McHenry man sentenced to prison for cocaine delivery   

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A McHenry man involved in a single-vehicle crash that sent him to the hospital in 2017 was sentenced to prison Monday for having cocaine in his car the day it collided with a utility pole.

David D. McDow, 27, accepted an offer from the McHenry County State's Attorney's Office Monday and pleaded guilty to a felony charge of delivery of a controlled substance. McHenry County Judge Michael Coppedge sentenced McDow to seven years in prison.

In exchange for McDow's guilty plea, prosecutors agreed to dismiss additional charges, several of which were tied to separate cases. The man's attorney, Sam Amirante, said McDow was satisfied with the plea deal and is ready to put the situation behind him.

"He has come such a long way," Amirante said. "He actually turned from a boy to a man and is very, very mature and responsible in everything that he does now."

McDow was arrested in June 2017 after he reportedly crashed his Chrysler Sebring into a utility pole in Woodstock, according to a July 30, 2018 court filing from the McHenry County State's Attorney's Office.

While McDow was being treated for injuries, police conducted an inventory search of the man's vehicle before it was towed, according to the July 2018 court filing.

During the search, police discovered more than 6 ounces of cocaine packaged and ready for sale, according to a news release the McHenry County State's Attorney's Office sent Monday.

Police later learned McDow's blood-alcohol level was .146 at the time of the crash, prosecutors stated in the July 2018 document.

Since his arrest, McDow has worked through some personal issues, his attorney said.

"He’s really turned his life completely around," Amirante said. "It’s sad to see him go away."


          

DeSantis Seeks to Raise Minimum Salary for Florida Teachers to $47,500, or $7,000 Higher Than in Flagler   

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The Florida Education Association statewide teachers union issued a news release saying it was “encouraged to hear Gov. Ron DeSantis make clear that teacher pay matters to his administration.” But it also raised questions about how the plan would be funded and what it would do to help retain longstanding teachers.

The post DeSantis Seeks to Raise Minimum Salary for Florida Teachers to $47,500, or $7,000 Higher Than in Flagler appeared first on FlaglerLive.


          

FBI: Inmate is most prolific serial killer in US history   

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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – The inmate who claims to have killed more than 90 women across the country is now considered to be the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said.

Samuel Little, who has been behind bars since 2012, told investigators last year that he was responsible for about 90 killings nationwide between 1970 and 2005. In a news release on Sunday, the FBI announced that federal crime analysts believe all of his confessions are credible, and officials have been able to verify 50 confessions so far.

Investigators also provided new information and details about five cases in Florida, Arkansas, Kentucky, Nevada and Louisiana.

The 79-year-old Little is serving multiple life sentences in California. He says he strangled his 93 victims, nearly all of them women.

Some of his victims were on the margins of society. Many were originally deemed overdoses, or attributed to accidental or undetermined causes. Some bodies were never found.

The FBI provided 30 drawings of some of his victims – color portraits that were drawn by Little himself in prison. They are haunting portraits, mostly of black women.

The agency also provided videos taken during prison interviews with Little. He described how he spoke about a woman he strangled in 1993 – and how he rolled her down a slope on a desolate road.

“I heard a secondary road noise and that meant she was still rolling,” he said.

In another video, he described a victim in New Orleans. “She was pretty. Light colored, honey brown skin,” he said with a small smile. “She was tall for a woman. Beautiful shape. And, uh, friendly.”

It was 1982, and they met in a club. She left with him in his Lincoln, and they parked by a bayou.

“That’s the only one that I ever killed by drowning,” he said.

Investigators around the country are still trying to piece together his confessions with unidentified remains and unsolved cases from decades past. In August, he pleaded guilty to murdering four women in Ohio. He was convicted in California of three slayings in 2013 and pleaded guilty to another killing last year in Texas.

Authorities in Knox County, Tennessee, said Monday that a woman named Martha Cunningham was likely a victim of Little’s.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reported in December that a cold case investigator with the Knox County Sheriff’s Office had identified the victim who Little called “Martha.” The Knoxville mother’s body was found in a wooded area in eastern Knox County in 1975.

Cunningham’s body was found by a pair of hunters on the afternoon of Jan. 18, 1975. She was bruised and nude from the waist down; her pantyhose and girdle bunched around her knees. Her purse and some of her jewelry were missing. Her body appeared to have been dragged into the woods and dumped behind a pine tree, authorities said at the time.

Despite that evidence, detectives at the time attributed Cunningham’s death to natural causes within a day of the discovery. The medical examiner’s investigative report lists the probable cause of death as “unknown.”

Cunningham was a talented singer and pianist who grew up performing with her parents and her six younger siblings in a gospel group known as the Happy Home Jubilee Singers.

Law enforcement in Tennessee had Little in custody 19 years after Cunningham’s body was found.

Little was convicted of misdemeanor larceny in 1994 in Nashville, Tennessee, and he was sentenced to 90 days in jail, according to Tennessee Bureau of Investigation criminal records obtained Monday by The Associated Press.


          

UAW says negotiations with GM have ‘taken a turn for the worse’   

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DETROIT – The UAW’s lead negotiator said Sunday that talks with General Motors have “taken a turn for the worse.”

The surprise negative development followed reports of progress in recent days and adds more uncertainty to when the UAW’s 3-week-old strike against GM might come to an end.

In fact, a person close to the talks told the Free Press that the bargaining had turned somewhat sour as GM walked back what had been a proposed solution for temporary workers.

Health care, as of Saturday, was resolved, meaning it would not change or cost members more. But the person said the union considers GM’s last two proposals to be like ultimatums.

In a letter to union members around 11:30 a.m. Sunday, Terry Dittes, vice president for the UAW GM Department, said that the UAW on Saturday afternoon had prepared an extensive proposal and presented it to GM.

“Our proposal addressed issues of wages, signing bonus, job security, pensions, skilled trades, profit sharing, transfer rights; to name just a few,” Dittes said.

GM responded at 9:05 a.m. Sunday, Dittes said.

“The company’s response did not address our extensive package provided last evening,” Dittes wrote. “They reverted back to their last rejected proposal and made little change. The company’s response did nothing to advance a whole host of issues that are important to you and your families! It did nothing to provide job security during the term of this agreement.”

He wrote that the union, “could not be more disappointed with General Motors who refuse to recognize the experience and talent of our membership who make their world class products and billions of dollars in profits.”

Dittes said that after making progress on key issues “a couple days ago, the company has shown an unwillingness to fairly compensate the great workforce of the UAW. These negotiations have taken a turn for the worse. Your issues are our issues, and our strength is with you, our great membership. We will continue to negotiate on behalf of you, your families and all workers in our country.”

GM provided a statement in response to Dittes’ letter that defended the company’s proposals:

“We continue to negotiate in good faith with very good proposals that benefit employees today and builds a stronger future for all of us. We are committed to continuing discussions around the clock to reach a resolution.”

Roughly 46,000 UAW workers went on strike against GM sites nationwide on Sept. 16 after the 2015 contract expired two days before. The union continued contracts with Ford and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, following the customary plan to negotiate a deal with one company to use as a template for the other two.

A news release from the UAW Sunday afternoon included an email exchange between Dittes and Scott Sandefur, who is heading up negotiations for GM. The exchange highlighted the separation between the two sides as well as providing more details about the UAW proposal and response from GM.

“This package addressed a minimum of (35) hourly proposals and three (3) salaried proposals. Our extensive proposal package was an effort to move this set of negotiations to the next step to reach a tentative agreement,” according to the Dittes email to Sandefur. “During your response to our proposal delivered at 9:05 a.m. today, Sunday, October 6, 2019, you didn’t even have a professional courtesy to explain why you could not accept or why you rejected our package proposal for each item we addressed.”

Dittes continued by saying, “we expect the company to respond and discuss the package proposal we presented yesterday. The law and basic decency require no less.”

The change in tone about the state of talks followed word on Saturday from a person familiar with negotiations that the remaining outstanding issues centered on pensions and 401(k)s and the narrowing of the pay gap for in-progression workers.

The negotiations have continued as more than 46,000 GM UAW workers have remained on strike. The spillover impact from the strike has led to plant shutdowns outside of the United States, supplier layoffs and substantially reduced pay for striking workers, who now get $250 per week from the union’s strike fund.

Also this weekend, the Free Press reported that Vance Pearson, the director of the UAW region covering 17 states from Missouri to California, has been placed on leave. Pearson, who succeeded Gary Jones in the post when Jones became UAW president, is among those charged in an ongoing corruption probe. Jones has also faced scrutiny as his house was among those raided in August, and a source identified him as an unnamed union official who had $30,000 seized from his home.


          

O Canada – What’s Up with Salmonella and E. coli?   

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Listen while reading. Salmonella: The Public Health Agency of Canada issued a news release this week announcing that 110 Canadians have been sickened by the Reading strain of salmonella. There have, however, been no product recalls issued by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. “Based on the investigation findings to date, exposure to raw turkey and raw chicken products has been identified as the likely source of the outbreak,” the Public Health Agency said, adding that outbreaks are continuing. “Many of the individuals who became sick reported eating different types of turkey and chicken products before they fell ill,” the agency said. There have been 26 people sickened in British Columbia, 36 in Alberta, 24 in Manitoba and seven in Ontario and one each in Quebec, the Northwest Territories and New Brunswick plus six in Nunavit. Whole-genome sequencing linked all of these cases, which showed up between Apr. 2017 and Aug. 2019. Thirty-two people were…
          

Man who says he killed 93 women is America's deadliest serial killer, FBI says   

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Authorities say Samuel Little, 79, serving life in California prison, has confessed to the murders

The Federal Bureau of Investigation says the man who claims to have killed more than 90 women across the United States is the most prolific serial killer in the country’s history.

In a news release on Sunday, the FBI said Samuel Little confessed to 93 murders. Federal crime analysts believe all of his confessions are credible, and officials have been able to verify 50 confessions so far.

Continue reading...
          

Man convicted of drug, gun charges sentenced to prison   

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DOVER, Del. (AP) - A Delaware man who law enforcement says was caught with over 10,000 baggies of heroin and an AR-15-style semi-automatic assault weapon been sentenced to more than nine years in prison.

U.S. Attorney David C. Weiss said in a news release Monday that 49-year-old Kenneth Holland of ...

          

Oprah Winfrey now has the largest endowment ever at Morehouse College in Atlanta   

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Oprah Winfrey now has the largest endowment ever at Morehouse College in Atlanta  Oprah Winfrey now has the largest endowment ever at Morehouse College in Atlanta after donating $13 million (Ksh1.3 billion), according to a news release from the school. Winfrey visited the all men’s historically black college Monday for the 30th anniversary of the
          

College student votes doubled in last year   

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More college students came out to vote in the 2018 midterm elections than the 2014 midterms, according to a news release from Jen McAndrew, a source from Tufts University. “The turnout gap between students over 30 and those under 22 narrowed from 22.3 percent points to 16.9 points,” according to McAndrew. During the 2018 midterm...
          

Jury rules for Kansas clinic operator in stalking case    

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WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — A federal jury has sided with the operator of a Wichita abortion facility who contended she had reasonable grounds to seek a protection-from-stalking order against an abortion protester.

The verdict returned Tuesday follows a seven-day trial in the lawsuit filed by anti-abortion activist Mark Holick against clinic operator Julie Burkhart.

The lawsuit stems from anti-abortion protests in 2012 and 2013 in front of Burkhart's home and neighborhood. She got a temporary protection-from-stalking order against Holick that was dismissed two years later. He then sued her.

Jurors found Holick failed to prove his claim for malicious prosecution.

Burkhart says in a news release that she opened the clinic after Dr. George Tiller was killed for providing abortions. She says that's why she finds threats against her and her family "particularly chilling."


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