Ron Johnson gushes Conspiracy Theories, doesn't Trust FBI and CIA, before and now after.    

Cache   
Ron Johnson became Wisconsin's Senator because he didn't understand the Affordable Care Act, and hated a program offering more people access to affordable health insurance. He even said...


And it only got worse from there. In Washington, Johnson's blathering idiocy became the talk of the town:

And then he got reelected...true!

Johnson plays Trump as Victim, says he's "...never seen a president, administration, be sabotaged from the day after the election: Amazing. Let's remind our clueless Dumb Ron Johnson why that's not true either:
1. Here’s John Boehner offering his plans for Obama’s agenda: “We're going to do everything — and I mean everything we can do — to kill it, stop it, slow it down, whatever we can.”

2. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell summed up his plan to National Journal: “The single most important thing we want to achieve is for President Obama to be a one-term president.”

3. Mike Pence, underscored the point with a clip from Patton, showing the general rallying his troops for war against their Nazi enemy: “We’re going to kick the hell out of him all the time! We’re going to go through him like crap through a goose!”

4. Even though the economy was in free fall, not one House Republican had voted for the effort to revive it, prompting a wave of punditry about a failed party refusing to help clean up its own mess and dooming itself to irrelevance.

5. Have we forgotten that right when President Obama took office in 2009, the Republican leadership in Congress planned a no-honeymoon strategy of all-out resistance to Obama, even though the country was in an economic meltdown? Then-Sen. George Voinovich (R-Ohio) said that “if [Obama] was for it, we had to be against it.”
So it's mind-bending to hear Dumb Ron Johnson whine about the supposed "attacks" on the grifting Trump family presidency:
Johnson: "I have never in my lifetime seen a president after being elected, not having some measure of well wishes from his opponents; I've never seen a president, administration, be sabotaged from the day after the election; I've never seen no measure of a honeymoon what-so-ever." 
Johnson, chairman of the Senate's Homeland Security committee, rambled from one conspiracy theory to another (just like every Trump cultist), and admitted he doesn't trust the CIA or the FBI.
Johnson: "No, I don't — absolutely not. No, and I didn't trust them back then."


So, Nothing like this ever happened under Obama? Trump Investigations plays into GOP Victim-Hood: Here's just a quick reminder below. Note: Remember Trump's own attempts to seek out Obama's birth certificate to prove he was not a U.S. citizen and a secret Muslin:
MSNBC: Republicans made aggressive use of their investigative powers ... matters involving Hillary Clinton, her use of email as secretary of state, her conduct of foreign policy and the Clinton Foundation ... House Republicans unleashed a barrage of subpoenas ... a half dozen GOP-led House committees conducted protracted investigations of the 2012 attacks on U.S. diplomats in Benghazi, Libya ... investigations of the 2009-2011 Operation Fast and Furious episode – a botched initiative against drug cartels that ended up putting guns in the hands of murderers ... investigations into the IRS's treatment of conservatives, and his administration’s loan guarantee to the failed solar-panel startup, Solyndra. And much more.
Who can forget Johnson's imagined "secret society?" 


Or this Johnson gem:


Ron Johnson now has his eye on the governorship in Wisconsin. Just a little advice to anyone thinking about moving to a state who's economy is held hostage by the gerrymandered Republican Party determined to not change a thing because after 8 years of control, everything is perfect now; DON'T. 



          

Schools launch Kindness Campaign   

Cache   
State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mark Johnson has declared October School Safety and Kindness Month and local school officials are getting behind the launch of the new Kindness Campaign.
          

In the Woods   

Cache   
Anna Ruth Johnson from Haran Baptist Church in Roanoke, VA brings us this tree-filled design. Their theme for their service was “Consider the Stars.” They built a large projection screen and used video footage of the night sky, oceans, mountains, etc. as well as footage taken from the International Space Station. For the surrounding walls, they hung […]
          

Tiny Windows   

Cache   
Anna Ruth Johnson from Haran Baptist Church in Roanoke, VA brings us this stained glass window look. From Anna: We chose a stained-glass window theme for an evening praise and worship service. To accompany the projected images of stained glass, I used the shape of a cathedral window and cut panels from black foam board to […]
          

Community of Metal Designers (art roundup)   

Cache   











































          

Boris Johnson Preparing for Brexit Talks to Collapse: Spectator   

Cache   

Boris Johnson Preparing for Brexit Talks to Collapse: Spectator(Bloomberg) -- Boris Johnson’s government is preparing for Brexit talks to collapse, a move for which it will blame Ireland and European Union leaders, according to a text message from one of the prime minister’s officials reported by the Spectator magazine.The message, which ran to nearly 800 words, was published in full by the magazine on its website. It was attributed simply to someone in Johnson’s office.It blamed the EU’s refusal to move on the Irish border question, which has stalled talks for more than a year, on Parliament for passing a law that aims to stop Johnson taking the U.K. out of the bloc without a deal. As a result of that, the author claimed Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar had decided not to make concessions on the border.The message suggested that the main way Johnson would try to avoid delaying Brexit would be to try to get an EU country to veto one. It said Britain would offer rewards to any country opposing an extension to negotiations. According to the Spectator, the U.K. would also threaten cooperation on areas including defense and security if it stays in the EU.Johnson Warned Against Big Tax Cuts as U.K. Faces No-Deal ShockNevertheless, the author seemed to accept that an extension was likely, and that Johnson would then fight an election, promising a no-deal Brexit immediately if he won.Talks about Johnson’s Brexit plan, announced last week, are due to continue Tuesday in Brussels. The U.K. side has given more legal detail about how its plan would work, but EU leaders are still demanding that Britain drop its plan to introduce a customs border on the island of Ireland. There’s an informal deadline for the talks of the end of this week. Johnson yesterday called counterparts in what Brexit minister James Duddridge told Parliament was an attempt to “whip up enthusiasm for the deal and avoid no-deal.”Rules and QuestionsMeanwhile, Johnson’s government has delayed publishing its rules for when it would be able to intervene to help businesses after a disagreement over what those rules should be.According to a person familiar with the plans, speaking on condition of anonymity, changes to state aid rules were going to be published Tuesday. That has now been held back.The precise nature of the disagreement isn’t clear, but for months there has been an argument within government on the issue. The Treasury has argued that the European Union’s rules should be copied into British law, to give businesses continuity, and to promote competition. EU rules aim to prevent governments from distorting markets by helping particular companies.On the other side of the argument are ministers who want the government to be able to help businesses struggling in the wake of a no-deal Brexit. Without the constraints of the EU’s rule, the government would be able to back national champions, potentially undercutting rival European firms.To contact the reporter on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Robert JamesonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



          

Trump left isolated as Republican allies revolt over US withdrawal from Syria   

Cache   

Trump left isolated as Republican allies revolt over US withdrawal from SyriaMitch McConnell and Lindsey Graham lead condemnation of foreign policy move that could prove ‘disaster in the making’Donald Trump with Mark Milley, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, in the Cabinet Room on Monday. Lindsey Graham said abandoning the Kurds would be ‘a stain on America’s honour’. Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/APDonald Trump was dangerously isolated on Monday as, in a rare rebuke, some of his most loyal allies revolted against his decision to withdraw US troops from north-eastern Syria.Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell led a chorus of Republicans who, having defended the president on almost every other issue – including over impeachment – decided to draw a line in the sand.“A precipitous withdrawal of US forces from Syria would only benefit Russia, Iran, and the Assad regime,” McConnell said. “And it would increase the risk that Isis and other terrorist groups regroup.”He added: “As we learned the hard way during the Obama administration, American interests are best served by American leadership, not by retreat or withdrawal.”The criticism was significant because McConnell is usually at pains not to cross Trump even at his most capricious. Last week the Kentucky senator released a Facebook video promising to stop Democratic-led impeachment in its tracks.Article 1 of the United States constitution gives the House of Representatives the sole power to initiate impeachment and the Senate the sole power to try impeachments of the president. A president can be impeached if they are judged to have committed "treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors" – although the constitution does not specify what “high crimes and misdemeanors” are.The process starts with the House of Representatives passing articles of impeachment. A simple majority of members need to vote in favour of impeachment for it to pass to the next stage. Democrats currently control the house, with 235 representatives.The chief justice of the US supreme court then presides over the proceedings in the Senate, where the president is tried, with senators acting as the jury. For the president to be found guilty two-thirds of senators must vote to convict. Republicans currently control the Senate, with 53 of the 100 senators.Two presidents have previously been impeached, Bill Clinton in 1998, and Andrew Johnson in 1868, though neither was removed from office as a result. Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 before there was a formal vote to impeach him.Martin BelamThe unusual fracture emerged on Sunday night when, shortly after a phone conversation between Trump and Turkey’s president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the White House announced removal of US troops from the Syria-Turkey border area. “Turkey will soon be moving forward with its long-planned operation into Northern Syria,” it added.Critics of all political stripes have long feared that the move could open the way for a Turkish strike on Kurdish-led fighters in the area. Kurdish groups have fought alongside a small US presence in Syria to drive Islamic State militants from the region.The Republican backlash was rapid and potentially unnerving for a president whose fate is tethered to the party and the assumption that it will acquit him in the Senate if, as widely expected, the Democratic-led House of Representatives votes for impeachment.Lindsey Graham, chairman of the Senate judiciary committee, who has become an outspoken defender (and frequent golf partner) of Trump, did not acquiesce this time. Abandonment of the Kurds would be “a disaster in the making”, he said, and “a stain on America’s honour”.Graham told Fox News: “I hope I’m making myself clear how short-sighted and irresponsible this decision is. I like President Trump. I’ve tried to help him. This, to me, is just unnerving to its core.”Graham wrote on Twitter that if the plan goes ahead, he will introduce a Senate resolution opposing it and seeking reversal of the decision. He added: “We will introduce bipartisan sanctions against Turkey if they invade Syria and will call for their suspension from NATO if they attack Kurdish forces who assisted the US in the destruction of the ISIS Caliphate.”Kevin McCarthy, the top Republican in the House, whose attempts to defend Trump’s phone call with Ukraine’s president have provoked mockery, said: “If you make a commitment and somebody is fighting with you, America should keep their word.”Michael McCaul of Texas, the lead Republican on the House foreign affairs committee, also urged the president to reconsider. “The United States should not step aside and allow a Turkish military operation in north-east Syria,” he said. “This move will undermine our ongoing campaign to prevent an Isis resurgence and will ultimately threaten our homeland.“Additionally, the United States needs to stay engaged to prevent further destructive involvement in the region from our adversaries like the Assad regime, Putin and Iran.”Notably, senator Marco Rubio of Florida, reluctant to criticise Trump even when the president suggested that China investigate former vice president and 2020 election rival Joe Biden, was clear , describing the retreat as “a grave mistake that will have implications far beyond Syria”And Nikki Haley, Trump’s former UN ambassador, admonished Trump without mentioning his name. “We must always have the backs of our allies, if we expect them to have our back,” she tweeted. “The Kurds were instrumental in our successful fight against ISIS in Syria. Leaving them to die is a big mistake. TurkeyIsNotOurFriend”Ominously for Trump, even conservative Fox News aired dissent. Host Brian Kilmeade described the pullout as “a disaster”, telling viewers of Fox & Friends: “Abandon our allies? That’s a campaign promise? Abandon the people that got the caliphate destroyed?”Republicans who have contradicted Trump before did so forcefully again. Utah senator Mitt Romney described Trump’s announcement as “a betrayal”, adding: “It says that America is an unreliable ally; it facilitates ISIS resurgence; and it presages another humanitarian disaster.”Romney and Democratic senator Chris Murphy issued a joint statement insisting Trump’s administration “explain to the American people how betraying an ally and ceding influence to terrorists and adversaries is not disastrous for our national security interests”.Democrats also piled in but there was a lone voice of support for the president on Capitol Hill. Republican senator Rand Paul, long a critic of foreign intervention, said: “So many neocons want us to stay in wars all over the Middle East forever. [Trump] is absolutely right to end those wars and bring the troops home.”Trump himself was undeterred by the blowback. Speaking at the White House on Monday, he said he has “great respect” for the prominent Republican critics. And added: “People are extremely thrilled because they say it’s time to bring our people back home. We’re not a police force. They’re policing the area. We’re not a police force. The UK was very thrilled at this decision … many people agree with it very strongly.”



          

Why the EU is rejecting Boris Johnson's latest Brexit plan   

Cache   

Why the EU is rejecting Boris Johnson's latest Brexit planIt was no secret that the European Union wasn't prepared to accept U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson's latest Brexit proposal, but The Guardian obtained leaked documents with the EU's point-by-point reasoning for its rejection.Johnson's plan included Northern Ireland remaining in an all-Ireland regulatory zone within the EU's single market for goods and electricity, but with a catch that the EU reportedly couldn't come to terms with. Northern Ireland's parliament would hang on to veto powers to block the arrangement every four years, which was cause for concern for the EU.Beyond that, The Guardian reports that the EU believes Johnson's plan could eventually result in abuses within the trading market. For example, they argue Johnson and his team provided no details about how to combat smuggling and that they removed assurances made by previous Prime Minister Theresa May that Northern Ireland would not enjoy a competitive advantage when it comes to trade. The EU also noted that the U.K. would have access to EU databases which would allow it to police the Irish customs border and the U.K.-Northern Ireland regulatory border even if the proposal was vetoed.EU sources denied that Brussels would present a counteroffer to Downing Street. "It is the U.K. that wants to replace the backstop -- and that is our solution," one senior EU diplomat said. Read more at The Guardian.



          

Boost for Johnson as Court Rules in His Favor: Brexit Update   

Cache   

Boost for Johnson as Court Rules in His Favor: Brexit Update(Bloomberg) -- Follow @Brexit, sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, and tell us your Brexit story. As Brexit negotiations resumed in Brussels, Boris Johnson got a boost from the courts. A Scottish judge ruled in the prime minister’s favor in a case that could have forced him to obey a law requiring him to delay Brexit if he can’t reach a deal.But the lift may only be short-lived. The judge ignored the prime minister’s frequent assertions he won’t seek an extension and instead relied on assurances from government lawyers that he would obey the law. That may make it harder for Johnson to leave without a deal on Oct. 31.Key Developments:Johnson’s lead negotiator, David Frost, is in Brussels for talks with European CommissionScottish judge rules in Johnson’s favor after pledges over Brexit delayWhen This $2 Trillion Market Turns, Start Worrying About BrexitBrexit Deal Prospects Fade as Talks Stall, EU Signals PessimismJohnson Calls EU Counterparts to Urge Shift (4 p.m.)Boris Johnson spoke to his counterparts in Denmark, Sweden and Poland this afternoon, his office said. Brexit minister James Duddridge told Parliament the prime minister was trying to “whip up enthusiasm for the deal and avoid no-deal."Questioned over how the government would meet its apparently contradictory commitments to leave the EU by Oct. 31 and to abide by a law requiring it to seek a delay to Brexit if there isn’t a deal, Johnson’s spokesman James Slack told reporters: "The manner in which this is achieved is a matter for the government." he gave no further details.Government Won’t Publish Brexit Legal Text (3:45 p.m.)Brexit Minister James Duddridge said the government won’t make public the full legal 44-page text of its latest proposals to the EU.The full text “will only be published when doing so will assist with the negotiations,” Duddridge told MPs after being questioned about the issue in the House of Commons. “We’re not going to provide that legal text if it’s going to get in the way of negotiations and get in the way of a deal.”Keir Starmer, Brexit spokesman for the opposition Labour Party, said both Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar and European Commission President Jean-Claude Junker had asked for the document to be published. “The only party insisting on secrecy is the U.K. Government,” he told lawmakers. “The question is obvious: What is the Government hiding?”No Deal Trade Burden at 8 Billion Pounds (1:30 p.m.)Businesses trading between the U.K. and European Union will face almost 8 billion pounds ($9.9 billion) of additional costs in a no-deal Brexit, according to new estimates by the U.K’s tax and customs authority HMRC.Importers will pay a total of 3.8 billion pounds submitting the necessary customs declarations forms if the U.K. leaves the EU without a deal at the end of this month. Exporters’ costs will rise to 3.9 billion pounds, HMRC said.The calculation shows the cost for one year and is based on 2017 trade flows. HMRC said it calculated that year’s EU-U.K. trade flows as if they were carried out with the U.K. outside the bloc.Johnson Wins Scottish Challenge on Extension (12:55 p.m.)A Scottish judge refused to put further obligations on Boris Johnson, saying his “unequivocal assurances’’ to seek an extension to the Brexit deadline were sufficient.At a hearing in Edinburgh on Friday, Johnson’s lawyers promised he will obey a law that forces him to postpone Brexit. The claimants had argued that Johnson couldn’t be trusted and should be forced to comply with the legislation under threat of a fine or imprisonment.“I am not persuaded that it is necessary for the court to grant the orders sought or any variant of them,” Judge Peter Cullen said while giving his ruling.Jo Maugham, one of the challengers, said he will appeal the decision.Johnson May Meet Varadkar As EU Seeks Progress (12:15 p.m.)Boris Johnson may try to meet with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar in the coming days as he seeks to show progress in Brexit talks, according to a U.K. official speaking on condition of anonymity.The U.K. accepts both sides need to know where the proposals put forward by Johnson are heading by Friday, the person said. Both Varadkar and French President Emmanuel Macron signaled they want progress by the end of the week.If insufficient progress is made, then Johnson’s plan may not even appear on the agenda for the Oct. 17-18 EU Council meeting, the person said.Brexit TimelineTime for EU to Compromise, U.K. Says (11:45 a.m.)Boris Johnson wants the EU to engage fully with his proposals for the Irish border and it’s the bloc’s turn to compromise, the prime minister’s spokesman James Slack told reporters in London.Reiterating that he won’t accept Northern Ireland being in a separate customs territory from the rest of the U.K., Slack said London has made compromises and expects Brussels to follow suit. He doubled-down on the premier’s pledge to leave with or without a deal on Oct. 31.“We are ready to talk with the EU at a pace to secure a deal so that we can move on and build a new partnership between the U.K. and the EU, but if this is to be possible, the EU must match the compromises that the U.K. has made,” Slack told reporters. “The prime minister believes that we have set out a fair and sensible compromise.”Johnson will call the leaders of Poland, Sweden and Denmark on Monday, Slack said.EU Demands ‘Workable Solution’ (11:35 a.m.)David Frost, the U.K.’s chief negotiator, is at the European Commission for Brexit talks today, commission spokeswoman Mina Andreeva said.The negotiations this week are “to give the U.K. the opportunity to present their proposals in more detail and then we’ll take stock,” she said.She added that the U.K. has to come up with “a workable solution now and not something based on untried and revocable arrangements.”Scottish Ruling Expected at Noon (Earlier)The latest Scottish court ruling related to Brexit is expected at noon Monday. Politicians are seeking a ruling that forces Prime Minister Boris Johnson to obey a law that requires him to seek an extension if he can’t reach a deal with the European Union.Jolyon Maugham, a lawyer backing the case, said there are two elements to the ruling. First, will the court order Johnson to act as the law dictates, which would create the possibility of fines or even a jail term if he fails?Second, is sending a letter requesting the extension -- which Johnson’s lawyers have promised to do -- enough to comply with the law. Or could the court look at other actions by Johnson that might be seen as undermining the law?Earlier:Brexit Deal Prospects Fade as Talks Stall, EU Signals PessimismWhen This $2 Trillion Market Turns, Start Worrying About Brexit\--With assistance from Edward Evans, Anthony Aarons, Ian Wishart, Alex Morales and Jessica Shankleman.To contact the reporters on this story: Jonathan Browning in London at jbrowning9@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Edward Evans, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



          

Motorcycle Tragedy Is a Real Test for Boris Johnson   

Cache   

Motorcycle Tragedy Is a Real Test for Boris Johnson(Bloomberg Opinion) -- It is every family’s worst nightmare: a traffic accident that takes the life of a loved one, often through no fault of their own. Such incidents are usually an agonizing, private tragedy for those involved. The allegations in the case of 19-year-old Harry Dunn, however, are a matter of transatlantic diplomacy and threaten to become an embarrassment to the British prime minister Boris Johnson.They are also a reminder that diplomatic immunity is often used as a shield in ways that were never intended. Johnson, who once criticized the absurdity of the protections offered, can’t let his voice be muffled this time by his need to keep the Americans onside after Brexit.On Aug. 27, Dunn’s motorcycle collided head-on with a Volvo outside a U.S. intelligence base about 70 miles northwest of London; he suffered multiple injuries and was later pronounced dead. Dunn’s devastated family say they were told by police that they believe the Volvo driver was traveling on the wrong side of the road.The driver of the vehicle, named as 42-year-old Anne Sacoolas, is the wife of a U.S. diplomat who may have only been in the country for a short period. Police reported that she was cooperative initially and had no plans to leave the country. But after Dunn’s death, Sacoolas claimed immunity and returned to the U.S. with her family.The case has sparked outrage in the U.K. Harry Dunn and his family have suffered the ultimate irreversible harm, but they seem to have no recourse at all. Under the 1961 Vienna Convention, diplomats and their families are protected from prosecution in their host country, though the principle dates back thousands of years.It has survived so long for good reason. Not all judicial systems were independent or trustworthy. During the Cold War, there was always the danger that a honeytrap might ensnare a diplomat. But a road in Northamptonshire in 2019 is a long way from such dangers. In recent decades, immunity seems to be abused by diplomats more often than correctly invoked. Waivers of diplomatic immunity are, in practice, rare. Some years ago the Daily Telegraph revealed that the Metropolitan Police made 19 applications for such waivers in the five years to 2007 and most were rejected. A French diplomat accused of assault was sent home. Saudi officials escaped having to account for allegations of indecent assault and drug-dealing.Yet this isn’t just a problem of serious crimes and misdemeanors. If you included parking violations and other smaller offences, diplomatic law-breaking would count for a significant waste of time and resources for the London police.As London mayor, Johnson regularly criticized the U.S. ambassador Robert Tuttle for failing to pay the city’s daily 8 pound ($9.90) congestion charge over three years. “I think it’s the Geneva Convention which prevents me from slapping an ‘asbo’ on every single diplomat who fails to pay, I think it’s an unbelievable scandal,” Johnson said at the time, referring to the Anti-Social Behavior Order penalty that was often used back then against London’s young hooligans.On Monday Johnson broke his silence on Dunn, calling on the U.S. embassy to waive immunity and saying he’d raise the issue with the White House personally. He treads a fine line. His predecessor Tony Blair never lived down accusations that he was George W. Bush’s “poodle”; Johnson is struggling to appease Trump’s sensitivities on Iran and Huawei, both areas where the U.K. disagrees with the president.Brexit complicates things. Trump’s promise of a U.S./U.K. trade deal has become a cornerstone of Johnson’s promise that Brexit will be a success. But the Trump impeachment proceedings have been noted in Westminster. Johnson is often compared to the American president; their chumminess will look less advantageous the more trouble Trump finds himself in.Were immunity to be lifted and Sacoolas found to have caused death by dangerous driving, she might not be sent to prison. Sentences of up to 14 years can be handed down if the offender is under the influence of drink or drugs. But the maximum custodial term for death by “careless or inconsiderate driving” is five years and that is reserved “for rare cases when the blame is exceptionally high.” We’re not likely to find out anway.Could there be a better system? The renowned trial lawyer Geoffrey Robertson has argued that countries should either waive immunity or submit to an international court in criminal cases, with judges from the involved nations. “Any country that chooses to protect an embassy official against prosecution must be treated with the contempt it deserves: Its ambassador should be carpeted, any aid budget reviewed and full details of charges and evidence released to the media,” Robertson wrote nearly a decade ago.It’s hard to live up to such ideals when your entire post-Brexit strategy is about keeping one country happy.To contact the author of this story: Therese Raphael at traphael4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Therese Raphael writes editorials on European politics and economics for Bloomberg Opinion. She was editorial page editor of the Wall Street Journal Europe.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



          

Motorcycle Tragedy Is a Real Test for Boris Johnson   

Cache   

Motorcycle Tragedy Is a Real Test for Boris Johnson(Bloomberg Opinion) -- It is every family’s worst nightmare: a traffic accident that takes the life of a loved one, often through no fault of their own. Such incidents are usually an agonizing, private tragedy for those involved. The allegations in the case of 19-year-old Harry Dunn, however, are a matter of transatlantic diplomacy and threaten to become an embarrassment to the British prime minister Boris Johnson.They are also a reminder that diplomatic immunity is often used as a shield in ways that were never intended. Johnson, who once criticized the absurdity of the protections offered, can’t let his voice be muffled this time by his need to keep the Americans onside after Brexit.On Aug. 27, Dunn’s motorcycle collided head-on with a Volvo outside a U.S. intelligence base about 70 miles northwest of London; he suffered multiple injuries and was later pronounced dead. Dunn’s devastated family say they were told by police that they believe the Volvo driver was traveling on the wrong side of the road.The driver of the vehicle, named as 42-year-old Anne Sacoolas, is the wife of a U.S. diplomat who may have only been in the country for a short period. Police reported that she was cooperative initially and had no plans to leave the country. But after Dunn’s death, Sacoolas claimed immunity and returned to the U.S. with her family.The case has sparked outrage in the U.K. Harry Dunn and his family have suffered the ultimate irreversible harm, but they seem to have no recourse at all. Under the 1961 Vienna Convention, diplomats and their families are protected from prosecution in their host country, though the principle dates back thousands of years.It has survived so long for good reason. Not all judicial systems were independent or trustworthy. During the Cold War, there was always the danger that a honeytrap might ensnare a diplomat. But a road in Northamptonshire in 2019 is a long way from such dangers. In recent decades, immunity seems to be abused by diplomats more often than correctly invoked. Waivers of diplomatic immunity are, in practice, rare. Some years ago the Daily Telegraph revealed that the Metropolitan Police made 19 applications for such waivers in the five years to 2007 and most were rejected. A French diplomat accused of assault was sent home. Saudi officials escaped having to account for allegations of indecent assault and drug-dealing.Yet this isn’t just a problem of serious crimes and misdemeanors. If you included parking violations and other smaller offences, diplomatic law-breaking would count for a significant waste of time and resources for the London police.As London mayor, Johnson regularly criticized the U.S. ambassador Robert Tuttle for failing to pay the city’s daily 8 pound ($9.90) congestion charge over three years. “I think it’s the Geneva Convention which prevents me from slapping an ‘asbo’ on every single diplomat who fails to pay, I think it’s an unbelievable scandal,” Johnson said at the time, referring to the Anti-Social Behavior Order penalty that was often used back then against London’s young hooligans.On Monday Johnson broke his silence on Dunn, calling on the U.S. embassy to waive immunity and saying he’d raise the issue with the White House personally. He treads a fine line. His predecessor Tony Blair never lived down accusations that he was George W. Bush’s “poodle”; Johnson is struggling to appease Trump’s sensitivities on Iran and Huawei, both areas where the U.K. disagrees with the president.Brexit complicates things. Trump’s promise of a U.S./U.K. trade deal has become a cornerstone of Johnson’s promise that Brexit will be a success. But the Trump impeachment proceedings have been noted in Westminster. Johnson is often compared to the American president; their chumminess will look less advantageous the more trouble Trump finds himself in.Were immunity to be lifted and Sacoolas found to have caused death by dangerous driving, she might not be sent to prison. Sentences of up to 14 years can be handed down if the offender is under the influence of drink or drugs. But the maximum custodial term for death by “careless or inconsiderate driving” is five years and that is reserved “for rare cases when the blame is exceptionally high.” We’re not likely to find out anway.Could there be a better system? The renowned trial lawyer Geoffrey Robertson has argued that countries should either waive immunity or submit to an international court in criminal cases, with judges from the involved nations. “Any country that chooses to protect an embassy official against prosecution must be treated with the contempt it deserves: Its ambassador should be carpeted, any aid budget reviewed and full details of charges and evidence released to the media,” Robertson wrote nearly a decade ago.It’s hard to live up to such ideals when your entire post-Brexit strategy is about keeping one country happy.To contact the author of this story: Therese Raphael at traphael4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Therese Raphael writes editorials on European politics and economics for Bloomberg Opinion. She was editorial page editor of the Wall Street Journal Europe.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



          

Comment on Impeachment summary 2: of honeymoons and resumés by jmac    

Cache   
<blockquote>Remember when it was said that “Johnson is a moderate Republican? As if that meant something. We were told that “Toomey is a moderate, Tillis is a moderate.”</blockquote> Remember when Goldwater was a radical Republican... by today's standards he would be a center left Democrat.
          

Comment on Impeachment summary 2: of honeymoons and resumés by William    

Cache   
Just to add, after viewing Ron Johnson on MTP. Remember when it was said that "Johnson is a moderate Republican? As if that meant something. We were told that "Toomey is a moderate, Tillis is a moderate." What does that even mean in pragmatic/voting purposes? It never did, and Trump's regime has just accentuated that. They all follow in right behind Trump, parrot all of his wild conspiracies and attacks on the FBI and CIA, repeatedly demonize Democrats. I always have said, at least for the last 20 years, that voting for one Republican is like voting for them all, and this is being borne out. Yet enough credulous voters in certain states will continue to insist that their particular Republican legislator is different from the rest of them, so it's okay to vote for him or her. Maybe these are people who become engaged during campaign season, and then tune out during the actual terms of these people, so as not to realize how they vote in Congress, or what they say on TV programs.
          

JOHNSON   

Cache   

Hermel Johnson …….…..Wake was held: Saturday, October 5, 2019; 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., funeral Service was held: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.@ Taylor Funeral Home Ltd., 63 E. 79th Street, Chicago, IL., @ Cremation., Arrangements Entrusted To: Taylor Funeral Home, 63 East 79th. Street, Chicago, IL 60619: (773) 488.7300 cbtaylorfuneralhome.com

The post JOHNSON appeared first on Chicago Defender.


          

Dwayne Johnson Hints at 'Fast and Furious' Return After Vin Diesel Feud   

Cache   
The 'Hobbs and Shaw' actor appears to have called a truce with Diesel as he thanks the Dominic Toretto depicter for supporting the spin-off movie in an Instagram video.
          

Review: ‘The Royale’ at Olney Theatre Center   

Cache   

Black early 20th-century celebrity heavyweight boxing champion Jack Johnson has had as irresistible a pull on subsequent playwrights and filmmakers as he did on the public of his day. Already the subject of a hit biographical play and movie, Howard Sackler’s The Great White Hope (James Earl Jones’ breakthrough role when the play opened at DC’s […]

The post Review: ‘The Royale’ at Olney Theatre Center appeared first on DC Metro Theater Arts.


          

Jennifer Arcuri, linked to Boris Johnson allegations, refuses to say if relationship was intimate   

Cache   
BRITAIN-EU/

American businesswoman Jennifer Arcuri repeatedly refused to answer questions on Monday about whether she had an intimate relationship with U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson when he was mayor of London.


          

UK's Johnson reportedly to challenge Brexit delay requirement   

Cache   
UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson is prepared to go to the Supreme Court to challenge a law requiring him to ask the EU to dela -More

          

Boris Johnson invited to ‘lie down in front of bulldozers’ at Askham Bog   

Cache   
A YORK MP has said he would lie down in front of bulldozers to save Askham Bog - and has invited Prime Minister Boris Johnson to join him.
          

Comment on This is the Republican strategy by 🇨🇳 China, If You’re Listening... 👂🏻    

Cache   
Right-wing racist Ron Johnson is the only White Walker in the U.S. Senate. P.S. - WINTER IS COMING, TRUMPTARDS! 🏌🐘👈🏼🤪 #ImpeachTraitorTrump 🇷🇺
          

Fox, Jack Henderson   

Cache   
CHARLOTTE, NC- Jack Henderson Fox, 77, passed away October 3, 2019 at Robin Johnson Hospice House. He was born August 16, 1942 in Gaston County, a...
          

Potter, Renee (Hoffman)   

Cache   
GASTONIA – Renee Hoffman Potter, 65 went home to be with her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on October 3, 2019 at the Robin Johnson House. She was...
          

Irish Rock band Dean and Chapter releases astonishing new single Street Corners   

Cache   

According to the band Street Corners   is lead singer Deans take on the Robert Johnson story about selling your soul to the Devil .. the music has been described as being dark, grungy, rock and punk .. and even though the subject matter is dark the lyrics warn against it. Dean Wright is a musician Read More

The post Irish Rock band Dean and Chapter releases astonishing new single Street Corners appeared first on Finbar Hoban Presents.


          

UUP y TUV critican al DUP por su apoyo al Brexit de Boris Johnson   

Cache   
El DUP ha sido acusado de violar sus propias líneas rojas en el Brexit después de respaldar el plan de Boris Johnson para reemplazar la ''salvaguarda irlandesa''.

El líder de los Unionistas de Ulster, Robin Swann, dijo que la decisión del DUP de respaldar un plan que incluía una frontera en el Mar de Irlanda "representa un camino hacia la conversión de Damasco".

Y el líder de la TUV, Jim Allister, dijo que la línea roja del DUP "no solo está borrosa, sino que se ha ido".

Sinn Féin también rechazó los planes, alegando que le otorgan al DUP un veto en Stormont, mientras que Dublín y Bruselas también expresaron su preocupación.

El plan vería la creación de una "zona de cumplimiento normativo" para productos manufacturados y productos agroalimentarios que abarquen toda la isla de Irlanda, con el Norte alineado con las normas de la UE.

Las mercancías que ingresen al Norte desde el resto del Reino Unido estarían sujetas a controles de identidad y documentales en un puesto de inspección fronterizo o en un punto de entrada designado.

El Norte abandonaría la unión aduanera con el resto del Reino Unido, pero el plan insiste en que eso no significa que se realicen controles "en, o incluso cerca" de la frontera artificial impuesta.

En cambio, propone un sistema de declaraciones para bienes que se mueven entre ambos lados de la frontera artificial impuesta con solo una "muy pequeña proporción" sometida a controles físicos en las instalaciones de los comerciantes u otros lugares designados en cualquier lugar de la isla de Irlanda.

El establecimiento de la zona de cumplimiento normativo requeriría el consentimiento de la Asamblea de Stormont, que luego tendría que renovarse cada cuatro años.

Después de que DUP respaldara el plan, el líder de UUP Robin Swann dijo que DUP "no engañaba a nadie con estas propuestas".

"Este nuevo protocolo debería ser profundamente preocupante para todos aquellos que tienen el bienestar económico y constitucional a largo plazo de Irlanda del Norte y su gente en el corazón", dijo.

"Irlanda del Norte estaría encerrada en continuos debates políticos sobre el Brexit y su alineación con el resto del Reino Unido o la UE. Centrarían el tema de cada elección de la Asamblea y Westminster.

Sumerge a Irlanda del Norte en un referéndum en la Cámara de la Asamblea cada cuatro años con consecuencias de alto riesgo para nuestra gente. Mantendrá a nuestras empresas y al sector agroalimentario en un ciclo perpetuo de incertidumbre".

"Irlanda del Norte se convertiría en una parte híbrida del Reino Unido con una frontera con el Mar de Irlanda''.

"Esto representa un camino hacia la conversión de Damasco por parte del DUP y un cambio de sentido muy pronunciado a las declaraciones que hicieron a la gente de Irlanda del Norte."

El líder de la TUV, Jim Allister, dijo que su prueba de fuego para un acuerdo era si el Reino Unido abandonaría la UE como una sola nación.

"Lamentablemente, bajo estas propuestas no lo haríamos", dijo.

"La línea roja vital del DUP no solo está borrosa, se ha ido".

Añadió: "Dejar solo a Irlanda del Norte en el mercado único de la UE como esto es totalmente inaceptable y es asombroso que cualquier unionista acepte tales propuestas tan sólo un momento. Irlanda del Norte seguirá sujeta a la ley de la UE, no a la ley británica, cuando llegue el momento al mercado único. Leyes sobre las que no tendríamos nada que decir: una colonia vasalla de la UE.

¿Alguien cree seriamente que los nacionalistas no usarán esto como pretexto para argumentar que estaríamos mejor con los eurodiputados en una Irlanda unida?".

La líder del DUP, Arlene Foster, dijo que la capacidad de la Asamblea de Stormont para optar por entrar y salir de los acuerdos regulatorios presentados en toda Irlanda fue la "gran diferencia" del acuerdo de anterior.

"Lo que hace es que nos permite abandonar la unión aduanera de la Unión Europea, nos permite abandonar el mercado único y luego optamos por estar o no en condiciones de establecer acuerdos alternativos en ese momento", agregó.

Ella agregó: "Parte de la dificultad de este proceso es que la gente ha estado hablando sobre Irlanda del Norte en términos de mayorías nuevamente y no creo que eso funcione, creo que necesitamos el consentimiento del pueblo unionista en Irlanda del Norte y el consentimiento del pueblo nacionalista''.

"En eso se basa el Acuerdo de Belfast, por lo que si volvemos a la Asamblea, y espero que volvamos a la Asamblea y al Ejecutivo muy pronto, entonces podremos tener esas conversaciones sobre cómo avanzar de manera colegiada para Irlanda del Norte". "

A pesar de que Irlanda del Norte estuvo sin un gobierno para compartir el poder durante casi tres años, Foster no cree que eso proporcione un obstáculo.

"No creo que [Stormont] sea inherentemente inestable si regresamos", dijo.

"Creo que deberíamos regresar, deberíamos estar allí. Estoy dispuesta y lista para regresar a Stormont. Estoy lista para nombrar ministros mañana y espero que los demás vean que por muchas, muchas razones necesitamos estar en un ejecutivo y una asamblea".

          

El DUP respalda el plan de Brexit de Boris Johnson   

Cache   
Desde el Confidencial desarrollan la noticia de la siguiente manera (sin editar-rogamos, como es costumbre, una lectura crítica); El norirlandés Partido Democrático Unionista (DUP), socio del Gobierno británico, apoyó hoy [por ayer] la propuesta del primer ministro, Boris Johnson, para salir de la Unión Europea, con la que prevé suprimir la controvertida salvaguarda fronteriza.

En un comunicado emitido este miércoles, el DUP, mayoritario entre la comunidad de protestantes de Irlanda del Norte, destacó que el nuevo plan del Brexit de Londres no pone en peligro la relación de la provincia con el resto del Reino Unido y respeta el acuerdo del Viernes Santo (1998), el texto que puso fin al conflicto en el Ulster.

El primer ministro británico remitirá a la UE una propuesta de acuerdo sobre Brexit que permitirá que no haya controles en la frontera de Irlanda del Norte "bajo ninguna circunstancia".

"El DUP siempre ha indicado que el Reino Unido debe abandonar la UE como una sola nación y que, al hacerlo, no se levanten obstáculos para el comercio dentro del Reino Unido", señaló la formación unionista. En su opinión, la propuesta de Johnson "sienta la bases" para que los dos bloques "mantengan una relación seria y duradera", sin que ello "ponga en riesgo el mercado interno" británico.

Para lograrlo, será necesario acometer "cambios en el acuerdo de salida", expuso el DUP, en referencia al pacto que firmó la antecesora de Johnson, Theresa May, con Bruselas el pasado diciembre y que fue rechazado en Westminster por los unionistas y el ala más euroescéptica de los conservadores.

Un 'backstop' temporal

Consideran que la citada salvaguarda, incluida en ese pacto, pone en peligro la integridad territorial del Reino Unido, pues prevé mantener a la provincia británica alineada con ciertas normas comunitarias hasta que los dos bloques establezcan una nueva relación comercial.

Esta garantía legal ('backstop' en inglés) está pensada para evitar la vuelta de una frontera dura entre las dos Irlandas tras la salida del Reino Unido de la UE, clave para sus economías y el proceso de paz.

Según explicó hoy Johnson, la propuesta remitida este miércoles a Bruselas prevé "suprimir" la salvaguarda y sustituirla por un "área regulatoria" provisional en la isla de Irlanda que evitaría controles fronterizos.

El Parlamento autónomo norirlandés debería dar su visto bueno a ese arreglo antes de que entre en vigor así como ratificar su aprobación cada cuatro años y, según adelantó el primer ministro, es la última oferta que piensa poner sobre la mesa.

Los detalles del plan que avanzó esta mañana en un discurso el mandatario han sido remitidos a Bruselas de manera oficial en una carta dirigida al presidente de la Comisión Europea, Jean-Claude Juncker.

Next Page: 25

© Googlier LLC, 2019