Car chase ends in arrest   

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A man convicted in Edgecombe County for committing second-degree murder nearly 19 years ago now is facing four charges — including illegally possessing a firearm — after Tarboro police said he tried to escape possible detention at a traffic checkpoint set up in the early morning hours.
          

Joshua Brown   

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Joshua Brown (c.1991-2019), father of three, was a key witness in the murder trial of Amber Guyger, a White police officer in Dallas, Texas who killed an unarmed Black man, Botham Jean. She became the first police officer in Dallas found guilty of murder since the 1970s. Two days after she was sentenced to ten […]
          

Botham Jean, Amber Guyger And The Question Of Forgiveness In The Court   

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Tears, hugs and a new debate about race and forgiveness after an ex-Dallas cop is sentenced for the murder of her unarmed neighbor. Leona Allen and Jemar Tisby join Meghna Chakrabarti. Plus, Tom Steyer's bid for 2020.


          

Charge against Palestinian stabber bumped up to attempted murder after petition   

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Military court overturns earlier decision to convict Hebron resident of aggravated assault and concludes that he intended to kill Israeli, though he stabbed her only once
          

Couple pleads guilty in dehydration death of son   

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WYOMING, Mich. (AP) – The parents of an 18-month-old boy who died of dehydration have pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in western Michigan. Yurik Birkenmeyer weighed just 22 pounds when he was found dead at home in Wyoming, a Grand Rapids suburb, in March 2018. The boy had been in foster care for 10 months […]
          

Russell Brand, Rose Leslie, and Letitia Wright Join Gal Gadot in Kenneth Branagh's Movie   

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The star-studded movie adapted from Agatha Christie's book will bring back a character from 2017's film 'Murder on the Orient Express' and hit theaters in 2020.
          

Stream on Demand: Keep up with broadcasts on Hulu   

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What’s new for home viewing on Video on Demand and Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu and other streaming services.

Top streams for the week

Cable-cutters can keep up with many primetime network series on Hulu. Among the new shows now available are legal drama “Bluff City Law” with Jimmy Smits, mystery thriller “Emergence” with Alison Tollman, serial killer drama “Prodigal Son” with Michael Sheen, comedy “Perfect Harmony” with Bradley Whitford, melting pot comedy “Sunnyside” with Kal Penn, sitcom spin-off “Mixed-ish” and Portland-set private eye drama “Stumptown” with Cobie Smulders.

You also can see more than two dozen returning shows, including “This Is Us,” “Modern Family,” “The Good Doctor,” “New Amsterdam,” “Empire,” “The Good Place,” “The Voice” and warhorses “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Law & Order: SVU.”

Episodes arrive on Hulu (with limited commercial interruption) a day after their respective network debuts.

The Politician” is a musical melodrama starring Ben Platt as a wildly ambitious high school kid running for class president of his elite private school. Gwyneth Paltrow and Jessica Lange co-star in the satirical series created for Netflix by Ryan Murphy.

An underpaid spy (Manoj Bajpayee) keeps his dangerous life a secret in “The Family Man: Season 1” (India, with subtitles), an espionage thriller with a twist of workplace comedy. Ten episodes on Amazon Prime Video.

Gaby Hoffmann, Amy Landecker, Jay Duplass and Judith Light carry the tunes in “Transparent: Musicale Finale,” which brings the Emmy-winning Amazon Original comedy to an end without its original star Jeffrey Tambor (who left the show after harassment allegations). On Amazon Prime Video.

Great music sustains “Yesterday” (2019, PG-13), a romantic comedy about a failed singer-songwriter (Himesh Patel) who wakes up in a world where the Beatles never existed and performs their songs as his own. Lily James and Ed Sheeran co-star, Danny Boyle directs from an original script by England’s romcom king Richard Curtis (“Love Actually”). On Cable on Demand, VOD, DVD and at Redbox.

Classic pick: Buster Keaton’s action-packed comedy “Steamboat Bill, Jr.” (1928, silent with score) is hilarious and warmhearted and features some of the most amazing stunts captured on camera. Streams free on Kanopy, free through most library systems.

Pay-Per-View / Video on Demand

Shaft” (2019, R) is a multi-generational sequel to the private eye classic with Usher joining previous “Shaft” stars Samuel L. Jackson and Richard Roundtree. Also new:

· Horror reboot “Child’s Play” (2019, R) with Aubrey Plaza and the voice of Mark Hamill;

· Luc Besson’s action film “Anna” (2019, R) with Sasha Luss as a supermodel/assassin;

· Documentary “Pavarotti” (2019, PG-13) from director Ron Howard;

· Essay film “Around India With a Movie Camera” (2018, not rated) created from archival footage of India from 1899 to independence in 1947.

Available same day as select theaters nationwide is “10 Minutes Gone” (2019, R) with Bruce Willis and Michael Chiklis, from direct-to-video veteran Brian A. Miller. Also new are two horror films:

· Logan Miller in “Prey” (2019, not rated) from Blumhouse;

· “The Curse of Buckout Road” (2017, not rated) co-starring Henry Czerny and Danny Glover.

Netflix

A serial killer appears for one night every nine years in “In the Shadow of the Moon” (2019, not rated), a murder mystery with a science-fiction twist. Boyd Holbrook is the cop who follows the case for decades, and Cleopatra Coleman, Bokeem Woodbine and Michael C. Hall co-star in the Netflix Original movie from director Jim Mickle.

Wong Kar-Wai’s romantic action drama “The Grandmaster” (China, 2013, PG-13, with subtitles) stars Tony Chiu-Wai Leong as legendary martial arts master Ip Man. Ziyi Zhang and Chang Chen co-star and Yuen Woo Ping provides the choreography, which Wong turns into something more like a dance onscreen. It was nominated for two Oscars, including one for its rich cinematography.

Kristin Scott Thomas stars in World War II mystery “Sarah’s Key” (2010, PG-13), from the novel by Tatiana de Rosnay.

The animated short feature “Sound & Fury” (2019, not rated) is a companion piece to the new album by country artist Sturgill Simpson.

True stories: The short documentary “Birders” (Mexico, 2019, with subtitles) celebrates those who monitor and protect birds that migrate across the U.S.-Mexico border.

International TV: A former spy, now teaching Shakespeare, is called back into service in the “Bard of Blood“ (India, with subtitles). Also new:

· “Skylines: Season 1” (Germany, with subtitles), a drama set in the music industry;

· Prison drama “The Inmate: Season 1” (Mexico, with subtitles) about an undercover agent posing as a prisoner.

Kid stuff: A teen social media celebrity becomes a court-ordered wilderness club leader in the live-action comedy “Team Kaylie: Season 1” (TV-PG) for teens and tweens. Also new is the animated adventure “Dragons - Rescue Riders: Season 1” for younger viewers.

Standup:Jeff Dunham: Beside Himself” (2019, not rated).

Amazon Prime Video

Fido” (2007, R), a social satire of the undead used as menial servants, is one of the best zombie comedies to date. Carrie-Anne Moss, Dylan Baker and Billy Connolly star.

International affairs: Vincent Zhao stars in Yuen Woo Ping’s over-the-top action drama “True Legend” (China, 2010, R, with subtitles), featuring appearances by Jay Chou, Michelle Yeoh and David Carradine.

International TV:A French Village: Seasons 1-4” (France, 2009-2012, with subtitles) follows the inhabitants of a rural town during the Nazi occupation of World War II. The hit drama from France played on PBS in some American cities.

Hulu

Disney’s animated “Pocahontas” (1995, G), featuring the voices of Mel Gibson, Irene Bedard and Christian Bale, is one of the last classics of old school animation. It won Oscars for the score and original song “Colors of the Wind.”

Everywhere

American Horror Story: Apocalypse,” the eighth season of Ryan Murphy’s anthology series, is streaming on Netflix, Amazon Prime and Hulu.

HBO Now

The Lego Movie 2: The 2nd Part” (2019, PG) animates the world of interlocking toys for a new adventure involving invaders from outer space.

True stories:Buzz” (2019, TV-MA) profiles the very private Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and celebrated author Buzz Bissinger.

Available Saturday night is “Isn’t It Romantic” (2019, PG-13), a spoof of romantic comedy clichés starring Rebel Wilson and Liam Hemsworth.

Other streams

The fourth season of the documentary series “The Circus: Inside the Wildest Political Show on Earth,” is now on all Showtime platforms. New episodes each Sunday.

The family friendly adventure “A Dog’s Way Home” (2019, PG) with Ashley Judd is now streaming on all Starz platforms.

Doc Martin: Series 9,” the hit British drama starring Martin Clunes as a prickly surgeon turned country doctor, airs exclusively in the U.S. on Acorn TV. New episodes arrive each Thursday, a day after their respective U.K. premieres.

Britbox celebrates the 50th anniversary of “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” with the vintage comedy series “Ripping Yarns“ (1976-1979) from Michael Palin and Terry Jones and the 1980 BBC production of “The Taming of the Shrew“ starring John Cleese.

Two new series from Europe are now running on MHz Choice. “The Embassy” (Spain, with subtitles) is a drama set at the Spanish Embassy in Thailand and “Murder by the Lake” (Germany, with subtitles) is a crime drama set at Lake Constance, where a partnership of German and Austrian detectives solve crimes. New episodes arrive each Tuesday.

The Criterion Channel spotlights four German features “Directed by Christian Petzold,” including the Criterion Channel debuts of the mysterious “Yella” (2007), romantic thriller “Jerichow” (2008) and hard-hitting drama “Barbara” (2012), all starring the brilliant Nina Hoss. With subtitles.

Also on Criterion, “Directed by Lina Wertmüller” spotlights seven features by the Italian filmmaker who was the first woman ever nominated for Best Director at the Oscars, including the satirical “Love and Anarchy” (1973), battle-of-the-sexes comedy “Swept Away” (1974) and Oscar-nominated black comedy “Seven Beauties” (1975), all starring Giancarlo Giannini. With subtitles.

Free streams: Andy Serkis stars as punk rock icon Ian Dury in “Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll” (2010, not rated). It’s now streaming on Kanopy, along with:

· “Frantz” (France, 2017, not rated, with subtitles), a historical drama set between the two world wars directed by François Ozon;

· “War Witch” (2013, not rated, with subtitles), a devastating drama about a child soldier in an unidentified sub-Saharan African nation;

· “Hara-Kiri: Death of a Samurai” (Japan, 2012, not rated, with subtitles), Miike Takashi’s remake of Masaki Kobayashi’s feudal drama;

· Joseph H. Lewis’ “The Big Combo” (1955), a tough film noir starring Cornel Wilde as an obsessive cop and Richard Conte as an arrogant mobster.

New on disc and at Redbox

“Yesterday,” “Shaft,” “Anna,” “Child’s Play”

Sean Axmaker is a Seattle film critic and writer. His reviews of streaming movies and TV can be found at streamondemandathome.com.


          

15-Year-Old Charged With Murdering Fall River Woman Allegedly Told Police ‘I Killed The Old Lady’   

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A 15-year-old is charged with murder after a woman was stabbed multiple times inside a Fall River apartment Sunday night.
          

CRIMES PARFAITS - CAPITAINE LOUISE BONNE: À LA VIE, À LA MORT/TROP BEAU POUR ÊTRE VRAI (FRANCE 3)   

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[Swiss transmission order] French pubcaster France 3's detective drama Crimes parfaits is a "semi-anthology" where a murderer known from the start thinks he/she has committed the perfect crime but a detective (different in every couple of episodes) proves him/her wrong. 

It's the concept of the inverted detective story, popularized by Columbo though created in literature many years before the famous lieutenant.

The crime dramas of France 3 are a fully-fledged genre, recognizable from the postcard drone shots of their regional locations, the same actors jumping from one to another and stories sometimes so similar that you wonder if they are generated by some artificial intelligence. The channel is the happy home of Commissaire Magellan, Mongeville, Meurtres à... or ratings juggernaut Capitaine Marleau. The later is the most popular TV series in France, which certainly explains why Crimes parfaits is essentially a copycat factory of the gendarme played by Corinne Masiero.

One of Marleau's relatives is Police captain Louise Bonne ("Comme la poire"), played by actress and humorist Julie Ferrier. Introduced a year ago, she returns with her deputy and protégé Fatou (Wendy Nieto) in À la vie, à la mort and Trop beau pour être vraiJuliette Petiot (Louise's teenage daughter Zoé) and Sophie de la Rochefoucauld, very funny as the ill-named pathologist Gracieuse, are back too. Humorist (another one!) and actor Mathieu Madénian joins the main cast as Grégoire, a sympathetic procureur.

The two episodes, penned by Marie-Anne Le Pezennec and helmed by Nicolas Herdt, try to show a bit of ambition within the limits of both the series format and the labored humour of the main character. Arié Elmaleh guest stars as Bruno Aubert, the murderer of À la vie, à la mort. Bruno is the director of a funeral home founded by his father. He gets rid of Alex, his best friend, who's also the godfather of his daughter. The man ends up embalmed! Capitaine Bonne and Fatou investigate. The feud between Louise and her husband escalates

Arié Elmaleh does an impressive rendition of the closest thing to a France 3 version of Dexter Morgan (Dexter) at the beginning of the episode. Also starring Joyce Bibring (Marine), Louisiane Gouverneur (Annabelle), Yann Pradal (Alex), Virginia Anderson (Cécilia), Antoine Cholet (Romain), Serge Feuillard (Gérard) and Simon Thomas (Joël). Sylvain Damal, the victim of Trop beau pour être vrai, is described by his colleagues, friends and neighbours as a sort of saint and even a hero. The wife of this director of a fish trading company and two of his employees beg to differ.

They plot his murder and make it look like a drowning caused by jellyfishes. One of the guest stars is the talented Christelle Reboul as Violette, a role far away from Amélie in Nos chers voisins (2012-2017). Since Capitaine Marleau, it seems that a lot of crime dramas of France 3 have their dedicated teams of gagmen. Also with Armelle Deutsch (Hélène), Jérôme Robart (Lucas), Christophe Favre (Marcel), Jérémy Gillet (Hugo), François Briault (Sylvain) and Vincent Bercholz (Mayor). Developed with Toma de Matteis. Produced by Caroline Lassa for Salsa Productions.

Co-produced by France.tvstudio and France Télévisions with Be-Films and RTBF (Télévision belge). With the participation of RTS Radio Télévision Suisse. Music by Maïdi Roth and Franck Pilant. Additional music by Flemming Nordkrog. Theme music of Crimes parfaits by Jean-Pierre Taïeb. Filmed with the support of Département de la Charente-Maritime.

Not yet shown by France 3. 

See also:

https://tattard2.blogspot.com/2019/09/crimes-parfaits-capitaine-agnes-bertaud.html (Capitaine Agnès Bertaud) 

          

Benton County judge delays murder trial in boy's death   

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BENTONVILLE -- Mauricio Alejandro Torres is set to be retried beginning Feb. 18 in his son's death, which a medical examiner said resulted from him being sodomized with a stick. - Source: www.nwaonline.com
          

Comment on OMG, quote of the day: Angela Lansbury just heard the song ‘Murder She Wrote’ for the first time by Andy    

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Now somebody needs to let Ms. Lansbury know it's not just reggae, she's also a part of gangsta rap, via Tairrie B's "Murder She Wrote" from 1990. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcWbFQzBv6Q
          

Cultural Implications of the Amber Guyger Murder Trial   

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Join International Broadcaster and Photojournalist Victoria Gaither and Dr. Julius Bailey Professor of Philosophy at Wittenberg Univerisity in Springfield, Ohio as they discuss the case of Botham Jean and Dallas police officer Amber Guyger. Brandt Jean, the brother of Botham Jean,  made headlines when he asked a Texas judge if he could embrace his brother's killer before she was sentenced to 10 years. The images of Brandt embracing Amber touched off a debate within the African American community about race, images, and Christianity. Dr. Bailey will dissect this issue and what it means for the African American community and America. We will take calls, so please call in with your comments and thoughts.  To learn more about Dr. Bailey visit his website https://juliusbailey.com/ To learn
          

Trial of Martin Saberi accused of murdering Amy Griffiths to take place next week   

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A NEW date has been set for the trial of a 53-year-old man who has denied the murder of a transgender woman in Droitwich, wounding with intent and possession of a knife.
          

Indian Americans in Philadelphia charged with murder of Another Indian   

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PHILADELPHIA(TIP): The Philadelphia Police arrested two Indian origin suspects following a Sept 25 night shooting in the Castor section of Northeast Philadelphia that left another Indian man dead. Authorities say 34-year-old Prince Kunjappan-Joy and 51-year-old [...]
          

Tim Heidecker’s Mister America Is Funny (If You’ve Also Seen Everything Else Tim Heidecker Has Ever Done)   

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by Morgan Troper
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Magnolia Pictures

At the end of 2017, Tim Heidecker’s On Cinemaa web series lampooning film criticism that the comedian co-hosts with Gregg Turkington—apexed with a five-hour long, fictitious murder trial. Despite overwhelming evidence that Tim Heidecker’s character was guilty of several counts of murder (several attendees at a fake music festival he funded overdosed on vape pens, which these days hits a little too close to home), Heidecker was found innocent—and promptly launched a garish social media campaign around his implausible candidacy for San Bernardino district attorney.

This is where the feature-length film Mister America—which screens in Portland on Wednesday—comes in. It's a spin-off of a spin-off of a goofy web-series, and will likely only entertain those who have fully immersed themselves in the On Cinema universe—which, when taking into account the show’s 10 seasons, its annual Oscar specials, and its self-contained offshoot Decker, clocks in at an agonizing 20 hours of content.

If you are one of those people, Mister America is frequently funny. At best, it plays like a bizarro version of The War Room—just sub George Stephanopoulos with a woefully incompetent publicist-turned-campaign advisor named Toni (Terry Parks) and Bill Clinton for Heidecker’s On Cinema persona, a mix of O.J. Simpson and Trump. But just as often, Mister America's comedy is imperceptible: Take one early scene, when Heidecker and Toni discuss immigration. It doesn’t seem like a parody, and there’s no punchline. It just feels like a legitimately racist conversation, and it speaks to the dangers of ineffective satire. By the end of the film, when Heidecker breaks down and apologizes to his constituents after a violent outburst at a town hall debate, you don’t even feel sorry for the guy. You just want him out of your sight.

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Supreme Court Case Could Overturn Oregon’s Problematic Spilt-Jury Rule   

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by Blair Stenvick
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A case going before the United States Supreme Court on Monday morning could fundamentally change Oregon’s criminal court system—and while most legal experts in Oregon support the potential change, Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum is urging the Supreme Court to maintain the status quo.

The case, Ramos v. Louisiana, asks the court to consider whether state-level split-jury convictions—that is, criminal convictions that do not require a fully unanimous jury—are constitutional or not. The case concerns Evangelisto Ramos, a man who was convicted of second-degree murder by a 10-2 jury decision in 2016.

A 10-2 jury split was the minimum standard for most criminal convictions in Louisiana, but voters overturned the policy in a statewide ballot measure last year. That left Oregon as the last remaining state in the nation to allow split-jury decisions—which would change if the Supreme Court rules that all split-jury convictions are unconstitutional.

Both Louisiana and Oregon’s split-jury rules had roots in racism and xenophobia; in Louisiana, the policy stemmed from Jim Crow-era law, while Oregon’s law can be traced back to 1930s anti-immigrant sentiment. A recent Pulitzer Prize-winning analysis by Louisiana newspaper The Advocate found that split-jury convictions affect Black defendants much more often than white ones.

Both criminal justice reform advocates like the Oregon Justice Resource Center and mainstream legal groups like the Oregon District Attorneys Association (ODAA)—two groups that often find themselves on opposite ends of an issue—support overturning Oregon’s split-jury rule.

“[It]t is a hallmark of our justice system that it should be difficult to take someone’s liberty,” wrote an ODAA member in an Oregonian op-ed last year. “That’s exactly why defendants in criminal cases enjoy the presumption of innocence and the prosecutor must establish guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. Adding the requirement of unanimity is another important safeguard against both wrongful convictions and wrongful acquittals.”

Rosenblum is also on the record as opposing split-jury convictions, saying she would support a statewide ballot measure banning them. But when it comes to Ramos in particular, Rosenblum falls on the side of stalling change, going so far as to submit a legal brief to the Supreme Court asking them to rule in favor of Louisiana.

In a statement shared with media in August, Rosenblum said she was concerned that a ruling in favor of Ramos could “require new trials in hundreds, if not thousands, of cases” in Oregon, which could in turn clog Oregon’s court system. She said her brief “in no way undercuts my view that Oregon should require juror unanimity in criminal cases going forward"—rather, she is worried about the potentially retroactive nature of a Ramos decision.

Aliza Kaplan, a law professor at Lewis & Clark and the co-founder of the Oregon Innocence Project, told the Mercury that in her opinion, Rosenblum is “acting like the sky is falling,” and that her estimate of cases that could be re-opened is likely overblown. Rosenblum’s office recently furnished Kaplan with a list of 292 cases that could be re-tried should the Supreme Court rule in favor of Ramos, but when Kaplan analyzed 110 of them, she found just 14 that she said would fit the legal requirements for relitigating.

And even if the ruling would overwhelm state courts, Kaplan said, that isn’t reason enough to oppose it.

“The Constitution should always trump any administrative inconvenience or burden,” she said. “This is about preserving individual rights and liberties.”

There are many moral and racial arguments for doing away with non-unanimous jury convictions. There are also commonsense arguments for keeping split-jury decisions: namely, that they make for a more efficient legal system, because they reduce the risk of having a hung jury. But Monday’s Ramos hearing will likely center around a more technical legal issue.

It is already established law that people are entitled to a unanimous jury at the federal level, thanks to the Sixth Amendment, which is part of the original Bill of Rights. But it is yet to be determined whether that right is extended to the state level through the 14th Amendment, which guarantees “due process,” or fair legal proceedings, to states. This practice—extending federal Bill of Rights protections to states through the 14th Amendment—is known as the “incorporation doctrine.”

The Supreme Court has already made many rulings based on incorporation doctrine—earlier this year, for example, it ruled that a right to not face excessive fines should apply to states, as opposed to only applying at the federal level. If the Supreme Court decides that split-jury verdicts are unconstitutional, it will likely be for that same reason.

Although the Supreme Court will hear arguments for Ramos on Monday morning, it is not required to release its decision until June 2020.

It remains to be seen what the exact effect of a pro-Ramos ruling could have on Oregon’s legal system. But for Kaplan, no cost could outweigh the benefit of abolishing split-jury decisions.

“Too much justice,” she said, “is not really a problem.”

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10/8/2019: NEWS | WORLD: Charges for street killer   

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A HOMELESS man who used a metal rod to bludgeon four other homeless men to death in New York City was arrested holding the murder weapon covered with blood and hair, and admitted he was the person in a video of one of the attacks, prosecutors...
          

Court sets date to conclude Mowzey murder case trial   

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The High Court sitting in Entebbe has set October 23 to conclude the hearing of the case on the murder of singer Moses Sekibogo, alias Mowzey Radio. The suspect, Mr Godfrey Wamala, alias Troy, presented two witnesses during the hearing last Saturday. He was represented by defence lawyer, Mr Lenard Kasibante. Justice Jane Frances Abodo […]
          

Supreme Court’s election-year term opens with insanity case   

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WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court began its election-year term Monday by wrestling over whether states must allow criminal defendants to plead insanity.

The one minor surprise when the justices took the bench just after 10 o’clock was the absence of Justice Clarence Thomas. The 71-year-old Thomas was at home, likely with the flu, the court said.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was in her customary seat to the left of Chief Justice John Roberts. The 86-year-old Ginsburg asked the first question in the insanity arguments.

Ginsburg was treated this summer for a tumor on her pancreas.

Meeting for the first time in public since late June, the court opened a term that could reveal how far to the right and how fast the court’s conservative majority will move, even as Roberts has made clear he wants to keep the court clear of Washington partisan politics. The court is beginning its second term with both of President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court appointees, Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, on board.

The justices could be asked to intervene in disputes between congressional Democrats and the White House that might also involve the possible impeachment of the Republican president.

Roberts would preside over a Senate trial of Trump if the House were to impeach him.

Its biggest decisions, in cases involving abortion, protections for young immigrants and LGBT rights, are likely to be handed down in late June, four months before the election.

The case about an insanity defense comes from Kansas, where James Kraig Kahler was sentenced to death for killing his estranged wife, two teenage daughters and his wife’s grandmother.

Kahler wanted to mount an insanity defense, but Kansas is one of four states that eliminated a defendant’s ability to plead not guilty by reason of insanity. Idaho, Montana and Utah are the others. Alaska also limits the insanity defense.

It was unclear how the case would come out. Justice Elena Kagan suggested that even if Kahler were to win at the Supreme Court and could plead insanity, he ultimately would not get a reprieve from his conviction. In no state, she said, “would your client be found insane.”

The justices also were hearing arguments Monday in a challenge to a murder conviction by a non-unanimous jury in Louisiana.


          

Supreme Court begins election-year term full of big cases   

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WASHINGTON – The justices are returning to the Supreme Court bench for the start of an election-year term that includes high-profile cases on about abortions, protections for young immigrants and LGBT rights.

The court meets Monday morning for its first public session since late June. First up is a death-penalty case from Kansas about whether states can abolish an insanity defense for criminal defendants.

The justices also will hear arguments Monday in a challenge to a murder conviction by a non-unanimous jury in Louisiana.

The term could reveal how far to the right and how fast the court’s conservative majority will move, even as Chief Justice John Roberts has made clear he wants to keep the court clear of Washington partisan politics. The court is beginning its second term with both of President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court appointees, Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, on board.

The justices could be asked to intervene in disputes between congressional Democrats and the White House that might also involve the possible impeachment of the president.

Roberts would preside over a Senate trial of Trump if the House were to impeach him.

Its biggest decisions are likely to be handed down in late June, four months before the election.

The court also could be front and center in the presidential election campaign itself, especially with health concerns surrounding 86-year-old Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

For now, though, the court has plenty of significant cases to deal with, including whether federal civil rights law that bars workplace discrimination on the basis of sex covers LGBT people. The justices will hear arguments Tuesday in two cases on that topic, their first foray into LGBT rights since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote all the court’s major gay-rights rulings.

Next month, the fate of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is in front of the justices. Lower courts have so far blocked Trump from ending the Obama-era program that has shielded roughly 700,000 people from deportation and provided them with permits to work.

During the winter, the justices will take up a challenge to a Louisiana law that would force abortion providers to have admitting privileges at local hospitals. It’s another test of whether the change in the court’s composition will result in a different outcome. With Kennedy in the majority, the court in 2016 struck down a virtually identical Texas law.


          

Government sanctioned murder of Australia's natural habitat   

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Government sanctioned murder of Australia's natural habitat What will it take to save Australia’s environment, our forests, wildlife, rivers and the natural drivers of survival? read now...
          

Former Prosecutor Tries to Fend Off Serious Misconduct Charges   

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In 2003, three men were indicted for capital murder in connection with the April 3rd murders of two people during an attempted robbery of a Harris County business, ACE America’s Cash Express. One of the victims was an employee at the business while the other was a Houston police officer named Charles Clark. The three men indicted were Alfred DeWayne Brown, Elijah Dwayne Joubert, and Dashan Vadell Glaspie.   Glaspie entered into a plea agreement with the Harris County District Attorney’s Office to testify against Brown and Joubert in exchange for a lesser sentence. Joubert was convicted of capital murder in October 2004 and sentenced to death. A year later (October 18, 2005) Brown was convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death as well.   Innocent Man Sentenced to Death   Three years later Brown’s direct appeals were exhausted when the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals (CCA) affirmed his conviction and death sentence. Brown joined several…
          

Six media companies join Innocence Project lawsuit seeking records in case of former Suffolk County prosecutor’s misconduct   

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Sept 22, 2019 (NEW YORK) – The Associated Press, the Daily News L.P., the Hearst Corporation, The New York Times Company, Newsday LLC, and ProPublica Inc. have filed an amicus brief in support of the Innocence Project’s lawsuit against the Second Department Disciplinary Committee to open its files related to former Suffolk County District Attorney Glenn Kurtzrock’s egregious prosecutorial misconduct. Kurtzrock was referred to the Grievance Committee of New York’s Tenth Judicial District  for action over two years ago, after he was fired from his position as an Assistant DA in Suffolk County for committing egregious prosecutorial misconduct in several murder cases. Yet there has been no public report of any disciplinary action against him. In the meantime, Kurtzrock continues to practice law in Suffolk County as a defense attorney, touting his experience as a “former homicide prosecutor.” “We are gratified that these well-respected…
          

Peter Dupas won't face murder trial for 1997 death of Kathleen Downes   

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Serial killer Peter Dupas won't stand trial over the death of a 95-year-old woman who was stabbed in a Melbourne nursing home more than 20 years ago.
          

Man sentenced to 30 years to life for murder of Columbus couple   

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COLUMBUS, Ohio – A Columbus man has been sentenced to 30 years to life for the murders of a couple last November.

According to the Franklin County Prosecutor’s Office, John Jordan pleaded guilty to two counts of murder in court Monday.

Ryan Fuller and Mikayla Sotherland were last seen on October 27. Fuller’s mother said the last person she saw Fuller speaking with was Jordan, who was her neighbor.

According to the court documents, Jordan and Fuller had an argument that got out of hand and Jordan hit fuller with an object. When Sotherland tried to intervene she was struck and killed, too.

The documents say Jordan moved the bodies and left them inside his van away from the scene. Their bodies were found on November 4.

After pleading guilty, Jordan was sentenced to 15 years to life on each count for a total of 30 years.


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