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          Bonga and the Voudou Drums of Haiti: 'ouve pot'      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
'ouve pot' by Bonga and the Voudou Drums of Haiti from bonga and the vodou drums (CD) spun at 1:36pm PDT Wed Aug 8th 2018 by Diane on One World Music, KZFR Chico
          Conduct and Discipline Officer       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Level : P-3
Job ID : 101817
Job Network : Management and Administration
Job Family : Administration
Department/Office : United Nations Mission for Justice Support in Haiti
Duty Station : PORT-AU-PRINCE
Staffing Exercise : N/A
Posted Date : 8/8/2018
Deadline : 8/22/2018
          Other materials stories that may be of interest      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Solar energy used to provide water filtration in Haiti, 3-D printing battery electrodes, and other materials stories that may be of interest for August 8, 2018.
          Why Is This Asylum Seeker Still in Detention if 3 Court Decisions Have Ruled in His Favor? Demand ICE Release Ansly Damus.      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
"In the past, I thought I was going to leave, and still I'm here."

Those are the words of 42-year-old Haitian asylum seeker Ansly Damus spoken from a detention facility in Chardon, Ohio.

The ethics teacher first came to the States in 2016 after leaving his home country due to fear that he might be killed by a local politician. But the U.S. wasn't his first stop. He went to Brazil first to try to make a life for himself there, but after hearing that Haitian immigrants were being brutally killed, he decided to escape to the U.S. and ask for asylum.

That was nearly two years ago and Ansly is still being held in detention without the possibility to leave,even though on three different occasions the court has sided with his cause to get him released issuing a "denial of parole." Yet, he still lingers behind in ICE custody.

In April of 2017, an immigration judge first approved his request for asylum. When he still wasn't released, the judge approved it once again in January of 2018. But the anti-immigrant Trump administration appealed the decisions each time.

Aside from contravening the court's orders, ICE is also breaking its own policy. According to a recent article, several ICE offices, including the one managing Ansly's case, have been issuing blanket denials of parole for hundreds of asylum seekers, independent of each seeker's merits. This goes against ICE's own policy to grant parole on an individualized basis. The blanket denials have ensnared Ansly's fate even though time and time again immigration judges have sided with Mr. Damus.

This injustice must be fixed. It's time ICE follow its own rules and the orders of the immigration judge and release Ansly Damus on parole today.
          Looking for Global-Health Answers      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A Harvard summer program provides a “lexicon” for healthcare professionals.

Dr. Garba Bakunawa

Photograph by Brandon J. Dixon/Harvard Magazine


Dr. Garba Bakunawa

Photograph by Brandon J. Dixon/Harvard Magazine

International

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global health delivery intensive
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Three days before Garba Bakunawa traveled from Nigeria to Harvard for a nearly month-long course on global healthcare delivery, an electrical injury with the potential to imperil his ability to practice surgery knocked him unconscious. Heavy rains had flooded parts of his community in northeast Nigeria and damaged the local power provider. Abnormal voltage flares were causing problems throughout the area.

He awoke on June 29 to the furious chirp of wires sparking in the ceiling of his house. Telling his family to remain behind him, Bakunawa reached for the control box in the house to cut the power—and everything went black.

“I remember that I made an effort to touch it, but I can’t remember what happened next,” he said. “I just remember that I woke up on the way to the hospital and my brother was telling me that I was electrocuted.” By his account, he was luckier than most. The electrical problems injured many in his community, and even killed a few people. “At least I was healthy enough to walk around,” he said. After 12 hours in the hospital, he left on a regimen of antibiotics and with his right arm covered in a large cast. The shock had heavily charred the skin of his hand. It was not clear if he would recover well enough to practice again.

Bakunawa was due in Cambridge the following week for the start of the 2018 Global Health Delivery Intensive (GHDI), a three-week program jointly offered by the School of Public Health (HSPH), the Medical School (HMS), and Brigham and Women’s Hospital that convenes mid-career health professionals from across the globe for lessons about improving access to key health treatments. Voted an outstanding member of his hospital’s staff, Bakunawa received funding to attend the program and had already booked his ticket to Boston before his injury. His family urged him to try to reschedule. He would not be swayed.

In Boston, he joined a 55-member cohort of summer student learners representing 27 countries and a wide array of professional backgrounds, including in nonprofit leadership, clinical care, and community health work. More than half of that cohort labors in “resource poor settings” and a plurality of program participants are direct patient care providers, according to demographic data gathered by the program’s leaders. 

While Harvard does not provide financial assistance for the program, almost 90 percent of this year’s cohort received financial support from outside sources such as scholarship or training programs, or from employers, to cover the program’s $8,000 tuition fee. Sources of support came from a wide array of local and international organizations such as Massachusetts General Hospital and the Center for Health Care Delivery in Dubai (which funds ten full and ten partial scholarships to GHDI). 

“Some of the students are, of course, incredible themselves,” Davin Eurich, the program’s coordinator, added, “and will receive funding from the World Health Organization or their own ministries of health. It’s a work of art to see the funding work out.”  

Thinking Globally

In some ways, Bakunawa’s experience navigating dramatically different care infrastructure in Nigeria and the United States underscores the mission of the GHDI: to provide healthcare professionals with the know-how to standardize levels of care globally.

GHDI grew out of a larger effort launched nearly 11 years ago (the Global Health Delivery Project, GHDP), which sought to standardize a “lexicon” that healthcare professionals could apply to their respective regional contexts, said GHDI program director Rebecca Weintraub in an interview  (she is assistant professor of global health and social medicine at HMS). Eleven years ago, she said, her team set out to generate “what we viewed as novel public goods”—in this case, resources about best practices for global health professionals, including case studies similar to those created at the Business School, with step-by-step descriptions of how health professionals tackled issues in their regions, designed to help alleviate the disparities in levels of care and infrastructure that exist across the world. 

The GHDP was, according to Weintraub, one of the first of its kind, merging HMS’s clinical know-how with HSPH’s population-level, solutions-based frameworks: “It sounds not-so-novel now, but at the time the intersection between clinical and public health was relatively new, and when you think about it, Harvard Medical School and the School of Public Health are separate entities.” 

Harvard’s focus on global health is wide-ranging and continues to expand: it has launched more than 120 global-health related offerings, from Business School executive-education leadership programs to an undergraduate secondary field that focuses on interdisciplinary study of healthcare, policy, and science. 

GHDI, while not a degree- or certificate-granting program, is just as intensive as most other HMS courses. During their time in residence, students enroll in three courses—“Epidemiological Methods for Global Health,” “Introduction to Global Healthcare Delivery,” and “Management Practices in Healthcare Delivery”—which are meant to provide an interdisciplinary introduction to how health professionals tackle public health issues that recur worldwide. A combination of Harvard professors (some from HMS, HSPH, and the Kennedy School) and guest lecturers who work in healthcare teach the courses, which typically run 2 hours per session.

One GHDI case study this year examined a mother of three in rural Kenya whose youngest son developed a fever. A community health worker diagnosed him with malaria. The mother (named Esther in the study) could not find the prescribed antimalarials and mosquito netting for her children at the village drugstore, and she couldn’t get the materials from neighboring villages because their pharmacies were either out of stock or charged exorbitant fees. The case served as the starting point for a discussion on best practices for “last-mile logistics,” or how supply chains deliver their products to patients. The session pushed students to consider the inefficiencies at every step of the delivery process, from communication errors or demand fluctuations, that might lead to stock-outs during a crucial time of need. 

Other cases tackled issues such as the role of diplomacy in healthcare, community-based solutions to healthcare, and financing.

In one wide-ranging session of the management-practices course, Kolokotrones University Professor of global health and social medicinePaul Farmer—who chairs the eponymous department and co-founded the nonprofit Partners In Health—spoke at length about the challenges facing healthcare professionals: distrust of nonprofit organizations in places like Haiti (where Farmer and Partners have long been active); the need to understand historical context when planning broad care efforts; and continuing debates over how to define “equity” and “universality” in care. He stressed the importance of addressing such issues explicitly. “When you impoverish a discussion about healthcare for decades, a lot of not talking about it, I tend to believe any discussion of universality is a good one,” Farmer said. He put current discussions about the universality of healthcare into the context of American upheavals such as the abolitionist and civil-rights movements.  

The theme of equity in healthcare emerged in many of the program’s sessions, Weintraub emphasized. “In many ways, our students come to the program with that sense. Equity is already a part of their professional agenda, but they come here looking for ways to operationalize it.”

A Vast Network 

Though coursework is a major component of the experience of the GHDI, program coordinator Davin Eurich said networking and opportunities for peer-to-peer learning bolster the graduates’ experiences.

“Those that were willing to share their vulnerability and hardships [in ways] that others in the class could really relate to...is what really builds this network,” she said. “The students are coming and meeting different inspiration points. Some are moving on...to other programs at Harvard. Others are leveraging GHDI in numerous other ways back home.”

GHDI has graduated 350 students from 60 countries so far. Many have returned to work in the ministries of health of their respective countries or to aid nonprofits in region-specific work, while others return to local hospitals to deploy the new knowledge they have acquired.

Bakunawa will return with that—and more. O[2] ne day, during a lecture in the beginning of the program, Bakunawa raised his hand to answer a question, and HMS professor and GHDI co-director Joseph Rhatigan noticed the injury to his hand for the first time. 

“That day he sent me a message saying there was a doctor, a hand surgeon, who would like to review me, and he was able to link me with a plastic surgeon,” Bakunawa said. “Just like a family, they treated me very well.” Faculty from the program, HMS instructors, and physicians at Brigham worked to provide Bakunawa with surgery free of charge, including skin grafting to the affected areas on his hand and the removal of one of his fingers, which had been badly damaged.

“I called my wife and my family and I told them what was happening, and that they’re doing it for free. I didn’t have the money to do it here, and this was at one of the best hospitals globally,” he said. “I was so happy with the consideration, with the sympathy I received from my colleagues.” 

The program and the care he received from classmates has inspired him, demonstrating in word and deed that anything is possible. And that has become a mantra. “One of our facilitators here, Rebecca [Weintraub], she says that instead of saying ‘no,’ just say ‘it’s possible.”  

At the graduation ceremony on the last day of the program, the students heard from Stephen Kahn, president of the Abundance Foundation, an organization that helps train nonprofit leaders who work on the intersection of health, arts, and education. Kahn graduated with the first cohort of the program, and the foundation he now heads has supported Partners In Health in the past, and according to Eurich, provides financial support to GHDI that helps the program’s leaders improve the course offerings each year. 

In his keynote remarks, Kahn spoke of grappling with issues of scarce resources during an experience working in hospital in Zambia before attending GHDI. Without the necessary HIV diagnostic technology, he said he “had to guessat which of my languishing patients were dying of AIDS.” 

“I thumbed through my Merck manual, hoping the pages would answer the endless cascade of questions I had. All I had was my clinical vigilance,” he said. 

Kahn called GHDI a “profound turning point” for him, and stressed that the program’s emphasis on providing political and historical context for its cases helped deepen his understanding of how to address public-health crises. Moreover, he emphasized that relying on the network of GHDI graduates has strengthened his work—by providing professional advice and by helping him weather the toughest moments of being a healthcare provider.

“I’m standing shoulder to shoulder with you in this work to bring equity and excellence in healthcare,” Kahn told the graduates. “It’s so easy to get conditioned to scarcity. The global health delivery course is an antidote to that mindset.”

Harvard’s Global Health Delivery Intensive
Online Only

          Are Haitian Physicians Burned Out?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Imagine you are a Haitian pediatrician working in the slum. And imagine that you are responsible for examining 10 patients per hour (or one patient every six minutes) all day long. And also imagine that these patients range in age from one-hour-old to five-years-old. And imagine that during the course of your day—every day—you examined … Continue reading "Are Haitian Physicians Burned Out?"
          Listing vom Donnerstag, 9.08.2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Donnerstag, 09.08.2018

8h00 Beachvolleyball/Euro 1 Star: Vaduz, Laola1.tv live

8h30 – 19h00 Snooker: World Open aus Yushan, #4, eurosportplayer.de/$ live

9h30 – 22h00 European Championships: Donnerstag, ZDF | EURO1 | EURO2/$ | sportschau.de | zdf.de | eurovisionsports.tv/EuropeanChamps18 live
* EURO1: 9h30 – 13h15, 16h00 – 22h00
* ZDF: 9h45 – 22h00
* EURO2: 10h00 – 11h30

10h00 – 12h15 Eishockey/Test: Kazakhstan Stars – Neftekhimik Nizhnekamsk, Laola1.tv live

10h30 Tischtennis/Challenge Series: ITTF Nigeria Open, Laola1.tv live

11h00 Pferderennen/Indian Horse Racing: Bangalore, Laola1.tv live

11h00 – 11h05 Premier League: Deadline Day, Sportdigital/$ live
— Weitere Ausgaben um 13 Uhr, 15 Uhr, 17 Uhr, 18h45

11h00 – 13h00 Fußball/TCH, U21: Slavia Prag – Sparta Prag, Laola1.tv live

13h00 – 13h05 Premier League: Deadline Day, Sportdigital/$ live
— Weitere Ausgaben um 15 Uhr, 17 Uhr, 18h45

13h30 – 15h30 Fußball/F, U20-WM: China – Deutschland, #2, EURO1 | EURO2/$ | EURO2 Xtra/$ | eurosportplayer.de/$ live

15h00 – 15h05 Premier League: Deadline Day, Sportdigital/$ live
— Weitere Ausgaben um 17 Uhr, 18h45

15h30 – 17h45 Eishockey/Test: Barys Astana – Amur Khabarovsk, Laola1.tv live

16h30 – 18h30 Fußball/F, U20-WM: Nachmittagsspiele, #2, eurosportplayer.de/$ live
— 16h30: Haiti – Nigeria
— 16h30: Spanien – Japan

17h00 – 17h05 Premier League: Deadline Day, Sportdigital/$ live
— Weitere Ausgabe um 18h45

17h00 – 4h00 Tennis/ATP1000: Toronto, #4, SKY Sport 1/$ live

17h45 – 19h15 Radsport: Polen-Rundfahrt, EURO2/$ | EURO2 Xtra/$ live

18h00 – 20h15 Eishockey/Test: Dinamo Moskau – Dinamo Minsk, Laola1.tv live

18h30 Tennis/WTA, Premier 5: Montreal, #4, DAZN/$ live

18h30 – 22h45 Fußball/Europa League: Donnerstagsspiele, Quali, 3te-Runde/Hin, SPORT1 | Laola1.tv | DAZN/$ live
— 18h30: RB Leipzig – Universitatea Craiova [SPORT1 | DAZN] 
— 19h00: AS Trenčín – Feyenoord [Laola1] 
— 20h00: SBV Vitesse – FC Basel [Laola1] 
— 20h45: FK Spartak Subotica – Bröndby IF [Laola1] 

18h45 – 19h00 Premier League: Deadline Day, Sportdigital/$ live
— Letzte Ausgabe des Tages

19h00 – 1h00 Golf: PGA Championship in St.


          Germany U-20 (Æ) - Haiti U-20 (Æ)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Football. Women. World Cup U-20
          Why Are Some Countries Rich And Others Poor?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Why are some nations rich and others poor? In a new book called Why Nations Fail , a pair of economists argue that a lot comes down to politics. To research the book, the authors scoured the world for populations and geographic areas that are identical in all respects save one: they're on different sides of a border. The two Koreas are an extreme example. But you can see the same thing on the border of the US and Mexico, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, and dozens of other neighboring countries. In all of these cases, the people and land were fairly similar, but the border changed everything. "It's all about institutions," Daron Acemoglu, one of the authors, explained. "It's really about human-made systems, rules, regulations, formal or informal that create different incentives." When these guys talk about institutions they mean it as broadly as possible: it's the formal rules and laws, but also the norms and common practices of a society. Lots of countries have great constitutions
          'Suicide' by handcuffed youth near Panikhaiti OP raises eyebrows      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
GUWAHATI, Aug 8 - Major public uproar was witnessed in front of Panikhaiti outpost since early morning today after Chandan Bharali (23), who was in police custody since August 7, committed suicide a few metres away from the outpost premises using the rope of the handcuff, under extremely mysterious circumstances.
          Comment on State Production on Terry FOIA Lawsuit Leaves Key Questions Unanswered by Trumped      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
This is part of why the Deep State crooks wanted Hillary to win so badly - they knew she had been involved in so many illegal acts that she was easy to blackmail and control. She has been involved in illegal operations and cover ups all of the way since the 80s when her and Bubba were covering up the drugs being flown in by the cia to Mena. She has her hands in Fast and Furious, Benghazi, running guns to syria and Libyan terrorists, shady energy deals with russia, stealing money for Haitian earthquake victims, and lots of bizarre deaths involving people she knew like Vince foster and Seth rich.
          Women U-20 World Cup: Falconets battle Haiti in crunch tie      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

  The Falconets of Nigeria will on Thursday (today) face Haiti in Saint Malo, as they strive to keep their qualification hopes at the ongoing France 2018 FIFA U-20 World Cup. Chris Danjuma’s lasses went down to Germany by a lone goal in their opening match on Monday at the same venue and with the […]

The post Women U-20 World Cup: Falconets battle Haiti in crunch tie appeared first on Newtelegraph.


          Cap Haitien, Haiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A couple of friends and myself are planning to visit the Cap Haitien area, but we are not part of any group, so no one/organization will meet us at the airport. Likely fly direct to Cap from FLL. Any tips on getting through customs, hiring reliable transportation at the Cap airport, interpreter? Other Cap tips? We're heading to a remote villa, so mainly we just need assistance in/around Cap picking up supplies. Many thanks!
          Mimsi Gives Haiti Moms-to-Be the Medicine They Need      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Growing up in New York, Dr. Winfred S. (Freddy) Tovar would listen to the stories that his mother relayed about pregnancy and childbirth in her native Haiti. They were crushing, tragic tales, about stillborn babies and family members dying during childbirth. Tovar’s mother, who immigrated to the States in the 1970s, nearly died during her […]
          Looking for Global-Health Answers      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Harvard’s Global Health Delivery Intensive
global health delivery intensive

Three days before Garba Bakunawa traveled from Nigeria to Harvard for a nearly month-long course on global healthcare delivery, an electrical injury with the potential to imperil his ability to practice surgery knocked him unconscious. Heavy rains had flooded parts of his community in northeast Nigeria and damaged the local power provider. Abnormal voltage flares were causing problems throughout the area.

He awoke on June 29 to the furious chirp of wires sparking in the ceiling of his house. Telling his family to remain behind him, Bakunawa reached for the control box in the house to cut the power—and everything went black.

“I remember that I made an effort to touch it, but I can’t remember what happened next,” he said. “I just remember that I woke up on the way to the hospital and my brother was telling me that I was electrocuted.” By his account, he was luckier than most. The electrical problems injured many in his community, and even killed a few people. “At least I was healthy enough to walk around,” he said. After 12 hours in the hospital, he left on a regimen of antibiotics and with his right arm covered in a large cast. The shock had heavily charred the skin of his hand. It was not clear if he would recover well enough to practice again.

Bakunawa was due in Cambridge the following week for the start of the 2018 Global Health Delivery Intensive (GHDI), a three-week program jointly offered by the School of Public Health (HSPH), the Medical School (HMS), and Brigham and Women’s Hospital that convenes mid-career health professionals from across the globe for lessons about improving access to key health treatments. Voted an outstanding member of his hospital’s staff, Bakunawa received funding to attend the program and had already booked his ticket to Boston before his injury. His family urged him to try to reschedule. He would not be swayed.

In Boston, he joined a 55-member cohort of summer student learners representing 27 countries and a wide array of professional backgrounds, including in nonprofit leadership, clinical care, and community health work. More than half of that cohort labors in “resource poor settings” and a plurality of program participants are direct patient care providers, according to demographic data gathered by the program’s leaders. 

While Harvard does not provide financial assistance for the program, almost 90 percent of this year’s cohort received financial support from outside sources such as scholarship or training programs, or from employers, to cover the program’s $8,000 tuition fee. Sources of support came from a wide array of local and international organizations such as Massachusetts General Hospital and the Center for Health Care Delivery in Dubai (which funds ten full and ten partial scholarships to GHDI). 

“Some of the students are, of course, incredible themselves,” Davin Eurich, the program’s coordinator, added, “and will receive funding from the World Health Organization or their own ministries of health. It’s a work of art to see the funding work out.”  

Thinking Globally

In some ways, Bakunawa’s experience navigating dramatically different care infrastructure in Nigeria and the United States underscores the mission of the GHDI: to provide healthcare professionals with the know-how to standardize levels of care globally.

GHDI grew out of a larger effort launched nearly 11 years ago (the Global Health Delivery Project, GHDP), which sought to standardize a “lexicon” that healthcare professionals could apply to their respective regional contexts, said GHDI program director Rebecca Weintraub in an interview  (she is assistant professor of global health and social medicine at HMS). Eleven years ago, she said, her team set out to generate “what we viewed as novel public goods”—in this case, resources about best practices for global health professionals, including case studies similar to those created at the Business School, with step-by-step descriptions of how health professionals tackled issues in their regions, designed to help alleviate the disparities in levels of care and infrastructure that exist across the world. 

The GHDP was, according to Weintraub, one of the first of its kind, merging HMS’s clinical know-how with HSPH’s population-level, solutions-based frameworks: “It sounds not-so-novel now, but at the time the intersection between clinical and public health was relatively new, and when you think about it, Harvard Medical School and the School of Public Health are separate entities.” 

Harvard’s focus on global health is wide-ranging and continues to expand: it has launched more than 120 global-health related offerings, from Business School executive-education leadership programs to an undergraduate secondary field that focuses on interdisciplinary study of healthcare, policy, and science. 

GHDI, while not a degree- or certificate-granting program, is just as intensive as most other HMS courses. During their time in residence, students enroll in three courses—“Epidemiological Methods for Global Health,” “Introduction to Global Healthcare Delivery,” and “Management Practices in Healthcare Delivery”—which are meant to provide an interdisciplinary introduction to how health professionals tackle public health issues that recur worldwide. A combination of Harvard professors (some from HMS, HSPH, and the Kennedy School) and guest lecturers who work in healthcare teach the courses, which typically run 2 hours per session.

One GHDI case study this year examined a mother of three in rural Kenya whose youngest son developed a fever. A community health worker diagnosed him with malaria. The mother (named Esther in the study) could not find the prescribed antimalarials and mosquito netting for her children at the village drugstore, and she couldn’t get the materials from neighboring villages because their pharmacies were either out of stock or charged exorbitant fees. The case served as the starting point for a discussion on best practices for “last-mile logistics,” or how supply chains deliver their products to patients. The session pushed students to consider the inefficiencies at every step of the delivery process, from communication errors or demand fluctuations, that might lead to stock-outs during a crucial time of need. 

Other cases tackled issues such as the role of diplomacy in healthcare, community-based solutions to healthcare, and financing.

In one wide-ranging session of the management-practices course, Kolokotrones University Professor of global health and social medicinePaul Farmer—who chairs the eponymous department and co-founded the nonprofit Partners In Health—spoke at length about the challenges facing healthcare professionals: distrust of nonprofit organizations in places like Haiti (where Farmer and Partners have long been active); the need to understand historical context when planning broad care efforts; and continuing debates over how to define “equity” and “universality” in care. He stressed the importance of addressing such issues explicitly. “When you impoverish a discussion about healthcare for decades, a lot of not talking about it, I tend to believe any discussion of universality is a good one,” Farmer said. He put current discussions about the universality of healthcare into the context of American upheavals such as the abolitionist and civil-rights movements.  

The theme of equity in healthcare emerged in many of the program’s sessions, Weintraub emphasized. “In many ways, our students come to the program with that sense. Equity is already a part of their professional agenda, but they come here looking for ways to operationalize it.”

A Vast Network 

Though coursework is a major component of the experience of the GHDI, program coordinator Davin Eurich said networking and opportunities for peer-to-peer learning bolster the graduates’ experiences.

“Those that were willing to share their vulnerability and hardships [in ways] that others in the class could really relate to...is what really builds this network,” she said. “The students are coming and meeting different inspiration points. Some are moving on...to other programs at Harvard. Others are leveraging GHDI in numerous other ways back home.”

GHDI has graduated 350 students from 60 countries so far. Many have returned to work in the ministries of health of their respective countries or to aid nonprofits in region-specific work, while others return to local hospitals to deploy the new knowledge they have acquired.

Bakunawa will return with that—and more. O[2] ne day, during a lecture in the beginning of the program, Bakunawa raised his hand to answer a question, and HMS professor and GHDI co-director Joseph Rhatigan noticed the injury to his hand for the first time. 

“That day he sent me a message saying there was a doctor, a hand surgeon, who would like to review me, and he was able to link me with a plastic surgeon,” Bakunawa said. “Just like a family, they treated me very well.” Faculty from the program, HMS instructors, and physicians at Brigham worked to provide Bakunawa with surgery free of charge, including skin grafting to the affected areas on his hand and the removal of one of his fingers, which had been badly damaged.

“I called my wife and my family and I told them what was happening, and that they’re doing it for free. I didn’t have the money to do it here, and this was at one of the best hospitals globally,” he said. “I was so happy with the consideration, with the sympathy I received from my colleagues.” 

The program and the care he received from classmates has inspired him, demonstrating in word and deed that anything is possible. And that has become a mantra. “One of our facilitators here, Rebecca [Weintraub], she says that instead of saying ‘no,’ just say ‘it’s possible.”  

At the graduation ceremony on the last day of the program, the students heard from Stephen Kahn, president of the Abundance Foundation, an organization that helps train nonprofit leaders who work on the intersection of health, arts, and education. Kahn graduated with the first cohort of the program, and the foundation he now heads has supported Partners In Health in the past, and according to Eurich, provides financial support to GHDI that helps the program’s leaders improve the course offerings each year. 

In his keynote remarks, Kahn spoke of grappling with issues of scarce resources during an experience working in hospital in Zambia before attending GHDI. Without the necessary HIV diagnostic technology, he said he “had to guessat which of my languishing patients were dying of AIDS.” 

“I thumbed through my Merck manual, hoping the pages would answer the endless cascade of questions I had. All I had was my clinical vigilance,” he said. 

Kahn called GHDI a “profound turning point” for him, and stressed that the program’s emphasis on providing political and historical context for its cases helped deepen his understanding of how to address public-health crises. Moreover, he emphasized that relying on the network of GHDI graduates has strengthened his work—by providing professional advice and by helping him weather the toughest moments of being a healthcare provider.

“I’m standing shoulder to shoulder with you in this work to bring equity and excellence in healthcare,” Kahn told the graduates. “It’s so easy to get conditioned to scarcity. The global health delivery course is an antidote to that mindset.”


           ‘Suicide’ by handcuffed youth near Panikhaiti OP raises eyebrows       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
‘Suicide’ by handcuffed youth near Panikhaiti OP raises eyebrows
          When We Disadvantage Ourselves It Turns Out To Be To Our Advantage      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

I met with 40 of my favorite people. We gathered from different corners of the globe –Malaysia, Haiti, Bangladesh, Alabama, Ethiopia–representing a few dozen non-profits all working to provide dignified jobs in Jesus’ Name for one reason: to cheer each other on. When I started Mercy House Global in 2010, I was deeply discouraged by […]

The post When We Disadvantage Ourselves It Turns Out To Be To Our Advantage appeared first on Kristen Welch. Click here to check out my book Advertise on my blog


          World: Humanitarian Funding Update July 2018 - United Nations Coordinated Appeals      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Ukraine, World, Yemen

Funding Required: $25.41B
Funding Received: $9.39B
Unmet Requirements: $16.02B
Coverage: 37.0%

People in need: 134.0M
People to receive aid: 95.8M
Countries affected: 41

As of the end of July 2018, 21 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) and the Syria Regional Response Plan (3RP) require US$25.41 billion to assist 95.8 billion people in urgent need of humanitarian support. The 21 HRPs and the Syria 3RP were funded at $9.52 billion: 37 per cent of financial requirements for 2018. Humanitarian organisations still require $16.02 billion to meet the needs covered by these plans.

Requirements are $2 billion higher than last year at the same time. Overall coverage is also slightly higher (three per cent), with $1.4 billion more received this year than last.

Pooled funds

Between 1 January and 31 July 2018, the Emergency Relief Coordinator approved $333 million through the Central Emergency Response Fund, including $233 million through the rapid response window and $100 million through the underfunded emergencies window. In July, $24 million was approved in rapid response grants to respond to displacement in Ethiopia, population movement from Venezuela into Colombia, worsening food insecurity in Niger, and a volcanic eruption in Guatemala. The largest allocation was $15 million to provide relief items, safe water, sanitation facilities, and health and nutrition treatment to 800,000 people displaced by inter-communal violence in Gedeo and West Guji in Ethiopia.

Between 1 January and 6 August 2018, 17 country-based pooled funds (CBPF) received $536 million in contributions from 30 donors (including $80 million in pledges). During this period, $369 million were allocated to a total of 663 humanitarian projects, implemented by 443 partners, with the funds in Yemen ($92 million), DRC ($36 million) and Iraq ($34 million) allocating the largest amounts. During July, the funds in Afghanistan, Jordan, Nigeria, South Sudan and Turkey were processing allocations. As for overall CBPF allocations, 58 per cent were disbursed to NGOs, including 19 per cent ($71 million) directly to national and local NGOs. Another 41 per cent ($150 million) was allocated to UN agencies and 1 per cent of funding was allocated to Red Cross/Red Crescent organizations.

Country updates

Yemen is the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. Some 22.2 million people – about 75 per cent of the population – require humanitarian assistance or protection. This includes 8.4 million people who do not know where their next meal is coming from. An unprecedented outbreak of cholera and acute watery diarrhoea has resulted in more than 1.1 million cases since April 2017. Escalating conflict in Hudaydah has displaced more than 350,000 people since 1 June. More than 90 per cent of these people have received emergency relief packages distributed by humanitarian partners. Sustained hostilities in Hudaydah city, interruptions to port operations or a siege would be catastrophic and must be avoided. Humanitarian programmes have expanded significantly across Yemen. In June, partners provided emergency food assistance to 7.5 million people – an increase of 200,000 people since January. Similar increases have occurred in other sectors. As of mid-year, about 60 per cent of people targeted with assistance had been reached. Generous and flexible funding has been key. Donors have provided more than 60 per cent of the HRP’s $3 billion requirements – including an early, unearmarked $930 million contribution from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Partners recently sequenced the HRP to show first-line, second-line and full response activities, and require full funding to deliver all programmes based on this plan.

Needs remain high in Ethiopia with 7.88 million people food insecure, as per the Humanitarian and Disaster Resilience Plan (HDRP) released in March. There has been a major surge in displacement since the beginning of June around Gedeo (SNNPR) and West Guji (Oromia) zones resulting in the release of a response plan which seeks $117.7m to assist the 818,250 recently displaced people. Some funding has already been mobilized by Government and partners, primarily through reallocating resources that were originally intended for important response elsewhere in the country under the HDRP.

Fighting in south-west Syria continued to impact hundreds of thousands of civilians, with 180,000 people remaining newly displaced as of the end of July. Aerial bombardment and artillery shelling resulted in civilian deaths and destruction of civilian infrastructure in many areas. Humanitarian workers and service providers were caught up in the violence, with many displaced alongside other civilians. Humanitarian response continued in Dar’a governorate, building on cross-border prepositioning and subsequently drawing on programming from inside Syria. However more than 100,000 newly displaced people remained largely cut off from sustained assistance in Quneitra governorate. Partners identified priority requirements of $85 million to cover the most urgent protection and assistance needs of 300,000 people across the south-west up until mid-October. Concerns also persist around the threat of further military escalation in the north-west of the country, where the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance in Aleppo and Idleb governorates had increased by close to 600,000 by mid-year, to a total of 4.2 million, of whom half were in acute need. Response across the north-west continues to depend on cross-border assistance delivered from Turkey.

At least 3.4 million people in Cameroon need humanitarian assistance and protection. Six out of ten regions are affected by humanitarian crises related to Boko Haram in the Far North, the conflict in the Central African Republic and the worsening situation in the Anglophone regions. Further, growing levels of food insecurity and malnutrition are affecting over 2.6 million people, including 1.5 million children, and there is an ongoing cholera outbreak in the Center and North regions. The 2018 HRP calls for $319.7 million but is only 23 per cent funded. Additional donor support is critical to ensure life-saving assistance to the most vulnerable populations, especially the newly displaced persons in the Far North and the South-West.

Although the number of IDPs in the Central African Republic (CAR) fell to 608,000 during June, a seven per cent decrease compared to May, this does not indicate an improvement of the situation. The tensions and armed violence that erupted in April continue, and are causing new displacements in areas with very limited access. More than half (354,017) of the IDPs are staying with host families, while some 249,522 are in IDP sites and settlements, and another 4,489 are scattered in the bush, in desperate need of assistance. Increasing insecurity is affecting the delivery of aid, as five humanitarian workers have been killed since the beginning of 2018, making CAR one of the most dangerous countries in the world for the delivery of humanitarian aid. Moreover, underfunding remains one of the biggest impediments to stepping up the humanitarian response. At mid-year, the 2018 HRP had only received 26 per cent of its $515.6 million requirement. Without additional funding, humanitarian actors will be unable to address the needs of 1.9 million people targeted in the Plan.

The Marawi Conflict Response and Resources Overview (Mindanao, Philippines) seeks $61 million to provide essential services, food security, protection, livelihood and early recovery support for 199,000 conflict-affected people in Mindanao, of whom 69,412 are still displaced, from July 2017 to December 2018. While an organized return is underway, the majority of those who were forced to flee during the conflict will continue to require humanitarian assistance until sustainable recovery activities are underway, especially for those from the most affected areas of the city. Some $11 million (18%) has been received to-date.

Afghanistan is in the midst of a drought, the scale of which has not been seen since 2011. It has already resulted in some 84,000 people being displaced to Hirat City in western Afghanistan, with up to 150,000 at risk of being displaced. In 2017, wheat production was at an all-time low (57 per cent under the five-year average) and the expected shortfall in production in 2018 is decreasing further -- from 4.2 million metric tonnes to 3.5 million metric tonnes. This decrease is impacting some two million already food insecure people across two thirds of Afghanistan. The ongoing drought led the Humanitarian Country Team to increase the Afghanistan 2018 Humanitarian Response Plan requirements by $117 million, for a total of $547 million. The HRP is currently only 29 per cent funded. Additional funding is required to provide food security, agriculture, water, sanitation, hygiene and nutritional support. The humanitarian community is currently conducting a multi-sectoral humanitarian-development assessment, led by OCHA and UNDP, to examine both humanitarian needs and the wider, long-term complexities underpinning the drought crisis, that would need structural support through development programming.

Four years of conflict have put a tremendous strain on the civilian population in eastern Ukraine. Disrupted access to critical facilities and diminished livelihoods mean that some 3.4 million people are without basic supplies and services and need assistance for protection and survival. Some 200,000 people live under constant fear of shelling every day. One and a half million Ukrainians have been displaced across the country and cannot return home due to hostilities or lost livelihoods. Over 1 million civilians cross the “contact line” every month through operational checkpoints, which lack required shade, cooling spaces and healthcare facilities. Under these conditions, coupled with prolonged waiting hours and summer heat, civilians—many of them elderly—suffer health-related complications. Funding for the Humanitarian Response Plan is urgently needed, as only 27 per cent of the required $187 million has been received so far to respond to the urgent needs of 2.3 million vulnerable Ukrainians with assistance and protection throughout 2018.

Haiti is well into the hurricane season and increased international support for emergency preparedness efforts is required. Haitians are still recovering from consecutive natural disasters, including a major earthquake, hurricanes, floods and drought, and need sustained support. This support is not only to obtain life’s basic necessities, but also to move beyond recurring disasters and build sustainable livelihoods and live in resilient communities that are prepared for future shocks. Humanitarian actors aim to provide humanitarian assistance and protection services to the 2.2 million most vulnerable Haitians, but they have received only 9 per cent of the required $252 million this year.


          Fabrication d'armes artisanales: deux Haïtiens arrêtés en Rép. Dom. - Loop News Haiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Loop News Haiti

Fabrication d'armes artisanales: deux Haïtiens arrêtés en Rép. Dom.
Loop News Haiti
La Direction des enquêtes criminelles dominicaines ont procédé à l'arrestation de deux Haïtiens qui ont installé un atelier de fabrication d'armes artisanales dans la communauté de Los Mina, à Navarrete. Les autorités informent pourtant les avoir ...


          Rep. Dom. : Un Haïtien meurt tragiquement en sautant d'un véhicule - Loop News Haiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Loop News Haiti

Rep. Dom. : Un Haïtien meurt tragiquement en sautant d'un véhicule
Loop News Haiti
Un immigrant haïtien s'est tué en sautant d'un bus de la Direction générale de la migration de la République Dominicaine, a appris la rédaction de Loop Haiti. L'homme en question a été percuté par un véhicule sur la route Joaquin Balaguer dans la ville ...

et plus encore »

          History of the CIA - Part two      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
1968
Operation CHAOS — The CIA has been illegally spying on American citizens since 1959, but with Operation CHAOS, President Johnson dramatically boosts the effort. CIA agents go undercover as student radicals to spy on and disrupt campus organizations protesting the Vietnam War. They are searching for Russian instigators, which they never find. CHAOS will eventually spy on 7,000 individuals and 1,000 organizations.

Bolivia — A CIA-organized military operation captures legendary guerilla Che Guevara. The CIA wants to keep him alive for interrogation, but the Bolivian government executes him to prevent worldwide calls for clemency.

1969
Uruguay — The notorious CIA torturer Dan Mitrione arrives in Uruguay, a country torn with political strife. Whereas right-wing forces previously used torture only as a last resort, Mitrione convinces them to use it as a routine, widespread practice. "The precise pain, in the precise place, in the precise amount, for the desired effect," is his motto. The torture techniques he teaches to the death squads rival the Nazis’. He eventually becomes so feared that revolutionaries will kidnap and murder him a year later.

1970
Cambodia — The CIA overthrows Prince Sahounek, who is highly popular among Cambodians for keeping them out of the Vietnam War. He is replaced by CIA puppet Lon Nol, who immediately throws Cambodian troops into battle. This unpopular move strengthens once minor opposition parties like the Khmer Rouge, which achieves power in 1975 and massacres millions of its own people.

1971
Bolivia — After half a decade of CIA-inspired political turmoil, a CIA-backed military coup overthrows the leftist President Juan Torres. In the next two years, dictator Hugo Banzer will have over 2,000 political opponents arrested without trial, then tortured, raped and executed.

Haiti — "Papa Doc" Duvalier dies, leaving his 19-year old son "Baby Doc" Duvalier the dictator of Haiti. His son continues his bloody reign with full knowledge of the CIA.

1972
The Case-Zablocki Act — Congress passes an act requiring congressional review of executive agreements. In theory, this should make CIA operations more accountable. In fact, it is only marginally effective.

Cambodia — Congress votes to cut off CIA funds for its secret war in Cambodia.
Wagergate Break-in — President Nixon sends in a team of burglars to wiretap Democratic offices at Watergate. The team members have extensive CIA histories, including James McCord, E. Howard Hunt and five of the Cuban burglars. They work for the Committee to Reelect the President (CREEP), which does dirty work like disrupting Democratic campaigns and laundering Nixon’s illegal campaign contributions. CREEP’s activities are funded and organized by another CIA front, the Mullen Company.

1973
Chile — The CIA overthrows and assassinates Salvador Allende, Latin America’s first democratically elected socialist leader. The problems begin when Allende nationalizes American-owned firms in Chile. ITT offers the CIA $1 million for a coup (reportedly refused). The CIA replaces Allende with General Augusto Pinochet, who will torture and murder thousands of his own countrymen in a crackdown on labor leaders and the political left.

CIA begins internal investigations — William Colby, the Deputy Director for Operations, orders all CIA personnel to report any and all illegal activities they know about. This information is later reported to Congress.

Watergate Scandal — The CIA’s main collaborating newspaper in America, The Washington Post, reports Nixon’s crimes long before any other newspaper takes up the subject. The two reporters, Woodward and Bernstein, make almost no mention of the CIA’s many fingerprints all over the scandal. It is later revealed that Woodward was a Naval intelligence briefer to the White House, and knows many important intelligence figures, including General Alexander Haig. His main source, "Deep Throat," is probably one of those.

CIA Director Helms Fired — President Nixon fires CIA Director Richard Helms for failing to help cover up the Watergate scandal. Helms and Nixon have always disliked each other. The new CIA director is William Colby, who is relatively more open to CIA reform.

1974
CHAOS exposed — Pulitzer prize winning journalist Seymour Hersh publishes a story about Operation CHAOS, the domestic surveillance and infiltration of anti-war and civil rights groups in the U.S. The story sparks national outrage.

Angleton fired — Congress holds hearings on the illegal domestic spying efforts of James Jesus Angleton, the CIA’s chief of counterintelligence. His efforts included mail-opening campaigns and secret surveillance of war protesters. The hearings result in his dismissal from the CIA.

House clears CIA in Watergate — The House of Representatives clears the CIA of any complicity in Nixon’s Watergate break-in.

The Hughes Ryan Act — Congress passes an amendment requiring the president to report nonintelligence CIA operations to the relevant congressional committees in a timely fashion.

1975
Australia — The CIA helps topple the democratically elected, left-leaning government of Prime Minister Edward Whitlam. The CIA does this by giving an ultimatum to its Governor-General, John Kerr. Kerr, a longtime CIA collaborator, exercises his constitutional right to dissolve the Whitlam government. The Governor-General is a largely ceremonial position appointed by the Queen; the Prime Minister is democratically elected. The use of this archaic and never-used law stuns the nation.
Angola — Eager to demonstrate American military resolve after its defeat in Vietnam, Henry Kissinger launches a CIA-backed war in Angola. Contrary to Kissinger’s assertions, Angola is a country of little strategic importance and not seriously threatened by communism. The CIA backs the brutal leader of UNITAS, Jonas Savimbi. This polarizes Angolan politics and drives his opponents into the arms of Cuba and the Soviet Union for survival. Congress will cut off funds in 1976, but the CIA is able to run the war off the books until 1984, when funding is legalized again. This entirely pointless war kills over 300,000 Angolans.

"The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence" — Victor Marchetti and John Marks publish this whistle-blowing history of CIA crimes and abuses. Marchetti has spent 14 years in the CIA, eventually becoming an executive assistant to the Deputy Director of Intelligence. Marks has spent five years as an intelligence official in the State Department.

"Inside the Company" — Philip Agee publishes a diary of his life inside the CIA. Agee has worked in covert operations in Latin America during the 60s, and details the crimes in which he took part.
Congress investigates CIA wrong-doing — Public outrage compels Congress to hold hearings on CIA crimes. Senator Frank Church heads the Senate investigation ("The Church Committee"), and Representative Otis Pike heads the House investigation. (Despite a 98 percent incumbency reelection rate, both Church and Pike are defeated in the next elections.) The investigations lead to a number of reforms intended to increase the CIA’s accountability to Congress, including the creation of a standing Senate committee on intelligence. However, the reforms prove ineffective, as the Iran/Contra scandal will show. It turns out the CIA can control, deal with or sidestep Congress with ease.

The Rockefeller Commission — In an attempt to reduce the damage done by the Church Committee, President Ford creates the "Rockefeller Commission" to whitewash CIA history and propose toothless reforms. The commission’s namesake, Vice President Nelson Rockefeller, is himself a major CIA figure. Five of the commission’s eight members are also members of the Council on Foreign Relations, a CIA-dominated organization.

1979
Iran — The CIA fails to predict the fall of the Shah of Iran, a longtime CIA puppet, and the rise of Muslim fundamentalists who are furious at the CIA’s backing of SAVAK, the Shah’s bloodthirsty secret police. In revenge, the Muslims take 52 Americans hostage in the U.S. embassy in Tehran.
Afghanistan — The Soviets invade Afghanistan. The CIA immediately begins supplying arms to any faction willing to fight the occupying Soviets. Such indiscriminate arming means that when the Soviets leave Afghanistan, civil war will erupt. Also, fanatical Muslim extremists now possess state-of-the-art weaponry. One of these is Sheik Abdel Rahman, who will become involved in the World Trade Center bombing in New York.

El Salvador — An idealistic group of young military officers, repulsed by the massacre of the poor, overthrows the right-wing government. However, the U.S. compels the inexperienced officers to include many of the old guard in key positions in their new government. Soon, things are back to "normal" — the military government is repressing and killing poor civilian protesters. Many of the young military and civilian reformers, finding themselves powerless, resign in disgust.

Nicaragua — Anastasios Samoza II, the CIA-backed dictator, falls. The Marxist Sandinistas take over government, and they are initially popular because of their commitment to land and anti-poverty reform. Samoza had a murderous and hated personal army called the National Guard. Remnants of the Guard will become the Contras, who fight a CIA-backed guerilla war against the Sandinista government throughout the 1980s.

1980
El Salvador — The Archbishop of San Salvador, Oscar Romero, pleads with President Carter "Christian to Christian" to stop aiding the military government slaughtering his people. Carter refuses. Shortly afterwards, right-wing leader Roberto D’Aubuisson has Romero shot through the heart while saying Mass. The country soon dissolves into civil war, with the peasants in the hills fighting against the military government. The CIA and U.S. Armed Forces supply the government with overwhelming military and intelligence superiority. CIA-trained death squads roam the countryside, committing atrocities like that of El Mazote in 1982, where they massacre between 700 and 1000 men, women and children. By 1992, some 63,000 Salvadorans will be killed.

1981
Iran/Contra Begins — The CIA begins selling arms to Iran at high prices, using the profits to arm the Contras fighting the Sandinista government in Nicaragua. President Reagan vows that the Sandinistas will be "pressured" until "they say ‘uncle.’" The CIA’s Freedom Fighter’s Manual disbursed to the Contras includes instruction on economic sabotage, propaganda, extortion, bribery, blackmail, interrogation, torture, murder and political assassination.

1983
Honduras — The CIA gives Honduran military officers the Human Resource Exploitation Training Manual – 1983, which teaches how to torture people. Honduras’ notorious "Battalion 316" then uses these techniques, with the CIA’s full knowledge, on thousands of leftist dissidents. At least 184 are murdered.

1984
The Boland Amendment — The last of a series of Boland Amendments is passed. These amendments have reduced CIA aid to the Contras; the last one cuts it off completely. However, CIA Director William Casey is already prepared to "hand off" the operation to Colonel Oliver North, who illegally continues supplying the Contras through the CIA’s informal, secret, and self-financing network. This includes "humanitarian aid" donated by Adolph Coors and William Simon, and military aid funded by Iranian arms sales.

1986
Eugene Hasenfus — Nicaragua shoots down a C-123 transport plane carrying military supplies to the Contras. The lone survivor, Eugene Hasenfus, turns out to be a CIA employee, as are the two dead pilots. The airplane belongs to Southern Air Transport, a CIA front. The incident makes a mockery of President Reagan’s claims that the CIA is not illegally arming the Contras.

Iran/Contra Scandal — Although the details have long been known, the Iran/Contra scandal finally captures the media’s attention in 1986. Congress holds hearings, and several key figures (like Oliver North) lie under oath to protect the intelligence community. CIA Director William Casey dies of brain cancer before Congress can question him. All reforms enacted by Congress after the scandal are purely cosmetic.

Haiti — Rising popular revolt in Haiti means that "Baby Doc" Duvalier will remain "President for Life" only if he has a short one. The U.S., which hates instability in a puppet country, flies the despotic Duvalier to the South of France for a comfortable retirement. The CIA then rigs the upcoming elections in favor of another right-wing military strongman. However, violence keeps the country in political turmoil for another four years. The CIA tries to strengthen the military by creating the National Intelligence Service (SIN), which suppresses popular revolt through torture and assassination.

1989
Panama — The U.S. invades Panama to overthrow a dictator of its own making, General Manuel Noriega. Noriega has been on the CIA’s payroll since 1966, and has been transporting drugs with the CIA’s knowledge since 1972. By the late 80s, Noriega’s growing independence and intransigence have angered Washington… so out he goes.

1990
Haiti — Competing against 10 comparatively wealthy candidates, leftist priest Jean-Bertrand Aristide captures 68 percent of the vote. After only eight months in power, however, the CIA-backed military deposes him. More military dictators brutalize the country, as thousands of Haitian refugees escape the turmoil in barely seaworthy boats. As popular opinion calls for Aristide’s return, the CIA begins a disinformation campaign painting the courageous priest as mentally unstable.

1991
The Gulf War — The U.S. liberates Kuwait from Iraq. But Iraq’s dictator, Saddam Hussein, is another creature of the CIA. With U.S. encouragement, Hussein invaded Iran in 1980. During this costly eight-year war, the CIA built up Hussein’s forces with sophisticated arms, intelligence, training and financial backing. This cemented Hussein’s power at home, allowing him to crush the many internal rebellions that erupted from time to time, sometimes with poison gas. It also gave him all the military might he needed to conduct further adventurism — in Kuwait, for example.

The Fall of the Soviet Union — The CIA fails to predict this most important event of the Cold War. This suggests that it has been so busy undermining governments that it hasn’t been doing its primary job: gathering and analyzing information. The fall of the Soviet Union also robs the CIA of its reason for existence: fighting communism. This leads some to accuse the CIA of intentionally failing to predict the downfall of the Soviet Union. Curiously, the intelligence community’s budget is not significantly reduced after the demise of communism.

1992
Economic Espionage — In the years following the end of the Cold War, the CIA is increasingly used for economic espionage. This involves stealing the technological secrets of competing foreign companies and giving them to American ones. Given the CIA’s clear preference for dirty tricks over mere information gathering, the possibility of serious criminal behavior is very great indeed.

1993
Haiti — The chaos in Haiti grows so bad that President Clinton has no choice but to remove the Haitian military dictator, Raoul Cedras, on threat of U.S. invasion. The U.S. occupiers do not arrest Haiti’s military leaders for crimes against humanity, but instead ensure their safety and rich retirements. Aristide is returned to power only after being forced to accept an agenda favorable to the country’s ruling class.

EPILOGUE

In a speech before the CIA celebrating its 50th anniversary, President Clinton said: "By necessity, the American people will never know the full story of your courage."

Clinton’s is a common defense of the CIA: namely, the American people should stop criticizing the CIA because they don’t know what it really does. This, of course, is the heart of the problem in the first place. An agency that is above criticism is also above moral behavior and reform. Its secrecy and lack of accountability allows its corruption to grow unchecked.

Furthermore, Clinton’s statement is simply untrue. The history of the agency is growing painfully clear, especially with the declassification of historical CIA documents. We may not know the details of specific operations, but we do know, quite well, the general behavior of the CIA. These facts began emerging nearly two decades ago at an ever-quickening pace. Today we have a remarkably accurate and consistent picture, repeated in country after country, and verified from countless different directions.

The CIA’s response to this growing knowledge and criticism follows a typical historical pattern. (Indeed, there are remarkable parallels to the Medieval Church’s fight against the Scientific Revolution.) The first journalists and writers to reveal the CIA’s criminal behavior were harassed and censored if they were American writers, and tortured and murdered if they were foreigners. (See Philip Agee’s On the Run for an example of early harassment.) However, over the last two decades the tide of evidence has become overwhelming, and the CIA has found that it does not have enough fingers to plug every hole in the dike. This is especially true in the age of the Internet, where information flows freely among millions of people. Since censorship is impossible, the Agency must now defend itself with apologetics. Clinton’s "Americans will never know" defense is a prime example.

Another common apologetic is that "the world is filled with unsavory characters, and we must deal with them if we are to protect American interests at all." There are two things wrong with this. First, it ignores the fact that the CIA has regularly spurned alliances with defenders of democracy, free speech and human rights, preferring the company of military dictators and tyrants. The CIA had moral options available to them, but did not take them.

Second, this argument begs several questions. The first is: "Which American interests?" The CIA has courted right-wing dictators because they allow wealthy Americans to exploit the country’s cheap labor and resources. But poor and middle-class Americans pay the price whenever they fight the wars that stem from CIA actions, from Vietnam to the Gulf War to Panama. The second begged question is: "Why should American interests come at the expense of other peoples’ human rights?"

The CIA should be abolished, its leadership dismissed and its relevant members tried for crimes against humanity. Our intelligence community should be rebuilt from the ground up, with the goal of collecting and analyzing information. As for covert action, there are two moral options. The first one is to eliminate covert action completely. But this gives jitters to people worried about the Adolf Hitlers of the world. So a second option is that we can place covert action under extensive and true democratic oversight. For example, a bipartisan Congressional Committee of 40 members could review and veto all aspects of CIA operations upon a majority or super-majority vote. Which of these two options is best may be the subject of debate, but one thing is clear: like dictatorship, like monarchy, unaccountable covert operations should die like the dinosaurs they are.


This article came from this website.

          #ecuador - music_videos_new_era      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
🤩 Hoy DIAMANTE NEW-ERA 🎥 #Barcelona 👍🗣 Brisas De luxe 🤩@darellpr #trap #dembow 🎥 #reggaeton ❌ #hiphop #reggaeton @music_videos_new_era👈🏼 ❌WWW.DIAMANTE-NEW-ERA.COM❌ #soundcloud #spotify #trapbow #musica #itunes #new #regaeton #remix #trap #new #diamantenewera 🇩🇴 #rap republicadominicana 🇵🇷🇦🇷argentins 🇧🇴bolivia 🇨🇷 🇨🇱chile 🇪🇨 ❌@latinbillboards @latinbillboards ❌#soundcloud #spotify #trapbow #musica #itunes #reggaemix #regaeton #musicaurbana #diamantenewera 🇩🇴 republicadominicana 🇵🇷🇦🇷#argentina #bolivia 🇨🇷costarica 🇨🇱châle 🇪🇨#ecuador #colombia 🇨🇺cubao #🇸🇻elsalvador 🇭🇳🇬🇹Guatemala 🇭🇹#haiti 🇲🇽mexico 🇳🇮nicaragua 🇵🇦panama 🇵🇪#peru 🇵🇾 @music_videos_new_era👈🏼 ❌WWW.DIAMANTE-NEW-ERA.COM❌ #soundcloud #spotify #trapbow #itunes #regaeton #remix #trap #music #diamantenewera 🇩🇴 republicadominicana 🇵🇷🇦🇷argentins 🇧🇴bolivia 🇧🇷brasil 🇨🇷 🇨🇱chile 🇪🇨 ❌latinbillboards @latinbillboards ❌#soundcloud #spotify #trapbow #musica #itunes #regaeton #remix #musicaurbana #diamantenewera 🇩🇴 republicadominicana 🇵🇷🇦🇷#argentina #bolivia #reggae 🇨🇷costarica 🇨🇱châle #🇪🇨ecuador #🇨🇴colombia 🇨🇺cubao #🇸🇻elsalvador 🇭🇳honduras 🇬🇹Guatemala 🇭🇹haiti 🇲🇽 🇳🇮nicaragua 🇵🇦panama 🇵🇪peru 🇵🇾paraguay 🇺🇾uruguay 🇻🇪venezuela ecuador 🇨🇴colombia 🇨🇺cubao 🇸🇻elsalvador 🇭🇳honduras 🇬🇹guatemala 🇭🇹haiti 🇲🇽mexico 🇳🇮Nicaragua 🇵🇦#panama 🇵🇪peru
          Every Miami Restaurant Marcus Samuelsson Visits on ‘No Passport Required’ – Eater Miami      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Eater MiamiIn the fifth episode of “No Passport Required,” chef and host Marcus Samuelsson heads to Miami to get to know the city’s Haitian community. In northern Miami, Little Haiti is home to Haitian shops, businesses, and restaurants serving flavorful, no … …read more Source:: Miami Restaurant News By Google News
          VOYAGE TO THE LAND OF THE (ZOMBIES) LIVING DEAD!      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[While looking through the INEXPLICATA archives, I came across one of our most popular features from the pre-Blogspot days: an article about zombies written by contributing editor Manuel Carballal, who visited the island to look into Haiti's occult practices, much as he had done earlier in Cuba. Although we often receive complaints about straying from ufology into other areas of the unknown, it is precisely this diversity - and the fearless journalism of reporters like Manuel Carballal - that have made INEXPLICATA stand out since 1998 -- SC]
 

By Manuel Carballal


 

The scene could have been derived from any suspense film. Manuel Delgado instinctively held on tightly to his television camera as we clutched our machetes. Our vehicle was being surrounded by a dozen ebony-skinned Haitians. The blancs, as they derisively call Europeans, are not welcome in Haiti and we had been warned that under no circumstances should we venture into the shanty towns outside Port-au-Prince where, we were told, "there exists a 90 per cent chance of being mugged." We ignored this sage advice, of course.

After endless minutes of waiting, our guide allowed us to emerge from the car. Monsieur Balaguer, an important bokor -- a voodoo high priest -- would allow us to visit his hounfor or temple. The hounfor consisted in a humble wooden shack whose center contained the peristyle, the indispensable central column of every voodoo ritual, by means of which the gods or loas descend to earth. A filthy light bulb and seven candles enabled us to see the disquieting form of Monsieur Balaguer, a tall man with sparkling black eyes, who covered his head with a Stetson.
 
While our guide stated all the arguments at his disposal in order to have Monsieur Balaguer allow us to film his "she-devil" and his "zombie", we were startled by a sudden blackout. The dirty light bulb was extinguished, plunging us into the shadows, illuminated only by the seven candles around the peristyle. Balaguer greeted his "she-devil" -- supposedly located behind a mysterious metal door -- by rapping on it a few times. From the other side, "something" responded with brutal blows against the door, causing the entire temple to shake. Suddenly we were told that the bokor had to consult the loas: we looked on as Monsieur Balaguer fell int a sort of trance, being "ridden" or possessed by Bravo, one of the loas who shares the lordship over death and cemeteries with Baron Samedi and Baron La Croix. Subjecting us to a sort of "trial," exchanging a curious combinations of handshakes to which we instinctively responded to, Balaguer drank rum through an ear as he smoked a cigarette through one nostril.
 
The fact of the matter is that in Haiti, Western patterns of logic become fragile in the face of the unpredictable, incomprehensible and irrational voodoo cult -- vodú in the native tongue -- which originates from the Fon language of Dahomey, meaning "deity" or "spirit." This is the precise nature of voodoo: a spirit that envelops Haiti, influencing each and every cultural or social manifestation of this small country, the poorest of the Americas.
 
Voodoo Reaches the Presidency
 
No single cultural manifestation is longer-lasting or more influential than a country's religion. In Haiti's case, this influence becomes particularly apparent. In late 1995, when President Bill Clinton visited Haiti to supervise the "changing of the guard" -- American troops being replaced by UN peacekeepers, more than four thousand Haitians converged upon the square in front of the Presidential Palace in Port-au-Prince to witness the event. President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, restored to power thanks to the intervention of twenty thousand U.S. troops in October 1994, would preside over the event.
 
Bill Clinton had barely finished his conciliatory speech concerning military intervention in Haiti when a white dove landed next to his microphone. Immediately, thousands of Haitians roared their approval and applauded in the light of such an unequivocal "sign of approval" from the gods. The Voodoo loas had accepted Clinton. This "innocent coincidence" made thousands of Haitians--and more importantly, secret societies like Bizango, who had promised to protect the country against foreigners through magic--put aside their anger against the new white invaders, respecting the wishes of the gods. Voodoo is the main power in Haiti: no one would dare contradict the wishes of the loas, or what is interpreted as their wishes.
 
From the days of Macandal, the pioneer of independence in the 18th century to the times of General Raoul Cédras, no Haitian ruler has forgotten to acknowledge the all-powerful influence of voodoo in Haiti. President Aristide was no exception. In spite of having been a Catholic priest, after an interview with several houngans (priests) and mambos (priestesses) on July 19, 1995, Aristide officially announced the construction of a great Voodoo temple within the capital. In this manner, the president equated the Voodoo religion with other "accepted#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000" religions, granting Voodoo practitioners a "cathedral" similar to the Baptist churches, Masonic temples or Catholic parishes which are so numerous in Haiti.
 
Warlocks in Charge
 
But there was one Haitian ruler who knew how to make use of Voodoo as a political tool: the mythical and shadowy "Papa Doc," François Duvalier. In 1954, the legendary "Papa Doc" published (with Lorimer Denis) a monograph entitled L'Evolution graduelle du vaudou (The Gradual Evolution of Voodoo). The knowledge of Voodoo displayed in this book was evidently utilized during his political career.
 
As a young man, along with other Haitian intellectuals, Duvalier published a nationalist newspaper called Les Griots. At a time when the government torched the sacred Voodoo drums and other objects of worship as a sign of loyalty to the Catholic church, Les Griots revindicated Voodoo as a religion and as rebellion against American colonizers. It isn't surprising that "Papa Doc" gained the support of the traditional secret societies, and that during his 1957 campaign, the hounfour or Voodoo temples were utilized as his local party headquarters.
 
Immediately after rising to the presidency of Haiti, Duvalier named the feared bokor of Gonaives, Zacharie Delva, as commander-in-chief of the army, and began to revindicate Voodoo as the official religion. His personal bodyguard, a sort of "esoteric police," were the Volunteers for National Security (VSN), the feared Tontons Macoutes who spread terror throughout the island (the name Tontons Macoutes refers to an old Haitian folk tale of the "men with the sack". Misbehaving children were warned that their tonton -- uncle -- would take them away inside a macoute, a sack). All the hounfor who were not aligned with the Duvalier regime were locked up and rebels were persecuted. According to his biographers, "Papa Doc" ordered a special airplane to bring him the head of former rebel captain Blucher Fhilgénes. The man was decapitated and his head was placed in a bucket of ice. According to the rumors filtering out of the Presidential Palace, Duvalier would spend hours contemplating the head and consulting its spirit in secret rituals.
 
"Man speaks, but doesn't act. God acts, but doesn't speak. Duvalier is a god." This was the thought echoing through the streets of Haiti. Papa Doc had woven around himself a terrible magical legend thanks to his knowledge of Voodoo, a legend that none dare question, and which allowed his dictatorship to flourish for decades. In fact, many peasants believed that "Papa Doc" was an incarnation of the dreaded Baron Samedi, lord of cemeteries. "They cannot have me. I am an immaterial being," Duvalier said during one of his speeches in 1963. The fact is that his legend exists to this day, and many believe that Duvalier has become a loa, a spirit of the Gede family that can still manifest itself in certain rituals...
 
Blood, Rhythm and Possession
 
We were engulfed by frantic drumbeats. The convulsive dancing of the hounsí --Voodoo initiates--bewitched us, and the markedly African chants and litanies overwhelmed us. The entire montage of the Voodoo ritual we were witnessing in Cachimán, near the border with the Dominican Republic, created an almost dreamlike atmosphere within the confines of Voodoo priest Manuel Sánchez Elie. Without a scrap of hesitation, one of the houngan's assistants delivered a powerful blade-stroke on the neck of a ram, abruptly decapitating the animal while its blood showered everyone present. The ram's head was torn from its body and offered to the gods, while two acolytes stripped the body, which would be served to the participants later. Voodoo religion is an imprecise mixture of blood, music and esthetics.
 
Voodoo, like Santería, Umbanda, Candomblé or Palo Mayombe, is the product of synchretism between African religions and Christianity. The ancestral beliefs brought by African slaves to the New World as their only treasure was forcibly mimetized with the saints of the Catholic onomasticon. The orishas and African loas were disguised as saints, mystics and martyrs in order that their worship could survive in a hostile world, which was that of slave-owning whites. This abstract mixture of witchcraft, paganism and christianity survives to this day.
 
This article continues tomorrow June 10, 2015!
 
 
Extra information about the article: 
While looking through the INEXPLICATA archives, I came across one of our most popular features from the pre-Blogspot days: an article about zombies...

          Helen Williams, WMP, August 6, 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
MNN’s Katey Hearth speaks with Helen Williams of World Missionary Press about partnership and God’s provision for Haiti.
          An Orphanage That Doesn't Seem Like An Orphanage       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Orphanages are falling out of favor.

Ever since the horrific conditions in Romanian orphanages were widely publicized in the 1990s – naked children tied to cribs in overcrowded wards — there's been a movement in the international aid world to shut down orphanages completely.

But according to UNICEF, there are still 2.7 million children living in orphanages worldwide.

So what if someone tried to set up a good orphanage — a place where parentless kids could thrive? What would it look like? And what could it tell us about the basics of child rearing?

It might look like this: A dozen kids piled on a couch watching a soccer match on TV while kids from neighboring houses drop by to chat. Other kids are preparing dinner in the kitchen. The kids call the employees of the institution "mom" and "auntie" while the staff call them "mi amor" — my love.

The kids and the adults at the SOS Children's Village, an orphanage in Tela, Honduras, interact like a big extended family. It's a place where dozens of kids who've been separated from their biological parents for a variety of reasons now live. Some of the kids' parents are dead. Some have left the country. Some lost custody of their children because they couldn't afford to feed them. All the kids have been placed at the institution by court order.

The director of the facility, Carolina Maria Matute, says what these kids need most is love. "A lot of love," she says. "A lot of affection."

The resident social worker, Jenny Zelaya, also puts love at the top of her list. But it's also important that the children feel that the staff have their backs, she says. "It's not just a job," she says about working at this institution. "We take a real interest in them [the kids] succeeding and being able to achieve their goals."

SOS Children's Villages is a nonprofit aid group founded at the end of World War II in Austria. The organization is remarkable now for the sheer number of children it has in its care. It's one of the largest providers of residential care to orphaned, abandoned and neglected kids worldwide, with more than 80,000 youngsters living in nearly 600 orphanages. SOS operates in 135 countries, primarily low- and middle-income nations. But it also runs three villages in the United States.

There are six SOS Children's Village in Honduras, one of the poorest countries in the Americas. On a per capita basis only people in Haiti earn less each year than Hondurans.

At the SOS Children's Village in Tela, the "mom" in house #9 is 45-year-old Sandra Hernandez.

Hernandez describes herself as a sports fanatic. The house is known among the kids in the village as the place to go to watch soccer. Hernandez a die-hard supporter of the Spanish Futbol Club Barcelona. A blue and maroon Barca FC shield is pasted on the wall in the living room. But because Barcelona was eliminated from the Champions League tournament, Hernandez is rooting against Barcelona's archrival Real Madrid.

The four teenagers in her house — three boys and a girl — refer to each other as brother and sister. Hernandez lives in the house full-time. When she takes her annual vacation an "SOS aunt" comes to stay with the kids for a week or two.

"It's a family model," Hernandez says. "It's like a natural family."

This SOS "village" is inside a large, fenced compound on the outskirts of the Caribbean coastal city of Tela. The 12 separate houses are connected by a footpath shaded by several giant mango trees. There's an open field where the kids often play soccer.

Chickens scurry amid the bushes.

Unlike some other orphanages, SOS doesn't offer these kids for adoption to families in wealthier countries in North America or Europe. The goal is to make this village their home and to raise these kids in their own culture. Some kids do leave before reaching adulthood — but only to be placed with biological relatives or, if conditions have improved, to return to their parents.

The houses themselves are not fancy. They're identical two-story, cinder block buildings with a kitchen and a living room on the ground floor and four bedrooms upstairs. Built in the mid-1970s they resemble bland public housing from that era.

The beige and brown paint outside many of them is peeling. The furniture inside is spartan and worn but Hernandez's 15-year-old "daughter," Naomi says her friends from school like coming over because she has such a nice house. (We're calling her Naomi to shield her privacy and because she is a ward of the state.)

Naomi was placed at the SOS Children's Village when she was 2 years old and has been living with Hernandez for the last eight years.

The SOS model, Hernandez says, provides a structure that gives the children natural social connections.

"It helps them a lot because they're not isolated," she says.

Hernandez says this not just because she's worked here for ten years. She was placed at an SOS Village in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa when she was 3 and grew up there.

"I lived the same situation as them," she says of the kids in the orphanage.

At Sandra Hernandez's house the day starts early.

At 5:30 a.m. the youngest boy in the house who's 15 is sweeping the back yard. Hernandez and Naomi are making breakfast. The two older boys stumble into the kitchen around 6:30. Hernandez is patting egg-size balls of dough into thick, traditional Honduran tortillas called baleadas.

Soon the children will go off to school — not in the children's village but in the town. That's part of the SOS strategy: to integrate the kids into the community so they can develop social connections that will help them find jobs and homes and spouses later in life.

One of the 16-year-old boys was just elected president of the student council, which is remarkable in part because he only returned to Tela a few months ago. He spent last year in a drug rehab program.

"They choose one student to represent the school in various activities," Hernandez says. "And he'll represent his school when they have meetings of all the schools in the city."

She is extremely proud of him.

The daily routine at Hernandez's house is a bit complicated because Naomi goes to the morning school session and the boys attend in the afternoon. On this day, the school, Instituto Triunfo de la Cruz, is celebrating its founding 69 years ago.

Naomi is one of a dozen contestants in what's essentially a beauty pageant to see who will be crowned "Señorita Aniversario," the queen of the anniversary festival.

As she walks confidently onto the stage the announcer declares that her hobby is studying and she hopes to become a medical doctor.

Naomi is one of three finalists — but doesn't win the top prize.

Her 9th-grade math teacher, Jennifer Gamez, says Naomi is one of the best students in the school.

"You explain something once and she gets it," Gamez says. "If she has a question or a doubt, she asks me about it. And her behavior is excellent."

Gamez says many of her students live in poverty. Jobs are hard to come by in Honduras, but Gamez tells them that their situation in life doesn't determine their future.

And Gamez says she's been extremely impressed with students who've come from the SOS orphanage.

"I know a lot of them who've become professionals, they're good people who come from this village," she says. "I know a lot of people like that."

There are also kids from the SOS Children's Village who struggle. The youngest member of Hernandez's household is one of them. One of his teachers says the 15-year-old doesn't pay attention. He talks too much in class, doesn't turn in his assignments. With a stern glare the teacher adds that he prefers to run around with his friends rather than do his work.

Hernandez says she's aware of these problems and is trying to get him more focused.

The big question is: Would he fare any better if he were living with his biological parents?

Duke University professor Kathryn Whetten isn't so sure. Whetten has researched residential care for kids who've been separated from their parents for various reasons and says that orphanages aren't inherently bad.

"We see the same continuum of bad and good care in the group homes as we see in the family settings," says Whetten.

For the last 12 years Whetten has been following 3,000 kids who were orphaned, abandoned or for some other reason separated from their biological parents. The professor of public policy and global health at Duke is conducting the study in five low- and middle-income countries. Half the kids are in institutions of some kind — government-run orphanages, private group homes. The other half have been placed with extended family members.

"What the kids really seem to need is a home-like environment," Whetten says.

Regardless of whether they're placed with extended family members or in institutions, the researcher's found that the one thing the children need is a stable living situation. They don't do well if they're bounced from one place to another. Having consistent long-term caregivers and steady sibling-like connections to other kids is also important.

"So creating a family-like environment is what is really important," Whetten says. "And that can happen in a family setting in a small home or it can happen in an orphanage slash institution slash group home like SOS."

None of the SOS Children's Villages are part of Whetten's long-term study but she says the group has the right model of placing kids in small, stable units.

The worst residential care facilities for orphans, she says, tend to be government-run institutions where employees look after the children in shifts.

"They often come in in white coats as if they're providing treatment. Usually there's three [caregivers] per day who rotate in and out. By the very nature of what they're doing they're not as committed to each child," Whetten says.

"And of course restraining the smaller kids, restraining them physically, is bad for them. We've seen very few of those [orphanages] that are really, really on the bad end and those are usually ones run by governments."

Also places where shift workers care for the kids tend to have the wrong organizational structure.

For the SOS moms like Sandra Hernandez, there are no shifts. Hers is a 24-hour-a day job.

When Naomi gets home after the Señorita Aniversario pageant, Hernandez is waiting anxiously for her on the porch. She wants to hear all the details.

Naomi tells how she made it through the first three rounds and how the crowd was cheering as she walked out on stage. All her friends were sure she was going to win.

Hernandez beams with pride.

Later that evening Hernandez organizes kids from all 12 of the houses to help clean up an overgrown section of the village next to the soccer field.

As the sun fades the kids rake up piles of cut grass and leaves. They haul bushes and small tree limbs off to a pile by the outer fence. The kids also chase each other around. One teenage boy is keen to show that he can carry a bigger bag of leaves and dirt than anyone else.

Some of the younger girls practice a song. A young boy from a neighboring house keeps running over to hug Hernandez — for no particular reason. Eventually the work party turns into a soccer game.

Hernandez scores three goals but the kids insist she was offside. And what could be more fun than arguing about whether or not someone is cheating at backyard sports?

It feels a lot like a big family picnic.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

          Trump's latest immigration injustice is a malicious travesty      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Trump administration wants you to believe it's devoted to protecting American taxpayers from supposedly welfare-mooching foreigners. Don't. What President Trump is really doing is shutting the door on all but a small sliver of well-heeled immigrants — while telling the "tired," "poor," and "huddled masses" yearning to put cheap food on American dinner plates to get lost.

There was a time when immigration restrictionists used to insist that they weren't motivated by nativist considerations because their beef was not with legal immigrants, but illegal ones who don't play by the rules. Trump has ripped the mask off that lie. He has slammed literally every law-abiding legal immigrant group — refugees, asylum seekers, foreign family members of Americans, low-skilled immigrants, high-skilled foreign workers on H-1Bs, their wives, foreign students, and even naturalized citizens.

Still, none of that compares with what the administration is planning next.

The Department of Homeland Security is finalizing rules that would make it vastly easier to brand immigrants deemed "likely" to qualify for even minimal social services a "public charge" and make it harder for them to enter the country if they are abroad — or, if they are here, obtain green cards or citizenship or otherwise upgrade their immigration status. It might not even matter if these legal immigrants personally consume these services. It would reportedly be enough that their American children or spouses do. By some estimates, 20 million immigrants may be affected.

The proposed guidance, evidently the brainchild of Stephen Miller, an implacable immigration opponent, is relying on an 1891 law that barred immigrants "likely to become public charges." But this meant — in the evocative language of its time — "idiots, lunatics, convicts," or otherwise indigent or disabled folks who couldn't earn a living and would therefore become a ward of the state. Consistent with this understanding, DHS's 1999 guidance defined "public charge" as anyone who would become "primarily dependent" on cash benefits.

Miller's scheme would brand anyone who receives — or is likely to receive — services or subsidies (barring a few explicitly exempted) worth greater than 3 percent of the poverty line a public charge. This works out to $1 per day for a single person or 50 cents for a family of four, Cato Institute's David Bier points out. Even subsidies to purchase coverage mandated by ObamaCare would count against them. Worse, immigrants don't actually have to avail of these benefits to have their petitions rejected. They or their family simply have to be eligible for these subsidies because they are sick, old, have young children, or don't have unsubsidized coverage — unless they make 250 percent of the poverty level, in which case they'd be exempted.

The administration's intention here is clear: Cut legal, family-based, and low-skilled immigration and allow only the tippy top in.

The perversity of this cannot be overstated.

An immigrant would be barred from upgrading his status if he married, say, an American woman on Social Security disability till he crossed the 250 percent earning threshold. Or consider, a real-life example of a Haitian green-card holder who works 80 hours a week as a nursing assistant but has a severely disabled American daughter who receives public assistance. His citizenship petition may not have a prayer. In effect, Miller's plan would penalize immigrants not because they are needy but because they have Americans in their lives who are.

What's particularly unfair about this is that it's not like legal immigrants get any reprieve from taxes. With very, very few exceptions, they pay all the taxes that Americans do and then some (if you count all the fees that they and their employers have to constantly cough up to get and keep their visas). Denying them a shot at citizenship would mean creating a permanently disenfranchised class that can be taxed but will be barred from basic assistance (in addition to all the federal means-tested benefits), and won't be allowed to vote, eviscerating America's bedrock commitment to no taxation without representation.

There might be a rationale for doing something this draconian if there were any reason to believe that immigrants consume more welfare than the native born. But in fact, the opposite is true.

A recent study by the National Academy of Sciences estimated that an average immigrant arriving today would contribute $150,000 more in taxes than he or she would consume in benefits over their lifetime. But even poorer immigrants tend to consume welfare at lower rates and lower amounts than the native born. Furthermore, even when immigrants receive welfare, they don't quit working: 14 percent more keep their jobs as compared to the native born. And none of this takes into account the fact that immigrants constitute a windfall for America's public coffers given that they tend to come during their peak productive years after another society has borne the cost of raising and educating them. If anything, every working immigrant is a gift to American taxpayers. And when one takes into account the taxes pocketed thanks to the economic growth generated by immigrants, their fiscal impact becomes overwhelmingly positive.

The scheme's biggest tragedy is that it would seriously undermine America's genius in assimilating newcomers. The relative ease with which immigrants have been able to transition from being outsiders to full citizens with full rights has prevented the kind of alienation, ghettoization, and marginalization that has turned many European countries into tinder boxes. America's bargain — no, promise — has been that anyone who works hard, plays by the rules, and craves freedom from stultifying hierarchies of class, caste, and creed can be an American. Allowing the administration to use a fake argument to deny people breaking their backs in farms, meat-packing plants, and construction to make Make America Great everyday would serve neither this country — nor immigrants — well.


          Coupe du Monde Féminine U20 : La compo du match Haiti-Nigeria      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Le Nigeria joue son deuxième match ce jeudi contre Haïti dans le cadre du groupe D de la Coupe du Monde Féminine U20 qu’organise la France. Les Super Falconets doivent […]

Lire l'article Coupe du Monde Féminine U20 : La compo du match Haiti-Nigeria sur Africa Top Sports.


          Another Black South Floridian Says Wells Fargo Refused to Cash His Check, Called Cops      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
After a long day of work, Jean Romane Elie headed to a Wells Fargo branch in West Palm Beach to withdraw money for rent. But when he handed over his driver's license and Visa card, the bank teller told the Haitian man to wait while she consulted with another...
          JEAN, MARIE      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
JEAN, Marie of Jersey City. Funeral services on Saturday, 9:00 a.m. at Haitian Evangelical Church of Jesus Christ, Jersey City. Arrangements by:...
          A VAGABUNDIZAÇÃO DO BRASIL.      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Desde 2003 (com chegada do Regime Petista)  até HOJE, o Direito, a Medicina, o Jornalismo, a Educação, toda Universidade e a Igreja Católica DESCERAM, no nosso país, a um nível sem precedentes na História Mundial. Nem Idi Amin Dada em Uganda, nem Imelda Marcos nas Filipinas, nem mesmo “Papa Doc” no Haiti conseguiram aputalhar,  vagabundizar, esculachar tanto a vida cultural e moral de uma Nação quanto aquilo que os Vagabundos Petistas fizeram no Brasil. O PT “vagabundizou o Brasil” - todos nós fomos “vagabundizados”.

Milton Pires.
          Latin America's fight to legalise abortion: the key battlegrounds      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

After Argentina rejected a bill to allow abortion in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy, hopes of reform now rest elsewhere

An estimated 6.5 million abortions take place across Latin America each year. Three-quarters of these procedures are unlawful, often performed in unsafe illegal clinics or at home.

Of 33 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean, only Cuba, Uruguay and Guyana permit elective abortions. Women also have the right to choose in Mexico City. Elsewhere, however, the right to an abortion is severely restricted, with terminations often permitted in cases of rape, or if the pregnancy will endanger the life of the mother. Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, the Dominican Republic, Haiti and Suriname all have a complete ban on abortion.

Continue reading...
          #hangover - effyzziemusicgroup      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
DAY 2 @yemialade and @taiyealiyu Went on a shopping for this Amazing kids in orphanage "Rose Mina" in #HAITI 🇭🇹 . . Let's be grateful for life #Yemialade #blackmagiccanadausatour #BLACKMAGIC #hangover #OhMyGosh
          #hangover - effyzziemusicgroup      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
DAY 2 @yemialade Went on a shopping for this Amazing kids in orphanage "Rose Mina" in #HAITI 🇭🇹 . . Let's be grateful for life #Yemialade #blackmagiccanadausatour #BLACKMAGIC #hangover #OhMyGosh
          #hangover - effyzziemusicgroup      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
DAY 2 @yemialade Went on a shopping for this Amazing kids in orphanage "Rose Mina" in #HAITI 🇭🇹 . . Let's be grateful for life #Yemialade #blackmagiccanadausatour #BLACKMAGIC #hangover #OhMyGosh
          #hangover - effyzziemusicgroup      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
DAY 2 @yemialade Went on a shopping for this Amazing kids in orphanage "Rose Mina" in #HAITI 🇭🇹 . . Let's be grateful for life #Yemialade #blackmagiccanadausatour #BLACKMAGIC #hangover #OhMyGosh
          #hangover - infolivehaiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
@djnal_100.5_fm Press Conférence #Hangover @hangover_haiti at @royaloasishotel
          #hangover - infolivehaiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
@steezybabyyy - Press Conférence #Hangover @hangover_haiti at @royaloasishotel
          #hangover - taiyealiyu      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
DAY 2 @yemialade and I went on a shopping for this Amazing kids in orphanage "Rose Mina" in #HAITI 🇭🇹 . . Let's be grateful for life #Yemialade #blackmagiccanadausatour #BLACKMAGIC #hangover #OhMyGosh
          Dinesh D'Souza's lazy, ugly propaganda film      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   


Melissa Joskow / Media Matters

Dinesh D’Souza’s new fake-documentary Death of a Nation opens with Adolf Hitler and his companion Eva Braun grimly committing suicide in the Fuhrerbunker, after which their bodies are hauled up to the streets of war-ravaged Berlin and set on fire. If you were to ask me why the movie opens with this gruesome reenactment, or why D’Souza had the actor portraying the Nazi dictator stare poignantly into the camera before shooting himself in the head, I honestly could not tell you. Nor can I offer any coherent explanation for why this film inflicts several other cinematic retellings of Hitler’s life upon the viewer. None of it is explained, and none of it makes much sense. What I can say is that Death of a Nation is a terrible and disgusting film, even by D’Souza standards.

By now D’Souza’s filmmaking shtick is tiresome and relentlessly predictable: He play-acts at being a public intellectual and haphazardly tortures the historical record in the service of “proving” an ill-considered argument. In the process, he typically ends up accidentally disproving his own thesis and veers off into bigotry. The shodiness of the scholarship is (poorly) papered over with cinematic flourishes and ego-engorging footage of “Dinesh D’Souza: Serious Historian” as he walks around historically significant sites bathing them with terribly meaningful glances. Death of a Nation ticks all these boxes and offers a couple more pathetically self-indulgent twists, like carving out a few minutes of screentime for D’Souza’s wife to warble a treacly song about America.

The thrust of Death of a Nation is that America is at a moment of existential crisis similar to the Civil War, and that the nation will, ahem, die if “the left” (George Soros, antifa, moderate Democrats, whoever) succeeds at whatever nefarious scheme it is assumed to have. The only thing standing between America and its demise is President Donald Trump, whom D’Souza casts as a glittering reincarnation of Abraham Lincoln. D’Souza presents the divide between left and right in hilariously childish terms, describing Democrats and progressives as “the bad guys” (meaning racists and fascists and totalitarians) and Republicans and conservatives as “the good guys” (the opposite of the bad guys). This dynamic has held firm throughout American history, D’Souza argues, and is a global phenomenon as well.

That brings us back to Hitler. D’Souza’s theory of history requires that every villain be of the left, so he is obligated to demonstrate that fascism is actually a left-wing ideology. D’Souza is a late arrival to this rotten exercise in partisan revisionism, and his contributions to it are characteristically lazy. “Check out the official Nazi platform,” D’Souza says. “State-controlled health care, profit-sharing for workers and large corporations, moneylenders and profiteers punished by death, state control of education, state control of media and the press, state control of banks and industries, seizure of land without compensation, state control of religious expression -- this reads like something jointly written by Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders!”

This grotesque comparison required D’Souza to both water down the explicit bigotry of the Nazi platform and impute its totalitarian character to two sitting senators -- one of whom is Jewish, and neither of whom advocate for murdering bankers or call for state-run media, etc. But since D’Souza wants to ply this simple-minded exercise, I’ll point out that the Nazi platform also calls for a ban on immigration, mass deportations, a military buildup, and “legal opposition to known lies and their promulgation through the press.”

Blundering and incendiary allegations of leftist-fascist alignment abound in Death of a Nation. D’Souza argues that Auschwitz doctor and war criminal Josef Mengele was a “progressive” because he performed abortions in South America after the war. “Under Obama, we saw government control increase dramatically over banks, investment companies, energy companies, the entire health care sector, and education,” D’Souza says. “This is state-run capitalism [it isn’t], which is the clinical definition of fascism [it’s not].”

His treatment of Hitler’s relationship with Ernst Röhm, the commander of the Nazi Party paramilitary force Sturmabteilung, clearly demonstrates D’Souza’s pernicious sloppiness. “Some progressives try to portray Hitler as a right-winger by insisting he was anti-gay,” D’Souza says. “But Hitler knew that the brownshirt leader Ernst Röhm was a notorious homosexual, as were many other brownshirts. ... When Heinrich Himmler urged Hitler to purge the gay brownshirts out of the Nazi movement, Hitler refused. Hitler said he didn’t care what the brownshirts did in private, as long as they were good fighters. Hitler was no social conservative.”

This argument is a disgusting whitewash of Nazi terror and is an accidental indictment of social conservatism. To suggest that Hitler was somehow tolerant of (or indifferent to) homosexuality because he declined to persecute the stormtroopers who committed political violence on his behalf deliberately ignores Third Reich’s legal attacks on Germany’s LGBTQ population and the countless LGBTQ people who died in Hitler’s concentration camps. Röhm’s purge was followed by a viciously homophobic propaganda campaign used to justify the action.

And it’s absurd for D’Souza, himself a social conservative, to define “social conservatism” against Hitler’s politically expedient hesitancy to expel/murder gay men from his political movement. If Hitler’s (temporary) unwillingness to do that disqualifies him from the ranks of social conservatives, then what does that say about true social conservatives?

The flipside to D’Souza’s artless smearing of leftists as the “real” fascists is his equally incompetent effort to absolve the right generally (and Donald Trump specifically) of the taint of white supremacy.

D’Souza tries to argue that 2017’s violent white supremacist outburst in Charlottesville, VA, which left one counter-protester dead, had nothing to do with right-wing politics or Donald Trump. “There they are, white supremacists and neo-Nazis in Trump hats,” D’Souza sneers over footage of the Charlottesville rallies. “Doesn’t that prove that racism today is on the right?”

Not at all, D’Souza counters, saying that Charlottesville organizer and white supremacist Jason Kessler was once an Obama supporter. He doesn’t explain why that fact precludes Kessler being a white nationalist Trump supporter now, nor does he explain how it debunks the footage D’Souza himself aired of white supremacists in Charlottesville wearing “Make America Great Again” hats, nor does he address the fact that Trump defended the white nationalist protesters. He just makes a largely meaningless observation that leaves the ongoing issue of white nationalists’ affinity for Trump glaringly unresolved.

D’Souza also interviews white supremacist figurehead Richard Spencer in an attempt to demonstrate that Spencer’s and Trump’s worldviews are wholly divergent, and his gambit backfires. D’Souza asks him: “Would you be happy with an immigration strategy that basically said, ‘We want people from New Zealand, Australia, white guys from Europe, Iceland, and South Africa; we don’t want that many people from -- if any -- Barbados or Bombay?’” After Spencer says yes, D’Souza responds: “Now this seems very different than Trump.”

It’s not really that different, though, given that Trump reportedly told lawmakers that he wanted more immigrants from Norway and fewer people from “shithole countries” -- Haiti and African nations, specifically. That comment was a big hit among white supremacists, including Spencer. D’Souza insists to Spencer that “the line that Trump is drawing is not a racial line but a line between the legal and the illegal immigrant.” The Trump White House, meanwhile, is reportedly planning harsh restrictions on legal immigrants seeking citizenship.

Ridiculous, self-defeating arguments like this permeate Death of a Nation primarily because D’Souza doesn’t give a shit and has precisely zero respect for his intended audience. D’Souza does not want to change minds or start a discussion about political history -- this movie exists to wring as much cash as can be wrung from people who already believe that Democrats are Nazis and, as D’Souza puts it, “the real racists.” He doesn’t care about the soundness of his arguments. He just wants money and to go on TV.

At this point, D’Souza barely bothers to conceal his avarice and mendacity because he doesn’t have to. He exists within a putrefying conservative political and media ecosystem that either celebrates his fraudulent money-grubbing or determinedly ignores it. He’s doing the rounds on Fox News and talk radio, and he has the support of the president and the president’s family. None of them care that D’Souza has been discredited more times than can be counted, or that he’s erasing Hitler’s murderous persecution of LGBTQ people, or that he accidentally demonstrated parallels between Trump and white supremacists. D’Souza is calling Democrats “fascists” and Donald Trump the next Abe Lincoln, and that’s good enough.


          Haiti, la perla delle Antille      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Quando scendi la scaletta dell’aereo, l’aria calda ti avvolge e ti mozza il respiro. Succede soprattutto d’estate, quando le temperature salgono insieme all’umidità. Percorri a piedi i pochi metri che ti separano dall’aerostazione e già entri nel mood. L’orchestrina che ti accoglie all’ingresso è il primo impatto con questo luogo, impregnato di musica, di colori e di cultura. Benvenuti ad Haiti, recita il cartellone pubblicitario. Oltre l’accoglienza da cartolina, il nastro dei bagagli è l’anteprima di quello che ti aspetterà quando oltrepasserai le porte vetrate e ti ritroverai nel pieno dell’isola. Se immagini di vedere la tua valigia scorrere su un nastro vuol dire che sei arrivato con il piede sbagliato. Qui le valigie scorrono, sì, ma per un attimo. Poi vengono tutte scaricate al centro della sala, formando un cumulo multicolore e di varie dimensioni. Devi farti largo fra la folla e fra i bagagli per riuscire a recuperare il tuo, cercando di tenere a bada le mani che ti offrono aiuto in cambio di una mancia. Ti seguiranno fino all’uscita e oltre, se non hai nessuno che viene a prenderti e che li informi che stanno perdendo tempo. L’arrivo è sconcertante, e lo sono anche le prime immagini […]
          Nigeria hang on to defeat enterprising Haiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Rasheedat Ajibade's first-half penalty kick was enough to see Nigeria edge Haiti in Group D at the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup France 2018 to secure a crucial three points to keep their knockout round qualification hopes alive.


          Another Black South Floridian Says Wells Fargo Refused to Cash His Check, Called Cops      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
After a long day of work, Jean Romane Elie headed to a Wells Fargo branch in West Palm Beach to withdraw money for rent. But when he handed over his driver's license and Visa card, the bank teller told the Haitian man to wait while she consulted with another...
          Director Policia dice no permitirá que irrespeten a sus agentes      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   


Santo Domingo.- En el país existe un irrespeto a todas las autoridades, y para citar un caso, el director de la Policía Nacional puso como ejemplo lo sucedido en San Francisco de Macorís, donde un chofer golpeó en la cara a un coronel, “cuando él junto a los demás policías ahí presentes estaban tratando de imponer el orden para la colectividad”.

“Esas personas estaban en la calle y la Policía los estaba quitando porque impedían el libre tránsito de la colectividad. Entonces este ‘tipo’ viene por detrás y le da ese golpe al coronel. Acechado cualquiera le da al otro, pero ahí mismo los demás policías que estaban ahí debieron aplicarle todo el uso de la fuerza, todas las técnicas policiales, el uso apropiado de la macana”, manifestó el director policial.

“¿Qué yo veo mal? Que los policías que estaban ahí no hicieran  nada, y ellos están investidos para actuar, para darle su macanazo a ese ‘tipo’, pero con responsabilidad. Por eso, todos los que no actuaron así están violando los reglamentos policiales y tienen que pagar”.


Es por esa razón que, según el mayor general Bautista Almonte, todos los policías que estaban presentes cuando ocurrió ese irrespeto en contra del coronel serán sancionados.

El reentrenamiento

El reentrenamiento es un aspecto fundamental para el director policial, incluso fue lo primero que habló al asumir la dirección, pues con frecuencia ocurren casos que ponen al descubierto las faltas de estrategias de los policías.

Es por esa razón que ha ordenado a la Escuela de Comando a reentrenar a todo el personal, “donde tenemos siete equipos que se trasladan a todas las direcciones para mantener vivo ese reentrenamiento, lo que pasa es que somos más de 37,000 y por eso el proceso no llega tan rápido. Se va a sentir, pero no tan rápido”, dijo.

Recordó que la mayor evidencia de necesitar reentrenamiento fue el año pasado, frente a este diario, donde dos policías atendieron a un llamado; un haitiano quita el arma al policía y llegó a tener dos en sus manos, mientras, los agentes, trataron de protegerse.

@listin

          Fabrication d'armes artisanales: deux Haïtiens arrêtés en Rép. Dom. - Loop News Haiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Loop News Haiti

Fabrication d'armes artisanales: deux Haïtiens arrêtés en Rép. Dom.
Loop News Haiti
La Direction des enquêtes criminelles dominicaines ont procédé à l'arrestation de deux Haïtiens qui ont installé un atelier de fabrication d'armes artisanales dans la communauté de Los Mina, à Navarrete. Les autorités informent pourtant les avoir ...


          Under-20 Women's World Cup: Nigeria beat Haiti to kick-start campaign      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Nigeria get their Under-20 Women's World Cup campaign back on track in France on Thursday with a 1-0 win over Haiti.
          #luz - femarquitectura      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Comprar una casa es un paso muy importante. Muchas dudas afloran. 🔖Acompañarte es la mejor solución antes de tomar decisiones que van a condicionar tanto tu vida. 🔖Te asesoramos en tu compra, para que te asegures de que lo que necesitas. . . . BARCELONA | MADRID | ZARAGOZA | VALENCIA | MEXICO | HAITI . . . #nosinmiarquitecta . #nosinmiarquitecto #proyectos #arquitectura #viviendas #oficinas #hoteles #reformas #reformaparcial #reformaintegral #construccion #obra #projectmanagement #diseñodeinteriores #interiorismo #decoracion #interiores #espacio #space #luz #light #diseño #design #instahome #architecturelovers #architecturephotography #archilovers . . . #femarquitectura
          Comment on Cuba: Revolution or Resistance? by repatriado      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Captain, it is true that western culture (including japan) is in trouble, for me the biggest problem is the inequality, it is quickly approaching to levels never seen before and that is extremely dangerous for democracy. Now with Trump fucking around the world it is normal to foresee an increase of lack of faith or confidence in democracy, with the concentration of media power of course freedom of speech is under attack, bottom-line, it is not a good moment for humankind, but, there is hope, internet is a great distributor of information, there are social movements, and I am not talking about Foro do Sao Paulo, social movements demanding a better distribution of wealth, Obama something did on did, but too little and less of what he could I think, Europe is moving to a unity, with more or less speed but moving, one they manage to have a continental taxation organism Europe will improve a lot and social states will prevail there, China is growing and they still have to grow a lot to reach Europe or united states level of life, that is great for many many people there that were very poor, I don´t talk about the Chinese political system because I do think Chinese culture is different to ours. We people need to change a lot, we need to stop watching consume and constant economic growing as a goal, and we have to stop reproduction, we are not too many, but we can perfectly manage to keep the population we already have without growing, emigrations will help to balance humans situations, I love to see Africans and middle east people going to Europe and Latin Americans going to US, but there is needed some better politics to do that without people dying. Cuba have not the big problems that Guatemala, el Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti, or many others have, but we never had those problems so compare Cuba with those nations is not correct, but we have deep problems, the biggest, for me, to be in the hands of a corrupt elite that violate humans rights constantly, that is not only very unmoral, that is a brake, an stop in our development as nation. When you talk with Cubans, you have to think that the most of us have being disconnected from the world, and that our perspective of life is conditions by the state monopoly of disinformation. Thank you very much for care about Cubans.
          France 2018: Falconets get slim win over Haiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Falconets needed a win to keep their hopes of a qualification to the knockout stage alive

The post France 2018: Falconets get slim win over Haiti appeared first on Premium Times Nigeria. Reported by Premium Times Nigeria 23 minutes ago.
          Under-20 Women's World Cup: Nigeria beat Haiti to kick-start campaign      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Under-20 Women's World Cup: Nigeria beat Haiti to kick-start campaign#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000 Nigeria get their Under-20 Women's World Cup campaign back on track in France on Thursday with a 1-0 win over Haiti. Reported by BBC News 2 hours ago.
          VOYAGE TO THE LAND OF THE (ZOMBIES) LIVING DEAD!      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[While looking through the INEXPLICATA archives, I came across one of our most popular features from the pre-Blogspot days: an article about zombies written by contributing editor Manuel Carballal, who visited the island to look into Haiti's occult practices, much as he had done earlier in Cuba. Although we often receive complaints about straying from ufology into other areas of the unknown, it is precisely this diversity - and the fearless journalism of reporters like Manuel Carballal - that have made INEXPLICATA stand out since 1998 -- SC]
 

By Manuel Carballal


 

The scene could have been derived from any suspense film. Manuel Delgado instinctively held on tightly to his television camera as we clutched our machetes. Our vehicle was being surrounded by a dozen ebony-skinned Haitians. The blancs, as they derisively call Europeans, are not welcome in Haiti and we had been warned that under no circumstances should we venture into the shanty towns outside Port-au-Prince where, we were told, "there exists a 90 per cent chance of being mugged." We ignored this sage advice, of course.

After endless minutes of waiting, our guide allowed us to emerge from the car. Monsieur Balaguer, an important bokor -- a voodoo high priest -- would allow us to visit his hounfor or temple. The hounfor consisted in a humble wooden shack whose center contained the peristyle, the indispensable central column of every voodoo ritual, by means of which the gods or loas descend to earth. A filthy light bulb and seven candles enabled us to see the disquieting form of Monsieur Balaguer, a tall man with sparkling black eyes, who covered his head with a Stetson.
 
While our guide stated all the arguments at his disposal in order to have Monsieur Balaguer allow us to film his "she-devil" and his "zombie", we were startled by a sudden blackout. The dirty light bulb was extinguished, plunging us into the shadows, illuminated only by the seven candles around the peristyle. Balaguer greeted his "she-devil" -- supposedly located behind a mysterious metal door -- by rapping on it a few times. From the other side, "something" responded with brutal blows against the door, causing the entire temple to shake. Suddenly we were told that the bokor had to consult the loas: we looked on as Monsieur Balaguer fell int a sort of trance, being "ridden" or possessed by Bravo, one of the loas who shares the lordship over death and cemeteries with Baron Samedi and Baron La Croix. Subjecting us to a sort of "trial," exchanging a curious combinations of handshakes to which we instinctively responded to, Balaguer drank rum through an ear as he smoked a cigarette through one nostril.
 
The fact of the matter is that in Haiti, Western patterns of logic become fragile in the face of the unpredictable, incomprehensible and irrational voodoo cult -- vodú in the native tongue -- which originates from the Fon language of Dahomey, meaning "deity" or "spirit." This is the precise nature of voodoo: a spirit that envelops Haiti, influencing each and every cultural or social manifestation of this small country, the poorest of the Americas.
 
Voodoo Reaches the Presidency
 
No single cultural manifestation is longer-lasting or more influential than a country's religion. In Haiti's case, this influence becomes particularly apparent. In late 1995, when President Bill Clinton visited Haiti to supervise the "changing of the guard" -- American troops being replaced by UN peacekeepers, more than four thousand Haitians converged upon the square in front of the Presidential Palace in Port-au-Prince to witness the event. President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, restored to power thanks to the intervention of twenty thousand U.S. troops in October 1994, would preside over the event.
 
Bill Clinton had barely finished his conciliatory speech concerning military intervention in Haiti when a white dove landed next to his microphone. Immediately, thousands of Haitians roared their approval and applauded in the light of such an unequivocal "sign of approval" from the gods. The Voodoo loas had accepted Clinton. This "innocent coincidence" made thousands of Haitians--and more importantly, secret societies like Bizango, who had promised to protect the country against foreigners through magic--put aside their anger against the new white invaders, respecting the wishes of the gods. Voodoo is the main power in Haiti: no one would dare contradict the wishes of the loas, or what is interpreted as their wishes.
 
From the days of Macandal, the pioneer of independence in the 18th century to the times of General Raoul Cédras, no Haitian ruler has forgotten to acknowledge the all-powerful influence of voodoo in Haiti. President Aristide was no exception. In spite of having been a Catholic priest, after an interview with several houngans (priests) and mambos (priestesses) on July 19, 1995, Aristide officially announced the construction of a great Voodoo temple within the capital. In this manner, the president equated the Voodoo religion with other "accepted#source%3Dgooglier%2Ecom#https%3A%2F%2Fgooglier%2Ecom%2Fpage%2F%2F10000" religions, granting Voodoo practitioners a "cathedral" similar to the Baptist churches, Masonic temples or Catholic parishes which are so numerous in Haiti.
 
Warlocks in Charge
 
But there was one Haitian ruler who knew how to make use of Voodoo as a political tool: the mythical and shadowy "Papa Doc," François Duvalier. In 1954, the legendary "Papa Doc" published (with Lorimer Denis) a monograph entitled L'Evolution graduelle du vaudou (The Gradual Evolution of Voodoo). The knowledge of Voodoo displayed in this book was evidently utilized during his political career.
 
As a young man, along with other Haitian intellectuals, Duvalier published a nationalist newspaper called Les Griots. At a time when the government torched the sacred Voodoo drums and other objects of worship as a sign of loyalty to the Catholic church, Les Griots revindicated Voodoo as a religion and as rebellion against American colonizers. It isn't surprising that "Papa Doc" gained the support of the traditional secret societies, and that during his 1957 campaign, the hounfour or Voodoo temples were utilized as his local party headquarters.
 
Immediately after rising to the presidency of Haiti, Duvalier named the feared bokor of Gonaives, Zacharie Delva, as commander-in-chief of the army, and began to revindicate Voodoo as the official religion. His personal bodyguard, a sort of "esoteric police," were the Volunteers for National Security (VSN), the feared Tontons Macoutes who spread terror throughout the island (the name Tontons Macoutes refers to an old Haitian folk tale of the "men with the sack". Misbehaving children were warned that their tonton -- uncle -- would take them away inside a macoute, a sack). All the hounfor who were not aligned with the Duvalier regime were locked up and rebels were persecuted. According to his biographers, "Papa Doc" ordered a special airplane to bring him the head of former rebel captain Blucher Fhilgénes. The man was decapitated and his head was placed in a bucket of ice. According to the rumors filtering out of the Presidential Palace, Duvalier would spend hours contemplating the head and consulting its spirit in secret rituals.
 
"Man speaks, but doesn't act. God acts, but doesn't speak. Duvalier is a god." This was the thought echoing through the streets of Haiti. Papa Doc had woven around himself a terrible magical legend thanks to his knowledge of Voodoo, a legend that none dare question, and which allowed his dictatorship to flourish for decades. In fact, many peasants believed that "Papa Doc" was an incarnation of the dreaded Baron Samedi, lord of cemeteries. "They cannot have me. I am an immaterial being," Duvalier said during one of his speeches in 1963. The fact is that his legend exists to this day, and many believe that Duvalier has become a loa, a spirit of the Gede family that can still manifest itself in certain rituals...
 
Blood, Rhythm and Possession
 
We were engulfed by frantic drumbeats. The convulsive dancing of the hounsí --Voodoo initiates--bewitched us, and the markedly African chants and litanies overwhelmed us. The entire montage of the Voodoo ritual we were witnessing in Cachimán, near the border with the Dominican Republic, created an almost dreamlike atmosphere within the confines of Voodoo priest Manuel Sánchez Elie. Without a scrap of hesitation, one of the houngan's assistants delivered a powerful blade-stroke on the neck of a ram, abruptly decapitating the animal while its blood showered everyone present. The ram's head was torn from its body and offered to the gods, while two acolytes stripped the body, which would be served to the participants later. Voodoo religion is an imprecise mixture of blood, music and esthetics.
 
Voodoo, like Santería, Umbanda, Candomblé or Palo Mayombe, is the product of synchretism between African religions and Christianity. The ancestral beliefs brought by African slaves to the New World as their only treasure was forcibly mimetized with the saints of the Catholic onomasticon. The orishas and African loas were disguised as saints, mystics and martyrs in order that their worship could survive in a hostile world, which was that of slave-owning whites. This abstract mixture of witchcraft, paganism and christianity survives to this day.
 
This article continues tomorrow June 10, 2015!
 
 
Extra information about the article: 
While looking through the INEXPLICATA archives, I came across one of our most popular features from the pre-Blogspot days: an article about zombies...

          Fabrication d'armes artisanales: deux Haïtiens arrêtés en Rép. Dom. - Loop News Haiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Loop News Haiti

Fabrication d'armes artisanales: deux Haïtiens arrêtés en Rép. Dom.
Loop News Haiti
La Direction des enquêtes criminelles dominicaines ont procédé à l'arrestation de deux Haïtiens qui ont installé un atelier de fabrication d'armes artisanales dans la communauté de Los Mina, à Navarrete. Les autorités informent pourtant les avoir ...


          ANÁLISE: Apesar da derrota, 'maré verde' argentina pode ecoar na América Latina      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Avanços para a legalização do aborto ainda são lentos e caminham para a descriminalização. Manifestante a favor da legalização do aborto reage à rejeição do projeto no Senado argentino'' Reuters/Marcos Brindicci Ativistas contrários ao aborto comemoraram como se fosse um gol a rejeição do projeto de lei que legalizaria a prática, deixando as mulheres argentinas à mercê da legislação de 1921, que proíbe a interrupção voluntária da gravidez. E também em situação semelhante à de 97% de suas vizinhas latino-americanas. Mas, na Argentina do século XXI e do Papa Francisco, o placar apertado e a grande mobilização são indicativos de que nada será como antes. Apesar de proibido, o aborto ganha força como um dos temas dominantes da campanha presidencial do próximo ano. E o governo Macri já cogita incluir a sua descriminalização no projeto de reforma do Código Penal que enviará ainda este mês ao Congresso. Toda vez que o aborto consegue romper resistências e entrar na agenda legislativa, o debate viraliza, mobilizando os dois campos, independentemente da nacionalidade. Esta semana, mulheres latino-americanas buscaram inspiração na maré verde argentina, tentando fazer com que o movimento ecoasse em seus países. Numa região em que o peso do conservadorismo encontra na Igreja seu maior aliado, apenas Uruguai, Cuba e Guiana permitem o aborto, que pode ser realizado até a 12ª semana também em Porto Rico e na Cidade do México. A interrupção da gravidez é terminantemente proibida em El Salvador, Honduras, Haiti, Nicarágua, República Dominicana e Suriname. Oito países permitem que ocorra apenas para salvar a vida da mulher. Ativistas antiaborto comemoram rejeição do projeto no senado argentino Agustin Marcarian/Reuters Os avanços, contudo, ocorrem lentamente. A legislação chilena foi flexibilizada no ano passado, liberando a prática em casos de má formação do feto, de perigo da vida para a mãe e de gravidez decorrente de estupro. No Brasil, o debate ainda ressoa mais no Judiciário do que no Congresso. O STF encerrou esta semana as audiências públicas para debater a ação impetrada pelo PSOL pedindo para que o aborto não seja mais considerado crime se feito até a 12ª semana. Ainda não há prazo para a relatora, ministra Rosa Weber, preparar o voto ou pedir a sua inclusão na pauta de julgamento do plenário do Supremo. A proibição do aborto não reduziu o número de intervenções. Ao contrário, segundo relatório da Organização Mundial de Saúde, incrementou a prática clandestina, pondo em risco a saúde da mulher. Mas, por enquanto, a descriminalização, que exime a mulher de ser presa por praticar o aborto, ainda parece ser o atalho para a legalização do aborto na América Latina. Arte/G1
          Falconets beat Haiti 1-0 to get campaign back on track      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Nigeria got their Under-20 Women's World Cup campaign back on track in France on Thursday with a 1-0 win over Haiti.


A 36th minute penalty from Rasheedat Ajibade was enough to bring Nigeria their first points in Group D.

The Super Falconets lost their opening match to Germany 1-0 on Monday.

This result moves Nigeria up to second in the table after two games, three points behind leaders Germany.

China are third, level on points with Nigeria, with Haiti bottom - still without a point.

Nigeria's final group game will be against China on Monday.

There are four groups of four with the top two teams progressing to the quarter-final stage.

Ghana's hopes of qualifying to the last eight were dashed with a 4-0 defeat to the Netherlands on Wednesday.

          Haiti & New Orleans: Is The Feeling Mutual?      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
WWNO’s original history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300 launches its third season with this special on the relationship between New Orleans and Haiti. Listen to the hour long documentary here: TriPod : New Orleans at 300 returns with an hour-long special that explores two places linked in history. called “Haiti and New Orleans: Is the Feeling Mutual?” “The connection in New Orleans is all around you, right? It’s in the music, it’s in the food. It’s in the culture with the carnival. When people get married, when they are put to rest, and die. So, when New Orleans is celebrating its tricentennial, I think it’s only natural that Haiti play its proper role in that celebration. There’s no denying it, we’re kin. You can try to deny it, but you know, history will prove you otherwise.” This whole series is leading up to the tricentennial of New Orleans. 300 years — and definitely no shortage of material. But throughout the past two seasons of TriPod, one place kept coming up: Haiti. And the
          Sneak Peek Of The TriPod Special On Haiti And New Orleans      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
WWNO’s original history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns next week. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson traveled to Haiti this past summer and will launch the third season on Oct. 27, with an hour-long special about the relationship between Haiti and New Orleans. This documentary is called, "Haiti And New Orleans: Is The Feeling Mutual?" WWNO's Janae Pierre sat down with Laine to get a sneak peek of this TriPod special. TriPod is a production of WWNO in collaboration with The Historic New Orleans Collection and the Midlo Center for New Orleans Studies at the University of New Orleans. The series is hosted and produced by WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson , working with the assistance of a forty-member international advisory group of historians and archivists. This TriPod special was made possible with support from the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South at Tulane University through the Global South Fellowship program. TriPod airs Thursdays during Morning Edition at 8:30 a.m. on 89.9 FM,
          TriPod Goes To Haiti      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
In this edition of TriPod Xtras, host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sits down with WWNO’s Janae Pierre to talk about a recent trip to Haiti, the end of TriPod’s second season, and a look at season three. To see photos from Laine’s reporting trip to Haiti, follow TriPod on Instagram at @TriPodnola. You can also tweet your favorite episodes at @tripodnola, and we’ll re-air them this summer, and give you a special shoutout! New TriPod xtras will be released between season 2 and season 3, but on the podcast only, so make sure you subscribe to the TriPod podcast wherever you get your podcasts.
          This mom is running 50 Ironman races in 50 days      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
By the time Ashley Horner finishes this ultra-endurance conquest, they may be calling it “Ironwoman.” The Virginia-based fitness trainer flew to Haiti Thursday morning to embark on a feat no other woman has accomplished: completing 50 Ironman races in 50 days. That’s a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride and a 26.2-mile marathon — times...


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