Agricultural Production Assistant - Canopy Growth Corporation - Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON   

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Must have knowledge of greenhouse processes. Legalization has opened up the recreational cannabis market in Canada, and the global demand for medical cannabis…
From Canopy Growth Corporation - Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:03:41 GMT - View all Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON jobs
          

Irrigation Technician - Canopy Growth Corporation - Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON   

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Legalization has opened up the recreational cannabis market in Canada, and the global demand for medical cannabis continues to expand.
From Canopy Growth Corporation - Mon, 07 Oct 2019 21:03:41 GMT - View all Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON jobs
          

Got fish? New York Sea Grant part of $1 million Great Lakes Aquaculture Collaborative   

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New York Sea Grant has recently been announced as part of a three-year, $1 million, multi-state Great Lakes Aquaculture Collaborative project designed to help Great Lakes states respond to consumer demand for freshwater fish and a $14 billion national seafood trade deficit identified by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service.
          

How Chinese gangs are scamming Japan’s Olympics ticketing system for major profits   

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A loophole in security measures designed to prevent illegal reselling of tickets for next year’s Tokyo Olympic Games is allegedly being exploited by Chinese criminal gangs cashing in on sky-high demand among mainland residents.According to Japanese media, the gangs employ hundreds of Chinese living in Japan to buy tickets from registered ticket vendors then resell them at up to 10 times the price to rich Chinese desperate to see a slice of the action.They are easily able to get around measures…
          

Real Feel Work Shirt   

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By popular demand we present you the Real Feel Work Shirt:

Ultra realistic work shirt for Genesis with extra care assigned to recreate real life fabric behavior and modern fashion trends. Built in adjustment morphs and visibility options add versatility to the outfit. Automatically fits to Genesis male and female characters, from adult to kids and young teens, creatures and beasts and all their combinations with the included six styles in 18 MAT options. Use the top as a long sleeved item (two lengths of the sleeve - long and pulled up), or make a sleeveless shirt out of it with the included visibility options. Great looking hyper realistic shirt for all your workmen, villains, heroes, superheroes - men who have real jobs to keep the world on its tracks and who do their jobs well.

Price: $17.95 Special Price: $8.98


          

On-Demand Pay Considerations   

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Has your organization started offering on-demand pay as an employee benefit? On-demand pay is exactly what it sounds like—a way for employers to give employees access to their pay on demand instead of waiting for the standard payday. On-demand pay is often implemented through a third-party app, coordinated by a payroll provider, to give employees […]

The post On-Demand Pay Considerations appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.


          

How Can AVOD Cater to Audiences who are Accustomed to Ad-Free Viewing?   

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While subscription video on-demand (SVOD) services found strong early success on over-the-top (OTT) platforms, ad-supported (AVOD) services are now starting to catch up. This is well demonstrated by how […]
          

Vehicle Demand Energy Manager - FCA - Auburn Hills, MI   

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Lead VDE tool development for integration of aero, inertia, tires and all other parasitic loss variables that feed fuel economy development.
From Fiat Chrysler Automobiles - Fri, 16 Aug 2019 15:20:59 GMT - View all Auburn Hills, MI jobs
          

Robot Democratization: A Machine for Every Manufacturer   

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With collaborative robots proliferating, we wanted to know who’s using these robots and what tasks they’re doing. Design News caught up with Walter Vahey, executive vice-president at Teradyne, a company that helps manufacturers gear up their automation. Vahey sees a real change in the companies that are deploying robotics. For years robots were tools only for the largest manufacturers. They required expensive care and feeding in the form of integrators and programming. Now, collaborative robots require configuration rather than programming, and they can be quickly switched from task to task.

Vahey talked about robot companies such as Universal Robots (UR) which produces robot arms, and MiR, a company that produces collaborative mobile robots. He explained how they’re putting robotics in the hands of smaller manufacturers that previously could not afford advanced automation. The difference is that these robots are less expensive, they can be set up for production without programming, and they can be quickly reconfigured to change tasks.

Universal Robots, MiR, Taradyne, robotics, robots, automation, small manufacturers
Robots are now within the investment reach of small manufacturers. That's fueling a surge in the use of collaborative robots. (Image source: Universal Robots)

We asked Vahey what’s different about collaborative robots and what he’s seeing in robot adoption among smaller manufacturers.

Design News: Tell us about the new robots and how they’re getting deployed.

Walter Vahey: Companies such as Universal Robots and MiR are pioneering the robot space. They’re bringing automation to a broad class of users and democratizing automation. For small companies, the task at hand is to figure out how to fulfill their orders. It’s particularly challenging to manufacturers. In a tight labor market, manufacturers are facing more competition, growing demand, and higher expectations in quality.

Manufacturer can plug UR or MiR robots in very quickly. Everything is easy, from the specs up front to ordering to quickly arranging and training the robot. There’s no programming, and the robots have the flexibility to do a variety of applications. Every customer is dealing with labor challenges, so now they’re deploying collaborative robots to fulfill demand with high quality.

The whole paradigm has shifted now that you have a broader range of robot applications. You can easily and quickly bring in automation, plug it in ,and get product moving in hours or days rather than months. That’s what’s driving the growth at UR and MiR.

The Issue of Change Management

Design News: Is change management a hurdle?. Does the robot cause workforce disruption?

Walter Vahey: We really haven’t seen that as an issue. The overwhelming need to improve and fulfill demand at a higher quality level helps the manufacturers deploy. It outweighs other challenges. We help with the deployment, and the manufacturers are making the change easily.

We grew up as a supplier of electronic test equipment. Since 2015, we’ve entered the industrial automation market with a focus on the emerging collaborative robot space. We see that as a way to change the equation for manufacturers, making it faster and easier to deploy automation.

Design News: What about return on investment? Robotics can be a considerable investment for a small company/

Walter Vahey: The customers today are looking for relatively short ROI, and we’re seeing it from 6 months to a year. That’s a no brainer for manufacturers. They’re ready to jump in.

We work hard to make deployment less of an issue. We have an application builder, and we use it to prepare for deployment. The new user may have a pick-and-place operation. They choose the gripper, and we guide them to partners who make it easy to deploy.

The application builder helps the customer pick the gripper. The whole object is to get the customer deployed rapidly so the automation doesn’t sit. With MiR, the robot comes in, and we find an easy application for the mobile device. We take the robot around the plant and map it. We’ve work to guide customers through an application quickly and make the robot productive as soon as possible.

There are hundreds of partners that work with UR and MiR, providing grippers and end effectors. We have a system that customers can plug into. Customer can look at grippers from a wide range of companies. We’re not working just on the robot deployment. We work to get the whole system deployed so they can quickly get the ROI.

What Tasks Are the Robots Taking On?

Design News: Who in the plant is using the robots, and what tasks are involved?

Walter Vahey: There is a range of users. To be effective at training a robot and configuring it, the people best suited for it are the ones most aware of the task. To get the robot to be effective you have to know the task. By and large, the person who has been doing that task is best suited to train the robot. That person can then train other robots. Nobody’s better suited to do it than the people who know what needs to be done.

The tasks are broad set of applications. We automate virtually any task and any material movement. It’s not quite that simple, but it’s close. With UR, we’re doing machine learning, grinding, packing, pick-and-place, repetitive tasks, welding. It’s a very broad set of applications. In materials it’s also very broad. Parts going from a warehouse to a work cell, and then from the work cell to another work cell, up to a 1000-kilo payload. We’re moving robots into warehousing and logistics space, even large pieces of metal. The robots are well suited for long runs of pallets of materials.

Rob Spiegel has covered automation and control for 19 years, 17 of them for Design News. Other topics he has covered include supply chain technology, alternative energy, and cyber security. For 10 years, he was owner and publisher of the food magazine Chile Pepper.

The Midwest's largest advanced design and manufacturing event!
Design & Manufacturing Minneapolis connects you with top industry experts, including esign and manufacturing suppliers, and industry leaders in plastics manufacturing, packaging, automation, robotics, medical technology, and more. This is the place where exhibitors, engineers, executives, and thought leaders can learn, contribute, and create solutions to move the industry forward. Register today!

 


          

Tutor at Sheridan College - Darss Technologies Inc. - Greater Toronto Area, ON   

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We are seeking Tutors to help students in Sheridan Collegeexcel academically! You will provide on-campus, on-demand tutoring sessions to students on an… $15 an hour
From Indeed - Mon, 07 Oct 2019 18:12:00 GMT - View all Greater Toronto Area, ON jobs
          

GOP Senators Unnerved and ‘Concerned’ About ‘Betrayal’ of Kurds in Syria   

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GOP Senators Unnerved and ‘Concerned’ About ‘Betrayal’ of Kurds in SyriaBRENDAN SMIALOWSKIPresident Donald Trump’s decision to pave the way for a Turkish invasion of northern Syria at the expense of Kurdish allies in the region has infuriated Republican allies in the Senate who have spent the last two weeks twisting themselves in knots to defend him from an impeachment inquiry. Late on Sunday, the White House released a one-paragraph statement declaring that a Turkish invasion of northern Syria was imminent, and the United States would “not support or be involved in the operation” and “will no longer be in the immediate area.” For Kurds in the region—who have been fighting ISIS with U.S.-supplied weapons and are largely considered the strongest fighting force in Syria—the declaration amounts to an abrogration of agreements with the United States to defend them against Turkey, which considers them to be terrorists. In June, Trump himself warned that abandoning the alliance would allow Turkey to “wipe out the Kurds, who helped us with ISIS.”Trump’s Crazy Syria Move Will Wipe Out America’s Allies and Set Up a Big ISIS ComebackThe backlash from his Republican allies was swift.  Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), led the way on Monday morning, with the South Carolina senator calling the move “shortsighted and irresponsible” on Fox & Friends, a show that effectively serves as a televised presidential daily brief for Trump.“This impulsive decision by the president has undone all the gains we’ve made, thrown the region into further chaos, Iran is licking their chops, and if I’m an ISIS fighter, I’ve got a second lease on life,” Graham said. “I will do everything I can to sanction Turkey’s military and their economy if they step one foot into Syria. I hope I’m making myself clear how shortsighted and irresponsible this decision is.”Graham even referenced the House’s impeachment inquiry, unprompted, before adding that while “I’ve tried to help him,” the president’s behavior was “just unnerving to its core.”Graham, who has spent years trying to steer Trump closer to the hawkish foreign policy stances held by his Republican predecessors, opened the floodgates for Republicans who see Trump’s move as a threat to a critical U.S. ally in the region, and a potentially disastrous embrace of an autocratic regime.Indeed, Monday saw widespread pushback from around the Senate GOP, from lawmakers who’ve cozied up to Trump to those who have been more willing to call him out. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL), a Trump ally who has nudged him toward more hawkish positions on Venezuela and Iran policy, called the decision “a grave mistake that will have implications far beyond Syria.” Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) said that he was “deeply concerned” that the decision could leave Kurds who risked their lives to fight ISIS in harm’s way.And Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT), probably Trump’s most vocal Senate GOP critic, characterized the pullout as “a betrayal” that “presages another humanitarian disaster” in Syria. Romney went so far as to join Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT) to demand that administration officials explain their move to lawmakers and the public. Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE), meanwhile, has toned down his Trump criticism lately but warned that the retreat would “likely result in the slaughter of allies who fought with us, including women and children.” Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) managed to subtweet the president, calling Trump’s move “a terribly unwise decision” moments after the president described his wisdom on the matter as “great and unmatched.”Even Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, in a rare rebuke of the president whom he has pledged to protect from removal from office, pleaded with Trump to maintain an American presence in the region and to prevent Turkey from invading.“I urge the president to exercise American leadership to keep together our multinational coalition to defeat ISIS and prevent significant conflict between our NATO ally Turkey and our local Syrian counterterrorism partners,” McConnell said in a statement. Major new conflict between Turkey and our partners in Syria, McConnell said, “would seriously risk damaging Turkey’s ties to the United States and causing greater isolation for Turkey on the world stage.”Among Trump’s allies seeking to thread the needle between opposing the withdrawal and ensuring that the president didn’t feel attacked was Sen. Ted Cruz, who tweeted that while Trump was “right to want to bring our soldiers home,” it would be “DISGRACEFUL” (capital letters Cruz’s) to allow Turkey to attack Kurdish allies in the region.“Our enemies and rivals (Iran, Russia, etc.) don’t abandon their allies,” Cruz said. “If we want allies to stand with America in the future, we shouldn’t either. Honorable nations stand by their friends.”Seemingly alone among Senate Republicans in supporting the withdrawal was Sen. Rand Paul, who is perhaps the biggest cheerleader of Trump’s isolationist instincts. The Kentucky senator told reporters that he stands with Trump “as he once again fulfills his promises to stop our endless wars and have a true America First foreign policy.”Other Senate Republicans have remained tight-lipped on the president’s decision, perhaps praying that Trump will reverse course on the withdrawal—as he did in December 2018, after sharp rebukes from within the party and the resignation of Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis halted a hastily announced drawdown of U.S. troops from Syria.Asked during an event celebrating a trade agreement with Japan on Monday afternoon about whether he had consulted with the Joint Chiefs of Staff about the decision, Trump insisted that he had.“I consulted with everybody,” Trump said.Additional reporting: Sam Brodey Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



          

North Koreans Think Trump Admin Talks Are ‘Sickening.’ So Should You.   

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North Koreans Think Trump Admin Talks Are ‘Sickening.’ So Should You.Alex Wong/GettyIf President Donald Trump is thinking a deal with his friend Kim Jong Un might distract from his troubles at home, he'd better think again. The abrupt end of “working-level” negotiations between U.S. and North Korean officials in Stockholm over the weekend proves yet again that talking isn’t working. “Kim thought he could sucker us because of the president's statements and because our alliances are in trouble and because he believed Trump wanted a foreign policy success,” said David Maxwell, retired special forces colonel and senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. “We have to keep pushing Kim to really conduct negotiations, but the minute we give in to giving him concessions, he has won and we have lost.”While Trump Shrugs, North Korea’s Building Better MissilesIf the firing of the hawkish John Bolton as Trump’s national security adviser “helped Kim think he could get what he wants,” said Maxwell, the North Koreans at Stockholm yet again confirmed that Kim is not about to give up his precious nukes. The nuclear program was initiated by his grandfather, Kim Il Sung, perpetuated by his father, Kim Jong Il, and is now the centerpiece of Kim’s defense policy.North Korea’s foreign ministry left no doubt about the failure of the talks. “We have no intention to hold such sickening negotiations as what happened this time,” said the statement, throwing cold water over the session in Stockholm, which had lasted eight hours and thirty minutes. The U.S. negotiator, Stephen Biegun, had tried in vain to present ideas that the Americans should have known would be unacceptable. A North Korean official identified only as a spokesperson, possibly First Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui, who is a key figure in talks with the U.S., sarcastically mimicked Washington’s demand for “complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization.” The U.S., said the spokesperson, must take “a substantial step to make complete and irreversible withdrawal of the hostile policy toward the DPRK," i.e., the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.The statement wound up with a threat intended to catch the attention of Trump as he contemplates maybe a third summit with Kim–his fourth if you count their impromptu meeting on the North-South line at Panmunjom at the end of June.Better watch out, was the message. If the U.S. “again fingers [points] at the old scenario,” said the spokesperson, “the dealings between the DPRK and the U.S. may immediately come to an end.” Indeed, the statement concluded, “the fate of the future DPRK-U.S. dialogue depends on the U.S. attitude, and the end of this year is its deadline.”The Americans for their part seemed to think another round of talks would be just the thing to head off that looming deadline lest Kim inspire a crisis similar to that of two years ago when tests of nuclear warheads and long-range missiles were the norm. State Department spokesperson Morgan Ortagus said the U.S. was accepting Sweden’s invitation to meet again in two weeks, but North Korea was having none of it.“The U.S. is spreading a completely ungrounded story that both sides are open to meet after two weeks,” said the North Korean spokesperson, but “it is not likely at all that it can produce a proposal commensurate to the expectations of the DPRK and to the concerns of the world in just fortnight [sic].”The statement decried the U.S. failure to come up with what the North Koreans call “a new calculation method,” dismissing out of hand the litany of proposals that Biegun had put on the table.The exact nature of that “calculation method” was not clear, but presumably it calls for prolonging the moratorium on testing nuclear warheads and intercontinental ballistic missiles in exchange for relief from sanctions. The North might even suspend its aging nuclear complex at Yongbyon while fabricating warheads elsewhere in a step-by-step process immune from serious inspections and would surely press for an “end-of-war” declaration under which the U.S. would have to withdraw most of its 28,500 troops from South Korea.“The fundamental problem with Trump’s North Korea efforts—they can’t be called an actual policy—is that North Korea has not even considered giving up its nuclear weapons,” said David Straub, retired senior U.S. diplomat in Seoul and Washington. “As long as that’s the case, no amount of Trump sucking up to Kim will make a real difference, and Trump backed off maximum pressure long ago.”To veteran U.S. diplomats, Trump’s grasp on reality is far from clear. “As with many of his other policies, Trump is engaged in fantasy,” said Straub, “but because he engages in fantasy, who can predict how he will now respond?”  Straub asks if Trump “is mad at Pompeo and his negotiating team and will order even more gifts and concessions?”Evans Revere, who once headed the North Korean desk at the State Department and was number two U.S. diplomat in Seoul, sees the outcome at Stockholm as “a very predictable collapse.” The North Korean strategy, said Revere,  “appears to have been to take advantage of the U.S. fixation on working-level talks, use the testing of increasingly capable ballistic missiles to pressure Washington, and to issue threats about an end-of-year deadline to ensure the United States team came to the table with a more generous, flexible, and creative offer than the one Trump made in Hanoi.”Trump, Revere believes, “backed off maximum pressure long ago.”Under the circumstances, the U.S. was in no mood to articulate publicly its proposals at Stockholm. “The U.S. brought creative ideas and had good discussions with its DPRK counterparts,” said Ortagus at the State Department, citing but not explaining “a number of new initiatives that would allow us to make progress.”Clearly the North Koreans saw all that stuff as diplo-speak for an elaborate ruse to get them to give up their nukes while the North has flaunted its military prowess in short-range missile tests.Trump has said such tests are not in violation of any understanding reached with Kim at their first summit in Singapore last year, but North Korea most recently has aroused concerns by test-firing a short-range missile from an under-water platform. North Korea’s party newspaper, Rodong Sinmun, called the prototype for a submarine-launched ballistic missile a “time bomb” and “most fearful dagger” pointed at its enemies. In theory, a submarine might be able to launch such a missile, tipped with a nuclear warhead, while submerged undetected off the U.S. west coast.In fact, the North Koreans in Stockholm seemed to have gained a measure of revenge for the humiliation of the second Trump-Kim summit in Hanoi at the end of February when Trump walked out without reaching so much as a meaningless statement with Kim similar to the one that ended the Singapore summit.Donald Trump Enters the Eccentric Dictator Phase of His PresidencyThat denouement, which the North Koreans blamed on Bolton and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, resulted in the dismissal of the top North Korean advisers surrounding Kim, notably Kim Yong Chol, the North’s former intelligence chief, whom Pompeo had seen in Pyongyang, New York, and Washington. Trump, after his 45-minute closed-door meeting with Kim on the North-South line at Panmunjom on June 30, said Kim had agreed on working-level talks to bring about a real deal on the basis of their summit in Singapore. “The Kim regime may misperceive from Singapore that it can throw negotiators under the bus, rush into another summit, and extract greater concessions from Trump,” said Leif-Eric Easley, professor of international relations at Ewha University in Seoul, “but a lesson from Hanoi is that if the North Koreans want sanctions relief, they’re going to have to do the work at the working level.” This time, however, the new North Korean negotiator, Kim Myong Gil, a veteran diplomat who had negotiated with Americans in talks in the '90s and then as ambassador to the United Nations, was taking no chances. The meeting, he said, had “not fulfilled our expectations and broke down.” Presumably, on orders from Pyongyang, he was not going to concede anything in return for whatever concessions the Americans might offer. Instead, he staged a walkout of his own.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



          

'Silencing' of Iraq protests coverage feared after attacks   

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'Silencing' of Iraq protests coverage feared after attacksA spree of attacks and threats against media outlets in Iraq has alarmed the United Nations, journalists and monitors, who demand the government prevent the "silencing" of journalists covering mass protests. Raids over the weekend carried out by unidentified gunmen have added to concerns for freedom of expression that were first flagged when authorities implemented a near-total internet blackout after anti-government protests erupted last week in the capital and the country’s south. On Saturday evening, the Baghdad bureaus of Kurdistan-based NRT TV, Saudi-owned Al-Arabiya and local Al-Dijla channel were raided by masked men, the stations said.



          

UPDATE 2-UK retailers suffer worst September on record, BRC says   

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UPDATE 2-UK retailers suffer worst September on record, BRC saysBritish retailers endured their worst September since at least the mid-1990s as people spent money on entertainment instead, according to surveys that painted a muted picture of household demand ahead of Brexit. In a potential warning sign for consumer spending, which has helped the economy in the run-up to Brexit, the British Retail Consortium said total retail sales values declined 1.3% in September compared with the same month last year. A separate survey published on Monday by payment card company Barclaycard showed broader consumer spending -- which includes retail sales -- rose by a "modest" 1.6% in annual terms in September.



          

Hulu just added offline video downloads, but there’s a catch   

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Hulu’s ad-free plan now lets you download up to 25 videos at a time for offline viewing.

Hulu has added offline video downloads to its on-demand video service, but there’s a catch: the feature is only available with Hulu’s $12-per-month ad-free service, not the more popular $6-per-month service with ads. If you’re eligible, downloads are available today on iOS and are coming soon to Android.

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Epson ColorWorks on-demand color label printers   

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Epson announced four new additions to its ColorWorks on-demand color label printer lineup – the ColorWorks C6000A, C6000P, C6500A, and C6500P.


          

Lowe’s clarity, honesty highlight ‘Masterworks 2’ with superior guitarist Belinic   

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While music lovers in Spokane have been eager to get to know James Lowe, the new music director of the Spokane Symphony, we must recognize that he has been eager to learn more about us, too. The quality of a live music performance is inseparable from the quality of the audience.

Musicians will tell you they depend on the energy they feel in the house to attain levels of excellence they could never achieve in the practice room, and they can finish a performance before an appreciative audience feeling refreshed and exhilarated, while playing to an uninvolved crowd leaves them exhausted.

Lowe must have been very pleased after conducting “Masterworks 2: Garden Romance,” his second pair of concerts in the orchestra’s “Masterworks” series, at the Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox. The audience who cheered his appearance onstage, after doing the same for concertmaster Mateusz Wolski, was there not to see and be seen, but because they loved music and were eager to enjoy what the evening had in store.

They applauded at every opportunity and for every musician who took a solo. They chuckled at musical jokes, murmured at especially beautiful patches of melody and rose to their feet in appreciation for what they had been given. This positive energy was more than matched by what one could sense emanating from Lowe himself.

Even when the music did not demand it, he inspired his musicians to enliven every page, every bar, with palpable vitality. The first item on the program, a set of disparate dances by Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975) skillfully orchestrated by Gerard McBurney and published in 1988 as “Suite for Variety Orchestra No. 1,” is charming and enjoyable but certainly not great music.

The dances bear no trace of the searing passion and bleak ironies of the composer’s “Symphony No. 8” that we heard last year on the stage of the Fox so brilliantly conducted by Rei Hotoda. Lowe could certainly have merely allowed the endearing melodies and catchy rhythms of the suite to make their transitory points and move on to the more intellectually challenging parts of the program, but he did not. Instead, every clever turn of phrase, every witty interjection was delivered with point, clarity and focus.

The audience responded by roaring their approval, especially of featured players Keith Thomas (oboe), Chip Phillips (clarinet), Bruce Bodden (flute), and Steven Radcliffe and Greg Presley (pianos). Worthy of special mention was the luxury casting of accordionist Patricia Bartell, whose playing, not only in the solo passages but also in ensemble, was characterized by all the wit, imagination and elegance we have heard so often from her.

Guitarist Robert Belinic

Having enjoyed the delightful bonne bouche of the Shostakovich-McBurney, the audience was eager to hear guitar soloist Robert Belinic take on the beloved “Concierto de Aranjuez (1939)” of Joaquin Rodrigo (1901-1999). He proved himself to be an artist of superior technical finish and intense emotional projection, allied with a humility that allowed him to collaborate fully with his fellow musicians in bringing to life the rich sensory fabric of Rodrigo’s concerto.

Lowe carefully maintained textures in the orchestra that were light and vibrant, exactly as we heard from Belinic’s guitar. As a result, the virtuosity required to get around the technical difficulties posed by Rodrigo’s writing for orchestra and soloist dissolved, leaving the impressions of, as Rodrigo put it, “The fragrance of magnolias, the singing of birds and the gushing of fountains.”

In listening to his playing and remarks from the stage in the pre-concert lecture, one was impressed by the sincerity of Belinic. The guitar is unique in its ability to convey this quality, for the reason that, unlike the case of most other string instruments, the sound we hear is the result of unmediated contact of the string with the body of the performer.

By some neurological decoding, our minds recognize a degree of intimacy in those vibrations greater than can be found in other instruments. Thus, the experience of hearing Belinic play the guitar is like seeing directly into the heart of one who seeks beauty through music and wishes to take us with him.

The intoxicating sensuality of Rodrigo gave way in the second half of the program to the exquisite but sterile beauty of Erik Satie’s (1866-1925) “Gymnopédies 1 and 2 (1888),” composed for piano but heard in these concerts in orchestral arrangements by Satie’s vastly more gifted contemporary, Claude Debussy.

Emotional engagement

A difficult and solitary figure, Satie sought to create music as much as possible without emotional affect, music that could be experienced without engaging feeling. Fortunately, the performance on Saturday night missed that mark thanks to the sensitive orchestration by Debussy and Bodden and Thomas, whose playing commands emotional engagement.

As throughout the evening, Lowe achieved an orchestral texture of amazing transparency in which every strand made its maximum effect. From music that avoids any hint of conflict and sought otherworldly perfection, we moved to music that is as intensely human and fraught with emotion as any ever written: the Symphony No. 40 in G minor K. 550 (1788) of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-91).

Mozart’s music is famous for its perfection of proportion and balance. In the G minor Symphony, however, that perfection is one element in a duality, the other portion of which is the disorder and suffering that inevitably come to us in time. Mozart shifts tonality throughout the piece from minor to major, and back again, to make us feel the insecurity and impermanence of earthly happiness.

In the second movement of the work, the Andante, Mozart begins to state a cheerful diatonic melody in the major only to sour it with a shrilly dissonant chromatic accompaniment that drains the melody of its cheerful energy.

The finale of the work, ordinarily a place for triumph over all of the difficulties that went before it, is in this symphony an expression of anger and disappointment, as attempts at cheerful nonchalance are interrupted by harsh dissonances and pastoral melodies in the major sour into the minor.

Lowe was uncompromising in portraying the stressful emotions of this greatest of all Mozart’s symphonies. He reduced the sweetness of the violins by having them play with little or no vibrato. He asked for bowings that sharpened the outlines of phrases rather than smoothing them over.

Most of all, the impressive clarity we noted throughout the earlier parts of the concert was maintained throughout Mozart’s far deeper and more complex musical argument, allowing us to feel every wrenching disappointment, every burst of anger as though it were our own. Lowe’s unstinting clarity and honesty of musical vision, and his ability to bring that vision to us through music, are beginning to emerge as his most outstanding qualities.


          

Stream on Demand: Keep up with broadcasts on Hulu   

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What’s new for home viewing on Video on Demand and Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu and other streaming services.

Top streams for the week

Cable-cutters can keep up with many primetime network series on Hulu. Among the new shows now available are legal drama “Bluff City Law” with Jimmy Smits, mystery thriller “Emergence” with Alison Tollman, serial killer drama “Prodigal Son” with Michael Sheen, comedy “Perfect Harmony” with Bradley Whitford, melting pot comedy “Sunnyside” with Kal Penn, sitcom spin-off “Mixed-ish” and Portland-set private eye drama “Stumptown” with Cobie Smulders.

You also can see more than two dozen returning shows, including “This Is Us,” “Modern Family,” “The Good Doctor,” “New Amsterdam,” “Empire,” “The Good Place,” “The Voice” and warhorses “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Law & Order: SVU.”

Episodes arrive on Hulu (with limited commercial interruption) a day after their respective network debuts.

The Politician” is a musical melodrama starring Ben Platt as a wildly ambitious high school kid running for class president of his elite private school. Gwyneth Paltrow and Jessica Lange co-star in the satirical series created for Netflix by Ryan Murphy.

An underpaid spy (Manoj Bajpayee) keeps his dangerous life a secret in “The Family Man: Season 1” (India, with subtitles), an espionage thriller with a twist of workplace comedy. Ten episodes on Amazon Prime Video.

Gaby Hoffmann, Amy Landecker, Jay Duplass and Judith Light carry the tunes in “Transparent: Musicale Finale,” which brings the Emmy-winning Amazon Original comedy to an end without its original star Jeffrey Tambor (who left the show after harassment allegations). On Amazon Prime Video.

Great music sustains “Yesterday” (2019, PG-13), a romantic comedy about a failed singer-songwriter (Himesh Patel) who wakes up in a world where the Beatles never existed and performs their songs as his own. Lily James and Ed Sheeran co-star, Danny Boyle directs from an original script by England’s romcom king Richard Curtis (“Love Actually”). On Cable on Demand, VOD, DVD and at Redbox.

Classic pick: Buster Keaton’s action-packed comedy “Steamboat Bill, Jr.” (1928, silent with score) is hilarious and warmhearted and features some of the most amazing stunts captured on camera. Streams free on Kanopy, free through most library systems.

Pay-Per-View / Video on Demand

Shaft” (2019, R) is a multi-generational sequel to the private eye classic with Usher joining previous “Shaft” stars Samuel L. Jackson and Richard Roundtree. Also new:

· Horror reboot “Child’s Play” (2019, R) with Aubrey Plaza and the voice of Mark Hamill;

· Luc Besson’s action film “Anna” (2019, R) with Sasha Luss as a supermodel/assassin;

· Documentary “Pavarotti” (2019, PG-13) from director Ron Howard;

· Essay film “Around India With a Movie Camera” (2018, not rated) created from archival footage of India from 1899 to independence in 1947.

Available same day as select theaters nationwide is “10 Minutes Gone” (2019, R) with Bruce Willis and Michael Chiklis, from direct-to-video veteran Brian A. Miller. Also new are two horror films:

· Logan Miller in “Prey” (2019, not rated) from Blumhouse;

· “The Curse of Buckout Road” (2017, not rated) co-starring Henry Czerny and Danny Glover.

Netflix

A serial killer appears for one night every nine years in “In the Shadow of the Moon” (2019, not rated), a murder mystery with a science-fiction twist. Boyd Holbrook is the cop who follows the case for decades, and Cleopatra Coleman, Bokeem Woodbine and Michael C. Hall co-star in the Netflix Original movie from director Jim Mickle.

Wong Kar-Wai’s romantic action drama “The Grandmaster” (China, 2013, PG-13, with subtitles) stars Tony Chiu-Wai Leong as legendary martial arts master Ip Man. Ziyi Zhang and Chang Chen co-star and Yuen Woo Ping provides the choreography, which Wong turns into something more like a dance onscreen. It was nominated for two Oscars, including one for its rich cinematography.

Kristin Scott Thomas stars in World War II mystery “Sarah’s Key” (2010, PG-13), from the novel by Tatiana de Rosnay.

The animated short feature “Sound & Fury” (2019, not rated) is a companion piece to the new album by country artist Sturgill Simpson.

True stories: The short documentary “Birders” (Mexico, 2019, with subtitles) celebrates those who monitor and protect birds that migrate across the U.S.-Mexico border.

International TV: A former spy, now teaching Shakespeare, is called back into service in the “Bard of Blood“ (India, with subtitles). Also new:

· “Skylines: Season 1” (Germany, with subtitles), a drama set in the music industry;

· Prison drama “The Inmate: Season 1” (Mexico, with subtitles) about an undercover agent posing as a prisoner.

Kid stuff: A teen social media celebrity becomes a court-ordered wilderness club leader in the live-action comedy “Team Kaylie: Season 1” (TV-PG) for teens and tweens. Also new is the animated adventure “Dragons - Rescue Riders: Season 1” for younger viewers.

Standup:Jeff Dunham: Beside Himself” (2019, not rated).

Amazon Prime Video

Fido” (2007, R), a social satire of the undead used as menial servants, is one of the best zombie comedies to date. Carrie-Anne Moss, Dylan Baker and Billy Connolly star.

International affairs: Vincent Zhao stars in Yuen Woo Ping’s over-the-top action drama “True Legend” (China, 2010, R, with subtitles), featuring appearances by Jay Chou, Michelle Yeoh and David Carradine.

International TV:A French Village: Seasons 1-4” (France, 2009-2012, with subtitles) follows the inhabitants of a rural town during the Nazi occupation of World War II. The hit drama from France played on PBS in some American cities.

Hulu

Disney’s animated “Pocahontas” (1995, G), featuring the voices of Mel Gibson, Irene Bedard and Christian Bale, is one of the last classics of old school animation. It won Oscars for the score and original song “Colors of the Wind.”

Everywhere

American Horror Story: Apocalypse,” the eighth season of Ryan Murphy’s anthology series, is streaming on Netflix, Amazon Prime and Hulu.

HBO Now

The Lego Movie 2: The 2nd Part” (2019, PG) animates the world of interlocking toys for a new adventure involving invaders from outer space.

True stories:Buzz” (2019, TV-MA) profiles the very private Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and celebrated author Buzz Bissinger.

Available Saturday night is “Isn’t It Romantic” (2019, PG-13), a spoof of romantic comedy clichés starring Rebel Wilson and Liam Hemsworth.

Other streams

The fourth season of the documentary series “The Circus: Inside the Wildest Political Show on Earth,” is now on all Showtime platforms. New episodes each Sunday.

The family friendly adventure “A Dog’s Way Home” (2019, PG) with Ashley Judd is now streaming on all Starz platforms.

Doc Martin: Series 9,” the hit British drama starring Martin Clunes as a prickly surgeon turned country doctor, airs exclusively in the U.S. on Acorn TV. New episodes arrive each Thursday, a day after their respective U.K. premieres.

Britbox celebrates the 50th anniversary of “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” with the vintage comedy series “Ripping Yarns“ (1976-1979) from Michael Palin and Terry Jones and the 1980 BBC production of “The Taming of the Shrew“ starring John Cleese.

Two new series from Europe are now running on MHz Choice. “The Embassy” (Spain, with subtitles) is a drama set at the Spanish Embassy in Thailand and “Murder by the Lake” (Germany, with subtitles) is a crime drama set at Lake Constance, where a partnership of German and Austrian detectives solve crimes. New episodes arrive each Tuesday.

The Criterion Channel spotlights four German features “Directed by Christian Petzold,” including the Criterion Channel debuts of the mysterious “Yella” (2007), romantic thriller “Jerichow” (2008) and hard-hitting drama “Barbara” (2012), all starring the brilliant Nina Hoss. With subtitles.

Also on Criterion, “Directed by Lina Wertmüller” spotlights seven features by the Italian filmmaker who was the first woman ever nominated for Best Director at the Oscars, including the satirical “Love and Anarchy” (1973), battle-of-the-sexes comedy “Swept Away” (1974) and Oscar-nominated black comedy “Seven Beauties” (1975), all starring Giancarlo Giannini. With subtitles.

Free streams: Andy Serkis stars as punk rock icon Ian Dury in “Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll” (2010, not rated). It’s now streaming on Kanopy, along with:

· “Frantz” (France, 2017, not rated, with subtitles), a historical drama set between the two world wars directed by François Ozon;

· “War Witch” (2013, not rated, with subtitles), a devastating drama about a child soldier in an unidentified sub-Saharan African nation;

· “Hara-Kiri: Death of a Samurai” (Japan, 2012, not rated, with subtitles), Miike Takashi’s remake of Masaki Kobayashi’s feudal drama;

· Joseph H. Lewis’ “The Big Combo” (1955), a tough film noir starring Cornel Wilde as an obsessive cop and Richard Conte as an arrogant mobster.

New on disc and at Redbox

“Yesterday,” “Shaft,” “Anna,” “Child’s Play”

Sean Axmaker is a Seattle film critic and writer. His reviews of streaming movies and TV can be found at streamondemandathome.com.


          

Power demand falls for second straight month of September   

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Power demand falls for second straight month of SeptemberThe power minister recently told FE that power demand falling 1.6% in August was not connected to the LC mechanism



          

The PowerPAK from SignalFire Wireless Telemetry Serves as On-Demand Power Source for Field Instrumentation When One is Not Available   

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SignalFire Wireless Telemetry introduces the PowerPAK, an on-demand power source for 4-20mA and HART field instrumentation.
          

Re: Improving the TSP [for current participants]   

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vineviz wrote:
Mon Oct 07, 2019 9:57 am

tadamsmar wrote:
Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:59 am

And, unlike a bond fund, it never loses money in nominal dollars (it can lose money to inflation if the inflation rate is higher than the interest rate).


This is a virtue for portfolios which demand almost no volatility. For more typical portfolios, the "never loses money in nominal dollars" is a bug not a feature because it makes the G Fund completely useless at providing diversification.


I don't think you are properly using the term "diversification". I think you mean you you get less negative correlation with G vs F, that's true. But the whole point in the efficient frontier calculation is to take all this into account and provide optimal risk-adjusted return at each level of risk. Do you understand that bad-mouthing the specific characteristics of the assets involved in this calculation makes no difference because the calculation itself accounts for all that?



Have you noticed that on the low end of the risk domain that the efficient frontier calculation allocates some money to the asset that represents the risk-free rate? Yet, that asset provides no diversification (according to your definition of "diversification"). If you think that is a bad thing, then logically you should reject the whole concept of using the efficient frontier since this is an inherent characteristic of the calculation.


tadamsmar wrote:
Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:59 am

The efficient frontier calculation is not clearly faulty. It just uses different assumptions than you did.


The only way to produce the allocations in the L Fund portfolios is to assume that the expected returns of the G Fund and F Fund are precisely equal, which is a fairly aggressive assumption.

[/quote]



Perhaps I don't understand what you are saying, it seems to be obviously untrue since the L Fund estimation obviously assumes that G and F are not equal.
          

issues with short term disability insurance   

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dear fellow bogleheads,

i'd like to hear your thoughts about my problem:

my medical group( my employer) changed the STD insurance company as of 1/1/2019.

i became disabled as of 9/1/2019 ,and will be for probably for 3 months.

when i applied for STD benefits i was told that there is a clause that absolves the insurance from paying if there are preexisting conditions with in the 12 months preceding the file of my claim. there are no preexisting conditions .

long story short , they demand to know everything about my medical history over the last year, request hospital records, PCP statements etc etc.

of course not everybody responds right away and the whole saga drags on. meanwhile i am 7 weeks out of work and no payment has been made ,

of course there is always another statement they want about hospitals, doctors or pharmacies.... basically they delaying and dragging their feet



here are my questions:

do STD insurances have the right to demand private medical information ( HIPPAA anyone ?)

can i take them to court for breach of contract?

is there a national / state ( i'm in NM) review board that i can use to file a complaint ?

any other ideas what I can do ? i am getting really upset.

thank you for your thoughts !

Wahnfried
          

August brand-new residence sales unpleasant surprise with tough showing   

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Developers moved 1,122 new personal homes in the customarily peaceful month of August, down by simply 4.8 percent coming from the 1,179 systems sold in July, as demand continued to be resilient even with the weak macro-economic environment. Approved website: Parc Clematis Final month’s purchases amounts were enhanced through new launch Parc Clematis and purchases at projects that were launched ...
          

‘The Irishman’ Will Screen on Broadway Before It Arrives on Netflix   

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After butting-heads with movie theaters, Netflix has decided to get creative with Martin Scorsese‘s The Irishman. Most theater chains demand a specific window between theatrical screenings and streaming release, but Netflix doesn’t give a damn about that. Since Netflix isn’t willing to play ball, many theater chains are refusing to screen The Irishman. But Netflix wants this […]

The post ‘The Irishman’ Will Screen on Broadway Before It Arrives on Netflix appeared first on /Film.


          

Manchester United set asking price for Alexis Sanchez?   

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Manchester United are reportedly prepared to demand a fee of around 25m to part ways with Alexis Sanchez at the end of the campaign.


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