propia muerte….todo es parte de la enseñanza

El hacer política, el ser participe en la construcción de país es una pega enorme…aquellos que insultan a la política, que no creen  en ella, a sus gestores no tienen idea ni por donde les cae el pan…Son simples arbustos que nacieron en los enfrentamientos de clases, en la pobreza, en la ignorancia y que necesariamente, desgraciadamente ocupan un espacio concreto y servil que se doblan a favor de cualquier viento.

(Ellos Juran que los llevaran a Marte.)

Como enfrentamos a esa bestia arrugada…

Cansarse de ser mártir, que el sentido común, la honestidad sea nuestro punto de mira…Como dijera Ernesto…: tenemos que ir formando al “Hombre Nuevo ”…Ese que entiende, que lo de él, termina cuando comienza lo del  otro…con esa mentalidad se podrá construir un mundo maravilloso.

“Sal de ahí chivita chivita, sal de ahí de ese lugar”



Alejandro Fischer Alquinta.

Torrevieja 20180731






          ALGUNOS DATOS SOBRE LO QUE OCURRE EN NICARAGUA      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   






Todas las imágenes sobre los sucesos en Nicaragua, transmitidas desde el 18 de abril por los medios hegemónicos, viralizadas en las redes, se abstienen de mostrar la otra cara, la de los ataques con armas a los locales públicos, los saqueos, los militantes sandinistas quemados vivos en plena calle, la vejación a jóvenes.

Nicaragua es rehén de una realidad falseada y ficticia que mueve el terrorismo mediático de esta guerra de cuarta generación, al ritmo de las redes sociales, donde la realidad virtual se impone sobre la realidad real, donde, incluso, la masa de gente que de forma autoconvocada, genuina y respetuosa de la paz se moviliza por la democracia es convertida en carne de cañón, en ‘daño colateral’ para lograr el objetivo final: salir del gobierno constitucional, cueste lo que cueste.

Nadie dice que los ‘manifestantes pacíficos’ atacaron, quemaron, saquearon, destruyeron la oficialista Nueva Radio Ya, la Caja Rural Nacional (Caruna), cooperativa que ha administrado los fondos ALBA para proyectos sociales en beneficio de miles de familias, y el edificio del Ministerio de Economía Familiar.

La internacional capitalista existe, la moviliza el movimiento libertario de extrema derecha y, obviamente , está muy bien financiada: funciona a través de un inmenso conglomerado de fundaciones, institutos, ONGs, centros  y sociedades , unidos entre sí por Todas las imágenes sobre los sucesos en Nicaragua, transmitidas desde el 18 de abril por los medios hegemónicos, viralizadas en las redes, se abstienen de mostrar la otra cara, la de los ataques con armas a los locales públicos, los saqueos, los militantes sandinistas quemados vivos en plena calle, la vejación a jóvenes.

Nicaragua es rehén de una realidad falseada y ficticia que mueve el terrorismo mediático de esta guerra de cuarta generación, al ritmo de las redes sociales, donde la realidad virtual se impone sobre la realidad real, donde, incluso, la masa de gente que de forma autoconvocada, genuina y respetuosa de la paz se moviliza por la democracia es convertida en carne de cañón, en ‘daño colateral’ para lograr el objetivo final: salir del gobierno constitucional, cueste lo que cueste.

Nadie dice que los ‘manifestantes pacíficos’ atacaron, quemaron, saquearon, destruyeron la oficialista Nueva Radio Ya, la Caja Rural Nacional (Caruna), cooperativa que ha administrado los fondos ALBA para proyectos sociales en beneficio de miles de familias, y el edificio del Ministerio de Economía Familiar.

Las investigaciones del periodista estadounidense Max Blumenthal y del catedrático venezolano Álvaro Verzi Rangel, pusieron al descubierto el rol de entidades como la Usaid, Freedom House, y la NEDen el financiamiento de ONG’s nicaragüenses, que llamaron al derrocamiento de Ortega. La Usaidaportó 5,2 millones de dólares, para “la capacitación de la sociedad civil y las organizaciones de medios de comunicación”.

 En junio, los dirigentes del M19, el grupo estudiantil que comenzó las protestas antigubernamentales viajaron a Washington, financiados por Freedom House, donde se reunieron con la ultraderecha parlamentaria estadounidense. Félix Madariaga, uno de los líderes del M19, está al frente del Instituto de Estudios Estratégicos y Políticas Públicas, recibió 260,000 dólares de la NED. Otra fundaciones como “Hagamos Democracia”, de Luciano García, recibió 525,000 dólares de la NED desde 2014.

 Lo de Nicaragua es una demostración más del poder del terror mediático de los medios hegemónicos trasnacionales y cartelizados y de su capacidad de imponer imaginarios colectivos en la región. Y, también, de una agencia propia de los medios alternativos (al mensaje hegemónico), preocupados permanentemente por seguir reactivamente la agenda del enemigo y creer que la resistencia es la denunciología, sin informar sobre lo que realmente pasa.

 Nicaragua, junto a Venezuela, Cuba y Bolivia, se ha convertido en una piedra en el zapato de los proyectos “panamericanistas” de Estados Unidos y sus repetidores, y hoy usan todos los argumentos para aniquilarla. No es la primera vez, tampoco. Tras la revolución sandinista, llegó la guerra del escándalo Irán-Contras, la agresión desde Honduras, el bloqueo de los puertos, las sanciones económicas, el intento de rendir por muerte o por hambre al pueblo.

En el encuentro habanero del Foro de Sao Paulo, el segundo secretario del Partido Comunista Cubano, José Ramón Machado Ventura, señaló que con respecto a Nicaragua, la posición cubana es categórica: en la medida en que Estados Unidos trata de manipular asuntos internos que solo los nicaragüenses deben resolver sin injerencia externa alguna, nuestro Partido ha dado, da y dará toda la solidaridad que demande el Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional para posibilitar el retorno de la paz al país”.

(Párrafos seleccionados del trabajo "Nicaragüita" de Aram Aharonian, periodista y comunicólogo uruguayo. Mágister en Integración. Fundador de Telesur. Preside la Fundación para la Integración Latinoamericana (FILA) y dirige el Centro Latinoamericano de Análisis Estratégico (CLAE, www.estrategia.la)

                               INVITACIÓN

El CEILER, la Embajadade Nicaragua, la Confederación Nacional de la Construcción y  el Sindicato de la  Construcción, excavadores-alcantarilleros, te invitan al acto "Juan Vargas Puebla, el internacionalista, estaría hoy con Nicaragua".

Jueves 9 de agosto, a las 19,30 horas, en el salón Camilo Guzmán Sandoval del ICHIL (Brasil 153)






          Honduras y Guatemala revisarán avances de la Unión Aduanera      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
*** Los gobernantes esperan la pronta incorporación del vecino Salvadoreño para dinamizar el comercio en la región. El presidentes de Honduras Juan Orlando Hernández y su homólogo de Guatemala Jimmy Morales, revisarán en los próximos días los avances de la Unión Aduanera entre ambos países, en un encuentro que se realizará en el sector fronterizo […]
          Diálisis de Honduras firma contrato de servicios      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
***Se atienden a más de 2,200 pacientes renales a nivel nacional. Autoridades de la Secretaría de Salud y Diálisis de Honduras  firmaron este miércoles el contrato de prestación de servicios de hemodiálisis y diálisis peritoneal vigente hasta el 31 de diciembre 2018. El contrato dice que la empresa brindará los servicios de hemodiálisis, peritoneal continua […]
          ¡Increíble! Supuesto delincuente fingía ser deportista para asaltar en la Villa Olímpica      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

El malhechor fue detenido en un patrullaje de rutina en el Complejo Deportivo José Simón Azcona   Tegucigalpa, Honduras El Complejo Deportivo José Simón Azcona de Tegucigalpa, conocido como Villa Olímpica, es el centro de atletas más importante en la capital. Allí convergen una gran cantidad de deportistas y de ciudadanos que se dedican al 

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La entrada ¡Increíble! Supuesto delincuente fingía ser deportista para asaltar en la Villa Olímpica se publicó primero en Sporthiva Online.


          Young Catholics release open letter on McCarrick, call for investigation      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Washington D.C., Aug 8, 2018 / 02:30 pm (CNA).- A group of young Catholic writers, intellectuals, and activists released an open letter Aug. 8 calling for an independent investigation into the alleged crimes of Archbishop Theodore McCarrick. The letter also calls Catholic leaders to recommit themselves to the Church’s teaching on sexuality.

The letter was published Wednesday on the website of First Things.

Matthew Schmitz, senior editor at First Things and a signatory of the letter, told CNA that it was written by a “diverse group of Catholics from a whole host of backgrounds.”

The letter’s signatories said their letter was written in part to respond to a Vatican request that young people offer reports on their faith and the role of the Church in their lives, in advance of an upcoming Church synod on young people and vocations. 

The letter noted the the signatories were all children in the decades before the public sexual abuse scandals of 2002, and that they are now faithful adult Catholics.

“We ask you to agree to a thorough, independent investigation into claims of abuse by Archbishop McCarrick, both of minors and of adults. We want to know who in the hierarchy knew about his crimes, when they knew it, and what they did in response. This is the least that would be expected of any secular organization; it should not be more than we can expect from the Church,” the letter said.

In June, the Archdiocese of New York deemed an allegation that McCarrick serially sexually abused a minor to be “credible and substantiated.”

Since that initial allegation became public, additional accusations have surfaced concerning McCarrick’s alleged misconduct with adult seminarians, including confirmation of two out-of-court settlements reached with adult-aged accusers by dioceses previously led by McCarrick. Pope Francis accepted Archbishop McCarrick’s resignation from the College of Cardinals July 28.

Schmitz told CNA that the letter was a call for transparency and accountability by the hierarchy.

“We'd like to see light come in. We want an investigation. We want a new attitude on the part of the bishops.”

Such an investigation would be carried out by people not directly connected to McCarrick, and would report to both the Vatican as well as the Catholic faithful, Schmitz said.

Schmitz said the letter addresses a problem that goes beyond the McCarrick allegations. The signatories called for renewed emphasis on the Church’s teachings on sexuality and chastity, as well as “acts of public penance and reparation” by bishops to begin to restore trust among the Catholic faithful.

“I think over the last 50 years in our culture, with the sexual revolution, there's been a sense that the Church needs to broadly accommodate itself to sexual sins,” said Schmitz.

“McCarrick, I think, shows one of the possible outcomes of that accommodation.”

Schmitz warned of a slippery slope if the Church were to change or ignore her teachings on sexuality, bringing up the example of St. Peter Damian, an eleventh-century Benedicte monk, who confronted sexual sins in his own community. The saint recognized that sexual sins compound on another, explained Schmitz, suggesting there exists such a possibility in the contemporary Church.

"I don't think that this crisis would have happened had the Catholic community not succumbed to various sins and made compromises with the flesh," he said.

The letter emphasized this point: “As Catholics, we believe that the Church’s teaching on human nature and sexuality is life-giving and leads to holiness. We believe that just as there is no room for adultery in marriages, so there is no room for adultery against the Bride of Christ. We need bishops to make clear that any act of sexual abuse or clerical unchastity degrades the priesthood and gravely harms the Church.”

Schmitz also cited the recent accusations of widespread sexual abuse and misconduct in Honduras’ national seminary, as well as claims from former seminarians in the United States.

He said that there is a prevailing attitude among bishops to mitigate or dismiss the severity of abuse against adult men, and that this also must change, and that the laity have a duty to make their objections to this behavior known. 

"I think the laity should make itself heard and let the bishops know that it is an act of abuse for a bishop to molest the seminarians,” said Schmitz.

“Even if any of these acts were perfectly consensual, they are contrary to the Church's teaching and so profoundly scandalize the faithful."

The letter expressed gratitude for “the way good priests and bishops lay down their lives for us day after day. They say the Mass, absolve us from sin, celebrate our weddings, and baptize our children. Through their preaching, teaching, and writing, they remind us that Jesus Christ has conquered evil once and for all. Their daily sacrifices give us blessings of infinite worth. For all of this, we are profoundly thankful.”

However, Schmitz said an investigation should consider those clerics who have been negligent in uncovering sexual sins among the clergy, along with those who know about misconduct and failed to act. An investigation is needed to ensure a focus on individual responsibility, said Schmitz, and it should not simply result collective statements of fault and regret, as that would dilute the failings of those most responsible.

It is not acceptable for a bishop to plead ignorance, he said, as they are part of the Church hierarchy and must be accountable.

"A shepherd is supposed to protect his sheep, and if the wolves come and attack them, he can't simply say, 'well, I was asleep.'"


          Can Pope Francis’ Council of Cardinals still deliver on reform?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Vatican City, Aug 7, 2018 / 04:17 pm (CNA).- By most accounts, Pope Francis was elected with a mandate to reform the Roman Curia- the complex network of dicasteries, commissions, and councils charged with the central administrative work of the Catholic Church- a network that, even to insiders and experts, more often resembles a rabbit warren than a well-defined system of governable offices with clear responsibilities.

From the beginning, there were high expectations for Francis, and widespread belief that he could succeed in reforming the Curia. His informality and disdain for protocol -his ability to think ‘outside the box’- led many to believe that under his leadership, the Curial wilds could be tamed.

One month after his election, he made his first major reform announcement: the creation of the Council of Cardinals, tasked with helping him review and reform the entire governing structure of both the Roman Curia and the universal Church.

Cardinals Maradiaga, Bertello, Errázuriz, Gracias, Marx, Monsengo Pasinya, O’Malley and Pell were informally dubbed the C8, later the C9 (Cardinal Parolin was added to the council when he became Secretary of State). Many saw them, and the enormous task they were assigned, as the embodiment of the kind of global perspective the Church needed for Curial reform.

Five years on, Curial dysfunction has been compounded by international crises, and several members of the C9 are themselves mired in controversy. Rather than bringing an end to scandals in the Curia, Rome’s ongoing problems seem- to some observers- to have gone global.

Embroiled in sexual abuse scandals, shady financial dealings, Curial power-plays, and even full-blown doctrinal disputes – rather than becoming the engine of reform, the C9 has, to some, begun to look like a microcosm of everything going wrong in the Church. Critics have begun to ask if the Council of Cardinals, and the whole of Pope Francis’s reforming agenda, still has the credibility to effect any meaningful change.

For example, clerical sexual abuse has reemerged as a major crisis in the Church, and three of C9 are connected directly to issues surrounding sexual abuse allegations.

Cardinal Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga, Archbishop of Tegucigalpa and a close confidant of the pope, is the C9’s official coordinator. For months, he has been dogged by allegations concerning his personal finances. At the same time, his auxiliary bishop and his frequent proxy in the governance of his  archdiocese, Juan Pineda, was forced recently to resign, after allegations were made public that he sexually approached seminarians and maintained a string of male lovers – and allegations were also made that those behaviors were widely known in the diocese and by the cardinal.

In response to that scandal, several seminarians from Tegucigalpa wrote an open letter to the bishops of Honduras, detailing a culture of open and active homosexuality in the seminary, with reprisals taken against those who spoke out. Cardinal Maradiaga reportedly denounced the letter’s authors and their motivations for writing it.

Cardinal George Pell, another member of the C9, has had to return to Australia to defend himself against “historic” allegations of sexual abuse. While the trial is ongoing, the cardinal is vigorously defending himself in court against the charges, and questions have been asked about the methods of Victoria police during their investigation.

Furthermore, Cardinal Francisco Javier Errázuriz, a C9 cardinal who was known to be a close friend of the pope before his election, has emerged as a central figure in the disastrous Chilean abuse scandal.

Though he retired as Archbishop of Santiago in 2010, Errázuriz is alleged to have participated in cover-ups of clerical sexual abuse in Chile over a period of years, – including the abuse of notorious Fernando Karadima. It has also been reported that he tried to prevent Juan Carlos Cruz, the most visible and vocal of the Chilean abuse victims, from being appointed as a member of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Young People.

While five Chilean bishops have had their resignations accepted by Francis, and although Archbishop Theodore McCarrick made history recently by resigning from the College of Cardinals in the wake of his own scandal, Errázuriz remains both a cardinal and a member of the C9.

Meanwhile, Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston, whose public intervention was credited with the pope’s change of heart toward Juan Carlos Cruz and the other Chilean victims, is widely considered to be the Church’s most credible voice in speaking out against sexual abuse. Yet the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors, which he leads, has seen the resignation of two high-profile members, both survivors of sexual abuse. One of them, Marie Collins, has spoken often about her frustration that the Commission’s recommendations have not been adopted in the Curia or by national bishops’ conferences.

And O’Malley has faced criticism over reports that in 2015 his office received a letter from a priest detailing allegations against McCarrick, but issued only a staff member’s response, saying that the allegation was not the cardinal’s responsibility to address.

If the president of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors, a member of the C9, cannot advance binding reforms in the Curia, or even instill a culture of moral responsibility in his own staff, some working in Vatican tell CNA they are left wondering whether meaningful change can be expected to get beyond rhetoric.

Meanwhile, the structural reform of the Curia rumbles on, with Vatican departments being newly created, combined and renamed.

Initially, the most important of these new developments was the creation of the Prefecture for the Economy, led by Cardinal Pell. But even before Pell had to return to Australia, it became clear that bringing transparency and accountability to the Vatican finances was going to be an uphill slog.

In 2016, the Secretariat of State cancelled an external audit of  Curial finances that had been arranged by Pell’s department. The cancellation was ordered by then Archbishop, now Cardinal, Angelo Becciu. It was widely seen as an old-fashioned power-play - neither Becciu nor anyone else at the Secretariat of State technically had the authority to overrule Pell and the Prefecture for the Economy. That Francis was persuaded to back the move, granting it legal authority after-the-fact, was seen a serious blow to financial reform in the Curia.

In June 2017, Pell’s departure for Australia coincided with the dismissal of the first Vatican auditor-general Libero Milone. Milone was fired in dramatic fashion by the Secretariat of State, once again through Angelo Becciu, while being accused of “spying” on the finances of senior officials and facing the threat of prosecution.

Milone maintained that he was fired for being too good at his job, and because he and the reforming work of the Prefecture for the Economy were a direct threat to the Curial old guard. In May of this year, the Vatican quietly announced it had dropped all charges against Milone, but the financial reforms he and Pell were working towards appear to have been effectively dropped as well.

Despite expectations that the C9 would deliver a comprehensive reform of the Roman Curia, the results have been decidedly haphazard. New ‘super-dicasteries,’ like the Dicastery for Laity, Family, and Life, were announced with much fanfare, but thus far, without clear mandates of responsibility and processes for oversight, changes to the names of departments appear to be about as tangible as the reforms have gotten.

Meanwhile, as other departments like the Prefecture for the Economy have had their wings very publicly clipped, the Secretariat of State has seen its influence grow under Cardinal Parolin, to the point where virtually all Vatican business, either formally or informally, comes under its purview.

Ironically, some in Rome claim that Parolin’s greatest coup was arranging for his personal rival and nominal deputy, Angelo Becciu, to be made a cardinal and moved to the far less influential Congregation for the Causes of the Saints.

Parolin has also been known to take a personal interest in high-profile disciplinary cases handled at the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, “checking in” with the CDF to monitor their progress – something unthinkable in previous decades. Outside of Rome, bishops in far corners of the world have been awakened by phone calls from the cardinal weighing in on those local issues of Church governance that may have caught his attention.

A capable diplomat and politician, Parolin has managed to thrive in a Vatican where foundering structural reforms have disrupted traditional spheres of influence and centers of power, and the day-to-day authority he has centralized in his own department is considerable.

If the reformed Curia under Pope Francis has become, perhaps accidentally, ever more administratively centralized, doctrinally the pull is in the other direction.

On a whole range of issues, most notably the pastoral implementation of Pope Francis’ 2016 exhortation Amoris laetitia, bishops’ conferences have begun articulating very different approaches to what were, until recently, universal points of teaching and discipline.

Many of the more radical approaches have begun, or at least been strongly championed in Germany, where the national bishops’ conference is led by Cardinal Reinhard Marx. As de facto head of the German Church, Marx has been closely associated with some highly controversial pastoral policies, most notably the recent proposal to allow protestant spouses of Catholics to receive Communion.

The way in which the German bishops have effectively refused to take no from Rome as an answer is seen to demonstrate how weak the CDF has become, and how little Parolin’s preeminent state department can do, for all its administrative clout, on matters of discipline.

Some have noted that Marx and the German Church can act with a level of autonomy, even impunity, because of their vast financial resources. It is certainly not coincidental that Cardinal Marx also serves as the coordinator for the Vatican’s Council for the Economy.

The Church tax, by which the German government awards the local Church a proportion of the income tax of every citizen who registers as Catholic, has kept German dioceses fabulously wealthy, even as actual church buildings empty at a staggering rate.

The German bishops send millions of euros abroad each year, and with the Church in some parts of the world – and even parts of the Vatican – depending on Teutonic largesse, Marx can publicly muse about theological issues in a way that progressive bishops elsewhere would not dream of doing.

The result of the peculiar Parolin-Marx dynamic is that, under Francis, the Church has inched toward a federalized approach to teaching and discipline, even as administrative power in the Curia becomes more centralized.

It is possible that this situation will be reversed, or at least placed into some more coherent context, if and when the C9 produces a final version of a new governing constitution for the Vatican’s departments. A first draft was apparently presented to the pope in June of this year, but there is no clear indication of when a final document might be made public, let alone brought into force.

In the meantime, Curial politicking and scandal continues to rumble on, and the global sexual abuse crisis shows no signs of meaningful resolution.

Five years ago, the C9 was created to reassure the world that the best leaders from the global Church were hard at work to deliver on the Franciscan promise of reform. Today, with several of its members directly implicated in personal scandals and others publicly maneuvering for their own agendas, the Council of Cardinals seems every bit as tainted as the structures it was tasked to reform.

Famously reliant on people he knows and trusts to work his will, Pope Francis may be fast running out of credible collaborators, and that is likely to create a whole new problem for the universal Church.


          #ecuador - frasesautenticocristiano      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Y reflexiona en la palabra de Dios. √√activa NUESTRAS NOTIFICACIONES √√Etiqueta a una persona √√Comparte esta imagen #Chile #CostaRica #Peru #Honduras #Paraguay #frasesdeedificacion #frasescristianas #colombia #frwasesdebendicion #Venezuela #Argentina #Uruguay #Cuba #zionmusic_relevant #Mexico #ElSalvador #EstadosUnidos #Panama #Bolivia #Guatemala #brasil #sigueme #nicaragua #Cristianos #PuertoRico #RepublicaDominicana #Ecuador #Únete #España
          A Van Filled with Migrant Mothers Separated from Their Children Crashed — Then ICE Lied About It      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The embattled agency contradicted multiple pieces of hard evidence with its denial.

An ICE van full of separated mothers crashed into a pickup truck in Texas on July 18th. Then ICE repeatedly lied to the Texas Observer by claiming the crash, which was documented by the police, never happened.

“The crash was really strong, like maybe we were going to flip,” a mom from Honduras who rode on the bus told the Observer. Another woman said her "whole body hurt" after the crash.

Leticia Zamarripa, an ICE spokesperson, originally told the Observer that the crash didn't happen. “Your sources misinformed you,” she wrote on July 20. “There was no crash.”

After the Observer told ICE it obtained the actual accident report, ICE claimed there was a "fender bender" that "resulted in minor damage."

This wasn't true either.

A police officer who responded to the crash recorded that the vehicle sustained "disabling damage." One of the mothers whose leg was injured int he crash visited a doctor at the detention facility for treatment.

The denials by ICE follow a pattern of lying to the public, including misreporting arrest numbers and the political motivation of its actions.

 

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          A seis se reducen los candidatos a dirigir la Selección      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Fenafuth informó que la larga lista de candidatos a la Selección se redujo a seis   Honduras La elección del nuevo técnico de la Selección Nacional está llegando a su parte final. El minucioso trabajo de revisar las hojas de vida hizo que la lista se redujera a seis. “La idea es que el 

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La entrada A seis se reducen los candidatos a dirigir la Selección se publicó primero en Sporthiva Online.


          Congreso de Turismo Religioso reunirá en Honduras a especialistas internacionales      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
***El evento dará a conocer a Honduras a nivel mundial por su compromiso en impulsar el turismo de la fe en la región centroamericana. La directora de Marca País Honduras, Patricia Lardizábal, informó este miércoles que Comayagua,  será la sede  del XIV Congreso Internacional de Turismo Religioso y Sustentable. Ese evento reunirá a especialistas de […]
          Iglesias católicas cultura y tradición de Honduras      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
*** Muchas de estas magnificas obras representan el trabajo de todo una comunidad por 10, 20 30 o más años, y en algunos lugares es el edificio más grande y más costoso del pueblo, aunque la gran mayoría del pueblo viva en condiciones miserables. Las iglesias católicas del país son espectaculares, cada pueblo, cada aldea […]
          Aldea Garifuna de Sambo Creek posee una increíble belleza natural      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
***Según la tradición oral, los garifunas llegaron a las costas de Honduras 1797 luego de ser expulsados de la isla de San Vicente, pero se cree que la Comunidad de Sambo Creek se fundó unos años después. Sambo Creek es una bella y alegre aldea garifuna ubicada 15 kilómetros al este de La Ceiba, ciudad […]
          Illegal alien who was released from sanctuary city arrested after raping small child      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Department of Justice is prosecuting a previously deported illegal alien from Honduras for illegal re-entry while he is in prison for raping a small child after release by the city of Philadelphia. Illegal alien Juan Ramon Vasquez was previously deported in May 2009 and resurfaced on the radar of U.S. authorities in May 2014 after an arrest in Philadelphia. ICE agents were unable to detain Vasquez and re-deport him, however, because he was released by the city, which has a sanctuary policy for illegal aliens.
          Taiwán busca nuevos negocios en Honduras      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

DESARROLLO.  Una panorámica de Taipéi, la capital taiwanesa.

San Pedro Sula, HondurasDieciocho empresas taiwanesas participarán en una feria comercial a celebrarse del 21 al 23 de agosto en el Hotel Copantl.

La Expo Taiwán 2018 ofrecerá una amplia gama de productos de iluminación led, maquinaria, ferretería, cosmética, joyería, entre otros.

La actividad es organizada por el Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores de la República de China (Taiwán) y el Consejo de Desarrollo del Comercio Exterior de Taiwán (Taitra).

El evento ofrece a las empresas locales la oportunidad única de reunirse con delegados taiwaneses para debatir sobre la posible cooperación comercial.

Además, busca establecer vínculos comerciales más estrechos entre Taiwán y los países de Centroamérica.

El Banco Central de Honduras (BCH) reportó hasta mayo pasado $10.

1 millones por concepto de exportaciones a ese mercado asiático, un crecimiento de $2.

4 millones comparado con lo registrado al mismo mes de 2017.

Las importaciones totalizaron $29.

4 millones al quinto mes del presente año.


          Colombia es el cuarto país que más invierte en Honduras      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Logística.  Argos invertirá en Choloma, Cortés.

San Pedro Sula, Honduras Totto, la empresa de textiles colombiana, ha visto en el mercado centroamericano un nicho de constante crecimiento.

En Honduras tiene más de 12 años de operaciones y ocho puntos de venta y 200 distribuidores a nivel nacional.

Totto está en más de 30 países con 650 puntos de venta y 3,000 personas empleadas y otros 7,000 en sus canales de distribución.

63.

3Millones de dólares esel saldo de las compras que Honduras hizo de Colombia y las ventas a ese país sumaron más de 12 millones dólares hasta mayo.

“La marca, con sus maletines, ropa y accesorios, se ha convertido en la primera opción de compra, porque las personas la relacionan con calidad”, refiere Allan Martínez, gerente de Mercadeo de Totto en Honduras.

La empresa conquistó en 2016 el reinado de bolsos y accesorios en Colombia con un incremento del 87% de las ganancias, al tiempo de seguir conquistando el extranjero con un plan de expansión que sigue hasta la fecha y con agenda de avanzar para la década del 2020.

A criterio de Martínez, parte de la recepción favorable de los consumidores es explicado por la tecnología y diseños puestos en cada producto.

Para Honduras, la inversión extranjera directa (IED) de Colombia sumó $13.

3 millones hasta marzo de este año.

Al cierre del año pasado, estos flujos de capital sumaron $103.

9 millones, un incremento interanual de 5.

3%.

Con este resultado, casi el 9% de la IED que recibió Honduras vino de ese país sudamericano, convirtiéndolo en el cuarto país que más invierte en Honduras, luego de Panamá (20%), Estados Unidos (17%) y Guatemala (9.

6%), conforme al BCH.

Otras empresas colombianas que operan a nivel nacional son Pintuco, por medio de su marca Protecto, Davivienda, Avianca y Cementos Argos.

Esta última anunció a principios de año la construcción de una planta para ampliar su capacidad de producción de cemento, misma que está valorada en $20 millones.

La obra denominada estación de molienda estará en Choloma, Cortés.

En el período 2000-2014, la IED colombiana a Centroamérica, según datos del Banco de la República de ese país, sumó $9.

231 millones.

De ellos, Panamá captó el 70.

7% de toda la inversión, seguido por Guatemala (10.

9%), El Salvador (7.

8%), Honduras (5.

8%) y Costa Rica (4.

9%), detalla un informe de la Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (Cepal).

Los sectores financieros y empresariales, industria manufacturera, petróleo, electricidad, transporte y comercio al por mayor, son las actividades que más recibieron capital colombiano.

Argos invertirá en Choloma, Cortés.

EstrategiaLos mandatarios de Colombia y Honduras hablaron de potenciar dos importantes destinos de ambos países, San Andrés y Roatán.

La idea entre los dos países es impulsar un trabajo que explote en mejor forma el concepto de la economía naranja (basada en el talento, la cultura, la propiedad intelectual y la conectividad), indicó el presidente Juan Orlando Hernández en conferencia ayer en Tegucigalpa.

“Hablamos de complementar el trabajo entre las islas de Roatán y San Andrés; asimismo, de intercambios culturales por medio de un esquema bajo el concepto de la economía naranja, con actos culturales, recreaciones funcionales y otros aspectos”, explicó Hernández.

Añadió que en ese esquema de trabajo, en Honduras se pretende reforzar áreas de turismo a las que no se les había sacado el debido provecho, como la represa hidroeléctrica conocida como El Cajón.

“Debemos mejorar muchos aspectos en el turismo”, dijo Hernández.


          Industria de “call centers” lleva ya $100 millones en inversión      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

San Pedro Sula, HondurasUnos 100 millones de dólar lleva invertidos el sector de servicios de “call centers”, de acuerdo con el empresario Yusuf Amdani, de Grupo Karims, que administra el parque de negocios Altia, en San Pedro Sula.

El crecimiento del sector se refleja en el número de empleos generados, el cual ya supera los 14,000 puestos de trabajo, según el empresario.

El crecimiento anual del sector se calcula entre 2,000 y 3,000 empleos nuevos, mientras que la mayor parte de la inversión se concentra en la infraestructura que sirve de apoyo a este sector de los servicios.

Amdani adelantó que en lo que resta del año se espera la llegada de dos nuevas empresas, una a Tegucigalpa y otra a San Pedro Sula, lo que representa la añadidura de entre 2,000 y 4,000 nuevos puestos de trabajo.

Aunque hasta ahora el crecimiento de la industria de los servicios se concentra en las dos ciudades principales, el ejecutivo señaló que otros lugares como La Ceiba y Roatán ofrecen también potencial de crecimiento debido a la calidad del recurso humano con que cuentan.


          Junta directiva del Cohep reconoce trayectoria de cuatro mipymes cafetaleras      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

LOGRO. Mipymes cafetaleras posan con los reconocimientos.

Tegucigalpa, HondurasEl Consejo Hondureño de la Empresa Privada (Cohep) entregó ayer un reconocimiento a cuatro mipymes cafetaleras de varias regiones del país.

Estas fueron Finca el Puente, que es una empresa familiar dedicada a la exportación de cafés especiales y liderada por ganadores de Taza de Excelencia en 2016 y 2018.

Además, Comsa (Café Orgánico de Marcala), una organización de pequeños productores del aromático.

Otra organización fue la Cooperativa Cafetalera La Labor Ocotepeque Limitada (Cocafelol), que tiene 431 socios.

También recibió un galardón Café Raga, en La Paz.

Estas micro, pequeñas y medianas empresas representan el valor, el esfuerzo y la tenacidad de un sector que ha puesto en alto el nombre de Honduras, según Gabriel Molina, gerente de empresa sostenible del Cohep.

“Se han destacado por su operatividad, enfoque de género y generación de empleo”, agregó.


          Centroamérica creará una ley regional de libre competencia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Presentación. Autoridades de la CDPC participaron ayer en un foro celebrado en Tegucigalpa.

Tegucigalpa, HondurasPara aprovechar el acuerdo de asociación con la Unión Europea, Centroamérica se comprometió a crear una ley regional de libre competencia para 2020.

El acuerdo con la Unión Europea plantea una importante oportunidad para aumentar el intercambio comercial entre ambas regiones; pero también demanda el cumplimiento de la libre competencia para atraer la inversión.

“La ley va a dar vida a la autoridad centroamericana de libre competencia, que va a poder accionar de manera coercitiva para atacar las prácticas anticompetitivas que se cometan en dos o más países”, explicó Alberto Lozano, titular de la Comisión para la Defensa y Promoción de la Competencia (CDPC) durante un foro para celebrar el día de la libre competencia que se lleva a cabo en Honduras el 8 de agosto.

Regina Vargas, coordinadora de la Secretaría Ejecutiva de la Red Centroamericana de Autoridades de Competencia (Recac), indicó que entre los desafíos de CA está la necesidad de un sistema regional de competencia, que incluya la adopción de una legislación en todos los países centroamericanos; coherencia con los instrumentos de la integración y procedimientos de detección e investigación de prácticas anticompetitivas.

Asimismo, una autoridad centroamericana fuerte que administre un reglamento regional de competencia y mecanismos de cooperación entre autoridades nacionales y regionales.

Honduras es el país de la región que tiene una ley vanguardista para la libre competencia, de acuerdo con Lozano.

“La competencia mejora los negocios y las condiciones de trabajo para luego transferir las eficiencias a los consumidores”, dijo.


          Buscan inversores para distrito textil en el norte de Honduras      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

Tegucigalpa, Honduras La idea de desarrollar un distrito textil en el norte de país podría convertirse en una realidad este año, de acuerdo con Arnaldo Castillo, titular de la Secretaría de Desarrollo Económico (SDE).

Una fuerte inversión de más de 500 millones de dólares culminaría este proyecto en la zona alrededor del municipio de La Lima, Cortés (norte de Honduras).

“Queremos reunirnos con los inversionistas para tratar de corroborar que esta inversión se va a dar en el país”, explicó Castillo.

Por otra parte, agregó el ministro, se está avanzando en un proyecto de gas natural para generar energía, ya que la compañía presentó una garantía de 33 millones de dólares ante la Comisión para la Promoción de la Alianza Público-Privada (Coalianza).

“Creemos que este año va a ser un año bien positivo”, dijo el funcionario.


          Honduras registró una inflación del 0.38 % en julio y una acumulada del 2.4 %      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

La inflación en Honduras fue del 0.

38 por ciento en julio pasado, lo que llevó al 2.

4 por ciento la tasa acumulada en los primeros siete meses de 2018, informó este miércoles el Banco Central del país centroamericano (BCH).

La tasa de inflación acumulada en julio fue inferior en 0.

5 puntos a la del mismo mes de 2017, cuando llegó al 2.

9 por ciento, indicó el Banco Central en su informe sobre el índice de precios al consumidor (IPC).

La variación mensual se explica principalmente por el alza en el precio de algunos alimentos perecederos y preparados en restaurantes, así como en el servicio de agua potable, según el organismo.

Señaló además que los alimentos y bebidas no alcohólicas, alojamiento, agua, electricidad, gas y otros combustibles, hoteles, cafeterías y restaurantes, cuidado personal, muebles y artículos para el hogar fueron los que más influyeron en la inflación de julio.

El Banco Central indicó que la inflación interanual alcanzó en julio pasado el 4.

2 por ciento, superior al 3.

6 por ciento del mismo periodo de 2017.

Honduras cerró el año pasado con una inflación de 4.

7 por ciento, según el organismo monetario del país.

Para 2018 las autoridades económicas prevén una inflación que no supere el 4 por ciento.

EFE


          Así va la cotización del dólar en Centroamérica a mitad de semana      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

Ciudad de PanamáPrecios de venta en el día de hoy de las monedas de Centroamérica con relación al dólar estadounidense y su variación respecto a la jornada anterior: Países Moneda Precios Variación COSTA RICA Colón 570,65 (+0,02 %) GUATEMALA Quetzal 7,48 ( 0,00 %) HONDURAS Lempira 24,15 ( 0,00 %) NICARAGUA Córdoba 31,70 ( 0,00 %)


          Alleged MS-13 leader asks to ease NY jail restrictions      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

MINEOLA, N.Y. (AP) — A man identified by prosecutors as the East Coast leader of the MS-13 gang says he's suffering from his Long Island jail lockdown.

Newsday reports that Miguel Angel Corea Diaz recently asked a judge for an improvement in jail conditions.

His lawyer, Scott Gross, says Corea Diaz has been locked in a cell for about 23 hours a day and only has limited phone access.

Corea Diaz says he has been unable to talk to his children. He also said he had received death threats from outside the jail.

The judge said she would look into his request. Nassau County declined to comment.

An indictment alleges Corea Diaz ordered beatings and killings while directing MS-13 drug operations in New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Texas and elsewhere. He has pleaded not guilty.

MS-13, or La Mara Salvatrucha, recruits young teenagers from El Salvador and Honduras — though many gang members were born in the U.S.


          Golpe al cartel de Sinaloa en Los Ángeles: arrestan a 22 narcos en un operativo federal - Univision      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Univision

Golpe al cartel de Sinaloa en Los Ángeles: arrestan a 22 narcos en un operativo federal
Univision
A lo largo de tres años la operación 'Narconetas' siguió los pasos a tres células del cartel que recibían la mercancía en el norte de México y la cruzaban a través de garitas fronterizas de California ocultándola en compartimientos secretos de sus ...
Operación Narconetas: golpe al Cártel de Sinaloa en Los ÁngelesLa Opinión (Comunicado de prensa)
Operación encubierta contra el cartel de Sinaloa decomisa 1,4 millones de dólares y deja 22 arrestadosTelemundo
Operación encubierta en Los Ángeles contra el cartel de Sinaloa deja 22 arrestadosEl Tiempo Latino
EL DEBATE -Excélsior -El Economista -La Prensa de Honduras
los 103 artículos informativos »

          The most persistent and pernicious canard      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
One of the most persistent and pernicious canards we hear about Third World invaders of White lands is that if given a chance to settle they'll become 'just like us', law-abiding and productive. So why aren't they like that in their home countries? Ah, that would be because they have to 'endure' high levels of crime and corruption there. And who are the instigators of said crime and corruption? Well, unless unknown interlopers are making daring nightly raids  across their borders then their own people are to blame. 

The overwhelming majority of illegal immigrants to the USA are from Latin America and that region is one of the world's worst in terms of the murder, poverty and corruption upon which lie a flimsy and delusional patina of democracy. Unbelievably almost 120 politicians were murdered in the run up to Mexico's most recent election. But this just reflects the rest of society. The homicide rate stands around 22 per 100,000 population — near the levels of Columbia and Guatemala. By way of contrast the USA rate is 5 (the vast majority of murderers are non-White) while Ireland's is less than 1.  The real high achievers are Honduras (44) and El Salvador (60) - both, by the way, rich sources of illegal immigration to the USA.

Meanwhile in Brazil, that happy samba-land of multicultural bliss, things have got so bad that, according to Zero Hedge the country's elites have become "totally freaked out" and are fleeing 'bloodshed and chaos'. 'Amid the economic, political, and social collapse, Brazil has been described by many as being in the midst of a “zombie apocalypse” as years of corruption and violence spectacularly implodes all at once. Horrified by the out of control violence and pessimistic about the nation’s political and economic outlook, thousands of wealthy Brazilians are now fleeing the country'. A well-known actor said he has considered moving his family to Europe for the safety of his three children. “In several years, they’re going to want to go out, to start dating, without worrying about getting shot.”  Well there's a simple answer to that: Ban guns.

It makes perfect sense for Third Worlders to emigrate to wealthy, safe and clean White countries. It makes no sense whatsoever for White countries to let them in because, as we see in the barrios and ghettos of America and Europe they'll turn their new host countries into mirrors of the ones they fled. While complaining bitterly about the racism of their hosts. 

No less an authority than Plato recognised this phenomenon more than 2,000 years ago when he said that 'this City is what it is because our citizens are what they are.'

          Mary Morales - Honduras      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Óleo. Título: 27 de Enero

          Daniel Valladares Bustamante - Honduras      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

























          Flights into Copan, Honduras from Guatemala City      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
.. Flying into Guatemala city in November on our way to Antigua. My wife and I have decided we'd like to visit Copan on this trip. Have read the horror stories about bus tours from Antigua leaving at an unheard of 3-4am (I am NOT an early riser..) and taking 7 hours each way..!! so we have decided to fly. WE know there is aan airport in Copna Ruinas, but WHO flys there??

So far.. the only info I have not been able to find anywhere on the www is flight information from Guatemala City. Are there flights to Copan from Guatemala city? I can't even find a phone number for information inside the Guate airport to ask... Anyone have any ideas how I could find out? Any advice would be appreciated..
          Colombia reconoció a Palestina, ¿y ahora qué? - ElEspectador.com      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

ElEspectador.com

Colombia reconoció a Palestina, ¿y ahora qué?
ElEspectador.com
La última decisión del gobierno Santos puso en un aprieto al presidente Iván Duque, quien tendrá que lidiar con las implicaciones de haber reconocido al Estado palestino como “libre y soberano”. Leyenda / credito. “Colombia no reconocerá a Palestina ...
A Comisión de Relaciones Exteriores irá reconocimiento a PalestinaElTiempo.com
Colombia reconoce Estado palestino y Gobierno de Duque revisará implicacionesLa Prensa de Honduras
La embajada de Israel le pidió a Colombia revertir el reconocimiento al Estado palestinoInfobae.com
El Colombiano -Excélsior -Semana.com -El Comercio
los 203 artículos informativos »

          Dos personas heridas deja tiroteo en San Lorenzo, Valle      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

Valle, Honduras.

Dos personas heridas dejó un tiroteo registrado la noche de este miércoles en San Lorenzo, Valle, zona sur del país.

De momento se desconoce el nombre de las víctimas quienes fueron llevadas al Hospital de Sur.

Asimismo se ignora el origen del tiroteo.

Nota en desarrollo.

.

.


          Encuentran armas con mirilla telescópica abandonadas en vehículo en San Pedro Sula      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

Varias armas de grueso calibre fueron encontradas por agentes de la Policía Nacional dentro de un vehículo que fue abandonado en un sector de San Pedro Sula, zona norte de Honduras.

La camioneta marca Hyundai fue encontrada abandonada esta tarde en el barrio Medina, entre 16 y 17 calle, 6 avenida.

Dentro del vehículo las autoridades encontraron: - Un arma de fuego tipo escopeta con nueve proyectiles - Un arma de fuego tipo pistola marca Jirsan 9 milímetros con 13 proyectiles- Dos plasmas marca Samsung de 50 y 46 pulgadas - Una mira telescópica marca Center Point- Dos pasaportes.

- Dos lociones.

De inmediato el vehículo fue trasladado a las instalaciones de la Primera Estación Policial para continuar con el procedimiento que conforme a ley corresponde.

<amp-img src="https://imageshack.

com/i/poYMykvEj" alt="Pistola encontrada" width="380" height="250" layout="responsive"></amp-img>


          Pobladores queman dos vehículos municipales en Islas de la Bahía      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

Islas de la Bahía, Honduras.

Dos vehículos de la municipalidad de Roatán fueron quemados por pobladores de Watering Place en Islas de la Bahía, el hecho se produjo tras el desalojo en una invasión, según información que trascendió.

Al lugar del siniestro llegaron dos unidades del Cuerpo de Bomberos para apagar el fuego.

De momento se desconoce si hubo personas heridas.


          Cae supuesto ladrón que se hacía pasar por deportista en Tegucigalpa      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Un hombre fue detenido este día por suponerlo responsable del delito de asalto.

El hecho se registró mediante un operativo de rutina dentro del complejo de la Villa Olímpica ubicado al noroeste de Tegucigalpa, capital del país, informó la Policía.

El detenido responde al nombre de Héctor Adonis Vigil Zelaya (39) de oficio albañil, originario y residente en el barrio Morazán de Tegucigalpa.

De acuerdo al informe policial, a Vigil se le decomisó un teléfono celular marca Samsung Galaxi S4 color negro con blanco.

La captura se realizó tras la denuncia de la persona a quien el supuesto deportista le quitó el aparato telefónico antes señalado, según indicaron las autoridades.


          Libres abogado y enfermera del Leonardo Martínez      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

San Pedro Sula, Honduras Una enfermera, un apoderado legal del hospital Leonardo Martínez y un sobrino de él recobraron la libertad ayer luego de que una jueza resolviera que la mujer recibió de manera voluntaria a un recién nacido de manos de la madre.

Ambos profesionales fueron acusados por el Ministerio Público del delito de sustracción de menores, pero el tribunal resolvió aplicar un sobreseimiento definitivo.

En su resolución, la jueza decretó sobreseimiento definitivo porque la Fiscalía no probó que se haya cometido el delito.

El abogado Andrés Acosta Urrutia, la enfermera Lesly Geraldina Gómez Reyes y Christián José Guevara recobraron la libertad después de estar seis días presos.

Los dos funcionarios y el muchacho fueron capturados la madrugada del jueves 2 de agosto cuando iban a entregarle el recién nacido a la madre.

La fiscalía los acusó después de que la mujer de 17 años denunciara que le habían quitado a su bebé.

Los tres acusados comparecieron a audiencia inicial el martes 7 de agosto en la que declaró la madre, así como el director del hospital Leonardo Martínez y una enfermera.

Ayer, a las 3:00 pm, la jueza de lo penal indicó en su resolución que la madre de 17 años entregó voluntariamente su bebé a la enfermera, “por ello hay antecedentes probatorios que nos indican la inexistencia del vicio de consentimiento”.

Manifestó que el director del hospital declaró que vio en videos que la joven madre salió cargando a su hijo.

Otra enfermera declaró que la madre, desde que el niño nació, lo quería reportar como muerto o regalarlo.

Para la jueza no se logró proponer ni evacuar elementos de pruebas que “minímamente indique que la enfermera Lesly procedió dolosamente a sacar el recién nacido”.

“Existe un error ético, pero ello no está en el ámbito de la aplicación juridisccional”, concluye la resolución.


          Frente a una escuela y cerca de una posta matan a taxista en la capital      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

Tegucigalpa, HondurasUn taxista fue ultimado a tiros ayer entre una escuela, un colegio de segunda enseñanza y, aún más alarmante, a una cuadra de la estación policial de la zona.

El ruletero de la unidad con registro 5767 transitaba por la calle principal de la colonia La Rosa, frente al portón principal de la escuela Doctor Modesto Rodas Alvarado.

El tráfico, las malas condiciones de las calles y un pozo de inspección en mal estado propició que el hombre redujera la velocidad de su carro.

René Espinal Izaguirre, quien este día cumpliría sus 63 años de vida, es la víctima mortal del violento ataque ocurrido cerca de las 2:15 pm en el límite entre las colonias La Rosa y La Pradera, de Comayagüela.

El hombre recibió dos balazos, uno cerca de la sien izquierda y el otro entre el pómulo y la oreja izquierda.

Una sobrina del malogrado taxista relató que él acababa de recoger a un niño en su casa, a quien dos veces a la semana llevaba a practicar fútbol.

El menor iba en el asiento trasero del carro y presenció el ataque en contra de don René.

Según testigos oculares del crimen, el niño se bajó deprisa del taxi y salió corriendo, atemorizado.

A pesar de que en la zona casi siempre está estacionada una patrulla de la Policía Militar, ayer no había presencia de los elementos.


          Este es el video donde quedó grabado el supuesto asesino del abogado Mateo Galán      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

El sujeto llega hasta la puerta del bufete del abogado Rubén Darío Mateo Galán, entra y segundos después sale apresuradamente guardando algo en una mochila roja, dejando gravemente herido al profesional del derecho, según la Policía Nacional.

Este es el video en poder de la Policía con el que buscan al principal sospechoso del crimen.

El hombre es robusto y de piel clara, vestía una camisa polo azul; un pantalón jeans azul claro; tenis oscuros con blanco; gorra y lentes.

El asesinato del abogado se registró en pasado martes en la 9 avenida, entre segunda y tercera calle, del barrio Guamilito de San Pedro Sula, zona norte de Honduras.

VEA: Dramáticas imágenes de familiares que llegan a escena del crimen del abogado GalánLEA: Homicida vigiló bufete para matar al abogado Mateo Galán<amp-img src="https://imageshack.

com/a/img924/732/MVYja6.

png" alt="ETIQUETADELAIMAGEN" width="380" height="250" layout="responsive"></amp-img> <amp-img src="https://imageshack.

com/a/img922/6825/C9S7eB.

jpg" alt="ETIQUETADELAIMAGEN" width="380" height="250" layout="responsive"></amp-img>


          Capturan a sujeto por machetear a dos ancianas en Copán      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

Santa Rosa de Copán, Honduras.

Luego de atacar a machetazos a dos señoras, autoridades de la Policia Nacional lograron detener infraganti, a un hombre en el municipio de Dulce Nombre de Copán.

El incidente se registró esta mañana cuando el sospechoso, identificado como René Ortega, atacó con un machete a dos señoras que transitaban por la calle.

Las victimas son Maria de Rosario Mejía (86), y Rosa Enma Alvarado (87), quienes sufrieron heridas en la cabeza y que tuvieron que ser trasladadas por miembros del Cuerpo de Bomberos, al hospital de occidente.

Según relatos el atacante padece problemas mentales y cuando encontró a las dos ancianas, las atacó sin ninguna razón.

Gregorio Cornejo, portavoz de la Policia, indicó que la detención de Ortega se efectuó debido a que la población denunció el hecho rápidamente y por lo tanto, se logró ubicar al implicado.


          Capturan a sospechoso de matar al empresario Germán Coto        Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

Con base en una orden de detención preventiva emitida por la Fiscalía, capturaron ayer en Puerto Cortés a uno de los supuestos homicidas del transportista German Cortés Coto.

El aprehendido es un guardia de seguridad identificado por las autoridades policiales como José Rolando Lobo Hernández (de 51 años).

Lobo asegura que es inocente y que estaba trabajando cuando ocurrió el crimen.

La Policía informó que la principal prueba que hay contra Lobo Hernández es que uno de los testigos protegidos lo identifica como uno de los tipos que disparó contra el empresario del transporte Cortés Coto.

El celador fue capturado cerca de las 12:30 del mediodía en el barrio El Centro, de Puerto Cortés, mediante una labor de vigilancia y seguimiento de agentes de la Policía Preventiva y la Dirección Policial de Investigaciones (DPI).

El jefe de la Policía en Puerto Cortés, subcomisionado Raúl Martínez Alvarado, manifestó que contra el guardia hay indicios que fueron levantados en la escena del crimen, así como testigos protegidos que lo identifican.

Martínez agregó que la Fiscalía emitió la orden de detención porque hay pistas suficientes para que Lobo sea acusado en los juzgados.

Expuso que la principal línea de investigación en cuanto al motivo de la muerte del transportista son enemistades personales, ya que había recibido amenazas de muerte de personas de la Cooperativa de Transporte Urbano Limitado (Coptul), de la que el ahora occiso era gerente y socio mayoritario.

El jefe policial indicó que también manejan algunas situaciones personales de Cortés, como el hecho de que estuvo en investigación y agregó que hay otras líneas, las cuales se irán descartando.

Dijo que las investigaciones establecen que hay dos personas más que participaron en el homicidio y ya andan tras su pista.

Asimismo, Martínez informó que supuestamente fue un crimen por encargo.

Cortés fue ultimado el 24 de julio en el barrio El Porvenir de Puerto Cortés cuando conducía uno de sus buses del centro de Puerto Cortés a Cienaguita donde está la terminal de los buses de la Coptul.

El transportista fue atacado a balazos por dos tipos que venían como pasajeros en el bus.

Los homicidas huyeron en un turismo rojo conducido por otro individuo.


          Cae uno de los sospechosos tras asalto a familia en Santa Mónica      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

Uno de los sospechosos de asaltar a mano armada a una familia en una residencial de San Pedro Sula, zona norte de Honduras, fue detenido este miércoles por autoridades policiales.

Se informó que el automóvil en el que se trasladaban los individuos fue identificado tras revisar las cámaras de seguridad de la colonia.

Los sospechosos llegaron a la colonia en un Hyundai rojo y después fueron perseguidos por la Policía Nacional, que recibió una llamada de alerta.

Los uniformados capturaron a los sospechosos en el barrio Medina tras una persecución en la 12 calle, 7 avenida.

El detenido fue identificado como Juan Miguel Portillo Pineda a quien le decomisaron una pistola 9 milímetros.

Al parecer se robaron varias computadoras y objetos de valor de la vivienda.


          Capturan en Choluteca a dos presuntos pirómanos      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

Choluteca, Honduras.

Agentes de prevención y seguridad comunitaria de la Policía Nacional capturaron a dos hombres por suponerlos responsables del delito de incendio.

Un juez de Choluteca emitió la orden de captura contra Gustavo López Velásquez (de 31 años) y Yelsthin Ariel Oyuela (de 24 años).

Ellos fueron capturados en el municipio de Yusguare, Choluteca, en la región sur de Honduras.

Los antecedentes policiales de los sujetos indican que los imputados tenían orden de captura pendiente por los delitos de daños e incendio en perjuicio del ciudadano Óscar Noé Rodas, la cual fue emitida el presente año por el Juzgado de Letras de la Seccional Judicial de Choluteca.

Al momento de su captura, a los encausados se les decomisó un vehículo marca Mazda, tipo pick-up, color blanco, con placas PDJ 4975.

Tras la lectura de sus derechos los capturados fueron trasladados a la instancia judicial que ordenó su arresto para que conforme a ley se prosiga con el debido proceso legal en su contra.


          Detienen a menor de edad por suponerlo responsable de extorsión      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

La Prensa

San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

Agentes de la Fuerza Nacional Anti Maras y Pandillas (Fnamp) detuvieron este miércoles a un menor de edad por suponerlo responsable del delito de extorsión.

La Policía informó que el joven (de 14 años), conocido con el alias de Toro Max, fue detenido en la aldea Ticamaya, en Choloma, departamento de Cortés.

Autoridades agregaron que al menor se le vigilaba y daba seguimiento para proceder con la detención.

<amp-img src="https://imageshack.

com/a/img923/4834/jGGVPV.

jpg" alt="Extorsión" width="380" height="250" layout="responsive"></amp-img><figcaption class="pie-imagen-amp"> El menor fue presentado por las autoridades.

</figcaption> Alias Toro Max fue detenido por supuestamente ser miembro de la Mara Salvatrucha (MS-13) y dedicarse a coletar dinero producto de la extorsión en el sector de Ticamaya.

El menor será remitido a los Juzgados correspondientes para seguir el debido proceso legal.

- Evidencia -Al joven le decomisaron 350 lempiras, los cuales serán presentados como evidencia.

<amp-img src="https://imageshack.

com/a/img923/6026/vRsr7G.

jpg" alt="Extorsión" width="380" height="250" layout="responsive"></amp-img><figcaption class="pie-imagen-amp"> Al menor le encontraron dinero que será usado como evidencia.

</figcaption>


          #ecuador - frases_fe_en_dios      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Y reflexiona en la palabra de Dios. √√activa NUESTRAS NOTIFICACIONES √√Etiqueta a una persona √√Comparte esta imagen #Panama #Argentina #Guatemala #ElSalvador #Honduras #Paraguay #CostaRica #Bolivia #Cuba #frwasesdebendicion #Venezuela #brasil #EstadosUnidos #frasescristianas #zionmusic_relevant #frasesdeedificacion #España #Cristianos #sigueme #nicaragua #Ecuador #Únete #RepublicaDominicana #PuertoRico
          #ecuador - frases_nuestro_dios      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Y reflexiona en la palabra de Dios. √√activa NUESTRAS NOTIFICACIONES √√Etiqueta a una persona √√Comparte esta imagen #colombia #Honduras #Mexico #EstadosUnidos #Argentina #Venezuela #zionmusic_relevant #frasescristianas #ElSalvador #Cuba #frwasesdebendicion #Uruguay #Paraguay #Panama #Ecuador #España #PuertoRico #RepublicaDominicana #Únete #nicaragua #Cristianos
          #ecuador - frasesautenticocristiano      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Y reflexiona en la palabra de Dios. √√activa NUESTRAS NOTIFICACIONES √√Etiqueta a una persona √√Comparte esta imagen #Paraguay #Honduras #frasesdeedificacion #Panama #brasil #EstadosUnidos #Argentina #frasescristianas #CostaRica #colombia #Peru #Guatemala #Bolivia #Uruguay #zionmusic_relevant #frwasesdebendicion #Cuba #Chile #Ecuador #PuertoRico #España #sigueme #Únete #Cristianos #RepublicaDominicana #nicaragua
          #ecuador - bryancc94      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
MEN AROUND THE WORLD 🇪🇨 🇭🇳 . . #madrid🇪🇸 #boys #cute #night #ecuador #honduras #party #friends #follow #nature #beautiful #happy #instalike #likeforlike #instadaily #instagood #fashion #me #selfie #smile #photographylovers #models #fashionmen #fun #photooftheday #like4like #love #followme #summer
          #ecuador - frasestodoscondios      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Y reflexiona en la palabra de Dios. √√Etiqueta a una persona √√activa NUESTRAS NOTIFICACIONES √√√√Comparte estas imagenes #zionmusic_relevant #frasescristianas #Venezuela #CostaRica #colombia #frwasesdebendicion #Guatemala #Argentina #frasesdeedificacion #Peru #Mexico #Chile #brasil #Honduras #nicaragua #Ecuador #PuertoRico #Cristianos #RepublicaDominicana #Únete
          Townsend Block and Shell cabinet      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Yes I do love mahogany. Honduras? And the work is amazing. Thank you for sharing.
          An Orphanage That Doesn't Seem Like An Orphanage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Orphanages are falling out of favor. Ever since the horrific conditions in Romanian orphanages were widely publicized in the 1990s – naked children tied to cribs in overcrowded wards — there's been a movement in the international aid world to shut down orphanages completely. But according to UNICEF, there are still 2.7 million children living in orphanages worldwide. So what if someone tried to set up a good orphanage — a place where parentless kids could thrive? What would it look like? And what could it tell us about the basics of child rearing? It might look like this: A dozen kids piled on a couch watching a soccer match on TV while kids from neighboring houses drop by to chat. Other kids are preparing dinner in the kitchen. The kids call the employees of the institution "mom" and "auntie" while the staff call them "mi amor" — my love. The kids and the adults at the SOS Children's Village, an orphanage in Tela, Honduras, interact like a big extended family. It's a place where
          HONDURAS CRISIS - El Gobierno hondureño está listo para un diálogo que supere la crisis, dice Hernández      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
none
          History of the CIA - Part two      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
1968
Operation CHAOS — The CIA has been illegally spying on American citizens since 1959, but with Operation CHAOS, President Johnson dramatically boosts the effort. CIA agents go undercover as student radicals to spy on and disrupt campus organizations protesting the Vietnam War. They are searching for Russian instigators, which they never find. CHAOS will eventually spy on 7,000 individuals and 1,000 organizations.

Bolivia — A CIA-organized military operation captures legendary guerilla Che Guevara. The CIA wants to keep him alive for interrogation, but the Bolivian government executes him to prevent worldwide calls for clemency.

1969
Uruguay — The notorious CIA torturer Dan Mitrione arrives in Uruguay, a country torn with political strife. Whereas right-wing forces previously used torture only as a last resort, Mitrione convinces them to use it as a routine, widespread practice. "The precise pain, in the precise place, in the precise amount, for the desired effect," is his motto. The torture techniques he teaches to the death squads rival the Nazis’. He eventually becomes so feared that revolutionaries will kidnap and murder him a year later.

1970
Cambodia — The CIA overthrows Prince Sahounek, who is highly popular among Cambodians for keeping them out of the Vietnam War. He is replaced by CIA puppet Lon Nol, who immediately throws Cambodian troops into battle. This unpopular move strengthens once minor opposition parties like the Khmer Rouge, which achieves power in 1975 and massacres millions of its own people.

1971
Bolivia — After half a decade of CIA-inspired political turmoil, a CIA-backed military coup overthrows the leftist President Juan Torres. In the next two years, dictator Hugo Banzer will have over 2,000 political opponents arrested without trial, then tortured, raped and executed.

Haiti — "Papa Doc" Duvalier dies, leaving his 19-year old son "Baby Doc" Duvalier the dictator of Haiti. His son continues his bloody reign with full knowledge of the CIA.

1972
The Case-Zablocki Act — Congress passes an act requiring congressional review of executive agreements. In theory, this should make CIA operations more accountable. In fact, it is only marginally effective.

Cambodia — Congress votes to cut off CIA funds for its secret war in Cambodia.
Wagergate Break-in — President Nixon sends in a team of burglars to wiretap Democratic offices at Watergate. The team members have extensive CIA histories, including James McCord, E. Howard Hunt and five of the Cuban burglars. They work for the Committee to Reelect the President (CREEP), which does dirty work like disrupting Democratic campaigns and laundering Nixon’s illegal campaign contributions. CREEP’s activities are funded and organized by another CIA front, the Mullen Company.

1973
Chile — The CIA overthrows and assassinates Salvador Allende, Latin America’s first democratically elected socialist leader. The problems begin when Allende nationalizes American-owned firms in Chile. ITT offers the CIA $1 million for a coup (reportedly refused). The CIA replaces Allende with General Augusto Pinochet, who will torture and murder thousands of his own countrymen in a crackdown on labor leaders and the political left.

CIA begins internal investigations — William Colby, the Deputy Director for Operations, orders all CIA personnel to report any and all illegal activities they know about. This information is later reported to Congress.

Watergate Scandal — The CIA’s main collaborating newspaper in America, The Washington Post, reports Nixon’s crimes long before any other newspaper takes up the subject. The two reporters, Woodward and Bernstein, make almost no mention of the CIA’s many fingerprints all over the scandal. It is later revealed that Woodward was a Naval intelligence briefer to the White House, and knows many important intelligence figures, including General Alexander Haig. His main source, "Deep Throat," is probably one of those.

CIA Director Helms Fired — President Nixon fires CIA Director Richard Helms for failing to help cover up the Watergate scandal. Helms and Nixon have always disliked each other. The new CIA director is William Colby, who is relatively more open to CIA reform.

1974
CHAOS exposed — Pulitzer prize winning journalist Seymour Hersh publishes a story about Operation CHAOS, the domestic surveillance and infiltration of anti-war and civil rights groups in the U.S. The story sparks national outrage.

Angleton fired — Congress holds hearings on the illegal domestic spying efforts of James Jesus Angleton, the CIA’s chief of counterintelligence. His efforts included mail-opening campaigns and secret surveillance of war protesters. The hearings result in his dismissal from the CIA.

House clears CIA in Watergate — The House of Representatives clears the CIA of any complicity in Nixon’s Watergate break-in.

The Hughes Ryan Act — Congress passes an amendment requiring the president to report nonintelligence CIA operations to the relevant congressional committees in a timely fashion.

1975
Australia — The CIA helps topple the democratically elected, left-leaning government of Prime Minister Edward Whitlam. The CIA does this by giving an ultimatum to its Governor-General, John Kerr. Kerr, a longtime CIA collaborator, exercises his constitutional right to dissolve the Whitlam government. The Governor-General is a largely ceremonial position appointed by the Queen; the Prime Minister is democratically elected. The use of this archaic and never-used law stuns the nation.
Angola — Eager to demonstrate American military resolve after its defeat in Vietnam, Henry Kissinger launches a CIA-backed war in Angola. Contrary to Kissinger’s assertions, Angola is a country of little strategic importance and not seriously threatened by communism. The CIA backs the brutal leader of UNITAS, Jonas Savimbi. This polarizes Angolan politics and drives his opponents into the arms of Cuba and the Soviet Union for survival. Congress will cut off funds in 1976, but the CIA is able to run the war off the books until 1984, when funding is legalized again. This entirely pointless war kills over 300,000 Angolans.

"The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence" — Victor Marchetti and John Marks publish this whistle-blowing history of CIA crimes and abuses. Marchetti has spent 14 years in the CIA, eventually becoming an executive assistant to the Deputy Director of Intelligence. Marks has spent five years as an intelligence official in the State Department.

"Inside the Company" — Philip Agee publishes a diary of his life inside the CIA. Agee has worked in covert operations in Latin America during the 60s, and details the crimes in which he took part.
Congress investigates CIA wrong-doing — Public outrage compels Congress to hold hearings on CIA crimes. Senator Frank Church heads the Senate investigation ("The Church Committee"), and Representative Otis Pike heads the House investigation. (Despite a 98 percent incumbency reelection rate, both Church and Pike are defeated in the next elections.) The investigations lead to a number of reforms intended to increase the CIA’s accountability to Congress, including the creation of a standing Senate committee on intelligence. However, the reforms prove ineffective, as the Iran/Contra scandal will show. It turns out the CIA can control, deal with or sidestep Congress with ease.

The Rockefeller Commission — In an attempt to reduce the damage done by the Church Committee, President Ford creates the "Rockefeller Commission" to whitewash CIA history and propose toothless reforms. The commission’s namesake, Vice President Nelson Rockefeller, is himself a major CIA figure. Five of the commission’s eight members are also members of the Council on Foreign Relations, a CIA-dominated organization.

1979
Iran — The CIA fails to predict the fall of the Shah of Iran, a longtime CIA puppet, and the rise of Muslim fundamentalists who are furious at the CIA’s backing of SAVAK, the Shah’s bloodthirsty secret police. In revenge, the Muslims take 52 Americans hostage in the U.S. embassy in Tehran.
Afghanistan — The Soviets invade Afghanistan. The CIA immediately begins supplying arms to any faction willing to fight the occupying Soviets. Such indiscriminate arming means that when the Soviets leave Afghanistan, civil war will erupt. Also, fanatical Muslim extremists now possess state-of-the-art weaponry. One of these is Sheik Abdel Rahman, who will become involved in the World Trade Center bombing in New York.

El Salvador — An idealistic group of young military officers, repulsed by the massacre of the poor, overthrows the right-wing government. However, the U.S. compels the inexperienced officers to include many of the old guard in key positions in their new government. Soon, things are back to "normal" — the military government is repressing and killing poor civilian protesters. Many of the young military and civilian reformers, finding themselves powerless, resign in disgust.

Nicaragua — Anastasios Samoza II, the CIA-backed dictator, falls. The Marxist Sandinistas take over government, and they are initially popular because of their commitment to land and anti-poverty reform. Samoza had a murderous and hated personal army called the National Guard. Remnants of the Guard will become the Contras, who fight a CIA-backed guerilla war against the Sandinista government throughout the 1980s.

1980
El Salvador — The Archbishop of San Salvador, Oscar Romero, pleads with President Carter "Christian to Christian" to stop aiding the military government slaughtering his people. Carter refuses. Shortly afterwards, right-wing leader Roberto D’Aubuisson has Romero shot through the heart while saying Mass. The country soon dissolves into civil war, with the peasants in the hills fighting against the military government. The CIA and U.S. Armed Forces supply the government with overwhelming military and intelligence superiority. CIA-trained death squads roam the countryside, committing atrocities like that of El Mazote in 1982, where they massacre between 700 and 1000 men, women and children. By 1992, some 63,000 Salvadorans will be killed.

1981
Iran/Contra Begins — The CIA begins selling arms to Iran at high prices, using the profits to arm the Contras fighting the Sandinista government in Nicaragua. President Reagan vows that the Sandinistas will be "pressured" until "they say ‘uncle.’" The CIA’s Freedom Fighter’s Manual disbursed to the Contras includes instruction on economic sabotage, propaganda, extortion, bribery, blackmail, interrogation, torture, murder and political assassination.

1983
Honduras — The CIA gives Honduran military officers the Human Resource Exploitation Training Manual – 1983, which teaches how to torture people. Honduras’ notorious "Battalion 316" then uses these techniques, with the CIA’s full knowledge, on thousands of leftist dissidents. At least 184 are murdered.

1984
The Boland Amendment — The last of a series of Boland Amendments is passed. These amendments have reduced CIA aid to the Contras; the last one cuts it off completely. However, CIA Director William Casey is already prepared to "hand off" the operation to Colonel Oliver North, who illegally continues supplying the Contras through the CIA’s informal, secret, and self-financing network. This includes "humanitarian aid" donated by Adolph Coors and William Simon, and military aid funded by Iranian arms sales.

1986
Eugene Hasenfus — Nicaragua shoots down a C-123 transport plane carrying military supplies to the Contras. The lone survivor, Eugene Hasenfus, turns out to be a CIA employee, as are the two dead pilots. The airplane belongs to Southern Air Transport, a CIA front. The incident makes a mockery of President Reagan’s claims that the CIA is not illegally arming the Contras.

Iran/Contra Scandal — Although the details have long been known, the Iran/Contra scandal finally captures the media’s attention in 1986. Congress holds hearings, and several key figures (like Oliver North) lie under oath to protect the intelligence community. CIA Director William Casey dies of brain cancer before Congress can question him. All reforms enacted by Congress after the scandal are purely cosmetic.

Haiti — Rising popular revolt in Haiti means that "Baby Doc" Duvalier will remain "President for Life" only if he has a short one. The U.S., which hates instability in a puppet country, flies the despotic Duvalier to the South of France for a comfortable retirement. The CIA then rigs the upcoming elections in favor of another right-wing military strongman. However, violence keeps the country in political turmoil for another four years. The CIA tries to strengthen the military by creating the National Intelligence Service (SIN), which suppresses popular revolt through torture and assassination.

1989
Panama — The U.S. invades Panama to overthrow a dictator of its own making, General Manuel Noriega. Noriega has been on the CIA’s payroll since 1966, and has been transporting drugs with the CIA’s knowledge since 1972. By the late 80s, Noriega’s growing independence and intransigence have angered Washington… so out he goes.

1990
Haiti — Competing against 10 comparatively wealthy candidates, leftist priest Jean-Bertrand Aristide captures 68 percent of the vote. After only eight months in power, however, the CIA-backed military deposes him. More military dictators brutalize the country, as thousands of Haitian refugees escape the turmoil in barely seaworthy boats. As popular opinion calls for Aristide’s return, the CIA begins a disinformation campaign painting the courageous priest as mentally unstable.

1991
The Gulf War — The U.S. liberates Kuwait from Iraq. But Iraq’s dictator, Saddam Hussein, is another creature of the CIA. With U.S. encouragement, Hussein invaded Iran in 1980. During this costly eight-year war, the CIA built up Hussein’s forces with sophisticated arms, intelligence, training and financial backing. This cemented Hussein’s power at home, allowing him to crush the many internal rebellions that erupted from time to time, sometimes with poison gas. It also gave him all the military might he needed to conduct further adventurism — in Kuwait, for example.

The Fall of the Soviet Union — The CIA fails to predict this most important event of the Cold War. This suggests that it has been so busy undermining governments that it hasn’t been doing its primary job: gathering and analyzing information. The fall of the Soviet Union also robs the CIA of its reason for existence: fighting communism. This leads some to accuse the CIA of intentionally failing to predict the downfall of the Soviet Union. Curiously, the intelligence community’s budget is not significantly reduced after the demise of communism.

1992
Economic Espionage — In the years following the end of the Cold War, the CIA is increasingly used for economic espionage. This involves stealing the technological secrets of competing foreign companies and giving them to American ones. Given the CIA’s clear preference for dirty tricks over mere information gathering, the possibility of serious criminal behavior is very great indeed.

1993
Haiti — The chaos in Haiti grows so bad that President Clinton has no choice but to remove the Haitian military dictator, Raoul Cedras, on threat of U.S. invasion. The U.S. occupiers do not arrest Haiti’s military leaders for crimes against humanity, but instead ensure their safety and rich retirements. Aristide is returned to power only after being forced to accept an agenda favorable to the country’s ruling class.

EPILOGUE

In a speech before the CIA celebrating its 50th anniversary, President Clinton said: "By necessity, the American people will never know the full story of your courage."

Clinton’s is a common defense of the CIA: namely, the American people should stop criticizing the CIA because they don’t know what it really does. This, of course, is the heart of the problem in the first place. An agency that is above criticism is also above moral behavior and reform. Its secrecy and lack of accountability allows its corruption to grow unchecked.

Furthermore, Clinton’s statement is simply untrue. The history of the agency is growing painfully clear, especially with the declassification of historical CIA documents. We may not know the details of specific operations, but we do know, quite well, the general behavior of the CIA. These facts began emerging nearly two decades ago at an ever-quickening pace. Today we have a remarkably accurate and consistent picture, repeated in country after country, and verified from countless different directions.

The CIA’s response to this growing knowledge and criticism follows a typical historical pattern. (Indeed, there are remarkable parallels to the Medieval Church’s fight against the Scientific Revolution.) The first journalists and writers to reveal the CIA’s criminal behavior were harassed and censored if they were American writers, and tortured and murdered if they were foreigners. (See Philip Agee’s On the Run for an example of early harassment.) However, over the last two decades the tide of evidence has become overwhelming, and the CIA has found that it does not have enough fingers to plug every hole in the dike. This is especially true in the age of the Internet, where information flows freely among millions of people. Since censorship is impossible, the Agency must now defend itself with apologetics. Clinton’s "Americans will never know" defense is a prime example.

Another common apologetic is that "the world is filled with unsavory characters, and we must deal with them if we are to protect American interests at all." There are two things wrong with this. First, it ignores the fact that the CIA has regularly spurned alliances with defenders of democracy, free speech and human rights, preferring the company of military dictators and tyrants. The CIA had moral options available to them, but did not take them.

Second, this argument begs several questions. The first is: "Which American interests?" The CIA has courted right-wing dictators because they allow wealthy Americans to exploit the country’s cheap labor and resources. But poor and middle-class Americans pay the price whenever they fight the wars that stem from CIA actions, from Vietnam to the Gulf War to Panama. The second begged question is: "Why should American interests come at the expense of other peoples’ human rights?"

The CIA should be abolished, its leadership dismissed and its relevant members tried for crimes against humanity. Our intelligence community should be rebuilt from the ground up, with the goal of collecting and analyzing information. As for covert action, there are two moral options. The first one is to eliminate covert action completely. But this gives jitters to people worried about the Adolf Hitlers of the world. So a second option is that we can place covert action under extensive and true democratic oversight. For example, a bipartisan Congressional Committee of 40 members could review and veto all aspects of CIA operations upon a majority or super-majority vote. Which of these two options is best may be the subject of debate, but one thing is clear: like dictatorship, like monarchy, unaccountable covert operations should die like the dinosaurs they are.


This article came from this website.

          “10 Cents of Change” Raises Over $1,000 to Provide Clean Water to Coffee-Growing Families in Honduras      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
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          Nicaragua’s failed coup      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

While the international pressure continues, by mid-July it became clear that, for the time being at least, the opposition in Nicaragua no longer has sufficient local support to achieve its goal. Español

Crowds of supporters during Daniel Ortega's inauguration speech. Wikimedia Commons. All Rights Reserved.

For three months Daniel Ortega and his government in Nicaragua were under intense pressure to resign – from protesters and opposition groups, from local media and from right-wing politicians in the US. But by mid-July it became clear that, despite persistent images of near-collapse painted by the international press, the country appears to be returning to something close to normality. How did a protest that seemed so strong when it began, lose momentum so quickly?

Daniel Ortega has been in power since 2007, in the last election won 72% of the vote and until recently was running high in independent opinion polls. Despite this, a casual reader of the national and international media would get the impression that he’s deeply despised.

In Open Democracy, the international protest group SOS Nicaragua calls him a “tyrant hell-bent on the bloody repression of the nation.” His local detractors agree. For example, on July 10 Vilma Núñez, a longstanding opponent of Ortega’s who was originally his ally, told the BBC that he is rolling out an “extermination plan” for Nicaragua.

When rebels briefly held one of Nicaragua’s cities a few weeks ago, their leaders said they had ended “eleven years of repression”. SOS Nicaragua even claims that Ortega is a “more hated and more long-lived tyrant than Nicaragua’s former dictator” (Anastasio Somoza and his family, who ruled Nicaragua ruthlessly for more than 40 years).

A casual glance at social media will show that plenty of people share these views, and at the peak of the opposition’s popularity they clearly had considerable traction. But the opposition’s first mistake might have been its overblown rhetoric, as people began to question whether it squared with their own perceptions.

For example, until April this year, Nicaragua was the second safest country in Latin America despite also being one of the poorest. Its police were renowned for their community-based methods in which (unlike in the “northern triangle” countries of Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala) killings by police officers were a rarity. Drugs-related crime was at a minimum and the violent gangs found in neighbouring countries didn’t exist.

Of course the police weren’t perfect, but people could safely report problems such as domestic violence without expecting a violent response from police themselves. Yet the same police are now labelled “assassins” by the opposition and blamed for the majority of the deaths since the protests started.

No one has questioned how a force with a record of limited violence was transformed overnight into ruthless murderers, supposedly capable of torture and even of killing children.

That there have been violent deaths in the past three months is not in doubt. Bloomberg repeated the claim from local human rights groups that 448 had died by the end of July. However, a detailed analysis of those reported in the first two months of the crisis showed how the numbers were being manipulated. By then nearly 300 deaths had been recorded by the two main human rights organisations or by the Inter-American Human Rights Commission.

A claim made right from the beginning by the protesters was that they were either unarmed or at best had only homemade weapons to protect themselves. Again, the international media were convinced. But local people could see otherwise.

A case-by-case analysis showed that of those listed only about 120 were definitely attributable to the protests, with many unrelated to the events or having unclear causes, or involved bystanders or resulted from double-counting.  Of course, the exaggerated picture is still held in many people’s minds (only the other day someone told my wife that “hundreds of students have been killed”), but many others have gradually realised that no massacre has in fact occurred.

In an important respect the opposition succeeded. They created what The Guardian calls “a widespread and growing consensus within the international community that Nicaragua’s government is in fact largely responsible for the bloodshed.” While human rights NGOs repeat the message that the police and security forces (in Amnesty International’s words) “shoot to kill”, the people themselves mostly know otherwise. Whatever the provenance of the deaths in the April protests, recent victims have often been government supporters or the police themselves.

In an analytic interview, Nils McCune explained to journalist Max Blumenthal how the opposition violence grew and Sandinistas were persecuted. Examples include a little reported incident on July 12, in which opposition gunmen killed four police and a schoolteacher in the small town of Morrito, kidnapping nine others.

On July 15, protesters captured a policeman from Jinotepe while he was on his way home, tortured him and burnt his body. Of the deaths verified in the analysis above, about half are of government officials, police or Sandinista supporters. On August 4 there was a massive march in Managua of government supporters calling for justice for these deaths, which are little reported internationally.

A claim made right from the beginning by the protesters was that they were either unarmed or at best had only homemade weapons to protect themselves. Again, the international media were convinced. But local people could see otherwise. The dangerous homemade mortars were soon being supplemented by more serious weapons. In the places where the protesters rested control of the streets, AK47s and other arms were being carried openly.

This was not surprising, as what started as mainly a student protest quickly changed to one in which trouble-makers were recruited from outside. There were reports from various cities of youths being paid to man the barricades; in some cases, more serious criminals became involved.

One of the student leaders of the protest, Harley Morales, admitted on June 10 that they had lost touch with what was happening on the streets. It was increasingly clear to local people that the coup attempt was leading to danger and insecurity of a kind they hadn’t experienced for years.

An initially successful element of the opposition’s campaign was building road blocks (“tranques”) on city streets and on the country’s half-dozen main highways. At one point the country was effectively paralysed and the government was forced to demand the lifting of the tranques before it would continue with the “national dialogue” aimed at resolving the crisis (hosted by Catholic bishops and involving both opposition and government supporters).

If the opposition had been sensible, it would have taken the government at its word, lifted the blockades and insisted that the dialogue proceed at pace. But either it was hooked on the power that the blockades had given it, or it couldn’t control those who were manning them. As well as simply being intimidating for local people to cross and very disruptive for local businesses, by this stage the tranques were the main focus of violence.

They quickly turned from being an opposition asset to being the main reason why people wanted a quick return to “normality” (a plea frequently heard in the streets). In the space of only a week or two, the opposition lost perhaps the best chance it had to influence the outcome of the crisis. When police and paramilitaries finally moved in to clear the tranques, people were out celebrating in Leon, Carazo and Masaya.

Another area in which the opposition wasted its initial gains was in use of social media. The starting point for the crisis was a forest fire in one of the country’s remote reserves. The opposition accused the government of ignoring the fire and turning down offers of help to fight it. By the time these were shown to be false, attention had moved on to a much more inflammatory issue, reforms to the social security system.

The strength and pace of the protests were fuelled by a stream of real and fake news, principally via Facebook. Of course government supporters were doing the same, but the opposition proved far more effective.

Again, there were distorted messages both about the reforms themselves and the subsequent protests. In perhaps the first example of mass manipulation of social media in Nicaragua since smartphones became widely available a couple of years ago, the strength and pace of the protests were fuelled by a stream of real and fake news, principally via Facebook. Of course government supporters were doing the same, but the opposition proved far more effective.

Any death was of a protester. Scenes were staged of tearful students uttering their “last messages” while under fire or people “confessing” to doing the government’s dirty work. While manipulation by the government side was more obvious and less sophisticated, many people became sceptical about what they saw on their phones and began to place more trust in their own experiences.

As the opposition became more desperate, social media took a turn for the worse, with instructions to track down and kill government “toads” (“zapos”), leading to the victimising and even torturing of government workers and supporters.  The intolerance has spread to the US and Europe, with SOS Nicaragua members shouting down anyone speaking about Nicaragua who does not support their line (as happened in early August in San Francisco).

Yet another opposition tactic that misfired was in calling strikes. That these came about was due to big business, which for long was happy to live with the Ortega government but was called to action by the US ambassador in March, when she told them they needed to get involved in politics. From day one they supported the opposition, even at the cost of their own businesses.

But Nicaragua is unique in Latin America in having only modest reliance on big firms. Thanks both to the nature of its economy and support from the Ortega government, small businesses, artesan workshops, co-ops and small farmers have grown in number.

What’s known as the “popular economy” contributes 64% of national income, far higher than is the case with Nicaragua’s neighbours. As well as being strangled by the tranques, small businesses couldn’t cope with strikes. Some observed them (perhaps under threat) but many did not, and the opposition lost other potential allies.

The protest marches, tranques and strikes were all aimed at putting pressure on the government, with the (televised) national dialogue as the public platform. Here, the opposition not only missed its best chance to secure reforms but its attacks misfired in other ways. It had only one argument, repeatedly put forward, that the government was responsible for all the deaths that were happening and must resign forthwith.

In other words, it didn’t really want dialogue at all. A belligerence that found approval among its hard-core supporters was simply off-putting to the majority of people who desperately wanted a negotiated outcome that would end the violence. The national dialogue now receives little attention, in part because the government has regained control of the streets but also because it is obvious that the opposition were using it only to insult and criticise, with no real intention of engaging properly.

Furthermore, instead of the Catholic church staying to one side as mediators, their priests have again and again been found to support the protests, so their role as neutral actors in the dialogue is no longer credible, if it ever was.

By aligning itself with the right wing of the US Republican party through its well-publicised trips to Washington and Miami, and its acceptance of US government finance, the opposition points to a change of political direction for Nicaragua which would be anathema to most Sandinistas and even to many of its own supporters.

By having to speak publicly in the dialogue, the opposition has also exposed other weaknesses. While it is united in wanting Ortega to go, it is divided on tactics and even more fundamentally in its politics. Whatever one thinks of the Ortega government, it can be seen to have taken the country in a certain direction and to have accumulated many social achievements during its eleven years in power.

What would happen to these? Even on the issue that ostensibly began the protests, the national social security fund, the opposition offers no clear alternative. Worse, by aligning itself with the right wing of the US Republican party through its well-publicised trips to Washington and Miami, and its acceptance of US government finance (detailed by the Grayzone Project), the opposition points to a change of political direction for Nicaragua which would be anathema to most Sandinistas and even to many of its own supporters.

There is a paradox here, because a tactic which backfired in Nicaragua may yet serve the opposition’s cause internationally and damage both Nicaragua and the Ortega government in a different way. While for the Trump administration Nicaragua is hardly a priority, there is long-running resentment about the success of Sandinista governments within the US establishment, awoken by the recent protests.

The same establishment also sees an opportunity to attack an ally of Venezuela’s. It has been working hard in bodies like the Organisation of American States, aided by its new allies in the region, to restrict Nicaragua’s support to the small number of Latin American countries that refuse to play the US game. While the OAS/OEA can take few concrete steps itself, it is contributing to an image of Nicaragua among US lawmakers that may allow sanctions to be imposed that could be very damaging to its economy and hence to its people.

As a result of all the opposition’s mistakes, and of the government’s concerted action to regain control, Nicaragua’s real situation has shifted markedly in the few weeks since mid-July. But international commentators are failing to keep up. The New York Times, Huffington Post, Guardian and other media continue to talk about the tyranny, or the mounting political violence, or (in the case of Huffpost) even the rise of fascism in Nicaragua.

In Open Democracy, José Zepeda claims that “the majority of the Nicaraguan people have turned their backs on [Ortega]”.  In Canada, the Ottawa Citizen talked about Nicaragua imploding. But most of these correspondents are not in the country. In practice the violence has slowed almost to a halt, Nicaraguan cities are clear of barricades and normal life is being resumed. The prevailing feeling is one of relief, and better-informed commentators have begun to conclude that the attempted coup has failed.

Of course there are enormous challenges, and huge potential pitfalls for a government now having to repair the country’s infrastructure with reduced tax revenues, scarce international investment and near-zero tourism, as well as facing open hostility from its neighbours and possible economic sanctions by the United States. But in terms of the strength of its core support among Nicaraguan people, Daniel Ortega’s government may even be stronger now than it was before the crisis began.

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          Apenas 10% de turoperadoras nicas están funcionando - El Nuevo Diario      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Las alertas que han emitido los diferentes países a sus ciudadanos sobre la peligrosidad de viajar a Nicaragua cierran las oportunidades de trabajo para los turoperadores del país.

“Hemos llegado a un nivel de cancelaciones del 90% de reservaciones porque tenemos sobre el país advertencias de viajes (…); le están diciendo a ese flujo turístico que Nicaragua en estos momentos no está en condiciones para recibir visitantes”,  dijo la presidenta de la Asociación de Turoperadoras (Antur), Claudia Aguirre, tras participar en un encuentro de representantes del sector turismo que buscan una estrategia para enfrentar la crisis.

Antur aglutina a 45 turoperadoras, de las cuales 15 han cerrado, y las que aún sobreviven están ofreciendo rutas en zonas donde  existen ciertos niveles de seguridad al momento de desplazarse.

 Pasajes más caros por la reducción de vuelos

“(Por ejemplo) alguien que pueda venir de la frontera de Peñas Blancas que pueda movilizarse en zonas cercas, alguien que pueda llegar a El Castillo, Solentiname. Estamos hablando de una mínima expresión, de un 10%. Pero, de ahí la otra franja y los otros destinos que históricamente han sido de actividad de turismo lógicamente ahí no  hay reservaciones”, indicó Aguirre.

En León, Granada, Masaya, Rivas y Managua es donde se realizan las actividades de mayor preferencia de los turistas, según el Instituto Nicaraguense de Turismo (Intur), zonas que han sido más afectada por la situación del país, lo cual deja en desventaja a los prestadores de servicios para el turismo.

“Nosotros somos nicaragüenses y nos desplazamos a Granada, León y para nosotros mismos, los nicaragüenses, es tensionante”, mencionó Aguirre.

Por su parte,  la presidenta la Cámara Nacional de Turismo (Canatur), Lucy Valenti, demandó a las autoridades gubernamentales “sacar de circulación a los paramilitares”, porque de lo contrario ni el turismo interno podrá desplazarse con tranquilidad en los diferentes destinos.

 Encapuchados ahuyentan a turistas, afirman dueños de negocios

El Intur registra que los turistas prefieren realizar actividades que demandan desplazamientos como visita de ciudades coloniales, pueblos blancos, isletas de Granada, Isla de Ometepe, reservas naturales, mercado de artesanía y la ruta del norte.

Nicaragua fuera de multidestinos

Las touroperadoras que tienen alianzas con sus pares en Nicaragua han reestructurado el itinerario de sus clientes, pues no existen “condiciones de seguridad óptimas” para el turista.

Las fuentes relacionadas al sector apuntan a que Costa Rica y Guatemala, principalmente, están captando a ese flujo de visitantes.

“El  visitante que venía a Nicaragua lo que hace es quedarse más  (tiempo) en Costa Rica”, aseveró Aguirre.

Valenti lamentó que el trabajo que venían realizando en esa vía, no tenga frutos en este momento. “No se está incluyendo a Nicaragua en estos momentos por la situación, seguramente se están yendo  a Costa Rica, Panamá, Guatemala, incluso Honduras y El Salvador, que también tiene multidestinos”.

Mientras que el presidente de la Asociación de Pequeños Hoteleros de Nicaragua (Hopen), Héctor Jiménez, afirmó que “Costa Rica está en bonanza, porque tiene sus turistas y el (turista) que no nos está viniendo a nosotros”.

 La corrupción de Guatemala es nociva para la economía de Centroamérica

Ese comportamiento ha obligado a los pequeños hoteleros a regresar el dinero a los huéspedes que habían reservado a través de las plataformas digitales.

“Nos pasó con Booking y Expedia, que tuvimos que regresar el dinero que ya teníamos de la reserva”, resaltó el presidente de Hopen.

Inevitable fuga de especialistas

Conocedores del sector turístico estiman que por la crisis han despedido a más de 70,000 empleados, la mayoría con experiencia en las especialidades propias del sector, lo cual los deja en mayor desventaja al momento de reiniciar las operaciones porque  muchos de ellos han migrado.

“Mucho de ese personal había regresado a Nicaragua procedente de Costa Rica, había aprendido y capacitado en la industria turística, pero mucho de ese personal se ha ido a Costa Rica”, añadió Valenti.

Antur aglutina a 45 turoperadoras, de las cuales 15 han cerrado, y las que aún sobreviven están ofreciendo rutas en zonas donde  existen ciertos niveles de seguridad al momento de desplazarse.

Aguirre dice que el profesional del turismo va a migrar donde haya mayor movimiento, y sí la mayoría lo ha hecho a Costa Rica es porque ahí “encuentran un espacio”.

Alertas botan campaña de promoción internacional

Valenti y Aguirre coinciden en que mientras no se busque una salida a la situación del país, no hay campaña de promoción internacional exitosa.

“¿Qué estrategia de promoción podemos ver? ¿Cuáles son las medidas a reflexión? Vamos a invertir en promoción internacional cuando nosotros tenemos serias e innumerables advertencias de viajes,  miremos primero y reflexionemos de cuáles son las condiciones reales en que estamos”, señaló Aguirre.


          Nicaragua’s failed coup      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

While the international pressure continues, by mid-July it became clear that, for the time being at least, the opposition in Nicaragua no longer has sufficient local support to achieve its goal. Español

Crowds of supporters during Daniel Ortega's inauguration speech. Wikimedia Commons. All Rights Reserved.

For three months Daniel Ortega and his government in Nicaragua were under intense pressure to resign – from protesters and opposition groups, from local media and from right-wing politicians in the US. But by mid-July it became clear that, despite persistent images of near-collapse painted by the international press, the country appears to be returning to something close to normality. How did a protest that seemed so strong when it began, lose momentum so quickly?

Daniel Ortega has been in power since 2007, in the last election won 72% of the vote and until recently was running high in independent opinion polls. Despite this, a casual reader of the national and international media would get the impression that he’s deeply despised.

In Open Democracy, the international protest group SOS Nicaragua calls him a “tyrant hell-bent on the bloody repression of the nation.” His local detractors agree. For example, on July 10 Vilma Núñez, a longstanding opponent of Ortega’s who was originally his ally, told the BBC that he is rolling out an “extermination plan” for Nicaragua.

When rebels briefly held one of Nicaragua’s cities a few weeks ago, their leaders said they had ended “eleven years of repression”. SOS Nicaragua even claims that Ortega is a “more hated and more long-lived tyrant than Nicaragua’s former dictator” (Anastasio Somoza and his family, who ruled Nicaragua ruthlessly for more than 40 years).

A casual glance at social media will show that plenty of people share these views, and at the peak of the opposition’s popularity they clearly had considerable traction. But the opposition’s first mistake might have been its overblown rhetoric, as people began to question whether it squared with their own perceptions.

For example, until April this year, Nicaragua was the second safest country in Latin America despite also being one of the poorest. Its police were renowned for their community-based methods in which (unlike in the “northern triangle” countries of Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala) killings by police officers were a rarity. Drugs-related crime was at a minimum and the violent gangs found in neighbouring countries didn’t exist.

Of course the police weren’t perfect, but people could safely report problems such as domestic violence without expecting a violent response from police themselves. Yet the same police are now labelled “assassins” by the opposition and blamed for the majority of the deaths since the protests started.

No one has questioned how a force with a record of limited violence was transformed overnight into ruthless murderers, supposedly capable of torture and even of killing children.

That there have been violent deaths in the past three months is not in doubt. Bloomberg repeated the claim from local human rights groups that 448 had died by the end of July. However, a detailed analysis of those reported in the first two months of the crisis showed how the numbers were being manipulated. By then nearly 300 deaths had been recorded by the two main human rights organisations or by the Inter-American Human Rights Commission.

A claim made right from the beginning by the protesters was that they were either unarmed or at best had only homemade weapons to protect themselves. Again, the international media were convinced. But local people could see otherwise.

A case-by-case analysis showed that of those listed only about 120 were definitely attributable to the protests, with many unrelated to the events or having unclear causes, or involved bystanders or resulted from double-counting.  Of course, the exaggerated picture is still held in many people’s minds (only the other day someone told my wife that “hundreds of students have been killed”), but many others have gradually realised that no massacre has in fact occurred.

In an important respect the opposition succeeded. They created what The Guardian calls “a widespread and growing consensus within the international community that Nicaragua’s government is in fact largely responsible for the bloodshed.” While human rights NGOs repeat the message that the police and security forces (in Amnesty International’s words) “shoot to kill”, the people themselves mostly know otherwise. Whatever the provenance of the deaths in the April protests, recent victims have often been government supporters or the police themselves.

In an analytic interview, Nils McCune explained to journalist Max Blumenthal how the opposition violence grew and Sandinistas were persecuted. Examples include a little reported incident on July 12, in which opposition gunmen killed four police and a schoolteacher in the small town of Morrito, kidnapping nine others.

On July 15, protesters captured a policeman from Jinotepe while he was on his way home, tortured him and burnt his body. Of the deaths verified in the analysis above, about half are of government officials, police or Sandinista supporters. On August 4 there was a massive march in Managua of government supporters calling for justice for these deaths, which are little reported internationally.

A claim made right from the beginning by the protesters was that they were either unarmed or at best had only homemade weapons to protect themselves. Again, the international media were convinced. But local people could see otherwise. The dangerous homemade mortars were soon being supplemented by more serious weapons. In the places where the protesters rested control of the streets, AK47s and other arms were being carried openly.

This was not surprising, as what started as mainly a student protest quickly changed to one in which trouble-makers were recruited from outside. There were reports from various cities of youths being paid to man the barricades; in some cases, more serious criminals became involved.

One of the student leaders of the protest, Harley Morales, admitted on June 10 that they had lost touch with what was happening on the streets. It was increasingly clear to local people that the coup attempt was leading to danger and insecurity of a kind they hadn’t experienced for years.

An initially successful element of the opposition’s campaign was building road blocks (“tranques”) on city streets and on the country’s half-dozen main highways. At one point the country was effectively paralysed and the government was forced to demand the lifting of the tranques before it would continue with the “national dialogue” aimed at resolving the crisis (hosted by Catholic bishops and involving both opposition and government supporters).

If the opposition had been sensible, it would have taken the government at its word, lifted the blockades and insisted that the dialogue proceed at pace. But either it was hooked on the power that the blockades had given it, or it couldn’t control those who were manning them. As well as simply being intimidating for local people to cross and very disruptive for local businesses, by this stage the tranques were the main focus of violence.

They quickly turned from being an opposition asset to being the main reason why people wanted a quick return to “normality” (a plea frequently heard in the streets). In the space of only a week or two, the opposition lost perhaps the best chance it had to influence the outcome of the crisis. When police and paramilitaries finally moved in to clear the tranques, people were out celebrating in Leon, Carazo and Masaya.

Another area in which the opposition wasted its initial gains was in use of social media. The starting point for the crisis was a forest fire in one of the country’s remote reserves. The opposition accused the government of ignoring the fire and turning down offers of help to fight it. By the time these were shown to be false, attention had moved on to a much more inflammatory issue, reforms to the social security system.

The strength and pace of the protests were fuelled by a stream of real and fake news, principally via Facebook. Of course government supporters were doing the same, but the opposition proved far more effective.

Again, there were distorted messages both about the reforms themselves and the subsequent protests. In perhaps the first example of mass manipulation of social media in Nicaragua since smartphones became widely available a couple of years ago, the strength and pace of the protests were fuelled by a stream of real and fake news, principally via Facebook. Of course government supporters were doing the same, but the opposition proved far more effective.

Any death was of a protester. Scenes were staged of tearful students uttering their “last messages” while under fire or people “confessing” to doing the government’s dirty work. While manipulation by the government side was more obvious and less sophisticated, many people became sceptical about what they saw on their phones and began to place more trust in their own experiences.

As the opposition became more desperate, social media took a turn for the worse, with instructions to track down and kill government “toads” (“zapos”), leading to the victimising and even torturing of government workers and supporters.  The intolerance has spread to the US and Europe, with SOS Nicaragua members shouting down anyone speaking about Nicaragua who does not support their line (as happened in early August in San Francisco).

Yet another opposition tactic that misfired was in calling strikes. That these came about was due to big business, which for long was happy to live with the Ortega government but was called to action by the US ambassador in March, when she told them they needed to get involved in politics. From day one they supported the opposition, even at the cost of their own businesses.

But Nicaragua is unique in Latin America in having only modest reliance on big firms. Thanks both to the nature of its economy and support from the Ortega government, small businesses, artesan workshops, co-ops and small farmers have grown in number.

What’s known as the “popular economy” contributes 64% of national income, far higher than is the case with Nicaragua’s neighbours. As well as being strangled by the tranques, small businesses couldn’t cope with strikes. Some observed them (perhaps under threat) but many did not, and the opposition lost other potential allies.

The protest marches, tranques and strikes were all aimed at putting pressure on the government, with the (televised) national dialogue as the public platform. Here, the opposition not only missed its best chance to secure reforms but its attacks misfired in other ways. It had only one argument, repeatedly put forward, that the government was responsible for all the deaths that were happening and must resign forthwith.

In other words, it didn’t really want dialogue at all. A belligerence that found approval among its hard-core supporters was simply off-putting to the majority of people who desperately wanted a negotiated outcome that would end the violence. The national dialogue now receives little attention, in part because the government has regained control of the streets but also because it is obvious that the opposition were using it only to insult and criticise, with no real intention of engaging properly.

Furthermore, instead of the Catholic church staying to one side as mediators, their priests have again and again been found to support the protests, so their role as neutral actors in the dialogue is no longer credible, if it ever was.

By aligning itself with the right wing of the US Republican party through its well-publicised trips to Washington and Miami, and its acceptance of US government finance, the opposition points to a change of political direction for Nicaragua which would be anathema to most Sandinistas and even to many of its own supporters.

By having to speak publicly in the dialogue, the opposition has also exposed other weaknesses. While it is united in wanting Ortega to go, it is divided on tactics and even more fundamentally in its politics. Whatever one thinks of the Ortega government, it can be seen to have taken the country in a certain direction and to have accumulated many social achievements during its eleven years in power.

What would happen to these? Even on the issue that ostensibly began the protests, the national social security fund, the opposition offers no clear alternative. Worse, by aligning itself with the right wing of the US Republican party through its well-publicised trips to Washington and Miami, and its acceptance of US government finance (detailed by the Grayzone Project), the opposition points to a change of political direction for Nicaragua which would be anathema to most Sandinistas and even to many of its own supporters.

There is a paradox here, because a tactic which backfired in Nicaragua may yet serve the opposition’s cause internationally and damage both Nicaragua and the Ortega government in a different way. While for the Trump administration Nicaragua is hardly a priority, there is long-running resentment about the success of Sandinista governments within the US establishment, awoken by the recent protests.

The same establishment also sees an opportunity to attack an ally of Venezuela’s. It has been working hard in bodies like the Organisation of American States, aided by its new allies in the region, to restrict Nicaragua’s support to the small number of Latin American countries that refuse to play the US game. While the OAS/OEA can take few concrete steps itself, it is contributing to an image of Nicaragua among US lawmakers that may allow sanctions to be imposed that could be very damaging to its economy and hence to its people.

As a result of all the opposition’s mistakes, and of the government’s concerted action to regain control, Nicaragua’s real situation has shifted markedly in the few weeks since mid-July. But international commentators are failing to keep up. The New York Times, Huffington Post, Guardian and other media continue to talk about the tyranny, or the mounting political violence, or (in the case of Huffpost) even the rise of fascism in Nicaragua.

In Open Democracy, José Zepeda claims that “the majority of the Nicaraguan people have turned their backs on [Ortega]”.  In Canada, the Ottawa Citizen talked about Nicaragua imploding. But most of these correspondents are not in the country. In practice the violence has slowed almost to a halt, Nicaraguan cities are clear of barricades and normal life is being resumed. The prevailing feeling is one of relief, and better-informed commentators have begun to conclude that the attempted coup has failed.

Of course there are enormous challenges, and huge potential pitfalls for a government now having to repair the country’s infrastructure with reduced tax revenues, scarce international investment and near-zero tourism, as well as facing open hostility from its neighbours and possible economic sanctions by the United States. But in terms of the strength of its core support among Nicaraguan people, Daniel Ortega’s government may even be stronger now than it was before the crisis began.

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          La Prensa, Honduras, 9 de agosto de 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
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          La Tribuna, Honduras, 9 de agosto de 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
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          A Van Filled with Migrant Mothers Separated from Their Children Crashed — Then ICE Lied About It      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The embattled agency contradicted multiple pieces of hard evidence with its denial.

An ICE van full of separated mothers crashed into a pickup truck in Texas on July 18th. Then ICE repeatedly lied to the Texas Observer by claiming the crash, which was documented by the police, never happened.

“The crash was really strong, like maybe we were going to flip,” a mom from Honduras who rode on the bus told the Observer. Another woman said her "whole body hurt" after the crash.

Leticia Zamarripa, an ICE spokesperson, originally told the Observer that the crash didn't happen. “Your sources misinformed you,” she wrote on July 20. “There was no crash.”

After the Observer told ICE it obtained the actual accident report, ICE claimed there was a "fender bender" that "resulted in minor damage."

This wasn't true either.

A police officer who responded to the crash recorded that the vehicle sustained "disabling damage." One of the mothers whose leg was injured int he crash visited a doctor at the detention facility for treatment.

The denials by ICE follow a pattern of lying to the public, including misreporting arrest numbers and the political motivation of its actions.


          Tegu Classroom Packs (Your Choice)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The company was founded in 2006 by Chris Haughey and Will Haughey. The company aims to help Honduras through positive employment opportunities, tree-planting efforts, and by funding days of school. That's it, no joke here, we just thought that was mega-cool. So buy this stuff!

In the box:

  • (1) Tegu Classroom Packs (Your Choice)

          An Orphanage That Doesn't Seem Like An Orphanage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Orphanages are falling out of favor. Ever since the horrific conditions in Romanian orphanages were widely publicized in the 1990s – naked children tied to cribs in overcrowded wards — there's been a movement in the international aid world to shut down orphanages completely. But according to UNICEF, there are still 2.7 million children living in orphanages worldwide. So what if someone tried to set up a good orphanage — a place where parentless kids could thrive? What would it look like? And what could it tell us about the basics of child rearing? It might look like this: A dozen kids piled on a couch watching a soccer match on TV while kids from neighboring houses drop by to chat. Other kids are preparing dinner in the kitchen. The kids call the employees of the institution "mom" and "auntie" while the staff call them "mi amor" — my love. The kids and the adults at the SOS Children's Village, an orphanage in Tela, Honduras, interact like a big extended family. It's a place where
          An Orphanage That Doesn't Seem Like An Orphanage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Orphanages are falling out of favor. Ever since the horrific conditions in Romanian orphanages were widely publicized in the 1990s – naked children tied to cribs in overcrowded wards — there's been a movement in the international aid world to shut down orphanages completely. But according to UNICEF, there are still 2.7 million children living in orphanages worldwide. So what if someone tried to set up a good orphanage — a place where parentless kids could thrive? What would it look like? And what could it tell us about the basics of child rearing? It might look like this: A dozen kids piled on a couch watching a soccer match on TV while kids from neighboring houses drop by to chat. Other kids are preparing dinner in the kitchen. The kids call the employees of the institution "mom" and "auntie" while the staff call them "mi amor" — my love. The kids and the adults at the SOS Children's Village, an orphanage in Tela, Honduras, interact like a big extended family. It's a place where
          Venezuela: Drönarna som skulle döda president Maduro och männen bakom dem      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Denna färska artikel av Dick Emanuesson i Honduras ger mer information om mordförsöket på president Madura. Har även publicerats på hans Facebook-sida med bilder. Facebook: Dick Emanuelsson. Mordförsöket har kommenterats i två andra artiklar nyligen Mordförsök mot Venezuelas president. Sveriges reaktion? 6/8 och Motiven bakom kuppförsöket mot Venezuelas president 7/8. · Det var två drönar…
          Caravan Of Central American Migrants Seeking Asylum Hope To Cross Border      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Now to the U.S.-Mexico border, where hundreds of people from Central America have gathered in hopes of crossing into the U.S. Many say they are fleeing from violence in Honduras and El Salvador and hope to present themselves to U.S. officials to ask for asylum. The so-called migrant caravan has attracted much media attention and the hostility of President Trump. U.S. officials say they will prosecute anybody who makes a false claim. NPR's Carrie Kahn is in Tijuana, Mexico, and she's with us now. Carrie, thanks so much for joining us. CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: Thanks. Thanks for having me. MARTIN: So Carrie, you're there with the caravan. We understand that U.S. officials are saying that the main San Diego border crossing can't accept any more asylum-seekers tonight. What does that mean? And what do you see? KAHN: I am standing on the Mexican side right in front of the U.S. border crossing in Tijuana, and a group of about 40
          Caravan Of Central American Migrants Attracting A Lot Of Attention After Trump's Tweets      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST: A caravan of Central American migrants is traveling through Mexico this week. More than a thousand people are participating, most of them from Honduras. Those thousand people have attracted a lot of attention thanks in large part to President Trump and his Twitter account. NPR's Carrie Kahn is in Monterrey, Mexico, where she has been following the movements of this caravan and reaction to it from both sides of the border. Hey, Carrie. CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: Hi. KELLY: Now, I know you've been speaking with the organizers of this caravan. What exactly is it? And let me start you with the fact this is not a new phenomenon. KAHN: Right. These are activists in Mexico and the United States that come to help migrants crossing through Mexico. And they have done this several times before. The people are from all over Central America. The majority of these migrants, however, are from Honduras. And most are fleeing the violence and
          An Orphanage That Doesn't Seem Like An Orphanage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

If you were to build a franchise-type structure for raising orphans, what would it look like?


          #ecuador - frases_dios_nos_cuida      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Y reflexiona en la palabra de Dios. √√activa NUESTRAS NOTIFICACIONES √√Etiqueta a una persona √√Comparte esta imagen #frasescristianas #Chile #Venezuela #Paraguay #Uruguay #Peru #EstadosUnidos #frwasesdebendicion #Mexico #frasesdeedificacion #Honduras #RepublicaDominicana #España #Ecuador #sigueme #Únete #Cristianos
          Comment on Top 10 Most Dangerous Countries To Visit by Brenda      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Seriously? You're basing the perceived danger of a country from a Netflix series? Well, then we'll we're at it, let's base our perception of Travel to Miami on Scarface. What a stupid article. I've traveled all over Latin America and we'll there is certainly crime and poverty (just like in the US) there isn't any entire country to avoid. Especially if you just use basic common sense (just like in US). Colombia is a beautiful country and doesn't deserve to be on this list. Its much less dangerous than it was 30 years ago and even then it was only certain parts. Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela and Honduras are overall where the most unrest is.
          An Orphanage That Doesn't Seem Like An Orphanage       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Orphanages are falling out of favor.

Ever since the horrific conditions in Romanian orphanages were widely publicized in the 1990s – naked children tied to cribs in overcrowded wards — there's been a movement in the international aid world to shut down orphanages completely.

But according to UNICEF, there are still 2.7 million children living in orphanages worldwide.

So what if someone tried to set up a good orphanage — a place where parentless kids could thrive? What would it look like? And what could it tell us about the basics of child rearing?

It might look like this: A dozen kids piled on a couch watching a soccer match on TV while kids from neighboring houses drop by to chat. Other kids are preparing dinner in the kitchen. The kids call the employees of the institution "mom" and "auntie" while the staff call them "mi amor" — my love.

The kids and the adults at the SOS Children's Village, an orphanage in Tela, Honduras, interact like a big extended family. It's a place where dozens of kids who've been separated from their biological parents for a variety of reasons now live. Some of the kids' parents are dead. Some have left the country. Some lost custody of their children because they couldn't afford to feed them. All the kids have been placed at the institution by court order.

The director of the facility, Carolina Maria Matute, says what these kids need most is love. "A lot of love," she says. "A lot of affection."

The resident social worker, Jenny Zelaya, also puts love at the top of her list. But it's also important that the children feel that the staff have their backs, she says. "It's not just a job," she says about working at this institution. "We take a real interest in them [the kids] succeeding and being able to achieve their goals."

SOS Children's Villages is a nonprofit aid group founded at the end of World War II in Austria. The organization is remarkable now for the sheer number of children it has in its care. It's one of the largest providers of residential care to orphaned, abandoned and neglected kids worldwide, with more than 80,000 youngsters living in nearly 600 orphanages. SOS operates in 135 countries, primarily low- and middle-income nations. But it also runs three villages in the United States.

There are six SOS Children's Village in Honduras, one of the poorest countries in the Americas. On a per capita basis only people in Haiti earn less each year than Hondurans.

At the SOS Children's Village in Tela, the "mom" in house #9 is 45-year-old Sandra Hernandez.

Hernandez describes herself as a sports fanatic. The house is known among the kids in the village as the place to go to watch soccer. Hernandez a die-hard supporter of the Spanish Futbol Club Barcelona. A blue and maroon Barca FC shield is pasted on the wall in the living room. But because Barcelona was eliminated from the Champions League tournament, Hernandez is rooting against Barcelona's archrival Real Madrid.

The four teenagers in her house — three boys and a girl — refer to each other as brother and sister. Hernandez lives in the house full-time. When she takes her annual vacation an "SOS aunt" comes to stay with the kids for a week or two.

"It's a family model," Hernandez says. "It's like a natural family."

This SOS "village" is inside a large, fenced compound on the outskirts of the Caribbean coastal city of Tela. The 12 separate houses are connected by a footpath shaded by several giant mango trees. There's an open field where the kids often play soccer.

Chickens scurry amid the bushes.

Unlike some other orphanages, SOS doesn't offer these kids for adoption to families in wealthier countries in North America or Europe. The goal is to make this village their home and to raise these kids in their own culture. Some kids do leave before reaching adulthood — but only to be placed with biological relatives or, if conditions have improved, to return to their parents.

The houses themselves are not fancy. They're identical two-story, cinder block buildings with a kitchen and a living room on the ground floor and four bedrooms upstairs. Built in the mid-1970s they resemble bland public housing from that era.

The beige and brown paint outside many of them is peeling. The furniture inside is spartan and worn but Hernandez's 15-year-old "daughter," Naomi says her friends from school like coming over because she has such a nice house. (We're calling her Naomi to shield her privacy and because she is a ward of the state.)

Naomi was placed at the SOS Children's Village when she was 2 years old and has been living with Hernandez for the last eight years.

The SOS model, Hernandez says, provides a structure that gives the children natural social connections.

"It helps them a lot because they're not isolated," she says.

Hernandez says this not just because she's worked here for ten years. She was placed at an SOS Village in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa when she was 3 and grew up there.

"I lived the same situation as them," she says of the kids in the orphanage.

At Sandra Hernandez's house the day starts early.

At 5:30 a.m. the youngest boy in the house who's 15 is sweeping the back yard. Hernandez and Naomi are making breakfast. The two older boys stumble into the kitchen around 6:30. Hernandez is patting egg-size balls of dough into thick, traditional Honduran tortillas called baleadas.

Soon the children will go off to school — not in the children's village but in the town. That's part of the SOS strategy: to integrate the kids into the community so they can develop social connections that will help them find jobs and homes and spouses later in life.

One of the 16-year-old boys was just elected president of the student council, which is remarkable in part because he only returned to Tela a few months ago. He spent last year in a drug rehab program.

"They choose one student to represent the school in various activities," Hernandez says. "And he'll represent his school when they have meetings of all the schools in the city."

She is extremely proud of him.

The daily routine at Hernandez's house is a bit complicated because Naomi goes to the morning school session and the boys attend in the afternoon. On this day, the school, Instituto Triunfo de la Cruz, is celebrating its founding 69 years ago.

Naomi is one of a dozen contestants in what's essentially a beauty pageant to see who will be crowned "Señorita Aniversario," the queen of the anniversary festival.

As she walks confidently onto the stage the announcer declares that her hobby is studying and she hopes to become a medical doctor.

Naomi is one of three finalists — but doesn't win the top prize.

Her 9th-grade math teacher, Jennifer Gamez, says Naomi is one of the best students in the school.

"You explain something once and she gets it," Gamez says. "If she has a question or a doubt, she asks me about it. And her behavior is excellent."

Gamez says many of her students live in poverty. Jobs are hard to come by in Honduras, but Gamez tells them that their situation in life doesn't determine their future.

And Gamez says she's been extremely impressed with students who've come from the SOS orphanage.

"I know a lot of them who've become professionals, they're good people who come from this village," she says. "I know a lot of people like that."

There are also kids from the SOS Children's Village who struggle. The youngest member of Hernandez's household is one of them. One of his teachers says the 15-year-old doesn't pay attention. He talks too much in class, doesn't turn in his assignments. With a stern glare the teacher adds that he prefers to run around with his friends rather than do his work.

Hernandez says she's aware of these problems and is trying to get him more focused.

The big question is: Would he fare any better if he were living with his biological parents?

Duke University professor Kathryn Whetten isn't so sure. Whetten has researched residential care for kids who've been separated from their parents for various reasons and says that orphanages aren't inherently bad.

"We see the same continuum of bad and good care in the group homes as we see in the family settings," says Whetten.

For the last 12 years Whetten has been following 3,000 kids who were orphaned, abandoned or for some other reason separated from their biological parents. The professor of public policy and global health at Duke is conducting the study in five low- and middle-income countries. Half the kids are in institutions of some kind — government-run orphanages, private group homes. The other half have been placed with extended family members.

"What the kids really seem to need is a home-like environment," Whetten says.

Regardless of whether they're placed with extended family members or in institutions, the researcher's found that the one thing the children need is a stable living situation. They don't do well if they're bounced from one place to another. Having consistent long-term caregivers and steady sibling-like connections to other kids is also important.

"So creating a family-like environment is what is really important," Whetten says. "And that can happen in a family setting in a small home or it can happen in an orphanage slash institution slash group home like SOS."

None of the SOS Children's Villages are part of Whetten's long-term study but she says the group has the right model of placing kids in small, stable units.

The worst residential care facilities for orphans, she says, tend to be government-run institutions where employees look after the children in shifts.

"They often come in in white coats as if they're providing treatment. Usually there's three [caregivers] per day who rotate in and out. By the very nature of what they're doing they're not as committed to each child," Whetten says.

"And of course restraining the smaller kids, restraining them physically, is bad for them. We've seen very few of those [orphanages] that are really, really on the bad end and those are usually ones run by governments."

Also places where shift workers care for the kids tend to have the wrong organizational structure.

For the SOS moms like Sandra Hernandez, there are no shifts. Hers is a 24-hour-a day job.

When Naomi gets home after the Señorita Aniversario pageant, Hernandez is waiting anxiously for her on the porch. She wants to hear all the details.

Naomi tells how she made it through the first three rounds and how the crowd was cheering as she walked out on stage. All her friends were sure she was going to win.

Hernandez beams with pride.

Later that evening Hernandez organizes kids from all 12 of the houses to help clean up an overgrown section of the village next to the soccer field.

As the sun fades the kids rake up piles of cut grass and leaves. They haul bushes and small tree limbs off to a pile by the outer fence. The kids also chase each other around. One teenage boy is keen to show that he can carry a bigger bag of leaves and dirt than anyone else.

Some of the younger girls practice a song. A young boy from a neighboring house keeps running over to hug Hernandez — for no particular reason. Eventually the work party turns into a soccer game.

Hernandez scores three goals but the kids insist she was offside. And what could be more fun than arguing about whether or not someone is cheating at backyard sports?

It feels a lot like a big family picnic.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

          Buenos días, viernes 06 de julio 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   



  • EFE: Estados Unidos negó hoy que el Gobierno del presidente Donald Trump llegara al punto el año pasado de planear una invasión de Venezuela, pero reconoció que la opción militar sigue sobre la mesa como una de muchas posibles herramientas para "ayudar al pueblo" venezolano a "recuperar la democracia".
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          Nuevamente MEU se toma las instalciones de la UNAH      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
***Las autoridades universitarias convocaron a otra reunión este jueves a las 11:00 de la mañana. Los integrantes del Movimiento Estudiantil Universitario (MEU), nuevamente este jueves se tomaron las instalaciones de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras (UNAH), tras no llegar a acuerdos en la mesa de diálogo en la que se pretende resolver el conflicto. […]
          From Bar Hopping and Fine Dining to Beaches and Snorkeling, a Weekend in Roatán is a Vacation Packed With Luxury and Adventure      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras, Aug. 9, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Travelers seeking the perfect weekend destination from North America or a way to unwind after a business trip in Central America will love Roatan in the Bay Islands of Honduras. The picture-perfect island offers spectacular turquoise...


          Geopolítica de la crisis económica mundial: globalismo vs. universalismo       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

[alai-amlatina] Alainet.org Al Día - 08/08/18

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Alainet.org Al Día - 08/08/18

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  • Debates estratégicos en torno a EEUU y China  
    El ascenso de China, propiciado por la Iniciativa de la Franja y la Ruta, genera nuevas oportunidades, retos y amenazas para la región. Maribel Aponte García

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    El gobierno paraguayo, a días de haber asumido las nuevas autoridades legislativas y pocos días de asumir las ejecutivas, aprobó las Notas Reversales que revisan el Anexo C del Tratado de Yacyretá, concretando una nueva entrega Cecilia Vuyk
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    “Los derechos fundamentales, entre ellos, la educación, la salud, la alimentación y el empleo, no son garantizados en Honduras, situación que obliga a decenas de hondureños a emigrar cada año poniendo en riesgo su vida”. Javier Suazo
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    Donald Trump es un líder mundial temperamental.  Parece desdeñar el viejo orden, los mecanismos de la globalización establecidos con Instituto Tricontinental de Investigación Social
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          Latin America's fight to legalise abortion: the key battlegrounds      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

After Argentina rejected a bill to allow abortion in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy, hopes of reform now rest elsewhere

An estimated 6.5 million abortions take place across Latin America each year. Three-quarters of these procedures are unlawful, often performed in unsafe illegal clinics or at home.

Of 33 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean, only Cuba, Uruguay and Guyana permit elective abortions. Women also have the right to choose in Mexico City. Elsewhere, however, the right to an abortion is severely restricted, with terminations often permitted in cases of rape, or if the pregnancy will endanger the life of the mother. Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, the Dominican Republic, Haiti and Suriname all have a complete ban on abortion.

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          [$199.99] Tegu Classroom Packs Your Choice by Home.Woot      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The company was founded in 2006 by Chris Haughey and Will Haughey. The company aims to help Honduras through positive employment opportunities, treeplanting efforts, and by funding days of school. Thats it, no joke here, we just thought that was megacool. So buy this stuffIn the box_ 1 Tegu Classroom Packs Your Choice

          Storia panino con tacchino - Categoria: panini e cibi di strada      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Il tacchino (Meleagris gallopavo ) è originario del nord dell’America. Probabilmente Colombo è stato il primo europeo a conoscere il tacchino quando, il 14 agosto 1502, sbarcando sulle coste dell’attuale Honduras, ricevette dai nativi alcuni cibi e tra questi anche quelle che lui chiama “gallinas de la tierra”.
          Ruta de La Entrada a La Ceibita      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Consulta fácilmente el trayecto más óptimo para llegar desde La Ent., Honduras hasta La Ceibita, Honduras
          Más de 5,300 menores hondureños deportados hasta julio, un 97,3% más que 2017 - El Nuevo Diario      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Un total de 5,314 menores hondureños que fueron detenidos cuando intentaban viajar ilegalmente a EE.UU., México, países centroamericanos y de Europa fueron deportados en los primeros siete meses de 2018, un 97,3 por ciento más que en el mismo periodo de 2017, informó hoy una fuente oficial.

Estados Unidos deportó en los primeros siete meses de este año a 119 menores hondureños, de ellos 84 son niños y 35 niñas, señala un informe del Observatorio Consular y Migratorio de Honduras al que tuvo acceso Acan-Efe.

 Lea: Deportación de guatemaltecos desde EEUU aumenta 85,2 % en siete meses de 2018

En el período de referencia, México deportó, por vía aérea, a 588 menores hondureños indocumentados, 377 de ellos infantes, añade el informe.

Según el documento, otros 4,573 menores hondureños, muchos de ellos solos, fueron deportados también por las autoridades mexicanas vía terrestre, mientras que otros 33 niños y adolescentes fueron repatriados desde Guatemala, El Salvador y Belice.

 De interés: Interceptan 149 migrantes centroamericanos en un camión en el sur de México

Las autoridades migratorias de Europa deportaron además a un menor hondureño, apunta el informe del Observatorio Migratorio de Honduras.

Un total de 2,693 menores hondureños indocumentados regresaron a su país deportados por las autoridades de Estados Unidos, México, Centroamérica, Europa y Suramérica en los primeros siete meses de 2017, según cifras oficiales.

  Además: Detienen a seis guatemaltecos acusados de tráfico de migrantes

De acuerdo con organismos de derechos humanos, un centenar de hondureños, muchos de ellos menores, salen a diario hacia Estados Unidos y pagan a traficantes de personas grandes cantidades de dinero.


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EL DOMINÓ VENEZOLANO
JOAQUIN VILLALOBOS 
La tragedia venezolana no tiene precedentes en Latinoamérica. Algunos consideran que Venezuela puede convertirse en otra Cuba, pero lo más probable es que Cuba acabe pronto convertida en otra Venezuela. Estamos frente a la repetición del efecto dominó que derrumbó a los regímenes del campo socialista en Europa Oriental, cuando hizo implosión la economía soviética. Las relaciones económicas entre estos Gobiernos funcionaban bajo lo que se conocía como Consejo Económico de Ayuda Mutua (CAME). Fidel Castro copió el CAME y se inventó la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de América (ALBA) para salvar su régimen con el petróleo venezolano. La implosión económica de Venezuela ha desatado un efecto dominó que pone en jaque a los regímenes de Nicaragua y Cuba y a toda la extrema izquierda continental.
Las economías de los ocho regímenes de Europa del Este y Cuba sobrevivían por el subsidio petrolero y económico soviético. Cuando este terminó, los países comunistas europeos colapsaron a pesar de contar con poderosas fuerzas armadas, policías y servicios de inteligencia. Cuba perdió el 85% de su intercambio comercial, su PIB cayó un 36%, la producción agrícola se redujo a la mitad y los cubanos debieron sobrevivir con la mitad del petróleo que consumían. Castro decidió “resistir” con lo que llamó “periodo especial” para evitar que la hambruna terminara en estallido social. En esas circunstancias apareció el subsidio petrolero venezolano que salvó al socialismo cubano del colapso. El dinero venezolano, a través de ALBA, construyó una extensa defensa geopolítica, financió a Unasur, a los países del Caribe y a Gobiernos y grupos de izquierda en Nicaragua, Ecuador, El Salvador, Honduras, Chile, Argentina, Bolivia y España.
Pero, como era previsible, la economía venezolana terminó en un desastre, resultado de haber expropiado más de 700 empresas y cerrado otras 500.000 por efecto de los controles que impuso al mercado. El chavismo destruyó la planta productiva y perdió a la clase empresarial, gerencial y tecnocrática del país. Este desastre terminó alcanzando al petróleo, con la paradoja de que ahora que los precios subieron, la producción se ha derrumbado porque Pdvsa quebró al quedarse sin gerentes y técnicos. El chavismo asesinó a la gallina de los huevos de oro, los subsidios al izquierdismo se acabaron y lo que estamos viendo ahora son los efectos. Más de 3.000 millones de dólares venezolanos parieron la autocracia nicaragüense, pero, cuando el subsidio terminó, el Gobierno intentó un ajuste estructural y estalló el actual conflicto. En mayo de este año Venezuela ¡compró petróleo extranjero! para seguir sosteniendo al régimen cubano.
La economía global está totalmente regida por relaciones capitalistas. La idea de que Rusia y China pueden ser la salvación es un sueño. Rusia es un país pobre con una economía del tamaño de la de España, pero con tres veces más población, y China es un país rico, pero, como todo rico, mide riesgos, invierte para sacar ganancias y si presta cobra con intereses. En la economía mundial, ahora nadie regala nada; Hugo Chávez fue el último Santa Claus y eso se acabó. No hay quien subsidie ni a Venezuela, ni a Cuba ni a Nicaragua. Quizás encuentren apoyos diplomáticos, pero lo que necesitan para no derrumbarse es dinero regalado no diplomacia compasiva.
Nada va a cambiar a favor, la única esperanza sería que se recuperara la economía venezolana y eso es imposible. El despilfarro y la corrupción hicieron quebrar a Pdvsa, ALBA y Unasur. Hay miles de millones de dólares perdidos y robados. Venezuela está en bancarrota y vive en un caos. Maduro se ha enfrentado a más de 5.000 protestas en lo que va de 2018, los venezolanos sufren hiperinflación, una criminalidad feroz, escases de comida, medicinas, gasolina y dinero circulante; los servicios de transporte, energía y agua están colapsados. En medio de un severo aislamiento internacional la cohesión del bloque de poder se acabó, Maduro está reprimiendo al propio chavismo, a los funcionarios de Pdvsa y a los militares, los tres pilares fundamentales de su poder. Este conflicto está dejando despidos, capturas, torturas, muertos y hasta un confuso atentado contra Maduro.
La brutal represión en Nicaragua acabó la confianza que había generado en el mercado y abrió un camino sin retorno que está arrasando con la débil economía del país. El Gobierno ha regresado a las expropiaciones poniendo terror al mercado y se estima que 215.000 empleos se han perdido; ya no habrá crecimiento, sino más pobreza, más crisis social, más emigración, más descontento, y un irreversible y creciente rechazo al régimen. En Cuba apenas empiezan a hablar de propiedad privada con cambios lentos y torpes hacia una economía de mercado. El régimen teme que el surgimiento de una clase empresarial rompa el balance de poder y tiene razón. En la Unión Soviética las primeras reformas obligaron a más reformas que terminaron derrumbando el sistema. La lección fue que no se podía reformar lo que es irreformable. Paradójicamente ahora la consigna para la economía cubana no es socialismo o muerte, sino capitalismo o muerte, los jóvenes cubanos no resistirán otra hambruna. Sin el subsidio venezolano, la crisis cubana está a las puertas y la débil autocracia nicaragüense flotará sin recuperarse hasta quedarse sin reservas para pagar la represión.
La defensa estratégica de Cuba ha sido alentar conflictos en su periferia para evitar presión directa sobre su régimen. Por eso apoyó siempre revueltas en todo el continente. Los conflictos en Venezuela y Nicaragua son ahora la defensa de Cuba, ha puesto a otros a matar y destruir mientras su régimen intenta reformarse. La salvaje represión que sufren y la compleja lucha que libran los opositores venezolanos y nicaragüenses no es casual. No se enfrentan a un Gobierno, sino a tres, y con ellos a toda la extrema izquierda. El destino de la dictadura cubana y de toda la mitología revolucionaria izquierdista está en juego. Los opositores sufren dificultades en el presente, pero los Gobiernos a los que enfrentan no tienen futuro. Son regímenes históricamente agotados, luchando por sobrevivir, pueden matar, apresar, torturar y ser en extremo cínicos, pero eso no resuelve los problemas económicos, sociales y políticos que padecen ni los libera del aislamiento internacional.
No hay una lucha entre izquierda y derecha, sino entre democracia y dictadura, en la que el mayor beneficio del fin de las dictaduras de izquierda será para la izquierda democrática que durante décadas ha pagado los costos del miedo y sufrido el chantaje de ser llamados traidores si se atrevían a cuestionar a Cuba. La izquierda democrática debe luchar con los pies en la tierra y asumir sin pena y sin miedo la democracia, el mercado y el deseo de superación individual que mueve a todos los seres humanos. No tiene sentido luchar por ideales y terminar defendiendo a muerte privilegios personales. No hay razones ni morales ni políticas, ni prácticas para defender algo que, además de no funcionar, genera matanzas, hambrunas y dictaduras.
Joaquín Villalobos fue guerrillero salvadoreño y es consultor para la resolución de conflictos.

          El aborto continuará siendo ilegal en Argentina: el Senado vota "no" a su despenalización      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Embarazo

El pasado mes de junio, la Cámara de Diputados de Argentina aprobó un proyecto de ley para despenalizar el aborto hasta la semana 14, aunque faltaba conocer el voto de Senado para ratificar esta decisión.

Ayer supimos que finalmente, con 38 votos en contra y 31 a favor, el Senado ha dicho "no" a reformar la ley del aborto en este país, continuando de este modo vigente la ley de 1921 por la que sólo se permite abortar en caso de violación o riesgo de vida para la madre.

La interrupción del embarazo seguirá siendo un delito penado con cárcel

Con el proyecto de ley aprobado por la Cámara de Diputados argentina, se pretendía despenalizar el aborto hasta la semana 14; es decir, que aquellas mujeres que quisieran poner fin a su embarazo en los primeros estadios de la gestación, pudieran hacerlo sin enfrentarse a penas de cárcel.

Pero el Senado, con un carácter mucho más conservador, no ha ratificado el proyecto de ley, por lo que la interrupción del embarazo continuará siendo tipificado como un delito penado con hasta cuatro años de cárcel, según la ley de 1921 que continuará vigente en el país.

La ley de 1921, sólo permite el aborto en caso de violación o riesgo de vida para la madre, dos supuestos que según muchas mujeres argentinas no responde a las demandas sociales actuales.

Este tema ha generado un gran debate en el país en los últimos meses, y ha dividido a la opinión pública en dos grupos enfrentados. De un lado, quienes se oponían a la legalización y pedían más ayudas y apoyo para las mujeres embarazadas. De otro lado, quienes apoyaban que el aborto pudiera ser legal, libre y gratuito.

Abortar en clandestinidad

El hecho de que el proyecto de ley no haya salido finalmente adelante, no hará que muchas mujeres argentinas continúen abortando de forma ilegal y poco segura.

Según explica El País, estimaciones extraoficiales cifran entre 350.000 y 450.000 las mujeres que abortan cada año en clandestinidad. Lo hacen asumiendo graves riesgos para sus vidas, sobre todo aquéllas que cuentan con menos recursos económicos y acaban sometiéndose a prácticas peligrosas realizadas por personas no profesionales .

Son muy pocos los países de América Latina y Caribe en los que el aborto es una práctica legal y libre: Cuba, Ciudad de México, Guayana, Guayana francesa, Puerto Rico y Uruguay (legalizado en el año 2012).

En seis países, el aborto no está permitido bajo ninguna circunstancia: El Salvador, Nicaragua, República Dominincana, República del Surinam, Honduras y Haití. Y en el resto de países (como el caso de Argetina), se permite con algunas excepciones

El caso de Irlanda

El caso de Argentina nos ha recordado al de Irlanda, uno de los países europeos que contaba con mayores restricciones en materia de aborto. Pero el pasado mes de mayo, se realizó un referéndum en el que los irlandeses votaron "sí" a la despenalización, provocando un cambio histórico en el país.

La modificación de la ley irlandesa permite ahora interrumpir el embarazo en las primeras 12 semanas de gestación, y hasta las 24 semanas si la vida o la salud de la madre estuvieran en riesgo, o si el feto no pudiera sobrevivir fuera del cuerpo de la madre.

Pero antes de esta reforma, las irlandesas sólo podían abortar si la vida de la madre corría peligro, y no se contemplaba el aborto en casos de incesto, violación o malformaciones del feto.

Según estimaciones de la OMS, cada año se realizan en el mundo 22 millones de abortos de forma insegura, lo que provoca la muerte de 47.000 mujeres, y discapacidad a cinco millones de ellas.

La OMS incide en la importancia de la educación sexual, la planificación familiar y el acceso al aborto inducido de forma legal y sin riesgos, para evitar las alarmantes cifras de muertes maternas en todo el mundo.

Vía | El País

En Magnet | Así se ha vivido en el Congreso y en las calles de Argentina el sí a la despenalización del aborto

En Bebés y Más | [Irlanda vota "sí" a reformar la legislación del aborto, según los primeros sondeos](Irlanda vota sí https://www.bebesymas.com/noticias/irlanda-vota-si-reformar-legislacion-aborto-segun-primeros-sondeos), Así es la ley que regula el aborto en los principales países europeos: plazos, supuestos y otras particularidades , La OMS ya alertó a España de que restringir el aborto provocaría más mortalidad materna


          ¿Qué técnico le gustaría que dirija a Honduras? Nacional o extranjero      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Todavía no hay un panorama claro en cuanto al próximo técnico de la Selección de Honduras Tegucigalpa, Honduras Entrenadores y selecciones buscan sus mejores opciones para el proceso hacia Catar 2022 y Honduras tiene una carpeta llena de posibilidades. Sin embargo, pasan los días, y los federativos no eligen al sustituto del colombiano Jorge Luis 

Continuar leyendo

La entrada ¿Qué técnico le gustaría que dirija a Honduras? Nacional o extranjero se publicó primero en Sporthiva Online.


          Selección de Honduras, sin técnico y en descenso en ranking mundial FIFA      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

El estadígrafo español emitió el que sería el ranking FIFA actualizado hasta agosto, Honduras descendió un puesto España El no tener entrenador para el proceso a Qatar 2022 se suma una nueva mala noticia. La Selección de Honduras descendió un puesto en el ranking mundial de la FIFA, así lo informó Alexis Martín Tamayo, popularmente conocido como 

Continuar leyendo

La entrada Selección de Honduras, sin técnico y en descenso en ranking mundial FIFA se publicó primero en Sporthiva Online.


          Reconocen labor de biblioteca católica que envía libros a países pobres      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   


MADRID, 08 Ago. 18 (ACI Prensa).- El Pontificio Consejo de la Cultura ha reconocido la trayectoria de la Biblioteca Solidaria Misionera de Valencia (España) por la distribución de libros a países necesitados de América Latina y África que realizan bajo el lema “Cultura contra la pobreza”.

El Presidente del Pontificio Consejo para la Cultura, Cardenal Gianfranco Ravasi, envió una carta al P. Antonio Benlloch, director de la Biblioteca Solidaria Misionera, en la que reconoció la gran labor que realizan al recoger y distribuir libros y material escolar para  las escuelas de los países más pobres”.

De esta manera, el Cardenal Ravasi le concedió el patrocinio del Pontificio Consejo “en consideración al valor didáctico y humanitario de la iniciativa”.

Según señala la agencia AVAN, la Biblioteca Solidaria Misionera nació en el año 2001 con el objetivo de ayudar a quienes más lo necesitan llevándoles la cultura por medio de libros y material escolar para todos los niveles de enseñanza.

De esta manera la Biblioteca recibe desde de particulares o instituciones libros, enciclopedias, diccionarios hasta material audiovisual como vídeos, dvd´s, cd´s, y también material escolar para después clasificarlo y enviarlo a los países que lo necesitan.

Según informan, durante los primeros meses del 2018 se han enviado 356 kilos de material a Paraguay y más de 6.500 kilos a Perú.

En el último año se han distribuido 27.610 kilos de libros y material en Guinea Ecuatorial, Angola, Perú, Honduras, Bolivia, Paraguay, República Dominicana, Cuba, El Salvador, Argentina, Ecuador, Isla Margarita, y Venezuela.

Desde su primer envío en 2001, la Biblioteca ha mandado cerca de 240.000 libros.

Esta Biblioteca nació con el lema “Cultura contra la pobreza” y gracias a la iniciativa del sacerdote valenciano Juan Eduardo Schenk Sanchís y por el instituto secular Lumen Christi, fundado por él. Cuenta con el apoyo de voluntarios que en sus sedes recogen clasifican y organizan el material escolar.

Según declaró a AVAN el coordinador de la Biblioteca, Francisco Tébar, son necesario s más voluntarios para poder atender todos los pedidos que recibe y también pidió más ayuda económica ya que no reciben subvenciones oficiales, aunque subrayó la “estrecha colaboración” con Cáritas Diocesana y con la Delegación de Misiones del Arzobispado.

Para más información sobre cómo colaborar o apadrinar el envío de material escolar y libros AQUÍ. www.fundacion.padrejuan.org o enviar un correo electrónico fundacionpadrejuan@gmail.com








          Diversidad turística de la Mosquitia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
***La Mosquitia hondureña se ubica al este del país,  es la zona más remota y aislada de Honduras a la que se le conoce también como la pequeña Amazonia de Centroamérica, asimismo  fue declarada  Patrimonio de la Humanidad por la UNESCO. Los rasgos naturales, ecológicos y culturales de esta región la convierten en el sitio […]
          Delegación de Olimpiadas Especiales lista para viajar a Emiratos Árabes en 2019      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
*** Los Juegos Mundiales de Verano de Olimpiadas Especiales se realizarán en marzo de 2019. Lista está la delegación de Olimpiadas Especiales que representará a Honduras en los Juegos Mundiales de Verano llevadas a cabo el próximo año en Abu Dabi, capital de Emiratos Árabes Unidos. Son 10 atletas que competirán en las disciplinas de […]
          Mexico manager search could be aided by merry-go-round in the Americas      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
During the latest episode of the Two on Tri podcast, Sebastian Salazar and Herculez Gomez examine potential candidates for Mexico's head coaching position. With the World Cup in the rear-view mirror, it's all change in the Americas as a number of national teams look for a new manager.  Argentina, Costa Rica, United States, Mexico and Honduras have vacancies, while Colombia's top job might shortly be available. Even with Ricardo Gareca reportedly continuing with Peru and Oscar Tavarez likely to stay on with Uruguay, the situation is open, complex and potentially linked. Costa Rica reportedly have 36 options and are set to take until October...
          An Orphanage That Doesn't Seem Like An Orphanage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Orphanages are falling out of favor. Ever since the horrific conditions in Romanian orphanages were widely publicized in the 1990s – naked children tied to cribs in overcrowded wards — there's been a movement in the international aid world to shut down orphanages completely. But according to UNICEF, there are still 2.7 million children living in orphanages worldwide. So what if someone tried to set up a good orphanage — a place where parentless kids could thrive? What would it look like? And what could it tell us about the basics of child rearing? It might look like this: A dozen kids piled on a couch watching a soccer match on TV while kids from neighboring houses drop by to chat. Other kids are preparing dinner in the kitchen. The kids call the employees of the institution "mom" and "auntie" while the staff call them "mi amor" — my love. The kids and the adults at the SOS Children's Village, an orphanage in Tela, Honduras, interact like a big extended family. It's a place where
          ¿Encontraron Colombia y Honduras el secreto para salvar su café de la roya?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
La roya del café es un problema constante, agravado por el cambio climático. Y está llevando a que el café siga aumentando su precio, mientras al mismo tiempo resulta cada vez más difícil para los productores ganarse la vida con su labor.
          Pompeo y Videgaray coinciden en importancia de pacto sobre TLCAN      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

El secretario de Estado de EU, Mike Pompeo, y su homólogo mexicano, Luis Videgaray, han coincidido en la "importancia" de llegar a un acuerdo sobre el Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte (TLCAN), apuntó hoy la diplomacia estadounidense.

La portavoz del Departamento de Estado, Heather Nauert, informó hoy de una llamada telefónica entre Pompeo y Videgaray, que se produjo ayer miércoles, justo antes de que el propio canciller mexicano viajara a Washington para revisar los progresos de las negociaciones comerciales.

Pompeo y Videgaray también conversaron sobre la "importancia de reducir la inmigración irregular" que cruza México huyendo, en su mayoría, de la violencia y la falta de oportunidades económicas del Triángulo Norte de Centroamérica (El Salvador, Guatemala y Honduras).

Al respecto, los titulares de Exteriores hablaron de la necesidad de una "mayor inversión" en Centroamérica para enfrentar los restos en materia económica, de seguridad y de fortaleza institucional.

"Ellos también hablaron de la importancia de llegar a un acuerdo sobre el TLCAN", dijo Nauert, sin ofrecer más detalles.

Videgaray se encuentra hoy en Washington junto al secretario de Economía de México, Ildefonso Guajardo, y Jesús Seade, designado como jefe negociador del TLCAN por parte del equipo del próximo presidente de México, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, quien asumirá el poder el próximo 1 de diciembre.

El pasado 1 de agosto, Videgaray, Guajardo y Seade efectuaron otro viaje a la capital estadounidense para participar en una reunión de renegociación del TLCAN.

México, Estados Unidos y Canadá están inmersos en una compleja renegociación del TLCAN, en vigor desde 1994, a petición del presidente estadounidense, Donald Trump, quien considera que el convenio comercial perjudica la industria y el empleo en su país.

A finales de julio, el secretario de Comercio de Estados Unidos, Wilbur Ross, dijo que las negociaciones sobre el tratado estaban "cerca de acabar".

Más información en El Siglo de Torreón


          An Orphanage That Doesn't Seem Like An Orphanage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Orphanages are falling out of favor. Ever since the horrific conditions in Romanian orphanages were widely publicized in the 1990s – naked children tied to cribs in overcrowded wards — there's been a movement in the international aid world to shut down orphanages completely. But according to UNICEF, there are still 2.7 million children living in orphanages worldwide. So what if someone tried to set up a good orphanage — a place where parentless kids could thrive? What would it look like? And what could it tell us about the basics of child rearing? It might look like this: A dozen kids piled on a couch watching a soccer match on TV while kids from neighboring houses drop by to chat. Other kids are preparing dinner in the kitchen. The kids call the employees of the institution "mom" and "auntie" while the staff call them "mi amor" — my love. The kids and the adults at the SOS Children's Village, an orphanage in Tela, Honduras, interact like a big extended family. It's a place where
          En Honduras sólo crecen las empresas que tienen negocios con el Estado      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
*** Para el representante de Libre, las empresas eléctricas, de comunicaciones, de peajes entre otras, son beneficiadas por contratos con el Estado. El dirigente  del Partido Libertad y Refundación (Libre), Carlos Reina, lamentó este jueves  que en Honduras sólo “prosperen” las empresas que tienen negocios con el Estado. Reina,  argumentó que el 78 por ciento de […]
          Tomas de la UNAH dejan un impacto microeconómico      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
***Aún no se puede contabilizar las pérdidas económicas tras cuatro días de tomas en ciudad universitaria, por lo que se espera que este conflicto se soluciones lo más ante posible. El economista de Foro Social de la Deuda Externa y Desarrollo de Honduras (Fosdeh), Isamel Zepeda, en una entrevista en exclusiva para Hondudiario.com dijo que […]
          Taiwán genera nuevas oportunidades de negocios en el país      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
*** Durante el evento de tres días, TAITRA facilitará el intercambio mutuo y la colaboración entre las empresas taiwanesas y hondureñas. Cada año, Taiwán organiza varias misiones comerciales y delegaciones a Honduras. El Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores de la República de China (Taiwán), el Consejo de Desarrollo del Comercio Exterior de Taiwán (TAITRA) anuncia la […]
          “Estoy con disposición al diálogo, pero mientras sigan las tomas no”: rector UNAH      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
***El rector de la UNAH aseguró que a pesar de las tomas, el actual período académico no se perderá. El rector interino de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras (UNAH), Francisco Herrera, aseguró que no se sentará en mesa de diálogo con estudiantes ni con el sector Transporte, mientras sigan tomadas las instalaciones de la […]
           Honduran man in US pretends to be dead in photos he sent to his wife to stop her asking for money       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Danny Gonzalez, 27, took photos of himself with cotton wool stuffed into his nostrils and a white sheet over his body as if he were in a morgue. He then sent them to his wife living in Saba, southern Honduras.
          To Counter Trump, Vox Defends MS-13 As Nice Kids Who Ride Bikes, Work After-School Jobs      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Vox and ProPublica take aim at President Trump’s heightened concern for gangs in the United States in a recently published video, claiming his harsh characterizations of MS-13 are unfair. The gang, also known as Mara Salvatrucha, numbers in the tens of thousands and is composed primarily of outlaws from El Salvador, Honduras, and other Central American countries. Trump’s hardline stance on crime and border security has made MS-13 a more widely recognized public menace. But instead of acknowledging the rising violent threat that MS-13 poses to the American people, progressive media outlets like Vox and ProPublica are casting the Trump...
          ¿Áreas protegidas en la república mafiosa de Honduras?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
En medio del caos que enfrenta el pueblo hondureño como consecuencia de la destrucción de las estructuras gubernamentales la cual se viene dando en la última década y como parte del proceso de privatización de las áreas protegidas y la subasta del territorio nacional, el actual gobierno optó por el uso de una de las zonas de mayor biodiversidad del país, para convertirla en el lugar de instalación una termoeléctrica a base de bunker c, para la producción de 87 megavatios de energía sucia.
          A viral tweet has inspired people to donate millions of frequent flyer miles to help reunite immigrant families separated at the US border      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

migrant child reunited

  • People are donating their frequent flyer miles to help reunite separated immigrant families.
  • Donations have spiked this week after a University of Michigan professor's tweet went viral.
  • According to Miles4Migrants, one of the organizations that helps facilitate the award flights, they've received more donated miles during the last week than they have over the past 23 months.

As the American Civil Liberties Union and the federal government work to reunite families separated at the US-Mexico border under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, road warriors and business travelers are donating their frequent flyer miles to help cover the cost of reuniting children with their families.

Although more than 1,400 separated families have been reunited as of a court-imposed July 26 deadline, at least 711 children were unable to be reunited with their families, including at least 431 who have not yet been reunited because their parents may have already been deported, according to the federal government.

As nonprofit organizations attempt to help with the reunification process, families have had to pay as much as $2,000 or more in airfare in order to be reunited, which includes the cost of a round-trip ticket for a family escort, and a pricey one-way for each child.

Several organizations — including Miles4Migrants and Michigan Support Circle — have been accepting donations of frequent flyer miles to help book those flights for families and children.

"Flights can be incredibly expensive, especially last minute," Seth Stanton, one of the directors of Miles4Migrants, told Business Insider. "Using miles helps us book these tickets to make reunifications possible."

Although both organizations have been soliciting donations of frequent flyer miles since the current crisis began, they've seen an explosion of donations over the past several days, thanks to a viral tweet by University of Michigan Law School professor Beth H. Wilensky. Wilensky learned about the option to donate miles from a post in Michigan Support Circle's Facebook group.

"At last count, we have commitments from about 175 volunteers," Rosaline Lochner, Michigan Support Circle's founder, said in a phone interview with Business Insider Tuesday afternoon. "Before Beth's tweet started to spread, we had around 8-10." 

Wilensky's husband, Jeff Wilensky, is the Vice President of global marketing for ProQuest, a multinational education technology company, and has amassed more than 600,000 Delta frequent flyer miles over the course of his work travel. He donated 75,000 of them through Michigan Support Circle, which helped reunite a three-year-old boy and his father, and fly them from Michigan — where the boy had been taken after being separated from his father at the border — to their extended family.

According to Andy Freedman, another director at Miles4Migrants, Wilensky's tweet — which has been retweeted over 30,000 times and liked more than 138,000, as of press time — and several follow-up tweets have had an immediate impact.

According to Freedman, once the tweet began spreading, miles started pouring in. "We've had more than 3.6 million miles donated by 112 separate people since the tweets," he said.

According to Stanton, the average cost of an award flight booked with miles to reunite a family is 20,000 miles, meaning the 3.6 million miles can be used for around 180 flights.

"For reference, since we founded Miles4Migrants in September 2016, we've booked just over 150 flights," according to Stanton. "We've more-than-doubled our capacity to help in just a day."

One of those donors was Tonia Ries, a marketing executive based in New York City. Ries learned about Miles4Migrants when someone she follows retweeted Wilensky's tweet, leading her to donate 50,000 American Express points that she earned by using her card for business expenses.

"This was an easy way to make a difference," Ries told Business Insider. "The recent family separation policy has made an issue I already cared about even more critical, so I was delighted to find an easy way to help. This is an ingenious way to let people use something that many can easily afford to share to help address an urgent need."

Michigan Support Circle began as a local grassroots organization primarily focused on helping separated families who had been relocated to Michigan, while Miles4Migrants has typically had a more global view, working with partner organizations that identify cases where miles can be helpful — since the border crisis gained attention, separated immigrant families within the US have become a focus of the organization. Any flights that Miles4Migrants books are for cases that are legally-approved, in cases where any necessary visas and paperwork are already arranged.

Because most airlines and credit card loyalty programs add significant fees or place restrictions on transferring miles to another user, both Miles4Migrants and Michigan Support Circle rely on pledges from donors to use their miles when needed. When a partner humanitarian organization identifies a case, the groups contact a pledged donor with instructions and information, and that individual can book the tickets.

The use of frequent flyer miles to reunite families is not the first time that airlines have come into the story as the spotlight has grown on the forced separation of children from their parents at illegal border crossings.

In June, as outcry grew, American Airlines issued a statement asking the federal government not to use its services to transport children who had been separated from their families. United quickly followed suit, with Frontier and Southwest following.

While the airlines don't have any direct involvement with individuals or organizations using miles to book flights for migrants, the process of helping a pledged donor book the tickets through their own account has a strong upside.

"Donors end up knowing exactly who they're helping," said Freedman. "It makes the experience less abstract, more real, and more tangible for donors."

SEE ALSO: 20 crazy things people have tried to smuggle past the TSA at airports

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          ANÁLISE: Apesar da derrota, 'maré verde' argentina pode ecoar na América Latina      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Avanços para a legalização do aborto ainda são lentos e caminham para a descriminalização. Manifestante a favor da legalização do aborto reage à rejeição do projeto no Senado argentino'' Reuters/Marcos Brindicci Ativistas contrários ao aborto comemoraram como se fosse um gol a rejeição do projeto de lei que legalizaria a prática, deixando as mulheres argentinas à mercê da legislação de 1921, que proíbe a interrupção voluntária da gravidez. E também em situação semelhante à de 97% de suas vizinhas latino-americanas. Mas, na Argentina do século XXI e do Papa Francisco, o placar apertado e a grande mobilização são indicativos de que nada será como antes. Apesar de proibido, o aborto ganha força como um dos temas dominantes da campanha presidencial do próximo ano. E o governo Macri já cogita incluir a sua descriminalização no projeto de reforma do Código Penal que enviará ainda este mês ao Congresso. Toda vez que o aborto consegue romper resistências e entrar na agenda legislativa, o debate viraliza, mobilizando os dois campos, independentemente da nacionalidade. Esta semana, mulheres latino-americanas buscaram inspiração na maré verde argentina, tentando fazer com que o movimento ecoasse em seus países. Numa região em que o peso do conservadorismo encontra na Igreja seu maior aliado, apenas Uruguai, Cuba e Guiana permitem o aborto, que pode ser realizado até a 12ª semana também em Porto Rico e na Cidade do México. A interrupção da gravidez é terminantemente proibida em El Salvador, Honduras, Haiti, Nicarágua, República Dominicana e Suriname. Oito países permitem que ocorra apenas para salvar a vida da mulher. Ativistas antiaborto comemoram rejeição do projeto no senado argentino Agustin Marcarian/Reuters Os avanços, contudo, ocorrem lentamente. A legislação chilena foi flexibilizada no ano passado, liberando a prática em casos de má formação do feto, de perigo da vida para a mãe e de gravidez decorrente de estupro. No Brasil, o debate ainda ressoa mais no Judiciário do que no Congresso. O STF encerrou esta semana as audiências públicas para debater a ação impetrada pelo PSOL pedindo para que o aborto não seja mais considerado crime se feito até a 12ª semana. Ainda não há prazo para a relatora, ministra Rosa Weber, preparar o voto ou pedir a sua inclusão na pauta de julgamento do plenário do Supremo. A proibição do aborto não reduziu o número de intervenções. Ao contrário, segundo relatório da Organização Mundial de Saúde, incrementou a prática clandestina, pondo em risco a saúde da mulher. Mas, por enquanto, a descriminalização, que exime a mulher de ser presa por praticar o aborto, ainda parece ser o atalho para a legalização do aborto na América Latina. Arte/G1
          Tegu Classroom Packs Starting $79.99 (Reg. $125+)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Today only at Woot.com these Tegu Classroom Packs start at $79.99 (Reg. $125+)!  

52 Piece Original Set
"Click-Clack". It's the iconic sound of two Tegu Blocks coming together. Tegu has reinvented the wooden block in a way that brings new life to a favored classic. By safely embedding magnets into each piece, Tegu Blocks become curiously attractive for both kids and kids at heart.

Defy gravity and push your imagination in ways never before possible. No instruction manuals or electronics, just toys that demand imagination and inspire limitless creativity across all ages. Open-ended play is endangered, but we're bringing it back.

Created with beautiful Honduran hardwoods and safe water-based finishes, these blocks have proven wildly addictive for kids (and kids at heart) and will encourage the simple joy of creating for generations. Includes 52 blocks in four shapes: 20 Cubes, 16 Long Planks, 10 Short Planks, and 6 Jumbo Planks.
  • Experience the mystery of magnets with Tegu's Original 52 Piece set. Fully Compatible with ALL other Tegu Magnetic Wooden Sets.
  • Naturally safe: no lead, no plastic, non-toxic, water-based lacquer finish, no small parts
  • Origin: Designed in the USA, purposefully made in Honduras from sustainably sourced hardwoods
  • Brilliantly simple and premium heirloom-quality toy that will last for generations
  • Curiously attractive and perfect for those seeking toys supporting open-ended and unscripted play
  • Includes 52 blocks in four shapes: 20 Cubes, 16 Long Planks, 10 Short Planks, and 6 Jumbo Planks
  • Imported: Honduras
~OR~

90 Piece Classroom Pack Set ~OR~ 130 Piece Classroom Pack Set
The Classroom Kit is a bulk pack of Tegu Blocks perfect for both the classroom or the home playroom. The Classroom Kit comes with magnetic hardwood blocks packaged neatly in their own storage box for easy clean up when individual or group play is done. With different shapes, it allows small groups of children to build big and teach unique lessons from science to math to art. Tegu support's a child's development over time through play: enhanced fine motor skills, pattern recognition, balance, sense of scale, imaginative play, problem solving, storytelling.
  • Tegu is a building system consisting in a series of blocks and shapes appropriate for multiple age groups. It is an open-play manipulative toy with puzzle-like construction abilities
  • The Classroom Kit is a bulk pack of Tegu Blocks perfect for both the classroom or the home playroom. Fully compatible with all other Tegu Magnetic Wooden Sets
  • Brilliantly simple and premium heirloom-quality toy that will last for generations
  • Curiously attractive and perfect for those seeking toys supporting open-ended and unscripted play
  • Imported: Honduras
Shipping is FREE for Amazon Prime Members or only $5 flat rate.

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          Emilio Izaguirre: Celtic poised to complete deal for full-back's return      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Celtic boss Brendan Rodgers expects Honduras left-back Emilio Izaguirre to return to the club 'in the next 24 hours'.
          ´Abolish ICE´ Philadelphia Released a Previously Deported Illegal Alien From Custody, Then He Raped a Child      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Townhall, by Katie Pavlich Posted By: JoniTx- Thu, 09 21 2018 08:21:29 GMT Two weeks ago Philadelphia city officials decided to end a long'standing contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. This week, an illegal alien who was released by local law enforcement officials pleaded guilty to unlawful reentry into the United States after being convicted of raping a child. The alien had an ICE detainer and officials let him out into the streets without notifying federal immigration officials. "U.S. Attorney William M. McSwain announced that Juan Ramon Vasquez, a citizen of Honduras, pleaded guilty today to illegal reentry after deportation. In May 2009, the defendant was deported from the United States," the Department
          Júnior Lacayo: “Si anoto un gol no lo voy a celebrar”      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

El exmarathón teme que la afición verdolaga le grite groserías desde las graderías Por Selvin Pineda    San Pedro Sula, Honduras Júnior Lacayo ya entrena a todo vapor con Olimpia y se reporta listo para ser tomado en cuenta por el entrenador Nahún Espinoza para el encuentro ante su exequipo, luego de resolver asuntos personales 

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La entrada Júnior Lacayo: “Si anoto un gol no lo voy a celebrar” se publicó primero en Sporthiva Online.


          Real España obligado a evitar una penosa eliminación      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

El Real España deberá ganar por dos goles de diferencia para pasar a la siguiente fase   San Pedro Sula, Honduras El Real España se metió a problemas el partido de ida ante el Tauro FC de Panamá. Jugó un mal partido y sacó barata la factura al tan solo perder por un gol. Ahora, 

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La entrada Real España obligado a evitar una penosa eliminación se publicó primero en Sporthiva Online.


          La FIFA rechaza recurso presentado por Ramón Maradiaga      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

No podrá ejercer ningún cargo relacionado al fútbol en las 209 asociaciones afiliadas a FIFA por omitir información sobre un intento de arreglo de partidos Honduras La Comisión de Apelación de la FIFA ha rechazado el recurso interpuesto por Ramón Maradiaga y ha confirmado la decisión adoptada por el órgano de decisión de la Comisión 

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La entrada La FIFA rechaza recurso presentado por Ramón Maradiaga se publicó primero en Sporthiva Online.




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