Baltimore IT director who went on leave after ransomware attack is no longer employed with the city   

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Baltimore IT director Frank Johnson, who went on leave in September amid criticisms over his handling of the recovery from a crippling ransomware attack, no longer works for the city.

Lester Davis, a spokesman for Democratic Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young, confirmed Monday that Oct. 1 was Johnson’s...


          

Virginia deserves better than self-described ‘redneck’ Amanda Chase   

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Regarding the Oct. 1 front-page article “Va. legislator’s swagger stirs GOP election angst”: “Swagger” is not a word I would use to describe Virginia state Sen. Amanda F. Chase. A self-described...
          

Carrie Lam Vows to Stop ‘Limitless and Lawless’ Violence in Hong Kong   

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Carrie Lam Vows to Stop ‘Limitless and Lawless’ Violence in Hong Kong(Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam said her government could handle growing violence without intervention by Beijing, but didn’t rule out seeking China’s help or invoking further emergency measures.“I still strongly feel that we should find the solution ourselves,” Lam told reporters Tuesday before a meeting of the city’s Executive Council. “That’s also the position of the central government that Hong Kong should tackle the problem on our own. But if the situation becomes so bad, then no option should be ruled out if we want Hong Kong to at least have another chance.”Lam said that her visit to Beijing for China’s National Day parade on Oct. 1 had been brief and didn’t include any business meetings with central government officials.Lam condemned protesters’ violence and attacks on businesses, after demonstrators vandalized shops and paralyzed the city’s transit system in some of the worst unrest of the past four months. She said authorities would offer support to industries affected by the movement and called for developers and store owners to provide relief measures.“This kind of violence has become limitless and lawless,” she said. The city government “will use its greatest determination to halt these violent acts,” she said.Stressing the impact to Hong Kong’s economy after four months of pro-democracy protests, she said that visitor arrivals to the Asian financial hub had dropped by more than 50% year on year during the Oct. 1-6 National Day holiday period, when the city is usually packed with tourists.The fierce clashes -- and the specter of Beijing deploying its People’s Liberation Army troops in the city -- have drawn condemnation and concern from officials from the U.S., the U.K. and others.On Monday, U.S. President Donald Trump warned Beijing that trade talks between the two sides could suffer if the country does anything “bad” to try and end protests in Hong Kong. “They have to do that in a peaceful manner,” he told reporters at the White House.The weekend’s unrest followed Lam’s decision to ban protesters from wearing masks under a colonial-era law that could also be used to detain and arrest protesters and censor publications. She didn’t rule out the possibility of further measures under the Emergency Regulations Ordinance, which was last used more than a half century ago to put down leftist riots.“We are faced with such a changing situation,” Lam said. “What I can assure you is the government will take a very serious view and very careful assessment before the ERO is to be invoked again.”The city’s subway network shut down over the weekend as radical protesters clashed with police, throwing Molotov cocktails and bricks at police officers and vandalizing banks and train stations. Many businesses shut down, and video footage showed a taxi driver dragged out and beaten by demonstrators after accusations he’d driven into a crowd of protesters.The dramatic scenes -- including the shooting of a second protester -- were the latest in four months of anti-China demonstrations opposing since-scrapped extradition legislation that have morphed into the most serious challenge to Beijing’s rule since Hong Kong returned to Chinese control in 1997.Lam has previously took the blame for the “entire unrest,” after withdrawing her ill-fated proposal to allow extraditions to mainland China. Last week, she condemned radical protesters and saying mask ban was required in the face of unending violence.“It is too early to say that the anti-mask law is not effective. For any new policy or new legislation, it will take time for it to be effectively implemented,” Lam said Tuesday. “If a piece of legislation has been enacted, but people refuse to abide by the law, then of course we have a problem at hand.”To contact the reporters on this story: Iain Marlow in Hong Kong at imarlow1@bloomberg.net;Shawna Kwan in Hong Kong at wkwan35@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Karen LeighFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



          

Panel: Board Should Have Granted Patentee Leave To Seek Correction   

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WASHINGTON, D.C. - In an Oct. 1 ruling, the Federal Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals found that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board abused its discretion when it denied a request by Honeywell International Inc. to correct an error in the chain of priority listed on the face of a Honeywell patent (Honeywell International Inc. v. Arkema Inc., Nos. 2018-1151, -1153, Fed. Cir., 2019 U.S. App. LEXIS 29478).
          

Sponsored: Milwaukee Film Festival Tickets On Sale This Week!   

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Tickets to the 2019 Milwaukee Film Festival will be available to Milwaukee Film Members Oct. 1 and to the general public on Oct. 3. To explore the films and purchase tickets, visit mkefilm.org/tickets.
          

Sponsored: Milwaukee Film Festival Tickets On Sale This Week!   

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Tickets to the 2019 Milwaukee Film Festival will be available to Milwaukee Film Members Oct. 1 and to the general public on Oct. 3. To explore the films and purchase tickets, visit mkefilm.org/tickets.
          

Sponsored: Milwaukee Film Festival Tickets On Sale This Week!   

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Tickets to the 2019 Milwaukee Film Festival will be available to Milwaukee Film Members Oct. 1 and to the general public on Oct. 3. To explore the films and purchase tickets, visit mkefilm.org/tickets.
          

Sponsored: Milwaukee Film Festival Tickets On Sale This Week!   

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Tickets to the 2019 Milwaukee Film Festival will be available to Milwaukee Film Members Oct. 1 and to the general public on Oct. 3. To explore the films and purchase tickets, visit mkefilm.org/tickets.
          

Orchestra Presents Sounds from British Isles in Fall Concert   

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Orchestra held their first concert of the year, Sounds from the British Isles, on Tuesday, Oct. 1 at the Round Rock ISD Performing Arts Center (PAC).  At this fall concert, the four orchestras performed pieces featuring Irish and English music that they prepared since the beginning of the year.  The concert began with the Camerata...
          

Louisiana men suspected of killing witness in Dallas cop's murder trial   

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Louisiana men suspected of killing witness in Dallas cop's murder trial

DALLAS - Police say a drug deal involving three men from Louisiana is what ultimately led to the death of a witness in the high-profile trial of a Dallas police officer.

WFAA reports the three men from the Alexandria area, identified as Michael Mitchell, 32, Thaddeous Charles Green, 22, and 20-year-old Jacquerious Mitchell, are suspected in the murder of Joshua Brown.

Jacquerious Mitchell is said to be in police custody at a hospital. Michael Mitchell and Green are still wanted.

Investigators say the trio traveled to Texas to buy marijuana from Brown, who had recently testified in the trial of former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger. Brown had lived in the same apartment building as Guyger, where she fatally shot Botham Jean.

Guyger was convicted Oct. 1 and sentenced the next day to 10 years in prison. Guyger said she mistook Jean's apartment for her own and thought he was an intruder when she fatally shot him in September 2018.


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Liberals and Conservatives agree: Ford is a liability for the federal Conservatives in Ontario   

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It is the one thing Justin Trudeau, Doug Ford, and Andrew Scheer seem to agree on: Ontario’s Progressive Conservative premier is considered a liability to the federal Conservative campaign here.

For Scheer, Premier Ford is a sort of Voldemort from Harry Potter — he who shall not be named.

For Trudeau, the nation’s most powerful and polarizing Conservative is a useful foil who can motivate disillusioned or complacent Liberal voters.

For Ford, still bothered by being booed at the Toronto Raptors’ June victory celebration while Trudeau and Mayor John Tory were cheered, the federal campaign is a time to seethe privately and regroup.

The premier did Scheer a favour last summer, delaying the scheduled return of the Ontario legislature from Sept. 9 until Oct. 28, one week after the federal election.

That was to give the national Conservatives a clean runway in Ontario.

Ford’s government also averted a strike this week by 55,000 school support workers, ceding to most of the demands from the Canadian Union of Public Employees to the relief of parents, students, and the federal Tory campaign.

For his trouble, Scheer has thanked the premier by refusing to utter his name in speeches, treating it as a four-letter F-bomb even while campaigning 700 metres from his Etobicoke home.

Adding insult to injury, the federal Tory leader conscripted Alberta Premier Jason Kenney last weekend to swoop into Ontario for 23 Ford-free campaign events, including in Ford’s riding of Etobicoke North.

Four Ford loyalists, speaking confidentially in order to discuss internal conversations, said the premier feels slighted by Scheer, who he invited to be the keynote speaker at the Ontario PC convention last November.

“He looks like the black sheep sitting in the corner simply because Scheer doesn’t want to make the narrative about Ford,” said one insider.

But another emphasized that if Scheer loses the Oct. 21 election, any Conservative failure to break through in Ontario should not be blamed on the provincial PC government’s record.

“After (Trudeau’s) ‘blackface’ (scandal), there’s no way Andrew Scheer can say Doug Ford cost him the election. That’s on Scheer and Scheer alone,” said the second source, pointing to the racism controversy that jolted the Liberal leader’s campaign last month.

Scheer has been criticized for concealing he is a dual American citizen and for inflating his professional credentials — snafus that have nothing to do with Ford.

A third confided the premier was galled that Kenney, who he campaigned for before the last Alberta election, was stealing his thunder in his backyard.

“We won 76 seats (in Ontario) last year. You don’t think we understand the lay of the land here?” fumed the third source.

Most of Ford’s ire, however, is reserved for the Liberal leader.

“Doug is willing to sit on his hands for another two weeks (until the election),” said a fourth provincial Tory insider.

“But it is really bugging him to have to do so.”

At Monday’s English-language debate, Trudeau name-checked Ford three times during the national telecast and on two more occasions in the post-event scrum with reporters.

“You seem to be oddly obsessed with provincial politics,” joked Scheer, artfully avoiding a Ford mention.

“There is a vacancy for the Ontario Liberal leadership and if you’re so focused on provincial politics, go and run for the leadership of that party.”

But a Liberal strategist insists there is a method to their madness because Ford, better known than the milquetoast Scheer, gets unmotivated Grit voters off their couches and to the polls.

“Ontario voters gave Doug Ford a blank cheque last year and elected him with an uncosted platform — just like Andrew Scheer is trying to get away with. How’s that working out?”

Even as Trudeau goads Ford on a regular basis during the campaign, the premier’s vanishing act has become fodder for editorial cartoons and a sketch on CBC’s, This Hour Has 22 Minutes.

In the Oct. 1 show, Ford, played by Mark Critch, is depicted as an elusive Bigfoot lurking in the woods.

Brandishing an Andrew Scheer election sign, a startled camper is able to scare him off.

Later, Ford’s notorious gas-pump stickers affixed to a tree are presented as evidence Sasquatch was in the vicinity.

In comedy as in this campaign, the premier quietly looms large.

Robert Benzie is the Star’s Queen’s Park bureau chief and a reporter covering Ontario politics. Follow him on Twitter: @robertbenzie


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