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          Ali Hasanov’s book “Armenians` policy of genocide against Azerbaijanis” published in Tajik and Russian languages in Dushanbe      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The Presidential Assistant for Public and Political Affairs Ali Hasanov`s books “Armenians` policy of genocide against Azerbaijanis” has been published in Tajik and Russian languages by “Bukharo” publishing house in Dushanbe, Tajikistan
          Prominent Tajik Journalist Sentenced To 12 Years In Prison      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A court in Tajikistan has sentenced prominent journalist Hairullo Mirsaidov to 12 years in prison.
          TB Patients in Tajikistan Celebrate New Treatment Access      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Tuberculosis medicines now available in Tajikistan give patients new hope for recovery.Language English (Source: MSF News)
          Tajikistan: General Agreement on the Establishment of Peace and National Accord in Tajikistan, Annex III: Protocol on Refugees (1997)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Publisher: National Legislative Bodies / National Authorities - Document type: Multilateral Treaties/Agreements
          Tajikistan: Law on Forced Migrants (1994)      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Publisher: National Legislative Bodies / National Authorities - Document type: National Decrees, Circulars, Regulation, Policy Documents
          GEORGE D. O’NEILL JR. - For Peace With Putin, End America’s Pointless Wars      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Ignore the establishment: Trump has a huge opportunity at his upcoming summit.



Another excellent article from the American Conservative, this is about half of it. KV.

The upcoming summit between Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin is an overdue opportunity for the American president’s next bold peace initiative. It is time for the U.S. to stop its wasteful wars, and Russia can be a constructive partner to this end.
The mainstream press on both sides of the Atlantic will howl against any agreement between Trump and Putin—no matter what’s in it. So why not take steps that the American public will instinctively understand and that will provide the support for Trump to end America’s failed interventions? Besides what are his opponents going to do? Vilify him for seeking peace and starting the process of healing the many wounds of the wars? The American people are not fooled by false claims that Trump is soft on terrorism; they are aware that U.S. military interventions oftentimes can—and do—fuel terrorism.
President Trump should propose a drawdown of American troops in Afghanistan in exchange for a drawdown of Russian troops in Syria (along with a pledge that America has no interest in reengaging in the Syrian Civil War). This would be consistent with Trump’s oft-stated observation that America’s wars (declared and undeclared) in the Middle East have been a waste.
Trump need not “recognize” the Russian annexation of Crimea but he should assert that a resolution to the situation on the ground in Ukraine is a European matter—to be settled by bilateral negotiations between Russia and Europe.
The American public is not interested in diplomatic and media theater. They know two things to be true: the failing “Trump-Russia collusion” hysteria is proving baseless (and distracting from concerns over economic growth and jobs); and whatever America’s international security interests are in the Middle East, we are all better protected with allies that face similar threats.
Russia has more reason to be concerned over Islamic terrorism than America. Their southern border touches on several Islamic countries: Turkey, Iran, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Afghanistan. The instability created by America’s misguided military adventures has, for years, been unsettling to Russia. According to a friend who has long studied Russia, America’s post-Cold War military aggression, starting in the Balkans, began the ascension to power of Russian military hardliners who were skeptical of America’s intentions for peace.
Russia has a significantly better understanding of and influence over most of those countries, including Iran. America’s relationship with Iran has long been hostile due to years of interference and mistreatment. The relationship was seriously complicated in 1953 when our CIA and British intelligence overthrew their democratically elected prime minister, Mohammad Mosaddegh, and placed the brutal Shah in power. The Washington keyboard warriors never mention this sad chapter in our history. Imagine how we would feel towards a country that interfered with us to that extent.
How much smarter would it be for Russia to work with its neighbor Iran to limit the civil war in Yemen, than for America to continue to provide military support to Saudi Arabia to perpetuate a colossal human tragedy?
The naysayers ridiculed Trump’s peace initiative with North Korea, and yet his denuclearization and pacification of the Korean Peninsula advances (in contrast to the efforts of four previous American presidential administrations). Given that Trump and Kim could sit together, what stands in the way of progress with Putin?


GEORGE D. O’NEILL JR. - For Peace With Putin, End America’s Pointless

          Afghanistan has an unbelievably beautiful hidden region untouched by war — here's what it looks like      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

AfghanistanFrederic Lagrange

  • While much of Afghanistan has been roiled by near constant war since the American invasion in 2001, there are parts of the country that are still untouched by war.
  • The Wakhan Corridor is a narrow strip of land in the far northeast of Afghanistan, bordering China, Tajikistan, and Pakistan. 
  • New York photographer Frédéric Lagrange fufilled a lifelong dream in 2012 by visiting the remote region. He found that it was even more beautiful than he imagined.

In the late 1990s, New York-based photographer Frédéric Lagrange became obsessed with traveling to Afghanistan’s Wakhan Corridor after reading "A Short Walk In The Hindu Kush," English writer Eric Newby’s travelogue of his adventures in the area.

He made plans to visit, but then 9/11 happened, and the American invasion quashed any plans. The trip was too dangerous.

In 2012, with the war cooling down, Lagrange finally made the trip he had been dreaming about.

The Wakhan Corridor is a narrow strip of land in the far northeast of Afghanistan, bordering Tajikistan, Pakistan, and Western China. The harsh, beautiful landscape, bounded by the Hindu Kush mountains on the south, was once used as a major trading route for those traveling the Silk Road to China.

For three weeks, Lagrange and a team of locals made their way up the Hindu Kush mountains to the shores of Lake Chaqmaqtin. Along the way, Lagrange photographed the local peoples, who survive on the edge of civilization by raising and herding cattle.

He shared some photos from his journey with us, but you can check out the rest at his website

Lagrange began by flying into Dushanbe, Tajikistan, crossing into the Wakhan Corridor by Afghanistan's northeast border. If he traveled from Kabul, he would have had to pass through numerous Taliban-controlled areas.

Frédéric Lagrange

After three days of driving with a guide, Lagrange reached the border. The army officer at the border told him that he was the first foreigner to cross that year.

Frédéric Lagrange

He was greeted by his guide Adab (left, with Lagrange), a 23-year-old Afghani boy. Adab warned him of the dangerous reality of his life, saying that "If the Taliban ever comes to power [in Wakhan], I will probably be one of the first to be executed, having been around Westerners."

Frederic Lagrange


See the rest of the story at Business Insider

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Much of Russia is blanketed in sunlight nearly 24 hours a day this time of year — here's what it looks like at every hour


          Afghanistan has an unbelievably beautiful hidden region untouched by war — here's what it looks like      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Afghanistan

  • While much of Afghanistan has been roiled by near constant war since the American invasion in 2001, there are parts of the country that are still untouched by war.
  • The Wakhan Corridor is a narrow strip of land in the far northeast of Afghanistan, bordering China, Tajikistan, and Pakistan. 
  • New York photographer Frédéric Lagrange fufilled a lifelong dream in 2012 by visiting the remote region. He found that it was even more beautiful than he imagined.

In the late 1990s, New York-based photographer Frédéric Lagrange became obsessed with traveling to Afghanistan’s Wakhan Corridor after reading "A Short Walk In The Hindu Kush," English writer Eric Newby’s travelogue of his adventures in the area.

He made plans to visit, but then 9/11 happened, and the American invasion quashed any plans. The trip was too dangerous.

In 2012, with the war cooling down, Lagrange finally made the trip he had been dreaming about.

The Wakhan Corridor is a narrow strip of land in the far northeast of Afghanistan, bordering Tajikistan, Pakistan, and Western China. The harsh, beautiful landscape, bounded by the Hindu Kush mountains on the south, was once used as a major trading route for those traveling the Silk Road to China.

For three weeks, Lagrange and a team of locals made their way up the Hindu Kush mountains to the shores of Lake Chaqmaqtin. Along the way, Lagrange photographed the local peoples, who survive on the edge of civilization by raising and herding cattle.

He shared some photos from his journey with us, but you can check out the rest at his website

SEE ALSO: Much of Russia is blanketed in sunlight nearly 24 hours a day this time of year — here's what it looks like at every hour

Lagrange began by flying into Dushanbe, Tajikistan, crossing into the Wakhan Corridor by Afghanistan's northeast border. If he traveled from Kabul, he would have had to pass through numerous Taliban-controlled areas.



After three days of driving with a guide, Lagrange reached the border. The army officer at the border told him that he was the first foreigner to cross that year.



He was greeted by his guide Adab (left, with Lagrange), a 23-year-old Afghani boy. Adab warned him of the dangerous reality of his life, saying that "If the Taliban ever comes to power [in Wakhan], I will probably be one of the first to be executed, having been around Westerners."



See the rest of the story at Business Insider


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