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          Auto schade door winkelwagen      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Mijn auto is tegen een winkelwagen aangereden die op de weg beheerloos ligt. Het is gebeurt aan de gambiadreef Utrecht Overvecht voor de deur van mijn moeder.


          MEJO, East Madison Community Center Kids, and Gambian Youths of Wisconsin Go Fishing!      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
On Saturday, July 7, the MEJO Starkweather project team, kids in the East Madison Community Center summer programs, and Gambian Youths of Wisconsin went to the mouth of Starkweather Creek to fish. It was a beautiful day and the fishing was great. Many kids and adults caught a fish or two (mostly panfish, but also a bass and pike!). The kids, many who had never fished before, had a wonderful time and would love to go fishing again. Though some fish were thrown back, 18 panfish were kept. Are these fish safe to eat? Generally speaking, the small panfish in Lake Monona are low in contaminants (mercury, PCBs) compared to larger fish. General Wisconsin statewide fish consumption advisories recommend one panfish meal a week for women of childbearing age and children under 15, and there are no consumption restrictions for women over 50 and all adult men. It is good that the state issues advisories for safe fish consumption. But we believe nobody should have to worry about fish contaminants at all; fish is local, fresh food and fishing is a healthy outdoor activity that connects people to waterways. Our Starkweather EJ team is engaging the community in discussions about pollution affecting the creek—as the largest tributary to Lake Monona, it is one of the main sources of toxic contamination to the lake and its fish. We’re talking with people in the community about their knowledge and concerns about the creek, and their recommendations about how to clean it up so that in the future we can go down to the creek and lake, catch fish, and eat them without any concerns about toxic contaminants. See more photos of our fishing trip below: Oh, the waiting can be so hard… Mack catches the first fish!! Learning to cast… Caught a fish! Touyeng was the “go to” bait man! Counting the catch… Eating pizza after counting the catch (fishing makes you hungry!)    
          The Global Reach Of Gabonese Afro-Zouk Singer Oliver N'goma's Song "Adia" (sound file and selected comments)       Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part pancocojams series that showcases the song "Adia" performed by Gabonese (Central Africa) Afro-Zouk singer and composer Oliver N'goma (also given as Oliver Ngoma).

Part II showcases a sound file of Oliver N'goma performing "Adia" and presents selected comments from that sound file's discussion thread, with a particular focus on comments from a number of African nations as well as comments from some other nations worldwide.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/07/gabonese-singer-oliver-ngoma-adia-part.html for Part I of this series . Part II presents information about Gabon and information about Oliver N'goma. Part I of this series also showcase a sound file of the song as well as three versions of this song's lyrics (in its original language from Gabon+ French; in English, and in French).

****
The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Oliver N'goma for his musical legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post. And thanks to the producer of this video and thanks to the publisher of this song file on YouTube.

****
SHOWCASE EXAMPLE: Oliver Ngoma...ADIA



jennithony, Published on Apr 19, 2008

4,065,894 total # of views [as of July 10, 20181; 12:51 AM EDT]

total # of likes 10K

total # of dislikes 608

total # of comments- 1,056

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS SOUND FILE'S DISCUSSION THREAD
Most of these selected comments identify the nation that the commenter is in or is from.

These comments are given in relative chronological order, except for replies. English translations by Google Translates are given under comments. Numbers are added for referencing purposes only.

This compilation doesn't include all of the comments from that discussion thread which identified a geographical place. However, after reading that entire discussion thread to date, I attempted to include at least one comment from every nation that was cited. My apologies if I inadvertently omitted a nation that was cited in that discussion.

1. asadraza5367, 2009
"I remember this song, when i was living in the Caribbean from 1999-2001. It was played a lot at the dance clubs there, along with his other songs like Fely and Bane."

**
2. Linje Manyozo
"i remember one radio dj playing this song often on radio mbc in malawi. very popular..and ngoma sounds like a malawian name anyway.."

**
3. dorlika, 2010
"this is pure african musique you feel the heart of africa by listening to this , i remember i was very young when this came out but it still rock , every single country of africa knows this song"

**
4. Domsta333, 2010
"RIP RIP RIP Olivier Ngoma! King of African Zouk!"

**
5. Aminah K., 2010
"ça me rappelle mon pays, le Sénégal!!!! Okhooooooo!!!!"
-snip-
"it reminds me of my country, Senegal !!!! Okhooooooo !!!!"

**
6. charleslester assoumou, 2010
"Que de bons souvenirs , quelle musique, un salut a partir de Montréal, Québec, Canada"
-snip-
"What good memories, what music, a salute from Montreal, Quebec, Canada "

**
7. ibara gaston, 2010
"congolese people respect you , forever in our mind , one of the big left us rest in peace ibaragaston from paris"

**
8. TheDarinelo, 2010
"Angolan peaple cry for you oliver ngoma R.I.P"

**
9. monace Productions, 2010
"im from mz.. and im telling you it is still a hit here =)
i love this guy"
-snip-
“mz”= probably Mozambique

**
10. cturiel, 2010
"Quel perte pour la musique africaine, puisses tu seulement reposer en paix l'ami ! Au paradis des musiciens ou tu te trouves maintenant tu nous as fait vibrer au son de ton afro zook tellement international. Cela fait plaisir de voir tous ces messages de condoléances affluer de partout dans le monde et cela prouve si il en était besoin que ton sound à su transcender les frontières...et les couleurs de peau !!! Pour sûr les enfants auront droit à Bane et Adia en boucle ce soir à la case :-) !!!"
-snip-
"What a loss for African music, can you only rest in peace the friend! In the paradise of the musicians where you are now you made us vibrate to the sound of your afro zook so international. It is nice to see all these messages of condolence pouring in from all over the world and that proves if it was necessary that your sound knew to transcend the borders ... and the colors of skin !!! For sure the children will be entitled to Bane and Adia loop this evening to the box :-)!"

**
11. Daryl Richardson, 2010
"in the caribbean too, we love us some Oliver N' gouma"

**
12. TimF, 2011
"I was clueless of his passing away. His video accidently popped out of a query I was conducting. Being one of his countless endearing fans, I went on to play the video miles away from expecting the awful news that was about to leave me speechless. When one resides within the U.S., one's completely shut off from the outside world!
Thankfully he left us with a cluster of perennial masterpieces and a beautiful voice that will never cease to marvel us. May GOD welcome him with open arms!!"

**
13. Gaira Alhadi, 2011
"Noli, you went too soon, but God knows best and may light perpetual shine upon you...Your music will live on forever, Love from Sierra Leone."
-snip-
"Noli" is Oliver N'goma's nickname.

**
14. eliott jonath, 2011
"olivier ngoma est le plus celebre artist d'afro zouk pour les mauriciens! repose en paix!!"
-snip-
"olivier ngoma is the most famous Afro zouk artist for the Mauritians! rest in peace!!"

**
15. Al-Jean J. Sauray, 2012
"Nice, the beat reminds me of the Konpa from Haiti and Martinique -- Nice, Love it1"

**
16. Willy E. Victoria Ramírez, 2012
"I like this song, great music. I am listen from dominican republic. Me gusta esta cancion, gran musica. estoy escuchando desde republica dominicana."
-snip-
Spanish to English translation : "Me gusta esta cancion, gran musica. estoy escuchando desde republica dominicana" = "I like this song, great music. I'm listening from the Dominican Republic."

**
17. JOHNWISLY OFFICIAL, 2012
"I like this song it makes me go crassy wisly am listening it in Belgium [ ik vind de lied heel heel super
-snip-
Dutch to English translation = "ik vind de lied heel heel super" = "I find the song very whole"

**
18. Alix, 2012
"that afro music that some of us youngn's grew up hearing :) (SOUTH AFRICA)"

**
19. Patra Okelo, 2012
"im 2o years old from sudan grew up in nairobi kenya and i listened to tjis song every tuesday it never missed the countdow it feel like im hearing it for the first time.....i love love this one..."

**
20. gyler972, 2013
"Je suis antillaise et j'ai dansé et vibré sur les sons de ce grand Monsieur à la voix pleine de sensibilité.J'avoue apprécié d'avantage l'afro zouk (Monique Séka etc...)au zouk purement antillais.INOUBLIABLE! Oliver ngoma.Paix à son âme.Merci pour les émotions qu'il nous a donner."

**
21. gyler972, 2013
"I am West Indian and I danced and vibrated on the sounds of this great gentleman with a voice full of sensitivity. I have enjoyed more afro zouk (Monique Séka etc ...) zouk purely antillais.INOUBLIABLE! Oliver ngoma.Peace to his soul.Thanks for the emotions he gave us."

**
22. Anibal DaSilva, 2013
"Noli, we Cape Vedeans love you. Rest in Peace!
Paz a tua alma!"
-snip-
Portuguese to English translation: "Paz a tua alma!" = "Peace to your soul!"

**
23. MrKoolvictor, 2013
"Manu Lima a Capeverdian producer helped with the tracks. Great music. viva Afrika"

**
24. sami guelawe Palm, 2013
"la musique africaine en general te donne la chaire de poule. comme un sage à tes cotés. très éducative en general la musique afrique; on se diverti mais éducative. Le journalisme africain est notre musique. Très sociale e éducative. chaque matin, nous écoutons nos journaux à travers ces chanteurs qui nous donnent beaucoup. Bref d'enchainer avec les media et journaux."
-snip-
"African music in general gives you goose bumps. like a wise man by your side. very educational in general music africa; we are entertained but educative. African journalism is our music. Very social and educational. every morning we listen to our newspapers through these singers who give us a lot. In short to chain with the media and newspapers."

**
25. Richardson Mzaidume, 2013
"It's unfortunate that he passed away without having seen him perform live. I'd have paid whatever amount. African politics also revolve around colonial times. As result, us from Anglophone Africa know very little about musicians from Francophone Countries. It's sad but true. Gone too soon!!"

**
26. peace kazungu, 2013
"Rip Ngoma now i talk on behalf of Ugandans even though we don't understand the mean ,but the music so good it sounds ."
-snip-
"Rip" = "Rest in peace"

**
27. kevin wamaya, 2013
"mad respect from KENYA!! my father loved this song so much. it reminds me of the good times we had together"
-snip-
"Mad respect" = an African American Vernacular English phrase meaning "lots of respect"

**
28. joseph mcgill, 2014
"I'm Liberian and a huge zouk fan and noli is my all time zouk favorite. His voice and rhythm gives you an indescribable feeling. Rip noli you sure are missed"

**
29. SuperPeace1970, 2014
"i have no idea what he is saying, however this music is soothing to my soul!! Loving this....from the U.S. Virgin Islands"

**
30. James Gitonga, 2014
"Wish i could turn back the hands of time.Gone are the days.RIP Oliver.
Kenyan in Krefeld,Germany."

**
REPLY
31. Tim Harvey, 2014
"I just feel exactly the same! I'm in Germany too"

**
32. elisabeth tenberge, 2014
"we from Surinam (South America) also knew his songs.
oh man what a rhythm"

**
33. Arturo, 2014
"wwwooooowww que riiiitmo. Supremo. Para bailar y bailar sin parar"
-snip-
Spanish to English translation: "wwwooooowww what riiiitmo. Supreme." = "Wow. What rhythm Supreme. To dance and dance without stopping"

**
34. essenamism
"Cette chanson me rappelle mon enfance au Togo. Je ne peux pas cesser de verser des larmes quand j écouté cette chanson et c est pour cette raison que j écouté rarement cette chanson aujourd'hui . Cette chanson me rappelle les amis d enfance et les rues de Lomé . Tout a changé . Les rues ne sont plus les même . Les amis sont tous mort ou à l étrange ou très pauvre."
-snip-
"This song reminds me of my childhood in Togo. I can not stop shedding tears when I listened to this song and that is why I rarely listened to this song today. This song reminds me of childhood friends and the streets of Lome. Everything changed . The streets are not the same anymore. Friends are all dead or strange or very poor."

**
35. SuperCapuka, 2014
"Boy i was 5 when i used to stay up till 5 am when we had party's at home, and this song remembers me of those days, life in Europe wasnt great but everyone was happy! We didn't had much but we shared among us Africans look at how we are separated now due to litle money! R.I.P Oliver N'Gomma, great songs!"

**
36. Marcos Bile by nze. 2015
"Mi infancia en Gabón"
-snip-
"My childhood in Gabon"

**
37. Nature Isle, 2015
"ahhh memories!!! Oliver's songs always brings me to tears.these good old days will never come back!!"

**
38. embe1, 2015
"Thanks so much! Listened to him as a small boy, didn't know he was from Gabon until right this minute. Always thought he was from Cameroon."

**
39. Léon-Paul BOUNOMBAR, 2015
"je saivas connu Oliver Ngoma dans les années 1977 en classe de 4éme au Lycée Technique National O. Bongo à Libreville. Des années plus tard, j'apprendrai qu'il serait devenu un célèbre musicien. Que son corps repose en paix dans les profondeurs du néant."
-snip-
"I knew Oliver Ngoma in 1977 in 4th class at the O. Bongo National Technical High School in Libreville. Years later, I will learn that he would become a famous musician. May his body rest in peace in the depths of nothingness."

**
40. Lil Mal, 2015
"forget Redsun and the likes.. now this is what i call muuussiiiiiic!!! a kenyan in the UK"

**
41. MySt Justin, 2016
"Nice music make me remember 90s in librevile lovely city"
-snip-
Libreville is the capitol of Gabon.

**
42. Appiah Eric, 2016
"I'm Ghanaian but I like Adia, a song by Oliver Ngoma"

**
43. yashouberry, 2016
"Mauritius? someone? ok im alone,,"

**
44. lapologang semong, 2016
"Am from Botswana and i love this song very much ,true african music.."

**
45. Bravia muyakane, 2016
"From Nairobi Kenya, Is all about Originality and not faking. I love this piece."

**
46. EL MIMOUNI Abla, 2016
"I am from Morocco and I love this music which make me feel extra happy, dancing like nobody watching ;)"

**
47. henrietta swen, 2016
"I 'm from Liberia, this song make me think on so many things during our civil war."

**
REPLY
48. Ettie Manjo, 2017
"Hello, my family is from Liberia, but I was born in America. I know it was hard back then auntie, but thankfully Liberia is getting better now. My father used to play this song allllll the time, I basically grew up listening to Oliver Ngoma."

**
49. Tawanda Chakupeta, 2016
"I'm a zimbo this music is good"
-snip-
My guess is that "Zimbo" means "Zimbabwe; "a person from Zimbabwe".

**
50. Ghuma Bama, 2016
"when i hear this Song i remenber my wonderfull childhood in Angola:) granda queta. ..😎"

**
51. loise mbaye, 2016
"am loise from kenya this song is awesome even if i dont understand the words it makes me feel so relaxed"

**
52. Gaelle M, 2016
"Mon enfance à Saint-Martin! jusqu'à mtn je l'entends. Une belle étoile qui nous a laissé de merveilleuses chansons qu'on n'oubliera jamais! R.I.P grand Monsieur"
-snip-
"My childhood in Saint-Martin! until I hear it. A beautiful star who has left us wonderful songs we will never forget! R.I.P tall gentleman"

**
53. Katongole Paulinho II, 2016
"anyone from Uganda here??"

**
REPLY
54. Roland Ainembabazi, 2016
"+Katongole Paulinho II Here iam.. i love the song so much, it just reminds me of how Wonderful African classics are, and above all of how African music is real music"

**
55. Prémices Lw, 2016
"who listen this in April 2016 like me ? vieux bons souvenirs!"
-snip-
"vieux bons souvenirs" = "old good memories"

**
REPLY
56. Priscah Wairimu, 2017
"Prémices Lwanzo am listening 2017 April😂love love Oliver ngoma songs though can't understand but i do enjoy. ...From Kenya👌"

**
REPLY
57. Cathrine Ntore, 2018
"Priscah Wairimu still listening December 2017 I so love Oliver Ngoma thought I was the only one from Kenya"

**
58. Esperanza Dias, 2017
"tolle musik höre ich mir fast täglich an und die anderen Songs auch.Andenken an früher in einer Disco in Strasbourg.merci pour ca"
-snip-
German to English translation = "I listen to great music almost every day and the other songs too. Remembering at a disco in Strasbourg.merci pour ca"

**
59. Marie Sambou, 2017
"love from Gambia :) :) :) :) :) : ) :) :) :)"

**
60. Essy Mirembe, 2017
"I really love and appreciate how a song can brew so much love and unity among us all...... God bless Africa...Rip Mr.Oliver Ngoma

**
61. N Jame, 2017
"One love to mother Africa!"

**
62. Masaba Masaba, 2017
"Am still loving Oliver Music ..Here in Uganda Kampala"

**
63. Owen Sampule, 2018
"Gabonese People please translate for us. It will make pipo enjoy the music even more."
-snip-
Lyrics for this song can be found by clicking http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/07/gabonese-singer-oliver-ngoma-adia-part.html (Part I of this pancocojams series).

**
64. 20x5 lao atr, 2017
"Merci, enfin la traduction d'une chanson très populaire en Nouvelle-Calédonie ! Thanks so much ;)"
-snip-
"Thank you, finally the translation of a very popular song in New Caledonia! Thanks so much;)"

[Note: That comment was written to a commenter who posted the French translation of "Adia"'s lyrics]

**
65. Edith Hoff, 2017
"edith from atlanta love this song .rest in peace oliver"
-snip-
Atlanta= Atlanta, Georgia [United States]

**
66. FATOU AWA THIAM, 2017
"Je suis Sénégalaise et j'adore cette chanson. Elle me rappelle mon premier jour d'école.
-snip-
"I am Senegalese and I love this song. She reminds me of my first day of school."

**
67. Abudushakulu Damulira, 2017
"Namibia windhoek city live"

**
68. TheSushiraw, 2017
"thumbs up from, NORWAY..."

**
69. My Dental Wig, 2017
"OMG! I danced this song at AFRO-Antillaise parties in FRANCE! Damn!!!!! Cette Terre sait ouvrir sa bouche et engloutir des vies!!!! Suis speechless d'apprendre qu'Olover N'Goma est decede depuis Juillet 2010 et nous sommes le 28 decembre 2016! Repose en paix l'Artiste!"
-snip-
..."This Earth knows how to open its mouth and swallow lives !!!! Am speechless to learn that Olover N'Goma has died since July 2010 and we are on December 28, 2016! Rest in peace the Artist!"

**
70. Chris4, 2017
"Composition et Interprétation: Oliver N'GOMA (Gabon)
Programmation et Arrangements: Manu LIMA (Cap Vert)
Deux génies de la musique africaine 😃"
-snip-
"Composition and Interpretation: Oliver N'GOMA (Gabon)
Programming and Arrangements: Manu LIMA (Cape Verde)
Two geniuses of African music 😃"

**
71. SuperCapuka, 2017
"When your kid asks for good and beautiful African music, here is a place to start!"

**
72. mara louna, 2017
"Africa Africa Africa i love you"

**
73. Matheus Nkandanga
"I'm from Namibia, I may not understand the language used in this music but it carries some African rhythms and lyrics. RIP Ngoma"

**
74. fredy adam, 2017
"He was a King, Genius and most of all he was our own brother.... everytime i hear this song my heart gets peace."

**
75. Natasha Washaya, 2017
"very nice song to dance along to on a wedding, will still have it on mine, it will never get outdated"

**
76. Unicornfan 246, 2018
"love from togo✊❤💛💚😄"

**
77. simon creevo, 2018
"Je kiffe trop. Ici Comores"
-snip-
"je kiffe"= French slang from Arabic; "Je Kiffe trop" = I really enjoy it.

**
78. OTHMANE MAJOR, 2018
"je suis de Maroc souvenir inoubliable merci infiniment"
-snip-
"I am from Morocco unforgettable memory thank you very much"

**
79. Rony Paul, 2018
"Afro-zouk! We truly miss you Mr Oliver N'goma..."

**
80. Rodgers Gasper, 2018
"am from TANZANIA just by listening this song made my day well."

**
81. Sophia Youboty, 2018
"Rip my African brother Oliver n Goma..love from U.S.A. 😂😂😂😂😂😂😂"

**
82. mohamed hussien, 2018
"i am from Ethiopia and I love this song he is songs"

**
83. Marliq Kigozi, 2018
"This reminds of my early years when everything was real ,life was more simpler and music was real and even people were real can't get enough of this song"

****
This concludes this two part pancocojams series.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.his is a nice african song,from Gabon, I love this song
          Nigeria gets commendation for training other African lawyers      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Nigerian government has been applauded for providing legal manpower training for law students from the Republic of Gambia, Sierra Leone and the Republic of Cameroon. Director General, Nigerian Law School, Professor Isa Hayatu Chiroma gave the commendation during the 2018 Call to the Nigerian Bar Ceremony in Abuja, Nigeria. Professor Chiroma also added that […]

The post Nigeria gets commendation for training other African lawyers appeared first on Voice of Nigeria.


          Gambia:Football House Discussing Fate of Gambian Ref Banned for 10 Yrs      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] Gambia Football Federation are set to meet over the fate of referee Ebrima Jallow slapped with a 10-year ban by Confederation of African Football (CAF).
          Gambia:Cricket - Ports Authority Grab Knockout Cup, Get D20,000 Richer      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] Gambia Ports Authority (GPA) defeated Wallidan by three wickets in the 2018 cricket knockout final, Saturday 7th July, at Mc Carthy Square in Banjul.
          Roma: aggredisce autista Cotral, arrestato 23enne del Gambia      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Roma – Talenti: aggredisce autista Cotral della linea Guidonia-Roma in via Ettore Romagnoli Interruzione di pubblico servizio, resistenza e lesioni a pubblico ufficiale, i reati per i quali un cittadino del Gambia di 23 anni è finito in manette. Il giovane mentre si trovava a bordo di un pullman Cotral della linea Guidonia-Roma, ha iniziato […]
          Gambia:Football House Discussing Fate of Gambian Ref Banned for 10 Yrs      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] Gambia Football Federation are set to meet over the fate of referee Ebrima Jallow slapped with a 10-year ban by Confederation of African Football (CAF). Reported by allAfrica.com 2 hours ago.
          Remittance rip-offs      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

All over the world migrant workers are sending money home to their families. The money pays hospital bills and school fees, buys land, builds houses and sets up small businesses. The cash goes from the US back to Mexico, from the Gulf back to India, from the UK back to Somalia, and from South Africa back to Malawi, Zimbabwe and the rest of southern Africa. 

But what these workers probably do not realize, since they usually only ever send to one country, is that the cost of sending money varies greatly. Now a study of the cost of remittances, carried out by London's Overseas Development Institute with support from the fund-raising charity Comic Relief, has revealed that transfers to African countries cost around half as much again as the global average, and twice as much as transfers to Latin America. 

The ODI estimates that if remittance charges were brought down to the world average, the money saved could educate an extra 14 million primary school children, half of all those currently out of school on the continent.

The bulk of this money goes through money transfer companies rather than banks, since the recipients are unlikely to have bank accounts, and transfer companies are quick, efficient and have a wide network of agents. But just two big international players dominate the business in Africa, Moneygram and Western Union, and participants in a meeting to launch the research were highly critical of the way they seemed to be abusing their market dominance.

Rwanda's High Commissioner in London, Williams Nkurunziza, said he was shocked at what the report revealed. “If you look at the remittances, 30 or 40 percent of the money that goes to Africa goes to rural areas,” he said. “This money goes to the people who are most needy, and you are allowing a multinational corporation to take bread out of the mouth of hungry children. This is not what I would call responsible capitalism!”

Glenys Kinnock, opposition spokesman on International Development in the upper house of the UK parliament, who chaired the meeting, called on the country's financial regulatory authority to intervene over the issue of excessive charges. “It is not a technocratic issue,” she said, “although it may sound like one. It is also about people's lives and the future of their children... These things have to change. We can't put up any longer with the prospect of its making things so difficult, very often impossible, for people who have such needs.”

At the end of last year, when the ODI did its research, the fees and charges to send money to most of Africa were around 12 percent - a bit less to Zambia or Tanzania, a bit more to Uganda, Malawi and the Gambia - against a world average of just over 8 percent. Even that is quite expensive; the governments of the G8 and G20 countries have pledged themselves to working towards reducing this to 5 percent.

It found that in more than 30 countries the two big players had more than 50 percent of the market; and in 10 countries they had more than 90 percent. Sometimes either Moneygram or Western Union had an effective monopoly, but even where both companies were present it did not necessarily mean that customers had much choice; one company could still have a monopoly of outlets in a particular area, and the companies habitually make their paying-out agents sign contracts promising not to also act as agents for their rivals. 

Somalia different

Significantly, the one country where the big two are absent - Somalia - has far lower remittance charges; transfers go through a number of smaller, competing companies.

Competition has been limited by the fallout from the US “war on terror”, with the banks who do bulk international transfers citing money-laundering and anti-terrorism regulations as the reason they are reluctant to extend facilities to smaller companies. Now only the biggest of the Somali companies, Dahabshiil, still has an account with a major British bank (Barclays) and even that concession was forced by a court case and is only until other arrangements can be put in place.

Inter-Africa transfers cost most

But if charges to send money to Africa from outside are steep, the cost of sending money from one African country to another can be eye-watering. 

Dilip Ratha, who works on these issues for the World Bank says exchange controls are one of the reasons the rates are so high; in some places sending money out of the country is illegal. “So if you are sending money,” he says, “let's say from Benin to Ghana, it is actually allowed (in some countries it's not even allowed) but first the CFA has to be passed through into euros or sterling or dollars, and then it has to be transferred back into the local cedi, and in both cases you pay commission. Some sort of regional currency market really needs to be created.” 

"So if you are sending money, let's say from Benin to Ghana, it is actually allowed (in some countries it's not even allowed) but first the CFA has to be passed through into euros or sterling or dollars, and then it has to be transferred back into the local cedi, and in both cases you pay commission. Some sort of regional currency market really needs to be created"  

The report found 10 routes with bank transfer charges over 20 percent. Charges from Nigeria to Ghana were 22 percent. To send from Tanzania to the rest of East Africa, or from South Africa to its near neighbours is particularly expensive, peaking at 25 percent for bank transfers between South African and Malawi. Some of the fees charged by money transfer companies are even higher; if you send money that way from Ghana to Nigeria you may have to pay a staggering 39 percent.

In some places mobile phone based systems like M-Pesa have made in-country transfers much easier and cheaper, but they haven't really taken off internationally, largely because conservative, inflexible regulatory systems insist that all international transfers must go through conventional banks. And African banks tend to have very high charges, often because they are forced by governments to finance government projects or make uncommercial loans. 

Chukwuemeka Chikezie of the Up Africa consultancy told IRIN a lot of the responsibility lay with African governments. “One of the reasons M-Pesa took off in Kenya was because the authorities nurtured and enabled innovation. If you look at other countries the regulators have tended to stifle innovation. They are very risk-averse and they don't enable even limited experiments to prove that the markets can absorb technical innovation.”

In addition, money-laundering regulations are putting impossible demands on systems designed to serve the poor, requiring, for instance, “know your customer” procedures like taking copies of ID documents for anyone receiving an international payout. Selma Ribica of M-Pesa points out this is an impossibility for agents in rural areas with no power supply. She told IRIN she would like to see a more realistic, tiered approach with much lighter regulation for small international transfers (under, say, US$200-300) which are most unlikely to have anything to do with money laundering.

Beware Facebook, Walmart

M-Pesa depends on moving money between different customers' mobile phone accounts. Now people are beginning to think of other kinds of electronic “purses” which might be linked in the same way. 

Facebook has just proposed allowing transfers between customers who have accounts with the company which they normally use to make payments for online games. So far this is only proposed for payments within the European Union, but Facebook has a huge geographical spread and has said it is keen to extend its reach in Africa. 

And the big profits made by the transfer companies are tempting other players into the market. The latest to announce it is starting money transfers is the US supermarket chain Walmart, with recipients being able to pick up their cash from any shop in the chain. To start with this will only work within the United States and Puerto Rico, but Walmart is an international group with nearly 350 stores in South Africa, and it also has a presence in Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, Malawi and Mozambique, opening up the tempting prospect of a new, and cheaper way for workers to send money home.

All these new ways of sending money aim to undercut Moneygram and Western Union. Now Western Union has responded by offering so-called “zero-fee” transfers to Africa if the money is sent from a bank account rather by credit card or cash. This would mean a saving of just under £5 ($8.40) for someone sending $100 from the UK to Liberia. The company would still make money (nearly $4) by using a favourable exchange rate, but it would bring the cost down to just below the G8/G20 target. 

For African's hard-pressed and hard-working migrants and their families back home, change may - finally - be on the way.

eb/cb

99977 201404221522570983.jpg Feature Politics and Economics Remittance rip-offs IRIN LONDON Angola Burkina Faso Burundi Benin Botswana DRC Congo, Republic of Côte d’Ivoire Cameroon Colombia Cape Verde Djibouti Eritrea Ethiopia Gabon Ghana Gambia Guinea Equatorial Guinea Guinea-Bissau Kenya Liberia Lesotho Morocco Madagascar Mali Mauritania Mauritius Malawi Mozambique Namibia Niger Nigeria Rwanda Seychelles Sudan Sierra Leone Senegal Somalia Sao Tome and Principe eSwatini Chad Togo Tanzania Uganda Samoa South Africa Zambia Zimbabwe
          Welcoming Vice President Ousainou Darboe      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

By Madi Jobarteh Building The New Gambia: Welcoming Vice President Ousainou Darboe I wish to congratulate Ousainou Darboe for his appointment as the Vice President of the Republic, becoming the second person to hold that position since our newfound democracy within one and half years. In congratulating Ousainou, I must say his assumption of this high [...]

The post Welcoming Vice President Ousainou Darboe appeared first on GAINAKO.


          Barrow Administration 1st Quarter (January-April 2018) Variance (Expenditure) Report      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

The Gambia: Barrow Administration 1st Quarter (January-April 2018) Variance (Expenditure) Report The Government of The Gambia has for the 1st time (at least to the best of my knowledge), publicly produced a variance (expenditure) report on the 1st quarter (January-April) of 2018.   This is GOOD! A good democratic government ought to report to the sovereign people [...]

The post Barrow Administration 1st Quarter (January-April 2018) Variance (Expenditure) Report appeared first on GAINAKO.


          West Africa gears up to contain Ebola spread      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

As the Ebola caseload rises to over 5,350, aid agencies and governments in countries not yet affected by the deadly virus are gearing up for its potential spread across new borders by pre-positioning supplies, training health workers, identifying isolation centres, and disseminating prevention campaign messages, among other activities.

Countries that share a land border with the affected countries, including Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea Bissau, and Mali, are considered to be most at risk.

"It is vitally important that, countries - especially surrounding countries that don't have Ebola cases as of yet - are prepared for a worst case scenario," said Pieter Desloovere, a spokesperson for the World Health Organization (WHO).

In August, WHO issued an Ebola Response Roadmap to help countries across the region limit the spread of the virus. One of its three objectives is to strengthen the ability of all countries to detect and deal with any potential cases.

"The reason that Ebola started in Guinea and has since spread to Liberia and other countries is that no one was paying attention," said Grev Hunt, the UN Children's Fund's (UNICEF's) sub-regional coordinator for the Ebola outbreak. "We were caught unaware. But now, we are paying very close attention to what is going on and making sure the same thing won't happen again."

Unlike in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, where response plans and training materials had to be created from scratch, UNICEF is now replicating those resources and giving them to neighbouring countries, saving time and effort.

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) says they have put in place Ebola preparedness and response activities in 11 countries across West Africa, and many local and international NGOs have been pre-positioning medical supplies, training health workers and educating the public.

"Failing to plan is actually planning to fail," said Unni Krishnan, the head of disaster preparedness and response for Plan International. "And we know from previous disasters that a dollar you put towards preparedness... tends to save thousands, even hundreds of thousands, of lives."

Preparedness funds

Key to prevention and preparedness in at-risk countries is having access to timely funding, said the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). Senegal currently has US$5.7 million at the ready to use towards Ebola preparation and prevention.

Mali has around $3.6 million and Côte d'Ivoire $2.9 million. In Guinea Bissau, where the health system is extremely weak, only $800,000 is currently available for Ebola-related activities. "It's quite a fragile situation right now," said Daniel Sanha, a communication officers for the Guinea Bissau Red Cross. "We have a contingency plan in place, but the Red Cross still has no funds to implement any Ebola intervention activities. At the same time, the government doesn't have enough funds or equipment to take all the necessary precautions."

Mass public education campaigns

National media campaigns, including radio shows, TV programmes and other on-air broadcasts, are now under way in all sub-regional countries to educate people about Ebola and give them enough information to protect themselves, as well as to prevent rumours and misunderstandings from spreading.

"This is the first time we have had an Ebola outbreak in West Africa and part of the challenge we are facing is that people have no idea what the disease actually is or how it is spread," Desloovere said.

Volunteers in Senegal, Mali, Côte d'Ivoire and Guinea-Bissau are handing out pamphlets and flyers door to door, as well as posting them in public areas. Social media platforms, including Facebook and Twitter, along with text messages to mobile phone subscribers, are being used by Health Ministries and aid agencies to transmit information and to remind people to practise safe hygiene measures, and to go to a clinic if they detect symptoms.

UNICEF says the messages, which have all been approved by the Ministries of Health, are transmitted in local languages and in culturally appropriate ways. Rather than urging families not to bury their dead in the traditional way, for instance, aid agencies work with communities to find a safer burial procedure that both are comfortable with.

"Our message is very simple," said Buba Darbo, the head of disaster management for the Gambian Red Cross. "Don't touch a sick person, don't touch a dead body. If everyone follows this advice they will prevent themselves from getting Ebola."

Some messaging specifies that people should avoid shaking hands as a gesture of greeting.

Aid agencies have also begun working with religious leaders and local community leaders to spread messages about what to do, and not do, in case of possible Ebola infections.

Health worker training

Doctors and nurses across the region are being trained to spot possible cases, as well as to follow protocol for reporting suspected cases, how to prevent any further contamination and how to protect themselves.

"Educating and protecting our health workers is a top priority," said Ibrahima Sy, a grants manager and health expert with the Open Society Initiative of West Africa (OSIWA). "We need to put at their disposal all the materials they need to avoid contamination, and arm them with the information they need to avoid further spread of this virus."

In Côte d'Ivoire, for example, the Red Cross has been conducting staged simulations of Ebola cases, so that health workers know exactly what to do if they encounter a suspected case.

"We hope Ebola never comes here, but if a case were to be declared today, with the emergency health system we have in place, we are ready to take charge of it," said Franck Kodjo, the communications officer for Côte d'Ivoire's Red Cross. "All the actors, from the Ministry of Health to the local volunteers, we are prepared to take it on."

Other countries, such as The Gambia, have been training healthcare workers on how to handle the dead bodies of suspected cases.

Thus far over 300 health workers in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone have contracted Ebola, according to WHO.

Specialized prevention and response teams

To help coordinate prevention efforts and put such measures in place, many countries have created multi-sectorial committees to implement the measures. Senegal's National Crisis Committee, for example, now has a 10-committee unit dedicated to Ebola prevention and containment. They have been working with the Ministry of Health and other key partners, including the Senegalese Red Cross and WHO, to engage in activities such as resource mobilization, media and communication, surveillance, logistics, security and clinical care. The Gambia has a similar seven-committee Ebola response unit, which works alongside the government and various health partners and NGOs to implement prevention measures.

Pre-positioning materials

Items such as soap, chlorine, gloves, disinfectant materials, medicines, medical equipment, and hygiene kits are being stocked in countries across the region. In Mali, protection kits have also been given to some of the volunteers who are involved in contact tracing and mass education campaigns.

Identifying isolation and treatment centres

Some treatment centres and isolation units in at-risk countries have been pre-identified, but not in sufficient numbers, say aid agency staff.

Cameroon now has isolation centres and laboratories in selected hospitals throughout the country, as well as a quarantine zone in the Southwest Region of the country, near the Nigerian border. The Gambia has also established three Ebola treatment centres: one in the greater Banjul area, the second in the country's "middle belt", and the third in the far east. Senegal has established an isolation unit and has testing facilities at its Institute Pasteur, as do the Institute Pasteur in Côte d'Ivoire and laboratories in Mali. Guinea-Bissau has not yet identified isolation units.

Border closings and surveillance measures

Despite strong recommendations by WHO not to close borders, or to restrict travel to or from the affected countries, seven African countries have decided not to allow anyone from an Ebola-affected country in or out. Senegal and Côte d'Ivoire, for example, have shut all land, sea and air borders with Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Guinea Bissau has closed its land borders with Guinea, and Guinea, in an attempt to contain the outbreak, has shut its land borders with Sierra Leone and Liberia. Cameroon has also closed its land and air borders with Nigeria though refugees fleeing Boko Haram attacks have been crossing the border.

All countries in the sub-region now have health workers posted at all main border crossings and points of entry, including the airports, where incoming travellers are screened for Ebola-like symptoms.

In Nigeria, where 21 cases have been confirmed, health workers are also going around communities to check people's temperatures and seek out the sick. Many schools, shops and restaurants now have handwashing stations set up outside their doors.

"It has become an everyday sight to see temperature-taking devices both at major border crossings, as well as hospitals and offices," said O. Nwakpa, of the Nigerian Red Cross. "They take our temperature and give you hand sanitizer each time you enter a building."

In Mauritania, not only do incoming travellers go through health checks, but outgoing travellers do as well, as the capital, Nouakchott, is considered a "last stop" before Europe.

Many communities in border areas most at risk have also created neighborhood watch programmes, in which people are encouraged to report anyone who shows Ebola-like symptoms.

Countries, such as Burkina Faso and Senegal, have set up toll-free numbers for people to call and report suspected cases.

Restricting public gatherings

To avoid potential bodily contact, many countries, such as The Gambia, have restricted or prohibited large public gatherings.

In Burkina Faso, the government has cancelled important high-level meetings, including the African Union Employment and Poverty Reeducation conference, which was scheduled to be held in the first week of September.

NGOs and health volunteers across the region say they have stopped performing educational theatre sketches on Ebola for fear of encouraging crowds to gather.

jl/bo/aj/cb

100645 201407311238290807.jpg News Health West Africa gears up to contain Ebola IRIN DAKAR/OUAGADOUGOU Burkina Faso Benin Côte d’Ivoire Cameroon Cape Verde Gabon Ghana Gambia Guinea Equatorial Guinea Guinea-Bissau Liberia Mali Mauritania Niger Nigeria Sierra Leone Senegal Sao Tome and Principe Chad Togo Samoa West Africa Africa
          Arrestato per tentato stupro il 28enne del Gambia che girava nudo a Grottaferrata      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
E’ rinchiuso nel carcere a Regina Coeli e stavolta per tentato stupro M.D.D., il 28enne gambiano che il 26 giugno scorso a Squarciarelli era stato arrestato a piede libero dai carabinieri per avere inveito violentemente contro di loro ed altre persone, denudandosi poi e vagando in costume adamico tra le auto in sosta, mettendosi addirittura […]
          Preview: Local Fulbright Scholar's Doc Sounds Alarm on Global Refugee Crisis and Rising Fascism      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A local filmmaker who was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship in 2015 to live with refugees in Sicily is screening her documentary, "Fata Morgana," at the Main Library of the Richmond Public Library on Monday, July 23.

Jen Lawhorne, who received a masters in film studies from Virginia Commonwealth University, lived for a year in Sicily and says that she hopes to educate the public on problems facing refugees in Europe.

The 45-minute documentary, “Fata Morgana,” which roughly translates in Italian to "mirage," was co-produced by Lawhorne and Ebrima and Toumani, two young men from Gambia and Mali trying to establish themselves in the northeast Sicilian city of Messina, who she discovered through a local refugee solidarity group.

As noted in a press release: "The documentary shifts the cinematic gaze over to the eyes of the refugees who filmed more than half of the documentary’s footage."

Lawhorne tells Style that the documentary is a little bit about her experience, why she chose to explore the topic, and mostly about how her life intersects with Toumani and Ebrima. It also covers the return of Italian fascism in the form of the extreme right wing group, La Lega Nord, which shares power in the Italian government.

"It's not a good sign for the future of the European union," she says, noting that she uses visual parallels with the United States and Trump's use of America First (similar to Italy First). "There are a lot of similarities between the refugee crisis there and here," she says.

The filmmaker has covered similar topics before. Her 2009 documentary, “The Little Trip of a Dream,” explored the lives of undocumented kitchen workers in Richmond and what they left behind in Mexico, according to a release. Lawhorne currently works as media specialist for a political advocacy organization, Progress VA, and teaches documentary filmmaking to area young people through ART 180.

She adds that "now is an alarming time with rise of xenophobia and the Republican Party catering to white nationalists." She hopes her film will be a call for people to make an effort to open themselves outward.

"There are millions of people living in really bad situations throughout the world, it's the responsibility of people in more developed countries to figure out ways to help them," she says. "The world is a small place and it doesn't do us any good to close ourselves off to other people."

"It's time for people to reject efforts to close ourselves off to other people. We all live on this planet together and we need to work together to find positive solutions," she says. "If we build walls, we're only making our situation worse for ourselves."

Lawhorne, who is influenced by artists such as Werner Herzog and Ava Duvernay, says she was sitting on the film for a couple years now, but realized with current news events she couldn't wait any longer. There will likely be more local screenings, as well as an online and DVD release.

“Fata Morgana” premieres Monday, July 23 at 6 p.m. at the Main Library of the Richmond Public Library.

          Gambia:Consultation On U.S.$300 Million Rice Value-Chain Project Commences      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] The Islamic Development Bank in collaboration with the Government of the Gambia, have commenced a two day consultative workshop on rice value-chain development in the Gambia. The two day consultative workshop started on Monday July 9th 2018 at a local Hotel in Bijilo.
          Gambia:Lorry Drivers Demand New Leadership for Their Union      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] Hundreds of lorry drivers on Monday paraded in the streets of Banjul asking for the Gambia Transport Control Association's leadership to step down for a new leadership to emerge.
          Gambia:'The Allegation About Janneh Commission Is Unsubstantiated' Attorney General      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] The Attorney General and the Minister of Justice, Hon A. Tambadou in a press conference held in his office in Banjul said the allegation made by Alagie Mamadi Kurang, the Secretary to the Commission of Inquiry probing the financial dealings of ex-president Yahya Jammeh and his associations are unsubstantiated.
          Gambia:At the Court - Martial - Absence of Panel Member Impedes Trial      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] The General Court Martial which presides the case of twelve accused soldiers of the Gambia Armed Forces (GAF), who have been alleged to have planned a coup against the current regime and communicated amongst themselves by creating a 'WhatsApp' group, on Monday July 9th 2018, failed to proceed. The reason given was that one of the experienced member of the panel, was indisposed. Thus, hindering the progress of the court.
          Gambia:New Cabinet Members Sworn in      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] The newly appointed Ministers were yesterday July 9th, sworn in at the State House, barely ten days after a major Cabinet reshuffle was done by the President, Adama Barrow. All the appointed Ministers have taken the prescribed oats of Office, Allegiance and Secrecy, which they swore to implement without fear or favor, affection or ill-will, according to the Constitution and other laws of The Gambia.
          Gambia:At the 'Janneh' Commission - Present, Former GPA MDs Reappear      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] Messers Abdoulie Tambadou, corrent Managing Director of the Gambia Ports Authority and Momodou Lamin Gibba, a former Managing Director, yesterday reappeared before the 'Janneh' Commission in connection to GPA investment on Gam Petroleum.
          Gambia:In the Brikama Murder Incident - Principal Suspect Arrested, Earlier Suspects Released On Bail      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] The Acting Inspector General of the Gambia Police Force, AIGP Mamour Jobe, said the principal suspect in the death of Musa Colley of Brikama, has been arrested while the earlier mentioned suspects have been released on bail. AIGP Jobe made these and other statements in a press briefing held at Police Headquarters on Friday, July 6th.
          Gambia:Faraba Commission Commences Inquiry      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] The Commission of Inquiry into the Faraba incident commenced hearing in public on Monday 9th July 2018 at the Atlantic Hotel in Banjul. Lawyer Emmanuel Joof, the Chairperson of the Commission of Enquiry in his introductory remarks said all the Commissioners were sworn in on the 5th of July 2018 and had since then commenced work.
          TNA podcast - West Africa and the First World War      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
The National Archives (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk) in England has a free to podcast online which may be of interest to those researching the First World War:

West Africa and the First World War
https://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/west-africa-first-world-war/

The First World War had a great impact on West Africa, as Britain ordered the invasion of German colonies in Cameroon and Togoland, using its own colonies as base. The West African Frontier Force, drawn from Sierra Leone, Ghana, Nigeria and Gambia played a key role in the campaign. War had also had a great impact on the civilian population, as the British drew off workers and resources. How did African soldiers experience the campaign, and what did the war mean for West African societies as a whole?

There is a downloadable media file on the page which can also be interacted with as you listen.

Chris

For my genealogy guide books, visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html, whilst details of my research service are at www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk. Further content is also published daily on The GENES Blog Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BritishGENES.
          Cadê o reinício das obras da Ponte Simplício Dias? Por que mentir tanto, governador?!!!      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Fotos do final da tarde de ontem
Com que cara os correligionários e apaniguados do governador W. Dias vão tentar defendê-lo da mentira por ele dita de que nesta segunda-feira (9) seriam retomadas as obras de reforma e recuperação da Ponte Simplício Dias?! Foi sexta-feira passada, quando ele aqui esteve, inclusive lançando uma programação de férias, na Pedra do Sal, à qual não compareceu o público que esperavam, aliás só a comitiva do mesmo.
Mentiroso contumaz, W. Dias escolheu os parnaibanos para iludi-los com promessas e iniciar uma porção de obras, todas inacabadas, sem data para serem concluídas um dia! E o pior é que existem ainda aqueles que não enxergaram ou fingem não enxergar a incompetência deste governo que transformou a administração estadual no “samba do criolodoido”, onde nada funciona e todos querem mandar. E o governador, acometido de uma paixonite aguda pelo presidiário Lula, vive perdendo tempo e gastando dinheiro do contribuinte viajando a Curitiba e São Paulo para dizer que ama o Lula.

Insensível, W. Dias não tem ideia dos transtornos que está causando a paralisação das obras da Ponte sobre a qual ele passou na última sexta-feira. Sequer teve a coragem de andar um pouco mais e visitar as obras de reforma do Complexo Porto das Barcas onde vão gastar 8 milhões para fazer uma “gambiarra” apenas no bloco onde funcionava o Museu do Trem. Como é que um governante, com tamanha incompetência, quer se perpetuar no poder? 
A obra de 8 milhões de reais
Fonte: Blog "o Piolho" 

          Gambia:Yusupha Becomes Third Gambian to Sign in French Ligue1      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
[Foroyaa] Yususpha Njie will enter into the record books after becoming the third Gambian to sign in one of Europe's most coveted leagues -the Ligue 1.
          Preview: Local Fulbright Scholar's Doc Sounds Alarm on Global Refugee Crisis and Rising Fascism      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

A local filmmaker who was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship in 2015 to live with refugees in Sicily is screening her documentary, "Fata Morgana," at the Main Library of the Richmond Public Library on Monday, July 23.

Jen Lawhorne, who received a masters in film studies from Virginia Commonwealth University, lived for a year in Sicily and says that she hopes to educate the public on problems facing refugees in Europe.

The 45-minute documentary, “Fata Morgana,” which roughly translates in Italian to "mirage," was co-produced by Lawhorne and Ebrima and Toumani, two young men from Gambia and Mali trying to establish themselves in the northeast Sicilian city of Messina, who she discovered through a local refugee solidarity group.

As noted in a press release: "The documentary shifts the cinematic gaze over to the eyes of the refugees who filmed more than half of the documentary’s footage."

Lawhorne tells Style that the documentary is a little bit about her experience, why she chose to explore the topic, and mostly about how her life intersects with Toumani and Ebrima. It also covers the return of Italian fascism in the form of the extreme right wing group, La Lega Nord, which shares power in the Italian government.

"It's not a good sign for the future of the European union," she says, noting that she uses visual parallels with the United States and Trump's use of America First (similar to Italy First). "There are a lot of similarities between the refugee crisis there and here," she says.

The filmmaker has covered similar topics before. Her 2009 documentary, “The Little Trip of a Dream,” explored the lives of undocumented kitchen workers in Richmond and what they left behind in Mexico, according to a release. Lawhorne currently works as media specialist for a political advocacy organization, Progress VA, and teaches documentary filmmaking to area young people through ART 180.

She adds that "now is an alarming time with rise of xenophobia and the Republican Party catering to white nationalists." She hopes her film will be a call for people to make an effort to open themselves outward.

"There are millions of people living in really bad situations throughout the world, it's the responsibility of people in more developed countries to figure out ways to help them," she says. "The world is a small place and it doesn't do us any good to close ourselves off to other people."

"It's time for people to reject efforts to close ourselves off to other people. We all live on this planet together and we need to work together to find positive solutions," she says. "If we build walls, we're only making our situation worse for ourselves."

Lawhorne, who is influenced by artists such as Werner Herzog and Ava Duvernay, says she was sitting on the film for a couple years now, but realized with current news events she couldn't wait any longer. There will likely be more local screenings, as well as an online and DVD release.

“Fata Morgana” premieres Monday, July 23 at 6 p.m. at the Main Library of the Richmond Public Library.



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