Operator Mesin   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Barat - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Packing   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Timur - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Packing   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Barat - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Assembling   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Timur - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Checker   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Pusat - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Produksi   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Barat - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Packing   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Pusat - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Produksi   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Timur - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Checker   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Barat - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Produksi   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Pusat - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Assembling   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Pusat - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Operator Assembling   

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PT Narazaki Manufacturing Indonesia - Jakarta Barat - Indonesia, Sekarang sedang membutuhkan Karyawan/ti, Untuk Posisi: 1. Operator Produksi 2.... Quality Control 3. Operator Packing 4. Operator Assembling 5. Administrasi Produksi 6...
          

Manufacturing Data Architect - FCA - Auburn Hills, MI   

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Ability to understand how to combine internal and external data sources in order to develop key data feeds to support analysis by data scientists.
From Fiat Chrysler Automobiles - Sun, 11 Aug 2019 02:11:08 GMT - View all Auburn Hills, MI jobs
          

Manufacturing Process Engineer - Senior - 2861 - Tata Technologies Inc. - Auburn Hills, MI   

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Determine proper feeds and speeds for each machine to ensure HPE productivity targets are achieved. Minimum of a Bachelor’s degree in a technical field …
From Tata Technologies Inc. - Wed, 26 Jun 2019 18:23:58 GMT - View all Auburn Hills, MI jobs
          

Manufacturing Program Manager - 2812 - Tata Technologies Inc. - Auburn Hills, MI   

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Determine proper feeds and speeds for each machine to ensure HPE productivity targets are achieved. 5 -8 years of experience.
From Tata Technologies Inc. - Tue, 11 Jun 2019 18:25:25 GMT - View all Auburn Hills, MI jobs
          

Laser Printing for Rapid Fabrication of Waterproof E-Textiles   

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So-called “smart fabrics” that have sensing, wireless communication, or health-monitoring technology integrated within them are the wave of the future for textile design, which is why researchers have been working on new ways to improve their design and fabrication.

Now a team from RMIT University in Australia have done just that with new technology that can rapidly fabricate waterproof smart textiles with integrated energy-harvesting and storage technology that precludes the need for a battery, researchers said.

rapid fabrication, laser printing, smart fabrics, RMIT University in Australia, waterproof, flexible textile patch
Litty Thekkakara, a researcher from RMIT University in Australia, holds a textile embedded with energy-storage devices developed using a new laser-printing process she and her team invented. (Source: RMIT)

Indeed, this is one of the challenges to developing smart textiles—a power source that doesn’t burden the wearer or is user-friendly, said Litty Thekkakara, a researcher in RMIT’s School of Science who worked on the project.

“By solving the energy storage-related challenges of e-textiles, we hope to power the next generation of wearable technology and intelligent clothing,” she said in a press statement.

Printing the Power

Specifically, Thekkakara and her colleagues have developed a method for fabricating a 10-by-10 centimeter waterproof, flexible textile patch with graphene supercapacitors directly laser-printed onto the fabric.

The invention is an alternative method to current processes for developing smart textiles, which have which have some limitations, she said.

“Current approaches to smart textile energy storage, like stitching batteries into garments or using e-fibers, can be cumbersome and heavy, and can also have capacity issues,” Thekkakara said in a press statement.

The electronic components also can be in danger of short circuiting or failing when they come in contact with sweat or moisture from the environment if the textile isn’t waterproof, she added.

Washable and Durable

The team tested their invention by connecting the supercapacitor with a solar cell to create a self-powering, washable smart fabric. Tests analyzing the performance of the fabric showed it remained relatively stable and efficient at various temperatures and under mechanical stress, researchers said. Researchers reported these findings in an article in the journal Scientific Reports.

 The team envisions the e-textile being used in novel wearable technology, which is currently being developed not only for consumer-fitness applications, but also for specialized clothing in medical and defense sectors for health monitoring and safety tracking, respectively.

The laser-printing method also paves the way for new, more advanced fabrication of next-generation smart textiles that can integrate intelligence in the process itself, said Min Gu, RMIT honorary professor and distinguished professor at the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology

“It also opens the possibility for faster roll-to-roll fabrication, with the use of advanced laser printing based on multifocal fabrication and machine learning techniques,” he said in a press statement.

Elizabeth Montalbano is a freelance writer who has written about technology and culture for more than 20 years. She has lived and worked as a professional journalist in Phoenix, San Francisco and New York City. In her free time she enjoys surfing, traveling, music, yoga and cooking. She currently resides in a village on the southwest coast of Portugal.

The Midwest's largest advanced design and manufacturing event!
Design & Manufacturing Minneapolis connects you with top industry experts, including esign and manufacturing suppliers, and industry leaders in plastics manufacturing, packaging, automation, robotics, medical technology, and more. This is the place where exhibitors, engineers, executives, and thought leaders can learn, contribute, and create solutions to move the industry forward. Register today!

 


          

Robot Democratization: A Machine for Every Manufacturer   

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With collaborative robots proliferating, we wanted to know who’s using these robots and what tasks they’re doing. Design News caught up with Walter Vahey, executive vice-president at Teradyne, a company that helps manufacturers gear up their automation. Vahey sees a real change in the companies that are deploying robotics. For years robots were tools only for the largest manufacturers. They required expensive care and feeding in the form of integrators and programming. Now, collaborative robots require configuration rather than programming, and they can be quickly switched from task to task.

Vahey talked about robot companies such as Universal Robots (UR) which produces robot arms, and MiR, a company that produces collaborative mobile robots. He explained how they’re putting robotics in the hands of smaller manufacturers that previously could not afford advanced automation. The difference is that these robots are less expensive, they can be set up for production without programming, and they can be quickly reconfigured to change tasks.

Universal Robots, MiR, Taradyne, robotics, robots, automation, small manufacturers
Robots are now within the investment reach of small manufacturers. That's fueling a surge in the use of collaborative robots. (Image source: Universal Robots)

We asked Vahey what’s different about collaborative robots and what he’s seeing in robot adoption among smaller manufacturers.

Design News: Tell us about the new robots and how they’re getting deployed.

Walter Vahey: Companies such as Universal Robots and MiR are pioneering the robot space. They’re bringing automation to a broad class of users and democratizing automation. For small companies, the task at hand is to figure out how to fulfill their orders. It’s particularly challenging to manufacturers. In a tight labor market, manufacturers are facing more competition, growing demand, and higher expectations in quality.

Manufacturer can plug UR or MiR robots in very quickly. Everything is easy, from the specs up front to ordering to quickly arranging and training the robot. There’s no programming, and the robots have the flexibility to do a variety of applications. Every customer is dealing with labor challenges, so now they’re deploying collaborative robots to fulfill demand with high quality.

The whole paradigm has shifted now that you have a broader range of robot applications. You can easily and quickly bring in automation, plug it in ,and get product moving in hours or days rather than months. That’s what’s driving the growth at UR and MiR.

The Issue of Change Management

Design News: Is change management a hurdle?. Does the robot cause workforce disruption?

Walter Vahey: We really haven’t seen that as an issue. The overwhelming need to improve and fulfill demand at a higher quality level helps the manufacturers deploy. It outweighs other challenges. We help with the deployment, and the manufacturers are making the change easily.

We grew up as a supplier of electronic test equipment. Since 2015, we’ve entered the industrial automation market with a focus on the emerging collaborative robot space. We see that as a way to change the equation for manufacturers, making it faster and easier to deploy automation.

Design News: What about return on investment? Robotics can be a considerable investment for a small company/

Walter Vahey: The customers today are looking for relatively short ROI, and we’re seeing it from 6 months to a year. That’s a no brainer for manufacturers. They’re ready to jump in.

We work hard to make deployment less of an issue. We have an application builder, and we use it to prepare for deployment. The new user may have a pick-and-place operation. They choose the gripper, and we guide them to partners who make it easy to deploy.

The application builder helps the customer pick the gripper. The whole object is to get the customer deployed rapidly so the automation doesn’t sit. With MiR, the robot comes in, and we find an easy application for the mobile device. We take the robot around the plant and map it. We’ve work to guide customers through an application quickly and make the robot productive as soon as possible.

There are hundreds of partners that work with UR and MiR, providing grippers and end effectors. We have a system that customers can plug into. Customer can look at grippers from a wide range of companies. We’re not working just on the robot deployment. We work to get the whole system deployed so they can quickly get the ROI.

What Tasks Are the Robots Taking On?

Design News: Who in the plant is using the robots, and what tasks are involved?

Walter Vahey: There is a range of users. To be effective at training a robot and configuring it, the people best suited for it are the ones most aware of the task. To get the robot to be effective you have to know the task. By and large, the person who has been doing that task is best suited to train the robot. That person can then train other robots. Nobody’s better suited to do it than the people who know what needs to be done.

The tasks are broad set of applications. We automate virtually any task and any material movement. It’s not quite that simple, but it’s close. With UR, we’re doing machine learning, grinding, packing, pick-and-place, repetitive tasks, welding. It’s a very broad set of applications. In materials it’s also very broad. Parts going from a warehouse to a work cell, and then from the work cell to another work cell, up to a 1000-kilo payload. We’re moving robots into warehousing and logistics space, even large pieces of metal. The robots are well suited for long runs of pallets of materials.

Rob Spiegel has covered automation and control for 19 years, 17 of them for Design News. Other topics he has covered include supply chain technology, alternative energy, and cyber security. For 10 years, he was owner and publisher of the food magazine Chile Pepper.

The Midwest's largest advanced design and manufacturing event!
Design & Manufacturing Minneapolis connects you with top industry experts, including esign and manufacturing suppliers, and industry leaders in plastics manufacturing, packaging, automation, robotics, medical technology, and more. This is the place where exhibitors, engineers, executives, and thought leaders can learn, contribute, and create solutions to move the industry forward. Register today!

 


          

Graphene-Lined Clothing Could Prevent Mosquito Bites   

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Scientists have found the carbon-based material graphene extremely useful in applications ranging from 3D printing to electronic devices to the creation of new materials. Now a team at Brown University has explored a rather novel use of the two-dimensional material—to help prevent someone from getting bitten by mosquitoes.

A team led by Robert Hurt, a professor in Brown’s School of Engineering, has developed fabrics that use graphene to repel mosquitoes in two distinct ways, researchers said.

graphine, mosquitoes, developed fabrics, Brown University
MIT engineers have developed robotic thread (in black) that can be steered magnetically and is small enough to work through narrow spaces such as the vasculature of the human brain. The researchers envision the technology may be used in the future to clear blockages in patients with stroke and aneurysms. (Source: MIT)

One is by acting as a barrier the pesky insects are unable to bite through, they said. The textile’s use of graphene also has proven in experiments to block chemical signals the pesky insects use to sense blood, which dims their urge to bite someone in the first place, researchers said.

Mosquitoes carry serious and sometimes-fatal diseases such as malaria and dengue fever in many parts of the world where medical care is limited, and can infect humans with their bite. This is why there is “a lot of interest in non-chemical mosquito bite protection,” Hurt said in a press statement.

His team already had been working on fabrics that integrate graphene as a barrier against toxic chemicals, which inspired them to explore new uses for the material in textiles, he said. “We thought maybe graphene could provide mosquito bite protection as well,” Hurt said in the statement.

Permission to Bite

To test if graphene could indeed repel mosquitoes, researchers recruited some brave test subjects who were willing to put their arms in a mosquito-filled enclosure with a small patch of skin exposed to disease-free mosquitoes for biting.

The team compared the number of bites participants received on their bare skin, on skin covered in cheesecloth, and on skin covered by a graphene oxide (GO) films sheathed in cheesecloth. GO is a derivative of graphene that can be made into films.

The mosquitoes all but ignored the graphene patch, leading researchers to believe that the material might not just have a physical, but also a chemical component to blocking the insects, they said.

Indeed, the skin covered by dry GO films didn’t get a single bite; participants wearing the cheesecloth and those without protection were not so lucky, sustaining multiple bites.

The Chemical Connection

After this initial test, researchers set out to see if their idea that there is a chemical barrier to mosquitoes in graphene was correct. They dabbed some human sweat onto the outside of a graphene barrier that had previously blocked the mosquitoes. This time, the insects showed as much interest in the area as they did to bare skin, researchers said.

Further tests confirmed that the graphene oxide could provide puncture resistance to the proboscis of mosquitoes that do the biting. However, it worked only when the material was dry; graphene saturated with water would offer little resistance, researchers found.

A workaround for this would be to use GO with a reduced oxygen content called rGO, which proved to be a barrier in both wet and dry conditions, they said.

The team published a paper on their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers next want to try to find a way to make GO water resistant as well by stabilizing it, as it has a key advantage over rGO when designing and developing mosquito-resistant clothing, which is the team’s ultimate aim, Hurt said.

“GO is breathable, meaning you can sweat through it, while rGO isn’t,” he said in the statement. “So our preferred embodiment of this technology would be to find a way to stabilize GO mechanically so that is remains strong when wet. This next step would give us the full benefits of breathability and bite protection.”

Elizabeth Montalbano is a freelance writer who has written about technology and culture for more than 20 years. She has lived and worked as a professional journalist in Phoenix, San Francisco and New York City. In her free time she enjoys surfing, traveling, music, yoga and cooking. She currently resides in a village on the southwest coast of Portugal.

The Midwest's largest advanced design and manufacturing event!
Design & Manufacturing Minneapolis connects you with top industry experts, including esign and manufacturing suppliers, and industry leaders in plastics manufacturing, packaging, automation, robotics, medical technology, and more. This is the place where exhibitors, engineers, executives, and thought leaders can learn, contribute, and create solutions to move the industry forward. Register today!

 


          

Bunting welcomes Robert Clausing as lean manufacturing coordinator   

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Bunting is proud to announce the hire of Robert Clausing as the company’s new lean manufacturing coordinator.


          

Cleveland Vibrator Company announces major expansion   

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Cleveland Vibrator Company announced today that it has  initiated the process of relocating the company’s headquarters and manufacturing operations from Cleveland’s near west side to a larger facility on the city’s south side, according to Craig Macklin, CEO.


          

C&EN: Thickening agents other than vitamin E acetate causing vaping injuries?    

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Great article from Chemical and Engineering News (by Britt Erickson) on the chemistry angle around the mysterious vaping illnesses, with this unusual tidbit about agents other than vitamin E acetate that may be responsible for the problem: 
Thickening agents are common in illicit THC cartridges, but they are rarely added to legal products where testing for potency is required, says Jeffrey Raber, cofounder and CEO of the Werc Shop, a California-based cannabis contract manufacturing and testing firm. 
“THC concentrates are known to be thick and viscous when they are high potency,” Raber says. So when street dealers dilute illicit products with various agents to maximize profits, those products are typically less viscous. Consumers can visually detect the viscosity of the product by turning the cartridge upside down. If a bubble goes from the top to the bottom quickly, it usually means that the product has been cut with something, Raber says. Dealers mask that visual test by adding a thickening agent, so the bubble doesn’t move from the top to bottom as fast, and consumers think they are getting a high-potency product. 
The illicit cannabis market “is out of control and concerning,” even in states like California where recreational cannabis is legal, Raber says. In California, the cannabis black market is estimated to be 3 to 4 times the size of the legal cannabis industry, he notes. 
One source of the black market problem is that California requires testing of final finished cannabis products, Wise says. If a product fails the test, more often than not, it doesn’t get thrown away. Instead, it enters California’s black market and is then distributed to states where cannabis is illegal, she says.
(Out-of-spec product being reworked for sale? Say it isn't so!)

In a similar news, I found the Mayo Clinic study (covered here by the New York Times) to be interesting, since they did not visually detect signs of lipoic pneumonia, as would be expected if it was vitamin E acetate causing the problem. Rather, the physicians explained it this way:
“All 17 of our cases show a pattern of injury in the lung that looks like a toxic chemical exposure, a toxic chemical fume exposure, or a chemical burn injury,” said Dr. Brandon T. Larsen, a surgical pathologist at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz. “To be honest, they look like the kind of change you would expect to see in an unfortunate worker in an industrial accident where a big barrel of toxic chemicals spills, and that person is exposed to toxic fumes and there is a chemical burn in the airways.” 
The injuries also look like those seen in people exposed to poisons like mustard gas, a chemical weapon used in World War I, he said.
I find Dr. Larsen's speculation a little confusing, i.e. do pathologists have visual markers for the various types of chemical injuries to the lungs? (They must have, right? I mean, do acidic burns look different than basic (say, ammonia burns), etc., etc?) There can't be just one visual presentation of lung tissue damage from chemicals, can there?

I confess to be very confused as to what exactly is causing the vaping illnesses, and I would really like chemists to get involved to determine what exactly the bad actor (or actors) is/are.

          

Higher steel exports to give momentum to production   

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Higher steel exports to give momentum to productionThe manufacturing PMI for India for September 2019 at 51.4, though exceeding contraction scenario, is no improvement over previous month.



          

Mahindra and Mahindra Rating: Buy; Synergy benefits expected from Ford joint venture   

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Mahindra and Mahindra Rating: Buy; Synergy benefits expected from Ford joint ventureThe JV will house Ford’s India manufacturing business. MM will be responsible for running the JV in India.



          

German manufacturing data released   

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Quality Inspector   

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NJ-New Providence, Quality Inspector Location : New Providence NJ US 07974 Job Type : Direct Reference Code : 19975-AS1 Compensation : 17.00 - 20.00 USD/HOUR Start Date : 10/07/2019 Hours : Full Time Required Years of Experience : 3 Required Education : High School Diploma / GED Travel : No Relocation : No Job Industry : Engineering Job Description : Permanent position for a Quality Inspector for manufacturing of co
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