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          WAREMBO 16 WASUSIA SHINDANO LA MISS BURUNDI 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Ange Bernice Ingabire (kati kati) alituzwa Miss Burundi wa mwaka 2016-2017
Warembo 16, waliokuwa wanashiriki shindano la kumtafuta Miss Burundi wamejiondoa katika hatua ya fainali iliyopangwa kufanyika Julai 21, 2018 na kupelekea shindano hilo kuahirishwa mpaka Julai 28, mwaka huu.


Hali iliyopelekea nchi ya Burundi kuingiwa na hofu kubwa ya kupatikana kwa mlimbwende atakaye iwakalisha nchi hiyo kimataifa kwa mwaka 2018 katika mashindano yenye mlengo wa kuonyesha utamaduni, uweledi na urembo wa mwanamke wa Burundi.


Hata hivyo warembo hao wamefikia maamuzi hayo ya kususia shindano hilo kufuatia madai kuwa shindano la mwaka huu kumefanyika udanganyifu mkubwa upande wa zawadi itakayozawadiwa kwa mshindi wa kwanza na mshindi wa pili.


Ambapo waandaaji wa shindano hilo, Burundi Event hapo awali walitangaza washindi hao kujinyakulia gari, kiwanja chenye mita mraba 400 pamoja na hundi ya pesa taslimum, cha kushangaza ni kwamba walimbwende hao wanadai kuwa hakuna maandalizi yeyote ya zawadi hizo.


Aidha kufuatia mzozo huo wanakamati watano wa shindano hilo waliamua kuchukua uamuzi wa kujiudhulu.
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          #bulgaria - shenbins_official      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
#albania#algeria#argentina#armenia#aruba#australia#austria#azerbaijan#belgium#benin#bulgaria#burundi#canada##china#egypt#ecuador#estonia#fiji#france#gabon#georgia#germany#ghana#greece#india#iran#iraq#ireland#isrand#italy
          #bulgaria - shenbins_official      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
#albania#algeria#argentina#armenia#aruba#australia#austria#azerbaijan#belgium#benin#bulgaria#burundi#canada##china#egypt#ecuador#estonia#fiji#france#gabon#georgia#germany#ghana#greece#india#iran#iraq#ireland#isrand#italy
          Uganda: Uganda: UNHCR Operational Update, June 2018      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda

During the month of June 2018, 8,729 persons from South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Burundi and other countries, arrived in Uganda—the majority from DRC. The humanitarian situation remains unpredictable in South Sudan, DRC and Burundi.

Refugees from South Sudan report fleeing primarily out of fear of being killed by fighters from either side of the conflict inside the country, while those from DRC report inter-ethnic clashes and fears related to the upcoming elections.

Burundians indicate several reasons for leaving their country, related to security concerns and fears around the referendum in Burundi.

Operational Highlights:

A peace agreement was signed in Khartoum, on 27 June, between the government of South Sudan and the opposition leader Riek Machar, which includes a permanent ceasefire, building a national army, improvement of infrastructure and security of the oil fields. The ceasefire is however being threatened by reports of renewed armed hostilities between the two groups, with each reportedly accusing the other of violating the agreement.

UNHCR and partners commemorated World Refugee Day (WRD) in all refugee hosting locations in Uganda. The national celebrations were held in Nakivale, on 20 June, as the settlement was also celebrating 60 years of hosting refugees in Uganda.
The occasion was presided over by the Minister for Disaster Preparedness, Hon.
Hillary Onek. During the occasion, UNHCR handed over 02 vehicles to Isingiro and Kyegegwa Districts to support the capacity of refugee hosting districts as part of CRRF. WRD events in all locations attracted a wide array of representation of government, including district officials and LCs, UN agencies, foreign missions, who joined refugees in the celebrations.

On 17 June a quarrel between refugees in Tika Zone, Rhino camp escalated into an ethnic fight between refugees of Dinka and Nuer communities, claiming the lives of four refugees. The incident caused displacement of families from the village to nearby location. Following the incident and after the fruitless reconciliatory effort by police,
OPM, UNHCR and partners, it was agreed to separate the two communities. 3,390 Nuer refugees were relocated to Omugo zone while Dinka refugees were moved back to Tika village. Following the incident, the UNHCR Representative in Uganda has called on partners to prioritize labour-intensive initiatives to create employment for youth in refugee settlements and adjacent host communities. He characterized failure to attend to the needs of refugee youth as a time bomb, noting that recourse to anti-social behaviour is in large measure the product of lack of opportunities to engage in productive activities.


          Worship Him marches Christian retail into the future      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

Christian retailers went to church Monday night at CBA’s Worship Him service during Unite 2018. CBA’s annual convention is being held July 8-11 at the Gaylord Opryland in Nashville.

Jekalyn Carr (Lunjeal Music/New Day Christian Distributors) kicked off the musical portion of the evening as she reminded participants through the power of song that God is bigger than anything they might face.

With his crowd-pleasing band, Jason Crabb (pictured) continued the theme of expecting big things of God, praying, “Bless us, Lord. Bless us, Lord. Send your presence.” Crabb mentioned his recent CD release, Unexpected (Daywind/New Day Christian), but sang one classic not on the current CD that really roused the crowd, “Working on a Building.” He also gave away a Rahab’s Rope product, which benefits the poor in India.

Sandi Patty brought her resounding voice to the service although she is no longer touring regularly. While she sang a number of favorites, she also played and sang a quieter song, declaring that “Jesus is a faithful friend in the in between,” referring to the “in between seasons” of life. HarperCollins Christian Publishing releases her new book, The Voice, on Nov. 6.

In a welcome by CBA President Curtis Riskey before the music started, he promised that Unite 2018 was “not business as usual.” The service did seem different than usual with the challenge by one key speaker, Eddie Roush, chairman of the Roush Foundation, which gave a million dollars toward CBA member retailers’ show expenses.

Roush, who is also chairman of the CBA Service Corporation, stood with a Bible held high declaring many of the names of God from the Scriptures. When Roush was young, his pastor-father sang “There’s Something About That Name.” He talked of facing troubled times and said God’s Word warned of that ahead of time.

Roush went on to talk about the power of words, to say that Christianity needs to be rebranded and that the Christian products industry needs a dramatic change in its business practices and strategies.

He spoke at length about the fact that there is no such thing as a “Christian business,” but that only people can be Christian: “Can an organization or corporation be born again? The answer is no.”

He talked of the rebranding of Christianity that’s needed because evangelicals have become “especially paranoid.” Christians “seem to be governed by fear.” He added: “We fear change, any change. … Perfect love drives us away from fear.”

A former lawyer, Roush seemed to speak against the Christian baker who recently won his Supreme Court case for not baking a cake for a homosexual couple and against the alliance of believers with right-wing politics. He called out double standards and hypocrisy among Christians and called for compassion rather than cruelty.

“We abuse the name of Jesus for our personal gain,” Roush also said, calling on the industry to become “consumer centric.”

“I never ask God for money,” Roush said. “I ask Him for ideas because God always finances His ideas.”

“I’ve come to interrupt the industry,” Roush declared, reminding attendees of the lyrics to a Stephen Curtis Chapman song, “Saddle up your horses. We’ve got a trail to blaze.”

Keynote speaker Clyde Rivers, a U.S. citizen who is the honorary ambassador at large for the African country of Burundi and founder of iChange Nations, closed the night by saying “there’s nothing bigger than God in this world.” But, he added, “His currency is people. There’s no economic famine. There’s a gift famine.”

Rivers talked of Noah and Enoch receiving radical words from God that changed their generations.

“God wants you to do something different,” Rivers told the audience, calling on retailers to “retake the top, which, he said, is what repentance means. Some attendees responded to his altar call, going forward to be honest with God, repent and leave behind the old in a “spiritual trash can.”

Rivers called CBA “the organization that can reframe the world.”


          CBA Future of the Industry event focuses on world market      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

FutureOfTheIndustry Unite CroppedTuesday morning’s Future of the Industry (FOI) breakfast continued on from the Sunday’s Worship Him themes. But FOI also highlighted CBA’s new emphasis on big, shared data for the Christian retail industry.

Following a musical set by Curt Anderson at the keyboard, CBA President Curtis Riskey introduced the topic of the FOI discussion.

“There isn’t an industry with a more powerful and important message,” the former Christian retailer declared. Focused on the future, Riskey prayed to the “God of new beginnings.”

The new chairman of CBA Service Corp. and chairman of the Roush Foundation, Eddie Roush invited his business partner, Kurt Ruf, and Clyde Rivers, a U.S. citizen who is an honorary ambassador at large for the nation of Burundi, into a living room setting, asking attendees to listen to their “private conversation.”

Roush talked of the Christian products industry as lacking “tools, vision and even the resources” to expand, noting how big the world market is. He asked Rivers if it would even be possible to pair a retail store in the U.S. with a city or region elsewhere to meet the needs of the internationals there. Rivers answered in the affirmative, saying it is possible to “re-store a nation.”

Roush cautioned against a close alignment with American politics and governments, which, he said, “turns off people, including Millennials.”

Rivers shared what life is like in Burundi and how open the people are to Christianity. Christian music is played in the airport he travels to and can be heard in restaurants as well.

Roush said the industry needs to “clean up our act” to be ready for this “global play.”

To do that, Ruf noted the importance of tailoring customer communication, to “differentiate and personalize.” Ruf observed that “the old spray-and-pray days are over” and that the industry must use data as a tool to target customers in a mobile society. Ruf spoke of isolating consumer prospects that align with key values such as “small town sensibility” and the need to continuously clean the data to be sure it is accurate.

Rivers believes that governments are willing to share data “if we can help them meet their needs.” He’s believes reaching the global market is possible.

“Jesus wants to set the narrative for every community in the world,” Rivers said.

Roush said the way forward is about “spreading the Jesus narrative,” not an American-style gospel. He also thinks Americans will benefit from global partnerships that pair particular stores with regions of the world to meet their needs for resources, even older products, and to hear from them as well.

“Who are the voices in those countries who have something to say back here?” Roush said.

Marilyn Hood, who with her husband, Frank, recently closed their Sweet Spirit store, have been coming to CBA for over 30 years. The FOI discussion gave Hood “a real sense of hope” for the future of Christian retail.

“I’m excited about the future of the industry even though we’re transitioning out of it,” Hood said. “If we were starting today, I would be so excited about having a little city in some other country where we would maybe give a little portion of our income, that we would be maybe taking a mission trip with our customers or even through our church or whatever to go visit that little country and get that sisterhood bonding.”

Becky Gorczyca, executive director of the Association of Logos Bookstores, believes that Logos Bookstores are “customer centric” rather than “product centric,” another topic in the FOI discussion.

“Our joy is matching up the need of the customer with the product and helping those people walk closer to the Lord because of the relationship with us, whether it be conversation or product, and also with the product that has prayerfully been developed by authors and publishers,” Gorczyca said. “I think there’s a very big network that the Lord has put together to take His people where they are and expose them to things that are going to help them to grow. He uses authors, He uses publishers, He uses bookstores, He uses staff people, He uses marketing, He uses catalogs, all these kinds of things the Lord uses to reach His people to bring them closer to Him and to grow them. I am very privileged, as all the local stores are, to be part of that plan. And may we be here for many years, and we plan to be, in order to be part of His plan.”

The Logos association had its annual conference just before Unite.

“We at the Logos Bookstores are optimistic and encouraged about the future,” she said. “The theme for our conference this year was based on Micah 6:8, What would the Lord require of us but to do justly, to love mercy and to walk humbly with our God. That is the path that we are going to take, and we think the future is bright if we follow the Lord and walk humbly where He wants us to go. We’re going to continue to reach out to our customers on an individual and relational basis. We’re going to continue to meet customers where they are and often that means that it’s not in our physical stores, but it’s outside of the four walls of our stores. We have been doing that consistently for years, and we’ve decided to ramp that up. We are happy about the future and are looking forward to it.”


          Remittance rip-offs      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   

All over the world migrant workers are sending money home to their families. The money pays hospital bills and school fees, buys land, builds houses and sets up small businesses. The cash goes from the US back to Mexico, from the Gulf back to India, from the UK back to Somalia, and from South Africa back to Malawi, Zimbabwe and the rest of southern Africa. 

But what these workers probably do not realize, since they usually only ever send to one country, is that the cost of sending money varies greatly. Now a study of the cost of remittances, carried out by London's Overseas Development Institute with support from the fund-raising charity Comic Relief, has revealed that transfers to African countries cost around half as much again as the global average, and twice as much as transfers to Latin America. 

The ODI estimates that if remittance charges were brought down to the world average, the money saved could educate an extra 14 million primary school children, half of all those currently out of school on the continent.

The bulk of this money goes through money transfer companies rather than banks, since the recipients are unlikely to have bank accounts, and transfer companies are quick, efficient and have a wide network of agents. But just two big international players dominate the business in Africa, Moneygram and Western Union, and participants in a meeting to launch the research were highly critical of the way they seemed to be abusing their market dominance.

Rwanda's High Commissioner in London, Williams Nkurunziza, said he was shocked at what the report revealed. “If you look at the remittances, 30 or 40 percent of the money that goes to Africa goes to rural areas,” he said. “This money goes to the people who are most needy, and you are allowing a multinational corporation to take bread out of the mouth of hungry children. This is not what I would call responsible capitalism!”

Glenys Kinnock, opposition spokesman on International Development in the upper house of the UK parliament, who chaired the meeting, called on the country's financial regulatory authority to intervene over the issue of excessive charges. “It is not a technocratic issue,” she said, “although it may sound like one. It is also about people's lives and the future of their children... These things have to change. We can't put up any longer with the prospect of its making things so difficult, very often impossible, for people who have such needs.”

At the end of last year, when the ODI did its research, the fees and charges to send money to most of Africa were around 12 percent - a bit less to Zambia or Tanzania, a bit more to Uganda, Malawi and the Gambia - against a world average of just over 8 percent. Even that is quite expensive; the governments of the G8 and G20 countries have pledged themselves to working towards reducing this to 5 percent.

It found that in more than 30 countries the two big players had more than 50 percent of the market; and in 10 countries they had more than 90 percent. Sometimes either Moneygram or Western Union had an effective monopoly, but even where both companies were present it did not necessarily mean that customers had much choice; one company could still have a monopoly of outlets in a particular area, and the companies habitually make their paying-out agents sign contracts promising not to also act as agents for their rivals. 

Somalia different

Significantly, the one country where the big two are absent - Somalia - has far lower remittance charges; transfers go through a number of smaller, competing companies.

Competition has been limited by the fallout from the US “war on terror”, with the banks who do bulk international transfers citing money-laundering and anti-terrorism regulations as the reason they are reluctant to extend facilities to smaller companies. Now only the biggest of the Somali companies, Dahabshiil, still has an account with a major British bank (Barclays) and even that concession was forced by a court case and is only until other arrangements can be put in place.

Inter-Africa transfers cost most

But if charges to send money to Africa from outside are steep, the cost of sending money from one African country to another can be eye-watering. 

Dilip Ratha, who works on these issues for the World Bank says exchange controls are one of the reasons the rates are so high; in some places sending money out of the country is illegal. “So if you are sending money,” he says, “let's say from Benin to Ghana, it is actually allowed (in some countries it's not even allowed) but first the CFA has to be passed through into euros or sterling or dollars, and then it has to be transferred back into the local cedi, and in both cases you pay commission. Some sort of regional currency market really needs to be created.” 

"So if you are sending money, let's say from Benin to Ghana, it is actually allowed (in some countries it's not even allowed) but first the CFA has to be passed through into euros or sterling or dollars, and then it has to be transferred back into the local cedi, and in both cases you pay commission. Some sort of regional currency market really needs to be created"  

The report found 10 routes with bank transfer charges over 20 percent. Charges from Nigeria to Ghana were 22 percent. To send from Tanzania to the rest of East Africa, or from South Africa to its near neighbours is particularly expensive, peaking at 25 percent for bank transfers between South African and Malawi. Some of the fees charged by money transfer companies are even higher; if you send money that way from Ghana to Nigeria you may have to pay a staggering 39 percent.

In some places mobile phone based systems like M-Pesa have made in-country transfers much easier and cheaper, but they haven't really taken off internationally, largely because conservative, inflexible regulatory systems insist that all international transfers must go through conventional banks. And African banks tend to have very high charges, often because they are forced by governments to finance government projects or make uncommercial loans. 

Chukwuemeka Chikezie of the Up Africa consultancy told IRIN a lot of the responsibility lay with African governments. “One of the reasons M-Pesa took off in Kenya was because the authorities nurtured and enabled innovation. If you look at other countries the regulators have tended to stifle innovation. They are very risk-averse and they don't enable even limited experiments to prove that the markets can absorb technical innovation.”

In addition, money-laundering regulations are putting impossible demands on systems designed to serve the poor, requiring, for instance, “know your customer” procedures like taking copies of ID documents for anyone receiving an international payout. Selma Ribica of M-Pesa points out this is an impossibility for agents in rural areas with no power supply. She told IRIN she would like to see a more realistic, tiered approach with much lighter regulation for small international transfers (under, say, US$200-300) which are most unlikely to have anything to do with money laundering.

Beware Facebook, Walmart

M-Pesa depends on moving money between different customers' mobile phone accounts. Now people are beginning to think of other kinds of electronic “purses” which might be linked in the same way. 

Facebook has just proposed allowing transfers between customers who have accounts with the company which they normally use to make payments for online games. So far this is only proposed for payments within the European Union, but Facebook has a huge geographical spread and has said it is keen to extend its reach in Africa. 

And the big profits made by the transfer companies are tempting other players into the market. The latest to announce it is starting money transfers is the US supermarket chain Walmart, with recipients being able to pick up their cash from any shop in the chain. To start with this will only work within the United States and Puerto Rico, but Walmart is an international group with nearly 350 stores in South Africa, and it also has a presence in Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, Malawi and Mozambique, opening up the tempting prospect of a new, and cheaper way for workers to send money home.

All these new ways of sending money aim to undercut Moneygram and Western Union. Now Western Union has responded by offering so-called “zero-fee” transfers to Africa if the money is sent from a bank account rather by credit card or cash. This would mean a saving of just under £5 ($8.40) for someone sending $100 from the UK to Liberia. The company would still make money (nearly $4) by using a favourable exchange rate, but it would bring the cost down to just below the G8/G20 target. 

For African's hard-pressed and hard-working migrants and their families back home, change may - finally - be on the way.

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99977 201404221522570983.jpg Feature Politics and Economics Remittance rip-offs IRIN LONDON Angola Burkina Faso Burundi Benin Botswana DRC Congo, Republic of Côte d’Ivoire Cameroon Colombia Cape Verde Djibouti Eritrea Ethiopia Gabon Ghana Gambia Guinea Equatorial Guinea Guinea-Bissau Kenya Liberia Lesotho Morocco Madagascar Mali Mauritania Mauritius Malawi Mozambique Namibia Niger Nigeria Rwanda Seychelles Sudan Sierra Leone Senegal Somalia Sao Tome and Principe eSwatini Chad Togo Tanzania Uganda Samoa South Africa Zambia Zimbabwe
          Après la visite ratée à Kinshasa. Guterres – Moussa Faki : la RDC au menu des discussions à Addis-Abeba !      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
*Lundi 9 juillet à Addis Abeba en Ethiopie, l’Onu et l’Union Africaine, deux organisations tentaculaires ont exprimé leur engagement à approfondir davantage leur partenariat stratégique. Elles sont également profondément préoccupées par les incertitudes concernant l’ordre international, les divergences dans les relations internationales et l’impact négatif sur la paix et la sécurité mondiales. C’est dans ce cadre que l’Onu et l’Union Africaine ont passé en revue les défis pour la paix, la sécurité et le développement sur le continent, notamment au Burundi, en République centrafricaine, dans le bassin du lac Tchad, aux Comores, en République démocratique du Congo, à Madagascar, au Mali et au Sahel, en Somalie et au Soudan du Sud et ont convenu d’accroître conjointement leur soutien, en étroite coopération avec les Communautés économiques régionales, aux initiatives de paix, de sécurité, de développement et de stabilisation dans ces pays. Le condensé, ci-dessous, tel qu’il a été réalisé par les services attitrés de l’Onu, en dit long.

ONU -Union africaine : le renforcement du partenariat déclenché
Le Secrétaire général de l’ONU, António Guterres (à droite), à la Conférence annuelle ONU-Union africaine à Addis Abeba, en Ethiopie.

A l’occasion de la deuxième Conférence annuelle ONU-Union africaine qui a eu lieu lundi à Addis Abeba, en Ethiopie, les deux organisations ont exprimé leur engagement à approfondir davantage leur partenariat stratégique.

Dans un communiqué publié à l’issue de cette conférence qui s’est déroulée au siège de l’Union africaine, le Président de la Commission de l’UA, Moussa Faki Mahamat, et le Secrétaire général des Nations Unies, António Guterres, ont souligné l’importance des organisations multilatérales et du multilatéralisme, « comme instrument pour une gouvernance internationale efficace et pour répondre aux défis mondiaux».

La Conférence annuelle a examiné la mise en œuvre du Cadre conjoint pour un partenariat renforcé pour la paix et la sécurité et s’est félicitée des progrès accomplis. Elle a également approuvé le plan d’action pour la mise en œuvre de l’Agenda 2063 et du Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030.

La Conférence s’est déclarée profondément préoccupée par les incertitudes concernant l’ordre international, les divergences dans les relations internationales et l’impact négatif sur la paix et la sécurité mondiales.

Mahamat et Guterres ont appelé « au renforcement d’une approche globale, intégrée et coordonnée de la prévention des conflits en s’attaquant aux causes profondes des conflits, en renforçant les processus politiques et le respect de l’Etat de droit, ainsi que la promotion d’un développement durable et inclusif».
La Conférence a également passé en revue les défis pour la paix, la sécurité et le développement sur le continent, notamment au Burundi, en République centrafricaine, dans le bassin du lac Tchad, aux Comores, en République démocratique du Congo, à Madagascar, au Mali et au Sahel, en Somalie et au Soudan du Sud et ont convenu d’accroître conjointement leur soutien, en étroite coopération avec les Communautés économiques régionales, aux initiatives de paix, de sécurité, de développement et de stabilisation dans ces pays.

L’ONU et l’Union africaine ont exhorté la communauté internationale à prendre des mesures énergiques pour atténuer les crises humanitaires, les risques et la vulnérabilité dans les communautés touchées.

Les deux organisations ont convenu de convoquer la prochaine Conférence annuelle UA-ONU à New York en 2019.

(Avec news.un.org)
          L’ONU et l’Union africaine s’engagent à approfondir leur partenariat      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
A l’occasion de la deuxième Conférence annuelle ONU-Union africaine qui a eu lieu lundi à Addis-Abeba, en Ethiopie, les deux organisations ont exprimé leur engagement à approfondir davantage leur partenariat stratégique. C’est après cette réunion que les deux devaient faire une visite conjointe en Rd Congo. Visite pour laquelle les autorités congolaises ont manifesté la volonté de convenir la date avec les services de ces deux hautes personnalités. Dans un communiqué publié à l’issue de cette conférence qui s’est déroulée au siège de l’Union africaine, le Président de la Commission de l’UA, Moussa Faki Mahamat, et le Secrétaire général des Nations Unies, António Guterres, ont souligné l’importance des organisations multilatérales et du multilatéralisme, « comme instrument pour une gouvernance internationale efficace et pour répondre aux défis mondiaux ». La Conférence annuelle a examiné la mise en œuvre du Cadre conjoint pour un partenariat renforcé pour la paix et la sécurité et s’est félicitée des progrès accomplis. Elle a également approuvé le plan d’action pour la mise en œuvre de l’Agenda 2063 et du Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030. La Conférence s’est déclarée profondément préoccupée par les incertitudes concernant l’ordre international, les divergences dans les relations internationales et l’impact négatif sur la paix et la sécurité mondiales. M.Mahamat et Guterres ont appelé « au renforcement d’une approche globale, intégrée et coordonnée de la prévention des conflits en s’attaquant aux causes profondes des conflits, en renforçant les processus politiques et le respect de l’Etat de droit, ainsi que la promotion d’un développement durable et inclusif ». La Conférence a également passé en revue les défis pour la paix, la sécurité et le développement sur le continent, notamment au Burundi, en République centrafricaine, dans le bassin du lac Tchad, aux Comores, en République démocratique du Congo, à Madagascar, au Mali et au Sahel, en Somalie et au Soudan du Sud et ont convenu d’accroître conjointement leur soutien, en étroite coopération avec les Communautés économiques régionales, aux initiatives de paix, de sécurité, de développement et de stabilisation dans ces pays. L’ONU et l’Union africaine ont exhorté la communauté internationale à prendre des mesures énergiques pour atténuer les crises humanitaires, les risques et la vulnérabilité dans les communautés touchées. Les deux organisations ont convenu de convoquer la prochaine Conférence annuelle UA-ONU à New York en 2019. (JMNK)
          From drawings to reality: boosting agricultural production in Burundi      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
For Calinie and Theophile, like many small-hold farmers in rural Burundi, crop failures were once a fact of life due to limited agricultural knowledge, the extreme paucity of arable land and high levels of soil erosion. Thanks to an innovative farming approach supported by Oxfam, they increased in yields and incomes to ensure a better quality of life for their children, now aged six to 22 years.

From drawings to reality: boosting agricultural production in Burundi

Caline and Theophile, small-hold farmers in rural Burundi. Photo: Lisa Murray/Oxfam

          JUMLA YA WAHAMIAJI HARAMU 1470 KUTOKA MATAIFA MBALIMBALI WAKAMATWA MKOANI KAGERA      Cache   Translate Page   Web Page Cache   
Na Editha Karlo wa blog ya jamii,Kagera.

JUMLA ya wahamiaji haramu 1470 kutoka mataifa mbalimbali wamekamatwa Mkoani Kagera kwa kuingia nchini kinyume cha sheria.

Akiongea na waandishi wa habari ofisini kwake Ofisa uhamiaji Mkoa wa Kagera Abdallah Towo alisema kuwa kwa kipindi cha January hadi June 30 mwaka jumla ya wahamiaji haramu walikamatwa katika maeneo mbalimbali ya mipaka iliyopo Mkoani humo.

Towo alisema kuwa kati yao Warundi 994,Waganda 223,Warwanda 193,Wathiopia 19,wacongo 39 na wakenya 2 jumla yao ni 1470.

Alisema jumla ya raia 5,787 wa Burundi kutoka kambi za mtendeli,Nduta na Nyarugusu zilizopo Mkoani Kigoma pia kambi ya rumasi Ngara wamerejea nchini kwao kwa hiyari.Alisema jumla ya raia 90 kutoka Mataifa mbalimbali wamemaliza vifungo vyao katika Magereza yaliyopo mkoani Kagera na wote wamerejeshwa makwao.

"Kwa mwaka huu toka january hadi June hakuna mkimbizi yoyote aliyeingia nchini kwasababu kule kwao kwasasa kumetulia"alisema.

Ofisa Uhamiaji u huyo alisema kuwa zoezi la uandikishaji wa vitambulisho vya utaifa linaenda vizuri Mkoani Kagera na mpaka sasa jumla wananchi 491513 ili kupata vitambulisho vya utaifa lengo ni kuandikisha wananchi 1,200,000.

Alisema pia zoezi la uzinduzi wa hati za kusafiria za kielectronic kwa mkoa wa Kagera ulifanyika tarehe 8 mwezi wa 6 mwaka huu linaenda vizuri kwani mpaka sasa wameshapokea jumla ya maombi 72 na hati 64 zimeshatolewa na kukabidhiwa kwa wahusika.
 Ofisa wa Uhamiaji Mkoa wa Kagera Abdallah Towo akiongea na waandishi wa habari(hawapo pichani)juu y utendaji kazi wa uhamiaji Mkoa wa Kagera
Baadhi ya waandishi wa habari wa Mkoa wa Kagera wakimsikiliza Ofisa wa uhamiaji Mkoa wa Kagera Abdallah Towo ofisini kwake



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