Iowa Teen With Punishing Past Is the New 'It' Girl   

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From war-torn Somalia to middle America to fashion runway—it isn't exactly a time-worn path. And teen model Ugbad Abdi seems just as surprised. "Everything that has happened so far to this moment, it's like, all a dream come true," she says. "I always get emotional." But the 19-year-old shows...
          

A message to applicants from the chair at Iowa State UPDATED   

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An update from Professor Jenks (4:24 PM Eastern, 07 October 2019):
The Chemistry Department at Iowa State University has an opening for an analytical or experimental physical chemist at the assistant professor level.  Applications were originally intended to close Sunday night, but software glitches caused problems from at least Friday onward.  Those have been addressed and applications will again be accepted through Thursday night Oct 10.  The software will close the window at 12:01 Friday morning. We apologize for the inconvenience and are glad to be able to re-open the position for those who were trying to apply.  (Contrary to an earlier comment, I do not have access to the names of anyone who had a partial application submitted; such people should also log into the application system again.) https://isu.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/IowaStateJobs/job/Ames-IA/Assistant-Professor_R659
Via the comments on the open thread, a comment from William Jenks: 
I am the chemistry chair at ISU. This happened because no one here knew the new software closes at 12:01 AM on a date instead of 11:59 PM. Yes, every single one of us agrees this is stupid. Additionally, there was some kind of partial software problem for Friday and Saturday, too. Anyone with a partial application should hear from us very soon. If you tried to start an application and failed, please send me an email ASAP at wsjenks@iastate.edu. I will try to get you into the pool, but I will have to go through our HR people because only a finite number of people will see this post. But yes, we'd like to get you into the pool if at all possible. Very sorry.
Best wishes to those involved. 

          

Harris says Iowa's caucuses can prove she's electable   

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"Iowans have the ability to show our country what can be, even if we've never seen it before," Harris said during an event on Iowa State University's campus.
          

Arthur Russell cautiva con ‘You Did It Yourself’, primer adelanto de la colección de maquetas ‘Iowa Dream’   

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Arthur Russell dejó una ingente cantidad de material inédito (cerca de 1.000 cintas) antes de su muerte en 1992, abarcando estilos muy dispares pues el compositor, productor y cellista de Iowa era un experimentador nato. De hecho, al margen de ‘World of Echo’, lanzado en 1986, la mayoría de discos de Russell que han visto […]

La noticia Arthur Russell cautiva con ‘You Did It Yourself’, primer adelanto de la colección de maquetas ‘Iowa Dream’ es de jenesaispop.com.


          

USDA, Cooperative Extension, & APLU Award Top Honors in Extension Excellence and Diversity   

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Contact:
APLU: Jeff Lieberson, (202) 478-6073
USDA-NIFA: William Hoffman, (202) 401-1112
Cooperative Extension: Sandy Ruble, (202) 478-6088

WASHINGTON, October 7, 2019 – Recognizing visionary leadership and diversity in educational programming, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), Cooperative Extension, and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) today announced that Matthew Devereaux, of the University of Tennessee, will receive the 2019 Excellence in Extension Award, and two Iowa State University-led teams, will receive the National Extension Diversity Award. Both awards, along with Regional Excellence in Extension Awards, will be presented at a ceremony on Nov. 10 in San Diego, California during APLU’s 132nd Annual Meeting. NIFA and Cooperative Extension have sponsored the awards since 1991.

“NIFA is proud to support the national network of extension experts and educators through our land-grant institution partnership,” said NIFA Director J. Scott Angle. “This collaboration brings science-based knowledge to farmers, ranchers and community members to help them grow their businesses, raise healthy families and support their communities.”

“We applaud this year’s Excellence in Extension and National Extension Diversity Awards winners,” said Ed Jones, Associate Dean and Director of Extension, Virginia Tech, and Chair of the Extension Committee on Organization and Policy. “Their work stands as an exceptional example of the impact of Cooperative Extension for the people in all 50 states and five U.S. territories where more than 32,000 Cooperative Extension professionals serve.”

National Excellence in Extension Award The Excellence in Extension Award is given annually to one Cooperative Extension professional who excels at programming, provides visionary leadership and makes a positive impact on constituents served.

Matthew Devereaux is Interim Assistant Dean and Department Head for Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Tennessee Extension. Much of Devereaux’s work has centered on developing innovative and highly impactful youth programs. Specifically, his research has focused on best practices for positively developing youth in afterschool settings.

His findings show the importance of focusing heavily on a student’s social/emotional development during the beginning of the school year to improve learning as the year progresses. Devereaux’s research has shown students have greater gains in grades and standardized test scores when incorporating significant social/emotional learning programming that teaches students how to recognize, understand, label, express and regulate emotions. He’s also focusing on developing resources on adverse childhood experiences (ACES), mindfulness, quality childcare and early brain development. He’s aiming to examine the impact of positive fathering in future research.

National Diversity in Extension Award The National Diversity Award recognizes significant contributions and accomplishments in achieving and sustaining diversity and pluralism.

Kimberly Greder, Professor of Human Sciences Extension and Outreach Family Life Specialist, leads efforts in Iowa to implement and evaluate extension programs to reduce educational and health disparities facing Latino families. Using Juntos Para Una Mejor Educación (Together for a Better Education), Greder and her teams helped 1,300 Latino youth and parents gain information, develop skills, access resources and broaden networks to help youth identify paths to post-secondary education.

In partnership with the University of Illinois, Iowa faculty engaged 262 parents and children of Mexican heritage in an extension research study focused on testing the efficacy of Abriendo Caminos, a curriculum designed to promote healthy lifestyles and reduce obesity risk. Preliminary findings revealed that families who participated had larger increases in good cholesterol levels, and larger decreases in bad cholesterol and blood inflammation, suggesting improved lifestyle behaviors reducing obesity risk. These efforts led to significant strides in expanding extension’s capacity to engage with and provide responsive programming to Iowa Latino families.

Regional Awards NIFA, Cooperative Extension, and APLU will also present four regional awards for excellence this year. The 2019 Regional Excellence in Extension recipients are:

  • 1890 Institutions Region: Dorothy Brandon, Family and Finance Extension State Specialist at Alabama A&M University, for work to improve thousands of adults’ financial well-being.
  • North Central Region: Dianne Shoemaker, Extension Field Specialist, Dairy Production Economics and Associate Professor at The Ohio State University, for holistic farm business management education efforts that help dairy farms improve profitability and sustainability.
  • Northeast Region: Gordon Johnson, Assistant Professor and Fruits and Vegetables Extension Specialist at the University of Delaware, for work to address challenges facing fruit and vegetable producers in Delaware and the broader mid-Atlantic region.
  • Southern Region: Mark Peterson, Professor of Community and Economic Development with the Division of Agriculture at the University of Arkansas System, Cooperative Extension Service, for efforts to build vibrant, sustainable communities and regions through community leadership education programming and mentoring.
  • Western Region: Dave Schramm, Family Life Extension State Specialist, Human Development and Family Studies at Utah State University, for innovative, scholarly leadership of family life programs.

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October 7, 2019
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College Football Big 12 Saturday Odds: Iowa State Cyclones at West Virginia Mountaineers   

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Iowa State at West Va Time: 3:00 PM CST, Saturday (ESPN) Spread: IOST -10 Total: 56.5 Odds c/o 5dimes Iowa State is 3-2 following its 49-24 win over TCU in Week 6. The Cyclones take to the road this week as it faces West Virginia. Iowa State is 10-point favorites in the affair, which has […]
          

Bernie Sanders, resting at home, announces plan to curtail money in politics   

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Prominent friends and supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., say he should cut back on his relentless campaign pace and speak openly about his recent heart attack when he returns to the campaign trail, urging a shift toward a more personal and less hectic campaign than he has run so far.

The comments reflect what supporters describe as a deeply personal decision with big implications for Sanders’s candidacy: how the 78-year-old democratic socialist, viewed by many of his backers as the leader of a movement, should proceed after a health scare that has sidelined him for days and raised questions about whether he can - or should - maintain the punishing demands of a presidential campaign.

“I would be very open about the experience he had,” said Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., a national co-chair of the Sanders campaign who made his pitch to the senator in a brief telephone conversation last week. “I think it can show a resilience, a sense of empathy and a sense of vulnerability.”

Sanders supporters privately acknowledge concern that the heart attack could give voters second thoughts about the candidate, who would be the oldest president in history if elected. In an effort to move beyond the setback, some hope he can seize on the event to transmit a softer side that’s eluded him.

The goal, said Khanna, would be to “make a very human connection.” He said he texted the senator’s wife, Jane Sanders, last week to tell her that this could be Sanders’s “FDR moment,” referring to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, whose battle with polio is sometimes said to have contributed to his empathy for the less fortunate.

The sensitivity of dealing with the heart attack has been evident since the episode occurred. The campaign did not immediately disclose the heart attack, initially saying only that Sanders had experienced chest pains and had two stents inserted in an artery.

Advisers and friends also say Sanders should consider easing his breakneck campaign pace. Sanders has been sprinting across the country, holding multiple events per day, maintaining a speed that has surpassed his top rivals.

“If I were giving him advice, I would tell him just slack up a little bit,” said former Senate majority leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., who visited Sanders in a Las Vegas hospital last week. “Even if he slacks up a little bit, he’s campaigning more than anybody else.”

Sanders spent Monday recuperating at home in Burlington, Vermont. On a conference call with staff, he reiterated that the movement he has been leading is not about him, a theme he often hits in campaign speeches.

“If there’s anything that this event kind of tells us, it is the importance of what our message is in this campaign. And our message is ‘Us, not me,’ ” Sanders said, according to a person with knowledge of his remarks.

Campaign officials have signaled that he is not expected to return to the trail until the Oct. 15 debate near Columbus, Ohio. That makes the debate a critical event for the campaign, as Sanders will face considerable scrutiny from voters and rivals sizing up his health and vitality.

“Bernie is raring to go, and his campaign staff has been trying to hold him back until the debate,” said Ben Cohen, who co-founded Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and serves as a national co-chair of the campaign. “The plan is for the debate to be his reentry into the race.”

People with knowledge of the situation said there had been a period of uncertainty about the campaign’s future in the immediate aftermath of Sanders’s hospitalization for chest pains last week. The campaign suspended an Iowa ad buy and made reassuring calls to supporters during those first hours.

But in recent days, the campaign has shown determination to move full speed ahead. The Iowa ad touting Sanders will be on the airwaves starting Tuesday.

The campaign rolled out a new policy proposal Monday aimed at curtailing the role of money in politics. It would eliminate big-dollar fundraising for all federal elections, enact a constitutional amendment to declare that campaign contributions are not speech and end corporate contributions to the party conventions.

Surrogates campaigned for Sanders in the key early states over the weekend, a strategy the campaign plans to continue. Cohen said he plans to campaign for Sanders this weekend in New Hampshire.

The campaign is also aggressively calling voters. After establishing a goal of making a million calls in the early primary states over the past 10 days, it beat that goal by 300,000 calls, the campaign said.

Sanders and his allies have also used his heart attack to call attention to his push to enact a Medicare-for-all universal health-care system. They note that while Sanders was fortunate to have access to good doctors and treatment, many Americans do not.

And Sanders has already begun showing a more personal side of himself. When he left the hospital on Friday, he stood shoulder-to-shoulder with his wife, Jane, smiling and waving. When he returned to Burlington, reporters there noted Sanders saying he was “happy to be home” before walking inside where family was waiting.

On Monday, he and Jane took a walk in the rain, and he joked with reporters he said should get paid more for working in the drizzle.

Early this year, when he launched his second campaign for president, advisers encouraged Sanders to speak about his participation in the civil rights movement and his modest upbringing in Brooklyn. He mentioned those things at early campaign stops. But as time went on, they faded from his stump speeches.

“He’s somewhat reticent to talk about his own … life experiences,” said Cohen. “But I think it’s helpful for him to do that and it’s certainly only a decision that he can make, but I do think this is an opportunity for him to talk.”

Sanders has been trailing former vice president Joe Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in many recent polls, sparing him the pressure that can face the front-runner. His Democratic rivals have either wished Sanders well or brushed aside questions about his physical fitness for office. President Donald Trump and his allies have been preoccupied with the impeachment inquiry.

These external events have led some Sanders allies to conclude that he does not have to rush back onto the national stage.

“The next months are going to be dominated by the impeachment inquiry, not the presidential race,” said Khanna. “His volunteers can do a lot of the work and he just needs to focus on recovering.”

In a sign of how the Sanders movement has charged ahead without him on the trail, a video created by a supporter arguing that he’s been criticized unfairly by the media had received 6 million views as of late Monday.

As Sanders recovers, his campaign has taken steps to reassure staffers and supporters, scheduling calls and other outreach to keep allies focused.

“The campaign reached out to me to let me know that he was doing fine. They gave me the details, which made me feel really comfortable,” said Deb Marlin, an Iowa small-business owner who has endorsed Sanders.

Reid recalled spending 30 to 45 minutes with Sanders on Thursday. They reminisced about their work in the Senate and talked about health care, Reid said. As for the next debate, Reid said Sanders ought to take things slowly before then.

“He should take it easy until then,” said Reid. “As far as I understand, that’s what he’s going to do.”


          

U.S. researchers on front line of battle against Chinese theft   

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WASHINGTON – As the U.S. warned allies around the world that Chinese tech giant Huawei was a security threat, the FBI was making the same point quietly to a Midwestern university.

In an email to the associate vice chancellor for research at the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, an agent wanted to know if administrators believed Huawei had stolen any intellectual property from the school.

Told no, the agent responded: “I assumed those would be your answers, but I had to ask.”

It was no random query.

The FBI has been reaching out to universities across the country as the U.S. tries to stem what American authorities portray as the wholesale theft of technology and trade secrets by researchers tapped by China. The breadth and intensity of the campaign emerges in emails obtained by The Associated Press through records requests to public universities in 50 states.

Agents have lectured at seminars, briefed administrators in campus meetings and distributed pamphlets with cautionary tales of trade secret theft. In the past two years, they’ve requested emails of two University of Washington researchers, asked Oklahoma State University if it has scientists in specific areas and asked about “possible misuse” of research funds by a University of Colorado Boulder professor, according to the emails.

The emails reveal administrators routinely requesting FBI briefings. But they also show some struggling to balance legitimate national security concerns against their own eagerness to avoid stifling research or tarnishing legitimate scientists. The Justice Department says it appreciates that push-pull and wants only to help separate the relatively few researchers engaged in theft from the majority who are not.

Senior FBI officials told AP they’re not encouraging schools to monitor researchers by nationality but instead to take steps to protect research. They consider the briefings vital since they say universities haven’t historically been as attentive to security as they should be.

“When we go to the universities, what we’re trying to do is highlight the risk to them without discouraging them from welcoming the researchers and students from a country like China,” said Assistant Attorney General John Demers, the Justice Department’s top national security official.

The threat, officials say, is genuine. A University of Kansas researcher was recently charged with collecting federal grant money while working full-time for a Chinese university, and a Chinese government employee was arrested in a visa fraud scheme allegedly aimed at recruiting U.S. research talent. The Justice Department launched last year an effort called the China Initiative aimed at identifying priority trade secret cases and focusing resources on them.

“Existentially, we look at China as our greatest threat from an intelligence perspective, and they succeeded significantly in the last decade from stealing our best and brightest technology,” said top U.S. counterintelligence official William Evanina.

The most consequential case this year centered not on a university but on Huawei, charged with stealing corporate trade secrets and evading sanctions. The company denies wrongdoing. Several universities including Illinois, which received the FBI email last February, have begun severing ties with Huawei.

But the government’s track record hasn’t been perfect.

Federal prosecutors in 2015 dropped charges against a Temple University professor earlier accused of sending designs for a pocket heater to China. The professor, Xiaoxing Xi, is suing the FBI. “It was totally wrong,” he said, “so I can only speak from my experience that whatever they put out there is not necessarily true.”

Richard Wood, the then-interim provost at the University of New Mexico, conveyed ambivalence in an email to colleagues last year. He wrote that he took seriously the concerns the FBI had identified to him in briefings, but also said “there are real tensions” with the “traditional academic norms regarding the free exchange of scientific knowledge wherever appropriate.”

“I do not think we would be wise to create new ‘policy’ on terrain this complex and fraught with internal trade-offs between legitimate concerns and values without some real dialogue on the matter,” Wood wrote.

FBI officials say they’ve received consistently positive feedback from universities. The emails show administrators at schools including the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and Nebraska requesting briefings, training or generally expressing eagerness for cooperation.

Kevin Gamache, chief research security officer for the Texas A&M University system, told the AP that he values his FBI interactions and that it flows in both directions.

“It’s a dialogue that has to be ongoing.”

The vice president for research and economic development at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas welcomed the assistance in a city she noted was the “birthplace of atomic testing.

“We have a world-class radiochemistry faculty, our College of Engineering has significant numbers of faculty and students from China, and we have several other issues of concern to me as VPR. In all of these cases, the FBI is always available to help,” the administrator wrote to agents.

More than two dozen universities produced records, including symposium itineraries and a 13-page FBI pamphlet titled “China: The Risk to Academia” that warns that China does “not play by the same rules of academic integrity” as American universities.

Some emails show agents seeking tips or following leads.

“If you have concerns about any faculty or graduate researchers, students, outside vendors … pretty much anything we previously discussed – just reminding you that I am here to help,” one wrote to Iowa State officials in 2017.

In May, an agent sent the University of Washington a records request for two researchers’ emails, seeking references to Chinese-government talent recruitment programs.

Last year, an agent asked Oklahoma State University if it had researchers in encryption research or quantum computing. The University of Colorado received an FBI request about an “internal investigation” into a professor’s “possible misuse” of NIH funds. The school told the AP that it found no misconduct and the professor has resigned.

Though espionage concerns aren’t new, FBI officials report an uptick in targeting of universities and more U.S. government attention too. The FBI says it’s seen some progress from universities, with one official saying schools are more reliably pressing researchers about outside funding sources.

Demers, the Justice Department official, said espionage efforts are “as pervasive, as well-resourced, as ever today.

“It’s a serious problem today on college campuses.”


          

Scouts Note a Half-Dozen Hawks   

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Waterloo, Iowa - Six skaters with links to the Waterloo Black Hawks attracted interest from NHL Central Scouting Monday in that organization's Prelimi... - USHL Waterloo Black Hawks
          

We are the War Criminal   

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Major column by Mohamad Bazi at THE GUARDIAN:


Since Saudi Arabia and its allies intervened in Yemen’s civil war in March 2015, the United States gave its full support to a relentless air campaign where Saudi warplanes and bombs hit thousands of targets, including civilian sites and infrastructure, with impunity. From the beginning, US officials insisted that American weapons, training and intelligence assistance would help the Saudis avoid causing even more civilian casualties.

But this was a lie meant to obscure one of the least understood aspects of US support for Saudi Arabia and its allies in Yemen: it’s not that Saudi-led forces don’t know how to use American-made weapons or need help in choosing targets. They have deliberately targeted civilians and Yemen’s infrastructure since the war’s early days – and US officials have recognized this since at least 2016 and done little to stop it.
A team of United Nations investigators, commissioned by the UN Human Rights Council, presented a devastating report in Geneva in early September detailing how the US, along with Britain and France, are likely complicit in war crimes in Yemen because of continued weapons sales and intelligence support to the Saudis and their allies, especially the United Arab Emirates.

Despite pressure from Saudi Arabia, the Human Rights Council voted last Thursday to extend its investigation.

If the council pursues an aggressive investigation based on the 274-page report, the world might finally see some accountability for war crimes committed in Yemen over the past five years. The report’s authors submitted a secret list of individuals who may be responsible for war crimes to the UN human rights commissioner, Michelle Bachelet, but it’s unclear if that list includes any western officials. The report said third states that have influence on Yemen’s warring parties – including the US, Britain, France and Iran – “may be held responsible for providing aid or assistance for the commission of international law violations”.

American complicity in the Yemen war goes beyond providing training and intelligence support, and selling billions of dollars in weapons to the UAE and Saudi Arabia, which has become Washington’s largest weapons buyer. The US is looking the other way while its allies commit war crimes and avoid responsibility for instigating the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.



True.  There's a reason so many around the world do not see our country as good or even not bad.  We have a strong inclination to ignore that view.  Hillary Clinton fanatics, for example, in the US refuse to recognize the feelings of so many in the Middle East when they express distaste for Hillary as a result of the policies she has supported that have destroyed their lives, the lives of their friends and their family.  We don't want to own what our government has done.  This goes exactly to Trina's post last night.  Not only do our rulers need to be held accountable, we need to take accountability for looking the other way and ignoring the damage done to so many.


Meanwhile, Bernie proves again why he should be president.



Search results
  1. It's going to be a real pleasure defeating you.


Even recovering from surgery, Bernie's instincts are solid.



"Iraq snapshot" (THE COMMON ILLS):
Thursday, October 3, 2019.  Even Joe Biden's friends in the press denying anything wrong took place demonstrates that Joe did something wrong and meanwhile the protests continue in Iraq.


In the United States, the race for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination continues.  While Senator Bernie Sanders has been temporarily sidelined due to surgery, War Hawk Joe Biden continues to flounder as desperation hits in.



I will put the integrity of my whole career in public service to this nation up against President Trump's long record of lying, cheating, and stealing any day of the week.





Will you put that record up?

Is that the record where you tell the public that you always believed Anita Hill but others -- including a US senator -- are on the record saying you told them you knew Anita was lying?  Is that the record?

Or is it the record where you were a cheerleader for the Iraq War?  Have you ever apologized to the Iraqi people for that?  You certainly haven't apologized to the American people.  You've either said that you were tricked by Bully Boy Bush or you've lied that you were against it as soon as it started.

Is it the record where you pushed through the 'crime' bill that targeted African-Americans?  This as your little blond princess niece assaults a police officer and does no time and then, a few years later, is caught stealing over $100,000 and does no time.

Caroline Biden.  Apparently she has a major vag problem.  Apparently she's crusty lips down there.  Apparently she had to steal a credit card and charge over $100,000 worth of Vagisil at a drug store to deal with her crust lips and to stop popping out loafs of sourdough bread from her personal oven.  Apparently, one of her boyfriends asked her why she was chewing bubble gum with her vagina and she replied that wasn't bubble gum, those were yeast bubbles.

That's got to be it, right?  The press doesn't want to talk about a thirty-something woman who's Joe Biden's niece and stole over $100,000 so it's got be vag related, right?  That's the only reason they're so mum on the topic.  (See Nora Ephron's essay "Dealing With The, Uh, Problem.")

When is Joe going to be asked why his niece was shown favoritism?

Joe's hoping and praying that his hideous campaign can struggle on through South Carolina.  He knows he's losing Iowa, he knows he's losing New Hampshire.  but if he can stay in until South Carolina, he just knows he'll prove to be a winner.

Now Iowa, please remember, knocked him out of the race in 2008.  He bowed out immediately after.

But he thinks the myth of Joe Biden support among African-Americans will save him this go round.

He is not huge with African-Americans.  He's popular with middle-aged and elderly African-Americans but, as his own campaign polling demonstrates (his campaign poured over it Monday), it's a very soft support.  It's doubtful South Carolina African-Americans from his age range will stick with him if he loses Iowa -- forget losing Iowa and New Hampshire.

Joe's desperate and it's really starting to show.

Link to headline article



And he's right, Donald Trump is not going to destroy Joe Biden -- mainly because Joe's doing such a good job of that all by himself.


Whenever he's lying, Joe likes to claim that he's the voice of truth.  That's his tell.

Or have we all forgotten this: "This is the God's truth.  My word as a Biden."


So many whores rush to prop Joe up.  Like here.

Twitter has since removed the video featuring Nickelback’s song “Photograph” for copyright reasons that President Trump tweeted on Wednesday. This, as the president accused Joe Biden of abusing his power to help his son. There’s no evidence of wrongdoing, reports.
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Bachmann Launches New Statewide Television Ad in Iowa   

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Contact: Press Office, Michele Bachmann for President,  press@michelebachmann.com   DES MOINES, Iowa July 20, 2011 /Standard Newswire/ -- Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann announced today the launch of a new ad entitled "Courage" to run statewide in Iowa beginning today, July 20, 2011. The ad highlights Bachmann's commitment to voting 'no' on increasing the debt ceiling and her courage to deal with the economic realities facing the federal government. Source: CCN
          

Costs Forcing Some Hospitals to Stop Delivering Babies   

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MARSHALLTOWN, Iowa (AP) — Last month's closing of Unity Point Hospital's obstetrics unit in Marshalltown was only the most recent in Iowa. The Iowa Public Health Department says nearly three dozen community hospitals have stopped delivering babies in the past two decades, and eight stopped last year — the most yet in one year. Stephen Hunter is vice chairman of obstetrics at the University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics. He says Iowa's aging population and shrinking rural numbers are among key reasons for the closures. Hansen Family Hospital CEO Doug Morse told Iowa Public Radio that the increased expense of labor and delivery care led officials to end deliveries at the Iowa Falls facility in November. That forced Jessica Sheridan of Iowa Falls to travel an hour away to deliver her daughter in Ames.
          

King Urges More Donations After UI Children's Hospital Fundraiser Ends   

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(Altoona, IA) -- Carson King's viral fundraiser is over, but he's using his newfound fame to urge people to continue donating to the University of Iowa Stead Family Children's Hospital. Almost three-million-dollars was raised in the last two weeks and it started when King went to ESPN's College GameDay broadcast in Ames and held up a sign asking for beer money to be sent to his Venmo account. The fundraising effort ended late Monday night, but King tweeted yesterday that people can still donate. They can visit Give To Iowa dot org.
          

Queen Nancy: Fly as I Say, Not as I Fly   

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And, of course, it's the double-barreled hypocrisy. There's the eco-hypocrisy of the Democratic leader who wags her finger at the rest of us for our too-big carbon footprints, and crusades for massive taxes and regulation to reduce global warming. Then there's the Bay Area hypocrisy of the woman who represents one of the most anti-military areas of the country soaking up military resources to shuttle her (and her many family members) across the country almost every weekend.

Remember: Pelosi's San Francisco is notorious for banning the Marines' Silent Drill Platoon from filming a recruitment commercial on its streets; killing the JROTC program in the public schools; blocking the retired battleship U.S.S. Iowa from docking in its waters; and attacking the Navy's Blue Angels -- which left-wing activists have tried to banish from northern California skies for the past two years.

Apparently, those anti-war protesters have no problem with evil military jets currying Pelosi and her massive entourages to the funerals of the late Rep. Stephanie Tubbs Jones and Charlie Norwood; foreign junkets to Rome; and politicized stops to Iowa flood sites to bash the Bush administration. One exasperated Department of Defense official, besieged with itinerary changes and shuttle requests back and forth between San Francisco International Airport and Andrews Air Force Base for Pelosi, her daughter, son-in-law and grandchild, wrote in an e-mail:

"They have a history of canceling many of their past requests. Any chance of politely querying (Pelosi's team) if they really intend to do all of these or are they just picking every weekend? ... (T)here's no need to block every weekend 'just in case.'"

Another official pointed out the "hidden costs" associated with the speaker's last-minute changes and cancellations. "We have ... folks prepping the jets and crews driving in (not a short drive for some), cooking meals and preflighting the jets etc." Upset that a specific type of aircraft was not available to her boss, a Pelosi staffer carped to the DoD coordinators: "This is not good news, and we will have some very disappointed folks, as well as a very upset speaker."

Three months ago, turmoil erupted over Queen Nancy's demand for the military to reposition her plane to fly out of Travis Air Force Base in Fairfield, Calif., closer to where she had "business," instead of San Francisco Airport/SFO (1.5 hours away). A special air missions official wrote: "We have never done this in the past. The deal is ... that the Speaker shuttle is from D.C. to SFO and back. We will not reposition. We do not reposition for convenience even for the SECDEF. It is not (too) far of a drive from Travis to SFO. Did the escort suggest to the speaker that this is OK? If so, I hope you guys correct them immediately. If you agree with me that I am correct, then you need to stay strong and present the facts to the speaker's office."

Another official stated bluntly: "We can't reposition the airplane such a short distance. It is not a judicial use of the asset. It is too expensive to operate the jet when there is truly no need to do so."

A beleaguered colleague responded: "(Y)ou know I understand and feel with you ... but this is a battle we are bound to lose if we tell the speaker office. In the end, this is what will happen. ... I wish that I could say this is a one-time request, but we know it will probably happen again in the future."

In the end, the military won that battle. But a few days later, Pelosi was back with a new demand: that her military plane taking her from D.C. to San Francisco make a stop in New Jersey to bring her and three Democrats to an "innovation forum" at Princeton University involving 21 participants and no audience. A Gulfstream jet was secured for the important "official business."

No word on whether Pelosi required vanilla-scented candles, Evian water and fresh white lilies aboard the flight. But rest assured: Air Diva traveled in style, courtesy of your tax dollars and the forbearance of the U.S. military.


          

SIMMONS   

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SIMMONS (don't know his first name) lived in Isabel, Dewey Co., SD. He was possibly born in Dundee, IL or Allamakee Co., IOWA. His brother was Franklin SIMMONS of Blue Earth, MN. His parents moved to IOWA in 1862. They were probably farmers. At the time of my ggrandfather's death in 1921, his brother was a resident of Isabel, SD.
          

ISU Foundation Presents 2019 Emerging Philanthropist Award to David and Christine Slump   

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David and Christine Slump of Weston, Connecticut, have been awarded the 2019 Order of the Knoll Emerging Philanthropist Award. This award recognizes individuals or couples who have provided philanthropic support and creative leadership to the Iowa State University Foundation and Iowa State University through the advancement of philanthropy.
          

ECpE’s spark: In memory of Ginny Anderson, forever helping students succeed   

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Virginia (Ginny) Anderson was a spark of light always burning, a go-to person for anything in the Iowa State University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECpE) — forever known as the glue that held everything together. Ginny passed away on Aug. 6, 2019, from bone cancer, leaving behind a legacy that will never be … Continue reading ECpE’s spark: In memory of Ginny Anderson, forever helping students succeed
          

EP106: Your Digital Footprint   

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Digging into the Netflix Original Documentary "The Great Hack" with Iowa State University's Cyber Security expert Doug Jacobson.
          

Ep104: Flooding Impact On Agricultural Systems   

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Matt Helmers, Iowa Nutrient Research Center Director and Professor of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering talks about this spring's flooding in the midwest, and the effect it will have on agriculture in the state of Iowa.
          

Ep103: Engineers Without Borders   

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Iowa State Mechanical Engineering senior Clare Lanaghan tells us about the ISU chapter of Engineers Without Borders, and the project they recently completed in Ullo, Ghana.
          

Ep101: Jill Fratini   

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Let's look back to 1978, when the first woman undergraduate from Iowa State University's Department of Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering received her degree. Jill Fratini believes engineering teaches resilience and problem-solving. “I think that any woman who wants to pursue a STEM major must have an inherent drive,” she says. “Not to show the world, but to show herself that she can do it.”
          

Selections from the Sackner Collection: The Association for Study of Arts Materials   

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Selections from the Sackner Collection: The Association for Study of Arts Materials Written by Diane Dias De Fazio, Curator of Rare Books & Book Arts   Well, konnichiwa.   The University of Iowa Special Collections announced the arrival of The Ruth and Marvin Sackner Collection of Visual and Concrete Poetry last May, and as the […]
          

Transition to more Northerly   

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Feature

The featured chart presents the monthly average wind speed and wind direction for Ames based on period of record data for the site. The average wind direction is computed by vector averaging the wind speed components. It is interesting to see the wind direction cycle from southerly during the summer months to northerly during the cold season. Since Iowa is well far away from significant bodies of water, our temperatures are often heavily influenced by the source region of the air mass currently visiting the state. The wind direction gives a good first guess as to where the air is coming from. The first half of this week will be very pleasant thanks to southerly winds present.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website


          

Slow-Motion Whiplash   

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Slow-Motion Whiplash Brian October 7th, 2019 at 1:15 PM
[Bryan Fuller]

10/6/2019 – Michigan 10, Iowa 3 – 4-1, 2-1 Big Ten

The story of the last 20 years of the Michigan-Ohio State rivalry is Jim Tressel gradually transitioning Ohio State from what was then accurately termed "pro style offense" to a spread option system that's been at or near the bleeding edge for 15 years. He inherited Steve Bellisari and Craig Krenzel, neither of whom will be confused with a gazelle any time soon, and transitioned to Troy Smith in a bumpy 2004 season that saw the Buckeyes reach The Game with a 3-4 Big Ten record.

One-loss, #7 Michigan entered a heavy favorite. Four hours later a nuclear bomb had gone off. Smith threw for 241 yards on 23 attempts. He ran for 145 on 18. Ohio State got 52 yards on 14 carries from fullback Brandon Joe; everything else was Smith gaining 9.4 yards per whatever he did.

OSU did not look back. Since November 20th, 2004, Ohio State has had zero sharp turns with their approach. They've pushed things around based on whether their QB was Braxton Miller or Cardale Jones; they've constantly iterated to keep up with the Joneses. At almost no point have they tried to do something completely different.

When they found themselves forced into something pretty different a year ago when it turned out Dwayne Haskins would rather eat a turtle than run a zone read, things were rickety to the tune of a 49-20 blowout at Purdue where the Buckeyes tried a WR screen on fourth and goal from the two.

Doing different things is hard. Especially all at once.

---------------------------------------

By contrast, Michigan has had no set offensive identity for longer than a few years. The tail end of the Carr era was almost nothing but outside zone from under center because the Broncos made it cool. Michigan imported Rich Rodriguez, then fired him after two years of Denard Robinson. Brady Hoke put Robinson under center a lot, because he is a neanderthal, and then recruited nothing but battleship pocket passers (and air). Michigan imported an Alabama OC who was no better than the guy putting Robinson under center; Hoke got fired.

In comes Jim Harbaugh, who had a fascinating period manballing it up from every formation that had ever been invented, lost Jedd Fisch, hired Pep Hamilton, threw Tim Drevno overboard two years too late, hired Ed Warinner, turned to Warinner after the Notre Dame debacle, developed a nice arc read package, ditched Hamilton, and hired Josh Gattis.

In the opener Gattis showed an arc read with an option attached that looked like the natural evolution of what Michigan had been running last year, and then for whatever reason all of that got stuffed in a garbage disposal. Michigan cited an oblique injury to the quarterback. Since then they've done various things, with nothing that you can actually call a base offense. Giving total control to Josh Gattis appears to have resulted in Michigan tossing some adequate babies out with the bathwater, and now the babies are not very adequate.

The number of whiplash moments here is approaching double digits, all while Ohio State calmly whittles a stick into a cruise missile. Michigan has repeatedly thrown over their offensive approach midseason.

Michigan doesn't need to go to Columbus for a counter-example, either: after getting ripped by Ohio State last year Don Brown has moved to a bunch of zone coverages. This is a pretty radical makeover itself, but since it's run by the same guy the terminology hasn't changed; the playbook is still the playbook, but different things are coming out of it. You can see where the defense is heading as it adapts to its personnel. Since that personnel has a decided lack of NFL defensive tackles it's been bumpy.

There's no comparison between the two units. Even after getting imploded by Wisconsin, Michigan sits 2nd in SP+ defense. In reality they're probably a few notches down from that—SP+ is still including a healthy preseason component. The offense is 66th, down over 40 spots from last year after returning nine starters. And there, too, optimistic preseason projections are propping that number up.

It's time to start moving certain pieces around, if only to experiment. Piece number one is quarterback, where it's time to see if any of the offseason Dylan McCaffrey hype was warranted.

Maybe that'll be enough for Michigan to dig in at some spot that—while vastly disappointing relative to preseason expectations—allows Michigan to entrench and see a way forward. Maybe not. Either way Michigan has another hard choice to make: continue on with an unproven coordinator off to a confusing, awful start, or throw it all away and try to build another sand castle before Ohio State can stomp it flat.

[After THE JUMP: defense though!]

AWARDS

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Clark Kent mode: still dormant [Fuller]

Known Friends And Trusted Agents Of The Week

you're the man now, dog

-2535ac8789d1b4991f1c37dee-a502-44d9#1 Kwity Paye/Aidan Hutchinson. 2.5 TFLs each; Paye's were all sacks; Hutchinson had one sack. Hutchison also added a forced fumble on the first play from scrimmage—nice when that happens to the other guys—and a PBU when he deflected a pass at the LOS. The relative proficiency of both guys on the interior allowed Michigan to put their rush package on the field on anything resembling a passing down and survive.

#2 Khaleke Hudson. 11 tackles, a QB hurry, a TFL, and suffered a hold so blindingly obvious that it drew a flag. Missed one tackle on a crossing route; otherwise excellent.  

#3 Cam McGrone/Jordan Glasgow. McGrone had some off moments but was also instrumental in Michigan's constant Stanley-shattering pressure; he's getting a +3 in UFR for a sack on which he took off from the linebacker level on the snap, dusted the RB, and finished. Glasgow converted a run blitz to a similar sack.

Honorable mention: Nico Collins was most of Michigan's touchdown drive, and he also got targeted two more times. Dax Hill had an impressive fourth-down PBU. Josh Metellus got over the top for an INT; so did Lavert Hill.

KFaTAotW Standings

NOTE: New scoring! HM: 1 point. #3: 3 points. #2: 5 points. #1: 8 points. Split winners awarded points at the sole discretion of a pygmy marmoset named Luke.

13: Aidan Hutchinson(#1 Army, HM Rutgers, T1 Iowa)
10: Zach Charbonnet (#2 MTSU, #2 Army)
9: Shea Patterson(HM MTSU, #1 Rutgers), Josh Uche (#3 MTSU, #3 Army, T2 Rutgers), Ambry Thomas (#1 MTSU, HM Rutgers)
7: Kwity Paye (T2 Rutgers, T1 Iowa).
5: Khaleke Hudson (#2 Iowa).
3: Ronnie Bell (HM Army, T3 Rutgers), Cam McGrone(HM Rutgers, T3 Iowa), Jordan Glasgow (HM MTSU, T3 Iowa)
2: DPJ (T3 Rutgers), Nico Collins (HM Rutgers, HM Iowa), Dax Hill(HM Rutgers, HM Iowa), Josh Metellus (HM Army, HM Iowa), Lavert Hill (HM Army, HM Iowa)
1: Will Hart (HM MTSU), Josh Ross (HM, MTSU), Sean McKeon (HM, MTSU),Brad Hawkins (HM Army), Christian Turner (HM Rutgers), Christian Turner (HM Rutgers).

Who's Got It Better Than Us(?) Of The Week

Nate Stanley is buried under an avalanche of persons on fourth and forever.

Honorable mention: The many and various sacks. Nico Collins catches a bomb.

X4OROG3KOKTIFUY4YU4SNSLDIY_thumb_thu[2]MARCUS HALL EPIC DOUBLE BIRD OF THE WEEK.

Moody misses a chip-shot field goal that would have essentially ended the game.

Honorable mention: Nordin gets iced at the end of the first half. Patterson throws a pick trying to get over a dropping defender on hi/low read. Patterson… well, just read the next section.

OFFENSE

McCaffrey time. Shea Patterson had one 51-yard bomb to Nico Collins and 25 other attempts on which Michigan advanced 96 yards, 3.8 yards an attempt. He threw a very bad interception and tried to throw another one. Both of his sacks were on him; he sat in the pocket forever on the first and then ran himself into pressure on the second.

I like Joel Klatt but when going over the game I about passed out when he lamented how no one was open on the first sack.

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Literally everyone is open! This coverage is a giant Iowa bust on which a corner playing outside leverage expects safety help and that safety help is moving up on a crossing route, which is also open. It really seems like this is the whole point of the play, as Bell takes his route vertical for a few steps to draw the safety's attention before breaking to the crossing route.

I should note that after attempting to match this up with the rush, the point at which Patterson needs to decide to throw is this:

image

Since both LBs are moving left and the safety has committed these guys are in fact all open but I didn't want to be accused of cherry picking a moment too late. We saw McCaffrey make a nice anticipation throw to McKeon against Wisconsin, it's not unreasonable to expect Patterson to decide any of these guys are open. Also the wide open post needs no anticipation.

Various other incidents where Patterson sat in the pocket and couldn't find anyone didn't get the downfield cam treatment but I imagine many of them were like this, because this has been a consistent issue any time Patterson goes up against a zone defense.

There is no reason to expect this to improve, so I'm on Team McCaffrey as soon as he returns from injury.

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rarely does it come easy [Fuller]

A brief bit of sun. Michigan's other drive—the one that ended in the missed field goal—was frustrating even when things were working: it interspersed one two-yard run with completions to Collins, DPJ, and Black on two hitches that wobbled their way out there but were still easily completed and an out on which Tru Wilson picked up a CB blitz and Patterson threw it where that came from.

It's impossible to see that bit and not think about why it couldn't be this easy all the time. After the deep shot to Collins Iowa cornerbacks were playing in the parking lot or showing more aggressive coverage and bailing just before the snap. Michigan threw one hitch at that until the fourth quarter, that the Sainristil third down conversion.

To be fair to Gattis, Michigan did try to high-low Iowa on a couple of different instances only for Patterson to throw an interception on one. And the wobble on those hitches may have been oblique-induced. They were not confidence inspiring.

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no sale [Fuller]

Legitimate complaint. One complaint about the WR corps that I do think was legitimate was a distinct lack of Grant Perry route artisanship on red-zone corner routes, which were continually well-covered because Michigan's double moves on them were weak or nonexistent. Perry liked the weak first move followed by a more convincing second one inside, and then he'd break out. Iowa's a lot better than Hawaii and Geno Stone in particular was amazing in this game; still would like to see some guys bite on your moves.

Wildcat. I'm of two minds about the wildcat snap: yes, it was sort of a six-v-six situation on which the OL didn't win. (I say sort of because the overhang linebacker flew into the box on the snap.) On the other, Michigan took a passing down and waved a giant flag that they were going to run. Pass protection gets worse once the opposition doesn't have to worry about the run—Michigan had 15 pass protection positives before their first negative against Wisconsin, and from there things went to hell—and no doubt that dynamic exists for obvious runs.

Meanwhile, Michigan's other trick play was supposed to be an end-around pass from DPJ to Erick All. All fell over, Iowa didn't bite anyway, and DPJ seemingly had not been coached to get rid of the ball if his passing option was not there.

Ground woes continue. More whiplash: after a week where Michigan ran power, outside zone, and inside zone with meh success and seemingly quite a bit of confusion Michigan flipped to approximately one run play: inside zone. There was some split zone in there and a couple of arc plays, but after some early success Iowa got locked in on the one thing Michigan was doing and turned it into a struggle.

It is depressing that Michigan's gone from a team that can throw a lot of stuff at your face and run it all pretty well to one that does literally nothing well enough to be a base play. That goes double given the returning starters Michigan has. A lot of this has to do with the suddenly non-functional QB run game—that one arc read outside of four-minute-drill time was so open it was painful—but I don't know what to do with a team-wide regression so comprehensive. Players are supposed to get better as they get older.

I don't even know man. Michigan threw one bubble in this game, when they put Eubanks outside of DPJ. Iowa rolled their CB up to the LOS and slid their LB corps heavily to the field, with an OLB, who is a real OLB since it's Iowa, head up on Eubanks. The presnap look was a giant blinking DO NOT THROW A BUBBLE.

image

Bubble. I'm going to walk into the ocean now.

Michigan can't throw a screen of any variety. No TE screens, no WR screens, no RB screens. No tunnels, no bubbles, no flash screens. Speed in space is nonexistent.

DEFENSE

Dax Hill: a man. Hill got another chunk of playing time and flashed eye-popping ability. His fourth and two PBU was a drag route on which he lined up with outside leverage, got a step behind, and then made up the distance in a flash. Almost casually. I look forward to fully actualized Dax Hill.

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at least there's someone missing a tackle [Fuller]

Mesh: a plan. Michigan got hit with a few different crossing routes in this game, but in almost all cases this was because someone messed up. McGrone had one; Hudson missed a tackle; I think Thomas was late recognizing his responsibility on the one to Iowa's little scatback. Like last week's not-quite switch-em-up that seemed like Dax Hill busting a trap coverage. Michigan is still getting used to a much more diverse defensive approach but it's working pretty well; see the column section above.

Drop-out blitzes: a canal. Michigan's TFL issues were always a product of who they played. Army is Army. MTSU and Rutgers have offenses designed around the fact they can't block anyone. Wisconsin is Wisconsin, and they only had to throw 15 passes. It wasn't likely that a Don Brown defense was going to be bad at getting to the QB.

But even the most optimistic view wouldn't have projected eight sacks and an intentional grounding that was functionally a ninth. Michigan obliterated Iowa's pass protection. They were extremely eager to throw their rush package on the field—second and seven+ was good enough—and in the second half they threw in a ton of threatened rushes and late drops that sent a ton of guys through untouched. McGrone zipped through the interior of the line when Uche dropped out multiple times; Hudson got a free run off the edge; etc.

Panama. I like Panama because on a continent where way too many countries have national anthems titled "The National Anthem," the Panamanian national anthem is "The Hymn Of The Isthmus."

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how Stanley didn't fumble in this game is unknown [Fuller]

McGrone, up and down. As mentioned above, Cam McGrone had some negative blips here. He was set to jam a crossing route from Smith-Marsette and airballed on him; there was a chunk iso run where he got thwacked by the fullback and didn't funnel to help.

But the dude has the Devin Bush thing where he can come from the linebacker level with no warning and get in on the quarterback in a flash. Iowa was constantly turning him free on blitzes up the middle in part because of that—there are guys who seem dangerous and guys who don't based on their positioning. McGrone was also excellent at not tipping when he was coming.

Handsy. A pretty frustrating game for both offenses in the PI department. Michigan had an open-drive TD that didn't quite come off because a DB who was beaten clean by Black yanked him from behind without a call. For Michigan's part it seemed like they dodged a couple of penalties: an official made the uncatchable signal after Ambry Thomas mugged Oliver Martin on a fade, and a Lavert Hill PBU saw some serious jersey tugging both ways.

On the latter play an official had tossed his hat to indicate the WR had stepped out of bounds. If you step out of bounds and are ineligible to touch the ball first, can you be interfered with? It seems like the answer should be no. But I don't know.

Michigan did get hit with an inevitable flag on a badly underthrown go route.

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[Fuller]

All right-thinking persons believe these flags are an affront to momentum and should not be called. Michigan was the beneficiary of one against Army, which felt dirty but was badly needed at the time. It is unfair to penalize someone when they are running in a straight line and the WR decides he needs to go through your body.

SPECIAL TEAMS

What are you doi—ok. DPJ fielded a punt at the four, which was bad. Then he DPJed his way out to the 40, which was good, and then he fumbled, which was bad, and then Michigan jumped on it, so that was okay again. Michigan got some fluck in this game to offset earlier bad luck.

Golden godhood: nah. Aussie drifter Michael Sleep-Dalton only averaged 38 yards a kick and didn't pin Michigan inside the 10. (Punting stats should record inside the 10, not inside the 20.) He did have a very frustrating line drive he hammered to the left after rolling right; DPJ had no shot at fielding it and it ended up being 56 yards with no return. Sleep-Dalton put a couple in the sideline as compensation.

By contrast Will Hart was his usual self: boom everything, live with the consequences. Iowa picked up 54 yards on four punt returns with a long of 17—ie, everything that got fielded came back a long way, and six of the eight punts either got returned or went into the endzone. So despite a 46 yard average, Michigan only netted 34 yards a punt once touchbacks and returns are accounted for.

These are the costs of Michigan's punting approach.

What was with the pop-ups? Michigan popped up their first two kickoffs. Smith-Marsette caught the first one on the dead run but had fair-caught it. The second one he took out to the 50. The opening kickoff of the second half went into the endzone, and you have to wonder why Michigan wasn't doing that from the beginning.

Nordin: very large leg. Consecutive 58-yarders were easily long enough; the second one got pushed wide after a bad snap.

MISCELLANEOUS

End of half, again. The end of half bugaboo struck again. Michigan was rightfully turtling until Kirk Ferentz called a somewhat unusual timeout on third and one; Haskins ripped off Michigan's longest run of the day—18 yards—and Michigan decided to try to get something with 20 seconds left and one timeout. Out of the timeout they threw a hitch, and DPJ got tackled in bounds. Michigan let the clock roll, threw another short pass, and then called timeout with one second left.

After the hitch the announcers clucked about how DPJ had to get out of bounds, something that would have been much easier if he'd been running an out. Why was he getting a throw at the numbers, five yards from the sideline?

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homecoming without lots of homecoming [Bryan Fuller]

No halftime show. Homecoming didn't have the alumni band performance. No Temptation, no War Chant. I don't even know what we're doing here if we're not preserving even extremely easy-to-preserve traditions. Let's become the mauve and taupe.

HERE

Best and Worst:

Meh: The Offense

I'm going to be a contrarian here and say the offense legitimately looked like it was making solid strides against what is a very good (if unspectacular) defense. Yes, Jim Harbaugh is probably trolling a bit when he says he thinks the offense is hitting its stride, as 10 points in any game is rarely a sign your team is firing on all cylinders. But I re-watched this game and there were a number of times where a play here, a play there turns what was a nail-biter into a blowout and we aren't having as many existential conversations about the state of the program. I know Iowa players said they didn't make adjustments to the pass defense, and I guess if your philosophy is "zone them hard and grab anyone who tries to get away", then in broad strokes that's probably correct. But Michigan still ground down the field at a decent clip (4.1 ypc after you excise sacks, kneel-downs, and whatever happened during that DPJ play), and perhaps most importantly stayed ahead of the sticks consistently (Iowa only picked up 4 TFLs, and two of those came on sacks and a third was the aforementioned DPJ play). Iowa's one of the worst teams in the country in generating tackles behind the line, but as we've seen past performance does not remotely portend future results. And heck, Patterson actually kept the ball on a couple of plays and picked up a couple of first downs in the process.

Also podcast, Ace's recap:

This was ¡El Assico! 2: This Time in Blue. Neither team cracked 270 yards of total offense. Of the game's 26 real drives, there were:

  • 15 punts
  • four interceptions
  • a lost fumble
  • two made field goals
  • two missed field goals
  • a single, solitary touchdown
  • Iowa's eight-play, 12-yard drive to end the game.

The defense, obviously, emerged as the game's heroes.

ELSEWHERE

Go Iowa Awesome:

THE BAD: ROAD NATE STANLEY

This is Nate Stanley’s worst performance on the road against a ranked conference opponent since…well…the last time Nate Stanley was on the road against a ranked conference opponent. In 2018 it was against Penn State, when he completed a pathetic 37% of his passes for 205 yards, threw for two interceptions and was sacked three times. In 2017 it was at Wisconsin where he completed eight (8!) passes for 41 yards, one interception and was sacked four times. His QBR against Wisconsin was 6.0. Six, point, zero.

Comically, this was statistically his best performance of those three games, as he threw for 260 yards and completed a more impressive 54.8% of his passes. Unfortunately, there were also the three interceptions and, oh yeah, the EIGHT sacks. Some of those weren’t his fault (which we’ll talk about), others, like the one where he had about 5 seconds to throw the ball away as he was running towards the sideline and decided instead to take the sack, were. Stanley turtles on the road in tough conference games and his decision-making is about a full two seconds slower. That was the case when he first started and unfortunately, that’s the case in his final year.

HSR:

A win is a win. Which is something you say when your team wins ugly.  But Michigan really needed this win, which, of course, will be immediately devalued by the national press because of how bad Iowa looked, and Iowa was overrated because who had Iowa played really?  It's going to happen because it's what always happens.  But things need to get fixed this week on the offensive side.  Figure something out, because you can't keep telling the defense it's all on them week in, week out.

Sap's Decals:

DEFENSIVE CHAMPION – I’m just going to come right out and say it, the ENTIRE DEFENSE played lights-out for Michigan. I mean, this was a total TEAM EFFORT. From Don Brown mixing up his schemes and his calls, to the d-line sacking the Iowa QB eight times, to the defensive secondary getting 3 interceptions, to the linebackers limiting the Hawkeyes to just one yard rushing. It wasn’t perfect, but in a one-possession game where the offense was having problems getting into the end zone, you just knew the defense was going to have to make the last stop – and they did.

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los barcos

October 7th, 2019 at 1:35 PM ^

Poor sam webb – probably going to throw out his back carrying all the water for this offense.  I usually appreciate his level-headed takes, but listening today makes me think we’re in two different worlds (cue Brian’s Sinbad/genie reference).

We *should* be 3-2, and a coin toss away from 2-3.  Think about that.  Objectively, this team as presently constructed cannot beat PSU (at night) or ND, they’re a 50/50 against MSU, and don’t even get me started about OSU…

You have to make a change – Shea looks utterly loss out there and the Offense has no confidence whatsoever.  I’m not one to usually call for the backup, but at this point what do you have to lose?  This isn’t even a hot take.  Pre-season everyone was raving about Dcaff – “we have two starting QBs” – and it wasn’t just smoke because they played both Shea and Dcaff together. 

So you liked Dcaff earlier, why not trot him out now? 

jdemille9

October 7th, 2019 at 1:55 PM ^

All signs say "yes, play McCaffery now!" but something tells me Shea is gonna be the guy for the rest of the season.. barring injury. I hope I'm wrong and they go back to him once he's cleared but I'm cynical and jaded after years and years of Michigan not doing what they should to help right the ship. 

I've resigned myself to a 7-5 regular season and a (hopefully) McCaffery-led bowl win over some cupcake to get us to 8-wins and once again re-ignite the offseason hype train. 

bronxblue

October 7th, 2019 at 2:43 PM ^

I don't know where all these "signs" that McCaffrey is any better are coming from?  One drive against Wisconsin?  Assorted spots from last year where he ran the ball reasonably well?  The only sign I see is people angry about Patterson (and the entire offense) looking bad and thinking any change is worth it.  Which is a fine decision if you accept that, no, Michigan probably loses 6 games then and the fat part of the bell curve ends with McCaffrey on the sideline injured and a combination of Milton and Patterson finishing off the year.  That's fine, but he isn't going to come in and suddenly turn this team into a monster.

 

umchicago

October 7th, 2019 at 4:21 PM ^

well, mccaffery isn't afraid to run the ball, which would help open up this offense.  he just needs to be coached-up to protect himself better.  add in that shae is terrible in the pocket.  i believe mccaffery will move the chains much better than shae on a consistent basis due to his legs alone.  shae is likely the better passer now, but i will leave with a mccaffery learning curve and some of the freshman mistakes..  if healthy, he has a full week to prepare against illinois than the real fun starts.

HollywoodHokeHogan

October 7th, 2019 at 4:59 PM ^

Yeah, he also isn't afraid to run like this is the first time he's played football.  I don't know that I've ever seen a QB who is so willing to run and also unwilling to protect himself.  I mentioned in another thread that even his "slides" are just him kneeling down with his upper-body perpendicular to the ground, waiting for an inevitable crushing hit.  If he doesn't fix that, he'll never make it through a game. 

jigsmcgee

October 7th, 2019 at 8:23 PM ^

to some degree, I’m happy he got savagely destroyed.  Maybe he will change how he plays so he can actually, you know, provide another option for the team instead of just being an idiot while running.  McCaffrey, if you are reading this, you Dumb fuck, I can’t believe I have to remind you that you broke your collarbone and got concussed in 15 plays over the past 2 seasons.  It’s not hard to see that you are not capable of taking hits like you think you are.  Manage risk and And take the job from Shea.  It’s literally being handed to you. 

All I see is stupidity on this team.  In every facet save for defense but even then, they end up playing man against osU

Yo_Blue

October 7th, 2019 at 5:27 PM ^

Does anyone legitimately think McCaffery can survive an entire game, let alone the remainder of the season?  In the two extended play situations he has 1) broken his collarbone, and 2) received a concussion after two blows to the head.  
I'm not ready to put the chinadoll label on him yet, but based on evidence....