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Vanderbilt Planetarium's Traveling Classroom, "Discover the Universe" Visits Kreamer Street

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Thanks to funding provided by the South Country Education Foundation, the third grade teachers and students at Kreamer Street Elementary School had the amazing opportunity to view Vanderbilt Planetarium's Traveling Classroom exhibit, "Discover the Universe". The exhibit offers an innovative learning experience to help elicit excitement in learning and to enhance the classroom instruction. Provided by the Vanderbilt Planetarium, "Discover the Universe" is a traveling outreach program, designed to bring unique educational experiences consisting of hands-on interactive activities to students as they focus on how astronomers acquire knowledge about the Universe. It consists of various modules that present a different part of how astronomers acquire knowledge of the Universe. The modules include Light, Telescopes, Digital Imaging, the 3-D Universe and Gravity. "The exhibit provided curriculum that enhances the district's continual focus on the Common Core Standards.
          

NASA's plans for the 2020s include landing humans on the Moon, detecting quakes on Mars, and defending Earth from deadly asteroids

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NASA's plans for the 2020s include landing humans on the Moon, detecting quakes on Mars, and defending Earth from deadly asteroidsOne year ago, NASA announced it would send astronauts back to the moon. Since then, new spacecraft and telescopes have filled its plans for the 2020s.



          

NoisyAstronomer’s Holiday Telescope Buying Guide

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We’re coming up on the gift-giving season, and every year I get a few folks asking me, “what kind of telescope should I get for an X-year-old?” I thought it was high time to write up my own easily shareable list of tips and recommendations. That department store scope? It’s a trap First things first. …
          

Looking through Chandra's eyes

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Looking through Chandra's eyes News

Looking through Chandra's eyes

Published: 29 November 2019

This revolutionary X-ray telescope has unprecedented spatial resolution, comparable to ground-based optical telescopes for the first time. Read what Belinda J Wilkes, Director of the Chandra X-ray Center has to say about the project.


          

Scientists inch closer than ever to signal from cosmic dawn

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Around 12 billion years ago, the universe emerged from a great cosmic dark age as the first stars and galaxies lit up. With a new analysis of data collected by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope, scientists are now closer than ever to detecting the ultra-faint signature of this turning point in cosmic history. The Murchison Widefield Array radio telescope, a portion of which is pictured here, is searching  for a...

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Black hole nurtures baby stars a million light years away

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Black holes are famous for ripping objects apart, including stars. But now, astronomers have uncovered a black hole that may have sparked the births of stars over a mind-boggling distance, and across multiple galaxies. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/INAF/R. Gilli et al.; Radio NRAO/VLA; Optical: NASA/STScIIf confirmed, this discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, would represent the widest reach ever seen...

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Gilman, Roeder Named 2020 AAAS Fellows

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Fred Gilman and Kathryn Roeder

Carnegie Mellon University's Fred Gilman and Kathryn Roeder have been selected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

AAAS is the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of several highly regarded journals, including "Science." Fellows are elected by their peers to honor their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. This year, AAAS has elevated 443 of its members with this honor.

Gilman, the Buhl Professor of Theoretical Physics was recognized for his work elucidating the fundamental nature of CP violation and his sustained and successful leadership in the particle physics and cosmology communities.

Gilman has a record of national and international professional service and leadership. Most recently, he served for six years as chair of the committee overseeing the construction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. From 1999 to 2005, he chaired the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel, which advises the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy (DOE) on setting the nation's priorities for particle physics. For over a decade he was one of three senior advisors designated by the DOE under the U.S.-China Agreement on Cooperation in High Energy Physics. This led to new Chinese facilities and increased collaboration in particle physics experiments in both China and the United States.

Gilman joined the Carnegie Mellon faculty in 1995. He was the head of the Department of Physics from 1999-2008, where he led its growth in emerging fields such as cosmology and biological physics. He was dean of the Mellon College of Science (MCS) from 2007-2016, where he ushered in many new innovations. He was deeply engaged in and actively oversaw the development and implementation of a new MCS Core Education for undergraduate students; introduced a framework for decreasing bias and increasing diversity in recruiting that has been adopted by other colleges at the university; joined with the dean of the College of Engineering to provide seed funding for new interdisciplinary collaborations; and led the construction of a major neurobiology facility while renovating many labs and creating interactive common spaces in the Mellon Institute.

Prior to arriving at Carnegie Mellon, Gilman was the associate director of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) and led the physics research portion of the SSC project. He previously spent 23 years as a faculty member at Stanford University.

Gilman's research has focused on the physics of heavy quarks and leptons and on the difference in the behavior of matter and antimatter (CP violation), which in turn is a key component of an explanation of the dominance of matter over antimatter in the universe.

Roeder, UPMC Professor of Statistics and Life Sciences, is being recognized for her distinguished contributions to statistical genetics and genomics methodology, outstanding research in genetics of autism spectrum disorder and contribution to statistical theory for mixture models.

Roeder started her research career in biology but was soon drawn to statistics. According to Roeder, "every question that interested me could only be answered by solving an even more intriguing statistical puzzle." Her first major data project was in DNA forensics, helping to solidify the credibility of this form of evidence in the judicial system.

As her scientific career advanced, Roeder transitioned to developing statistical and machine learning tools for finding associations or patterns in data. She focuses on high dimensional inference problems with applications such as analyzing variation in the whole human genome and how it relates to disease. Her work has contributed to a better understanding of schizophrenia, autism and other genetic disorders.

"My results for mixture models have been used to better understand a broad range of scientific phenomena," Roeder said. "This, for me, is the most satisfying aspect of statistics, when methods you develop are applied to answer important scientific questions."

Roeder holds a joint appointment at CMU, joining the Department of Statistics & Data Science in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences in 1994 and the Computational Biology Department in the School of Computer Science in 2004. She also served as the university's vice provost for faculty from July 2015 through June 2019.

Roeder has published more than 150 scholarly articles and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2019. She is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. She received the Snedecor Award for outstanding work in statistical applications, the Janet L. Norwood Award for outstanding achievement by a woman in statistical sciences and the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies Presidents' Award for the outstanding statistician under age 40.

Roeder previously served as the statistics section chair for AAAS and has played an integral role in organizing conference sections aimed at helping her community improve how statistics are communicated across scientific disciplines, as well as to the public.

"I am deeply honored to receive this recognition by my peers," Roeder said. "I will continue to push the boundaries of statistics to uncover the genetic underpinning of diseases and disorders, like autism, and I will continue to work with my colleagues in other fields to translate these findings into biology and therapeutics."

Gilman and Roeder are among 33 AAAS Fellows who have called CMU home. They will be inducted on Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020 during the AAAS annual meeting in Seattle.


          

"60 Minutes" Highlights CMU Brain Science Research Advances

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Image of Marcel Just

Ten years ago, Lesley Stahl, a correspondent with the CBS program "60 Minutes," interviewed Carnegie Mellon University's Marcel Just and Tom Mitchell about the use of brain imaging and machine learning to identify thoughts — based on brain activation patterns or neural signatures. During the program, the researchers showed how functional MRI could be used to identify the thought of a physical object, like a hammer, from a person’s brain scans. Read more from "60 Minutes."

With the decade drawing to a close, Stahl returned to CMU's Pittsburgh campus for an update. Just, the D.O. Hebb University Professor of Psychology at the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and his colleagues can now apply their research method to see brain activation patterns for scientific concepts. "It's like being an astronomer when the first telescope is discovered," Just said. His work is shining light on how abstract concepts, including emotions like "jealousy" and faith," form in the brain. His latest work focuses on detecting whether or not a person has been thinking about suicide.

Watch Sunday's program on the "60 Minutes" website. 

As the birthplace of artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology, CMU brain scientists have had real-world impact for over 50 years. Learn more about CMU's Neuroscience Institute.


          

There's Now a Radio Telescope in Operation on The Far Side of The Moon - ScienceAlert

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  1. There's Now a Radio Telescope in Operation on The Far Side of The Moon  ScienceAlert
  2. There's Now an Operational Radio Telescope on the Far Side of the Moon  Universe Today
  3. View full coverage on Google News

          

This telescope might show us the beginning of the universe | Wendy Freedman

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When and how did the universe begin? A global group of astronomers wants to answer that question by peering as far back in time as a large new telescope will let us see. Wendy Freedman headed the creation of the Giant Magellan Telescope, under construction in South America; at TEDGlobal in Rio, she shares a bold vision of the discoveries about our universe that the GMT could make possible.
          

How to take a picture of a black hole | Katie Bouman

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At the heart of the Milky Way, there's a supermassive black hole that feeds off a spinning disk of hot gas, sucking up anything that ventures too close -- even light. We can't see it, but its event horizon casts a shadow, and an image of that shadow could help answer some important questions about the universe. Scientists used to think that making such an image would require a telescope the size of Earth -- until Katie Bouman and a team of astronomers came up with a clever alternative. Bouman explains how we can take a picture of the ultimate dark using the Event Horizon Telescope.
          

Positive: 'Extraordinary' black hole weighs in at 70 solar masses

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A 70-solar-mass black hole has been discovered orbiting a star in the Milky Way. The object is the heaviest stellar-mass black hole detected so far in our galaxy. Its very existence is puzzling astronomers because black holes of this size are not expected in the Milky Way. ... an international team of astronomers has used the LAMOST telescope in China to detect a stellar-mass black hole by its effect on a companion star in a binary system. The binary system about 15,000 light-years away in the Milky Way and has been dubbed LB-1.
          

2019 Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar (25 photos)

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Time once more for one of my favorite holiday traditions: the 12th annual Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar. Every day until Wednesday, December 25, this page will present one new incredible image of our universe from NASA's Hubble telescope. Be sure to come back every day until the 25th, or follow on Twitter (@TheAtlPhoto) or Facebook for daily updates. I hope you enjoy these amazing and awe-inspiring images and the efforts of the science teams who have brought them to Earth. And once more, I want to say how fortunate I feel to have been able to share photo stories with you all year, and how much fun I have putting this calendar together every December. Wishing you all a merry Christmas, happy holidays, and peace on Earth.

A Colossal Shell of Light. Spirals of dust swirl across trillions of kilometers of interstellar space as an expanding halo of light around a distant star, named V838 Monocerotis illuminates the giant cloud. The glow comes from the red supergiant star at the middle of the image, which gave off a flashbulb-like pulse of light, This image shows the progress the light-pulse had made after two years of traveling away from the star in all directions, imaged by Hubble on February 8, 2004. V838 Monocerotis is located about 20,000 light-years away from Earth in the direction of the constellation Monoceros, at the outer edge of our Milky Way galaxy. ( NASA, the Hubble Heritage Team, AURA / STScI, and ESA)

          

An Active Antenna Subarray for the Low-Frequency Radio Telescope GURT—Part I: Design and Theoretical Model

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The new Giant Ukrainian Radio Telescope (GURT) intended for operation in 8–80 MHz range is now under construction. It employs an active phased array antenna composed of many dipole subarrays, several of which have been implemented and now are used for radio astronomy observations. In this two-part paper, the electrical and noise parameters of the subarray are studied by numerical and experimental ways. In this part, a theoretical model of the subarray based on the wave theory of noisy multiport networks that takes into account the mutual coupling in the dipole array placed over imperfect ground and the correlation between all existing noise sources is proposed. It is assumed that the initial parameters for this model should be obtained using the correct electromagnetic and circuit simulation. A technique for using of this model to calculate the effective area, radiation efficiency, internal and external noise temperatures, as well as sensitivity of the subarray in terms of system equivalent flux density (SEFD) for all possible beam directions in the frequency band of the GURT radio telescope is described.
          

An Active Antenna Subarray for the Low-Frequency Radio Telescope GURT—Part II: Numerical Analysis and Experiment

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This second part of two articles’ sequence presents the detailed numerical analysis of electrical and noise parameters of a subarray of the Giant Ukrainian Radio Telescope (GURT) designed for operation in the frequency range of 8–80 MHz. The theoretical model of the subarray and calculation technique of its parameters developed in the first part is used. Frequency behaviors of the absorption area, radiation efficiency, and system noise temperature budget of the subarray are studied. Special attention is paid to the subarray sensitivity given in terms of sky noise dominance (SND) and system-equivalent flux density (SEFD). The calculation results show that strong mutual coupling between subarray elements enables a significant increase in the subarray SND and enhancing overall its performance. The frequency dependences of the system noise temperature for 23 beams of the subarray, obtained by in situ measurements, are presented. A good agreement between the measured and calculated results well enough validates the subarray theoretical model.
          

Simple Telescope Diagram

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Simple Telescope Diagram
          

~ Christmas on the Chicorica ~

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Event date: December 14, 2019
Event Time: 05:00 PM - 08:00 PM
Location:
HRC 63
P.O. Box 386
Raton, NM 87740
Description:


Come and enjoy the Christmas on Chicorica Stroll along Chicorica Creek! This exquisite stroll is lit up with more than 1,000 luminarias while Christmas carols are played. You are welcome to enjoy cookies and hot chocolate. Stop by the park telescope for a view of the night sky. And don't forget to stop for a visit with Santa! For more information call: 575-445-5607
          

As estrelas da Via Láctea

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Esta imagem mostra a majestosa Via Láctea sobre o Observatório de La Silla do ESO no Chile, com a sua banda brilhante salpicada por regiões vermelhas de formação estelar e filamentos escuros serpenteantes de poeira interestelar. Podemos também ver na imagem dois dos telescópios do observatório, o telescópio Schmidt de 1 metro (à esquerda) e o telescópio MPG-ESO de 2,2 metros (à direita).

Apesar de todas as estrelas no céu pertencerem à galáxia Via Láctea, chamamos normalmente "Via Láctea" apenas a esta espessa risca no céu, facto que decorre da posição que ocupamos no interior da nossa casa galáctica: o Sistema Solar encontra-se num dos braços em espiral da Galáxia, situado aproximadamente a dois terços da distância entre o centro da Via Láctea e a sua periferia. A própria Galáxia tem uma forma parecida a uma panqueca gigante com um bojo brilhante no centro e quase todos os seus constituintes — estrelas, gás, poeira, planetas, etc. — estão situados no seio de um disco fino. A “Via Láctea” — a tira brilhante no céu noturno — é na realidade o que vemos deste disco a partir da nossa posição na Galáxia e é por isso que nos aparece muito mais brilhante e impressionante que o restante céu circundante, já que estamos a olhar na direção do centro galáctico muito denso.

À direita na imagem, mesmo por cima do telescópio MPG-ESO de 2,2 metros, podemos ver a nossa vizinha mais próxima, uma galáxia anã chamada Grande Nuvem de Magalhães. O brilho rosa e verde visível logo acima do horizonte trata-se da luminescência atmosférica, um fenómeno causado por átomos excitados presentes na atmosfera superior da Terra.


          

Um observador reformado

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Na periferia do deserto chileno do Atacama a elevada altitude, um meteoro cruza o céu por cima do Observatório de La Silla do ESO, resplandecendo ao longo da banda salpicada de estrelas e cruzada por poeira da Via Láctea. Este evento pitoresco tem um observador estático e silencioso, o qual pode ser visto do lado esquerda da imagem: o SEST (Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope).

O SEST foi construído em 1987 em prol do ESO e do Conselho de investigação de Ciências Naturais sueco, tendo sido desativado em 2003. Durante 16 anos, o telescópio observou um dos céus mais escuros e límpidos do planeta. Na altura da sua construção, o SEST de 15 metros de diâmetro era o maior telescópio no hemisfério sul concebido para a astronomia submilimétrica. 

Enquanto esteve ativo, o SEST foi utilizado para uma enorme variedade de trabalhos de investigação, incluindo a observação do centro da Via Láctea e o estudo de duas galáxias satélites da nossa, as Nuvens de Magalhães. Em 1995, observações obtidas com o SEST mostraram que a Nebulosa do Boomerang — uma nuvem de gás formada por uma estrela moribunda na constelação do Centauro — era o local mais frio conhecido no Universo, com apenas um grau acima do zero absoluto.


          

Exoplanets through extreme optics: from PLATO to SHARK-NIR

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Title: Exoplanets through extreme optics: from PLATO to SHARK-NIR Abstract: L’Osservatorio di Padova (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) e l’Università di Padova negli ultimi anni sono stati coinvolti massicciamente in progetti dedicati alla ricerca di pianeti extrasolari, sia con strumenti e telescopi da terra che dallo spazio. SHARK-NIR, che sta per “System for coronagraphy with High order Adaptive optics from R to K band – Near-Infrared”, è uno strumento disegnato per cercare e caratterizzare sistemi solari giovani e regioni di formazione stellare nel dominio di lunghezze d’onda del vicino infrarosso. La tecnica devota all’osservazione è quella spettroscopica e dell’immagine diretta. Questo strumento ottico è stato selezionato per la seconda generazione di dispositivi per il Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), con il vantaggio di sfruttare le eccellenti prestazioni del sistema di ottica adattiva di LBT. La correzione di ottica attiva estrema di LBT (XAO), è il requisito necessario di SHARK-NIR per ottenere la migliore cronografia attualmente disponibile con LBT ed è obbligatoria quando l’obiettivo è studiare pianeti poco luminosi che orbitano attorno a stelle brillanti. CHEOPS, che sta per “CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite”, è la prima missione spaziale dedicata alla caratterizzazione di piccoli pianeti già noti attorno a stelle brillanti tramite fotometria ad altissima precisione. Si otterranno accurate misure del raggio dei pianeti per i quali la massa è già nota da campagne spettroscopiche con telescopi da terra. Inoltre si conosceranno con precisione i raggi dei nuovi pianeti scoperti dalle campagne di osservazione da terra di nuova generazione basate sulla tecnica dei transiti, fino a pianeti di dimensioni di Nettuno o inferiori. PLATO, che sta per “PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars”, è una missione proposta per il programma di nuovi satelliti di medie dimensioni “Cosmic Vision” dell’Agenzia Spaziale Europea. Il telescopio è focalizzato alla ricerca e caratterizzazione di eso-pianeti attorno a stelle brillanti e vicine al nostro Sole. Il progetto proposto dal consorzio PLATO consiste in un telescopio multiplo, composto da decine di telescopi singoli uguali, per i quali si è sviluppata una soluzione ottica totalmente rifrattiva. Ogni singolo telescopio ha un grande campo di vista (fino a 20 gradi) e una qualità ottica tale da concentrare la maggior parte dell’energia raccolta in un singolo elemento del sensore di immagini. Un tale scopo è raggiungibile applicando una molteplicità di soluzioni, tra cui anche l’uso di elementi ottici asferici. In questa tesi descriverò le attività svolte sia nell’ambito di un progetto spaziale che di uno strumento per telescopio a terra. Il progetto PLATO è stato trattato nell’ambito dell’integrazione, assemblaggio e verifica (AIV) del prototipo della singola unità ottica del telescopio, allo scopo di validare la procedura completa di AIV e le prestazioni in condizioni di volo. Riguardo lo strumento SHARK-NIR si spiegheranno le attività svolte per l’allineamento ottico e la qualificazione finale.
          

Telescope

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Telescope
          

Hubble telescope finds mysterious black hole disc, Says Research

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Using NASA”s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered a disc very close to a starving black hole – something that should not be there – based on current astronomical theories. The unexpected thin disc of material was found encircling a supermassive black hole at the heart of the spiral galaxy NGC 3147, located 130 million […] More
          

WHT Schedule and Time Allocations 13 Jan-16 Feb Released

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Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes (ING):
          

Featured Video: Black Hole Eats Star

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National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO): What happens when a black hole has a star for dinner? In this new video, Melissa Hoffman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory takes us on a tour of one of the most disruptive events in Universe: a black hole ripping apart a nearby star. Astronomers call these stellar deaths tidal disruption events, and only a few of them have been observed. Using radio and infrared telescopes, including the National Science Foundation’s Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), in 2018 an international team of astronomers witnessed this event in a pair of colliding galaxies called Arp 299. Watch the video here. Read the original press release about this finding here. The post Featured Video: Black Hole Eats Star appeared first on National Radio Astronomy Observatory.
          

The Stars of the Milky Way

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Seen here, the majestic Milky Way rises above ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile, its bright band punctuated by red regions of star formation and dark, weaving filaments of interstellar dust. Two of the site’s telescopes, the 1-metre Schmidt telescope (left) and the MPG-ESO 2.2-metre telescope (right), are are visible as well.

While all of the stars in the sky belong to the Milky Way galaxy, we commonly refer to this thick streak across the sky as “the Milky Way”. This is because of our position within our home galaxy: the Solar System sits on one of our galaxy’s spiral arms and is located roughly two-thirds of the distance between the Milky Way’s centre and its peripheries. The galaxy itself is shaped a little like a giant pancake with a bright bulge in the centre, with almost all of its constituent stars, gas, dust, planets, and so on lying within a thin disc. The “Milky Way” — the bright strip we see painted across the night sky in this image — is actually our view of this disc, which is why it appears to be so much brighter and more impressive than the surrounding sky, as we look inwards towards the densely-packed galactic centre.

To the centre-right of the frame, just above the MPG-ESO 2.2-metre telescope, is one of our nearest neighbours in space, a dwarf galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud. The pink and green glow visible just above the horizon is known as airglow, and is caused by excited atoms in the Earth’s upper atmosphere.


          

A Retired Stargazer

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High up in the outskirts of the Chilean Atacama Desert, in the skies above ESO’s La Silla Observatory, a meteor blazes across the star-studded and dust-streaked Milky Way. This picturesque event had a silent, static onlooker, visible here to the left of the frame: the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST).

The SEST was built in 1987 on behalf of ESO and the Swedish Natural Science Research Council, and was decommissioned in 2003.For those 16 years it gazed up at some of the darkest and clearest skies in the world. At the time of construction, the 15-metre SEST was the only large telescope in the southern hemisphere designed for submillimetre astronomy

While active, the SEST was used for a broad range of research, including observing the centre of the Milky Way, and studying our galaxy’s two satellites, the Magellanic Clouds. In 1995, SEST observations showed the Boomerang Nebula — a gas cloud formed by a dying star in the constellation of Centaurus (The Centaur) — to be the coldest known location in the Universe at only one degree warmer than absolute zero.


          

Monster Black Hole That 'Should Not Exist' Discovered in the Milky Way

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An anonymous reader shares a report: Astronomers think our home galaxy -- the Milky Way -- is practically bursting with black holes, with estimates of up to 100 million of the invisible beasts hiding across the galactic neighborhood. It was generally assumed these black holes could reach a mass of up to 20 times that of the sun, but the discovery of a "monster" black hole, with about 70 times the mass of the sun, has surprised Chinese astronomers. In a new study, published in the journal Nature on Nov. 27, a research team from the Chinese Academy of Sciences peered across the galaxy with the Large sky Area Multi-Object fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (Lamost), based at Xinglong Observatory in China. Black holes don't emit light, so astronomers have to get crafty when they go hunting for them. Usually, this involves looking for signs a black hole is feasting on a nearby star or the gas and dust that swirls around them. If the black hole isn't feasting and if it isn't surrounded by bright gas and dust, it becomes a little trickier to locate. But, using Lamost, the team examined the movement of stars across the sky, searching for those that seemed to be orbiting an invisible object. Follow-up observations with telescopes in Spain and the US helped the researchers discover a star about eight times bigger than the sun. Intriguingly, it was orbiting a "dark companion": The monster black hole, dubbed LB-1. "Black holes of such mass should not even exist in our galaxy, according to most of the current models of stellar evolution," said Liu Jifeng, astronomer at the National Astronomical Observatory of China and first author of the study, in a press release. "LB-1 is twice as massive as what we thought possible. Now theorists will have to take up the challenge of explaining its formation."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


          

Hubble Studies Gamma-Ray Burst with the Highest Energy Ever Seen

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Newswise imageNASA's Hubble Space Telescope has given astronomers a peek at the location of the most energetic outburst ever seen in the universe--a blast of gamma-rays a trillion times more powerful than visible light. That's because in a few seconds the gamma-ray burst (GRB) emitted more energy than the Sun will provide over its entire 10-billion year life.
          

Army Technical Manual Tm 5 6675 270 25p Theodolite Directional 0 Graduation 59 Inch Long Telescope Waccessories Wild Heerbru Model T16

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Army Technical Manual Tm 5 6675 270 25p Theodolite Directional 0 Graduation 59 Inch Long Telescope Waccessories Wild Heerbru Model T16
          

Gloucester Area Astronomy Club Holiday Party!

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On Friday night, December 13, for our 16th annual Holiday Party, we are fortunate to once again have with us the celebrated Kelly Beatty, Senior Editor of Sky & Telescope Magazine (see more of Kelley’s bio below). This year Kelly’s presentation asks the perennial question “Are We Alone? Our galaxy, Kelly writes, “likely contains more … Continue reading Gloucester Area Astronomy Club Holiday Party!
          

Mid-Hudson Astronomical Association Monthly Star Party (Friday, December 27, 2019 06:00 PM)

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Lake Taghkanic State Park
Phone: (518) 851-3631 The Mid-Hudson Astronomical Association hosts a monthly stargazing party in the West Beach parking lot. Bring your own telescopes and binoculars or use those provided by our members. RSVP is required at least one day beforehand. You will be asked to provide your license plate number and make/model car so Park Management and Police have a record of who will be in park after hours. More info at https://www.meetup.com/mhastro. Registration: Required
          

Raspberry Pi model 4 thermal improvements

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During Callum's presentation at the recent Equipment and Techniques meeting there was reference to Raspberry Pi computers being used for telescope and equipment control using the INDI and INDIGO packages that are developing rapidly.


          

Dr. Richard Daystrom on (News Article):NASA’s Exoplanet Hunter Has Discovered an Earth-sized Alien World

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NASA’s Exoplanet Hunter Has Discovered an Earth-sized Alien World

Tuesday, November 26, 2019 byEdsel Cook

Tags: Alien worldBreakthroughCosmicDiscoveriesExoplanetsGood scienceHabitable planetsKepler space telescopeNASAPlanetsSpaceSpace researchStars

(Natural News) The TESS space telescope has taken its first step in catching up to the massive achievements of its predecessor, Kepler. The NASA-operated spacecraft has recently found its first Earth-sized exoplanet.

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has spotted a planet circling the dwarf star called HD 21749, which is 53 light-years away from Earth. This world, dubbed HD 21749b, is gaseous but not a gas giant like Jupiter or even Neptune. Experts classified it as a sub-Neptune.

“It’s so exciting that TESS, which launched just about a year ago, is already a game-changer in the planet-hunting business,” explained Carnegie Institution for Science(Carnegie) researcher Johanna Teske. She served as the co-author of the study on the new discoveries.

TESS examines some of the brightest and nearest stars on the off chance that they have planets orbiting them. It looks for transits, the small drops in luminosity when an exoplanet passes between its parent star and the space telescope.

Kepler also relied on the transit method to spot alien worlds. The retired space observatory proved very successful, accounting for 70 percent of the 4,000 exoplanets known currently. NASA predicts that TESS will outperform its predecessor. (Related: Has the second “alien megastructure” been found?)

New space telescope finds its first Earth-sized rocky planet

The best outcome is for TESS to find potentially habitable worlds in star systems that are in the range of other instruments. For example, the future James Webb space telescope will scan the atmospheres of planets in search of gases produced by living organisms.

TESS also discovered a “sibling” of the newly discovered Earth-sized planet – a smaller rocky world called HD 21749c. Sadly, it does not appear to be hospitable. With an orbital period of less than eight Earth days, HD 21749c is too close for comfort to its parent star.

Further, the star HD 21749 measures around 80 percent of the size of the sun. As a result, its planet is likely scorching hot.

The Carnegie-led research team calculated the size of HD 21749c by examining the transit data from TESS. They looked at the percentage of the stellar disk that the exoplanet obscured.

Mass is another thing entirely. The researchers took data from ground-based spectrographs that measured the gravitational pull of the other exoplanet, HD 21749b, on its parent star.

Using the other method, they succeeded in determining the mass of the second alien world. HD 21749b weighed the equivalent of 23 Earths.

Further, the transit data from TESS suggested that the second exoplanet measured 2.7 times wider than Earth. The researchers surmised that HD 21749b is gaseous compared to its rocky sibling HD 21749c, but it is also far smaller than Uranus and Neptune in the solar system.

TESS will find more exoplanets that may possibly support Earth-like life

Of the planets found by TESS, HD 21749b takes the most time to complete one orbit around its parent star. Its orbital period is 36 Earth days.

When they announced their discovery of HD 21749b in early 2019, Carnegie researchers estimated its surface temperature at 300 F (150 C). They also brought up the possibility of another exoplanet, which turned out to be HD 21749c. The mass of the Earth-sized rocky planet remains unknown. They need more accurate data for their calculations.

“Measuring the exact mass and composition of such a small planet will be challenging, but important for comparing HD 21749c to Earth,” explained Carnegie researcher Sharon Wang, who co-wrote the study alongside Teske. “Carnegie’s PFS team is continuing to collect data on this object with this goal in mind.”

While HD 21749c appears unsuited to host organic life like those on Earth, the research team believes that TESS will eventually turn up more candidates for life-bearing worlds.

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk

Space.com


          

Episode 597: Q&A 108: Why Are There Meteor Showers Every Year? And More, Featuring Paul Geithner from JWST

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In this week's questions show, I explain why we can see meteor showers every year, why we're not 3D printing telescopes in space, why there aren't any plans to launch telescopes with SpaceX Starship. And a lengthy answer to one of the most common James Webb questions we get: can it be refueled? This was answered by Paul Geithner, a Deputy Project Manager for James Webb during a recent livestream. 01:00 Why do we see meteor showers every year? 02:49 Why not also use 3D printing for space telescopes? 04:40 Why don't they design telescopes for Starship? 07:20 Could there be a privately backed telescope? 09:54 Is there glass on the Moon to build telescopes? 11:46 Could ISS help build new space telescopes? 13:47 Space telescopes on the far side of the Moon? 15:06 Is Andromeda actually much closer? 16:27 Why spend money on science? 19:20 Why is the dark side of the Moon illuminated? 21:34 Can James Webb be refueled? Watch the full livestream here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iX0iCqCTKzE Want to be part of the questions show? Ask a short question on any video on my channel. I gather a bunch up each week, and answer them here. Our Book is out! https://www.amazon.com/Universe-Today-Ultimate-Viewing-Cosmos/dp/1624145442/ Audio Podcast version: ITunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/universe-today-guide-to-space-audio/id794058155?mt=2 RSS: https://www.universetoday.com/audio What Fraser's Watching Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbJ42wpShvmkjd428BcHcCEVWOjv7cJ1G Weekly email newsletter: https://www.universetoday.com/newsletter Weekly Space Hangout: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0-KklSGlCiJDwOPdR2EUcg/ Astronomy Cast: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUHI67dh9jEO2rvK--MdCSg Support us at: https://www.patreon.com/universetoday More stories at: https://www.universetoday.com/ Twitch: https://twitch.tv/fcain Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/universetoday Instagram - https://instagram.com/universetoday Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com Karla Thompson - @karlaii / https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEItkORQYd4Wf0TpgYI_1fw Chad Weber - weber.chad@gmail.com
          

Episode 594: Building Space Telescopes... In Space

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When it comes to telescopes, bigger is better. That’s true down here on Earth, and it’s especially true out in space. As astronomers and engineers design the next generation of giant space telescopes, they’re running up against the limits of current launch providers. There are only so many ways you can fold a huge telescope to get it to fit inside a 5-meter launch fairing. The upcoming James Webb Space Telescope is pretty much the very limit of what you can construct on Earth and put into space in a single launch. To go bigger, space agencies will need to consider assembling their next-generation space telescopes… in space. Our Book is out! https://www.amazon.com/Universe-Today-Ultimate-Viewing-Cosmos/dp/1624145442/ Audio Podcast version: ITunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/universe-today-guide-to-space-audio/id794058155?mt=2 RSS: https://www.universetoday.com/audio What Fraser's Watching Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbJ42wpShvmkjd428BcHcCEVWOjv7cJ1G Weekly email newsletter: https://www.universetoday.com/newsletter Weekly Space Hangout: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0-KklSGlCiJDwOPdR2EUcg/ Astronomy Cast: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUHI67dh9jEO2rvK--MdCSg Support us at https://www.patreon.com/universetoday More stories at https://www.universetoday.com/ Twitch: https://twitch.tv/fcain Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/universetoday Instagram - https://instagram.com/universetoday Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com Karla Thompson - @karlaii / https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEItkORQYd4Wf0TpgYI_1fw Chad Weber - weber.chad@gmail.com References: https://hubblesite.org/mission-and-telescope http://herschel.cf.ac.uk/mission/launch https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/technology/in-space-assembly/iSATstudy/ https://www.nasa.gov/missionpages/station/structure/elements/space-station-assembly https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacex/2019/07/29/cargo-dragon-berthed-to-station/
          

A Dramatic Demise

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Some of the most dramatic events in the Universe occur when certain stars die — and explode catastrophically in the process.

Such explosions, known as supernovae, mainly occur in a couple of ways: either a massive star depletes its fuel at the end of its life, become dynamically unstable and unable to support its bulk, collapses inwards, and then violently explodes; or a white dwarf in an orbiting stellar couple syphons more mass off its companion than it is able to support, igniting runaway nuclear fusion in its core and beginning the supernova process. Both types result in an intensely bright object in the sky that can rival the light of a whole galaxy.

In the last 20 years the galaxy NGC 5468, visible in this image, has hosted a number of observed supernovae of both the aforementioned types: SN 1999cp, SN 2002cr, SN2002ed, SN2005P, and SN2018dfg. Despite being just over 130 million light-years away, the orientation of the galaxy with respect to us makes it easier to spot these new ‘stars’ as they appear; we see NGC 5468 face on, meaning we can see the galaxy’s loose, open spiral pattern in beautiful detail in images such as this one from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.


          

Marianne Vestergaard på Niels Bohr Institutets Temadag 2019

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Lektor Marianne Vestergaard fortæller om Sorte huller, og hvordan det for første gang lykkedes forskerne at få et billede af et Sort hul.

Indenfor de sidste ca 30 år er sorte huller gået fra at være noget der lignede teoretisk opspind og fantasi til at være en fysisk realitet hvis mærkelige egenskaber vi stadig forsøger at forholde os til. Vi har indenfor de senere år set nye kvantespring i vores udforskning af sorte huller via de nye resultater fra bl.a. gravitationsbølgedetektorer som LIGO og fra det store radio-teleskop samarbejde, Event Horizon Telescope, som i April viste hele verdenen det første billede af et sort hul - eller rettere, skyggen af det.

I foredraget vil jeg give et indblik i hvad sorte huller er, hvor de befinder sig samt hvordan man ved EHT har båret sig ad med at skabe et billede af skyggen af et sort hul og hvad billedet viser. Jeg vil også komme ind på hvilken betydning de nye resultater har for forskernes forståelse af sorte huller og deres role i universet.


          

Amazon Celestron - NexStar 8SE Telescope $799

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Amazon Celestron - NexStar 8SE Telescope $799 Lowest its ever been https://www.amazon.com/Celestron-...B000GUFOC8
          

NASA's Webb to Unveil the Secrets of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

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In two separate studies using NASA’s upcoming James Webb Space Telescope, a team of astronomers will observe dwarf galaxy companions to the Milky Way and the nearby Andromeda galaxy. Studying these small companions will help scientists learn about galaxy formation and the properties of dark matter, a mysterious substance thought to account for approximately 85% of the matter in the universe. In the first study, the team will gain knowledge of dark matter by measuring the motions of stars in
          

Starburst Galaxy M94 from Hubble

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Why does this galaxy have a ring of bright blue stars? Beautiful island universe Messier 94 lies a mere 15 million light-years distant in the northern constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici). A popular target for Earth-based astronomers, the face-on spiral galaxy is about 30,000 light-years across, with spiral arms sweeping through the outskirts of its broad disk. But this Hubble Space Telescope field of view spans about 7,000 … Read More →
          

Comment on A Closer Look at an Interstellar Comet by James Jason Wentworth

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"Short-range starships" (those words kept sounding in my mind as I read this update--and especially, your comment about the great difficulty of even achieving fast, "particles-grabbing" [and/or quick-scan] flybys of these visitors). Chemical rockets are pitifully inadequate (for really worthwhile missions to these objects), and ion drives and HETs [Hall effect thrusters], while they have the ISP for the job--although not by large margins--accelerate so slowly that having such probes in the right place at the right time to intercept or rendezvous seems like a perversely frustrating game that a Pan or a Loki might devise... But: Looking around, there *are* existing propulsion technologies that could get worthwhile instrument packages out to these objects, even to "land" (rendezvous and dock) on them and return actual samples to Earth. But one is still at a rather low technological maturity level, although the "engine" it would use--our Sun--already exists and is ready to be engaged (for one-way missions), whenever we are. The other could be built today, but it would have to be built--and launched--in/from areas of the world where the "No nukes in space...!" (or anywhere else) luddites would be afraid to go (and wouldn't be allowed in, in any event). It's frustrating to know what we *could* do, and that it is stymied by ignorance-based fear. The engineering--and even actual designs--have long been ready, though; for example: A "small" Orion nuclear pulse spaceship, with a pusher plate "just" 33 feet (10 meters) in diameter, was designed for launch aboard a Saturn V (its first two stages, the S-IC and the S-II). As with Skylab in May of 1973, those two stages would have injected the Orion vehicle into low Earth orbit. Once there, its high-thrust ^and^ high-specific impulse (a rare combination, as one must usually choose one over the other) nuclear "shaped charge" pulse units--designed to ensure that fully half of the high-velocity bomb debris, including the forward-directed (by a nozzle in each pulse unit bomb assembly) vaporized polyethylene, intercepted the pusher plate--would start firing, and: While this Saturn V-lofted Orion spaceship was likely intended for interplanetary travel (I haven't seen its specifications for some years), and thus utilized fission pulse units, the Orion team also designed starships (capable of reaching about 0.1 c, enabling a voyage to Alpha Centauri--as long as one didn't need to slow down!--that could take less than fifty years), which used thermonuclear (fusion bomb) pulse units. Plus: With the advances in fusion bomb design (including weapon miniaturization) that have occurred since Project Orion was shelved about half a century ago, today we could build smaller, lighter, 0.5% - 10% of light velocity cruising speed (and maybe more) Orion starprobes, which could reach the interstellar interlopers *and* return after reasonable intervals of time (0.5% - 1% of c should be amply fast for such missions), carrying generous samples as well as enormous quantities of data. It might be cheaper--as Arthur C. Clarke speculated concerning automatic interstellar probes--for such interstellar interloper probes to come back than to transmit such prodigious quantities of data back to Earth by radio or even laser, at least until/unless we have huge radio and/or optical telescopes in space and/or on the Moon. As well: Elon Musk's SpaceX is developing the Super Heavy (rocket)/Starship (a general-purpose upper stage/two-way shuttle/small-payload SSTO--Single-Stage-To-Orbit--interplanetary spaceship with in-space refueling capability) combination. With the Super Heavy first stage, this vehicle combination has an in-orbit payload mass capability, even initially, that is considerably greater than the Saturn V's (220,000 pounds [100,000 kilograms] initially, with a target of 150,000 kilograms). The Super Heavy/Starship, once it is flying, will be able to loft actual starships of the Orion type (at least robotic ones, for now) into Earth orbit, from which they can begin their long ultraplanetary (to meet interstellar interlopers)--and ultimately, interstellar--journeys.
          

78 9945 Telescopes Owners

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78 9945 Telescopes Owners
          

Spacewalking astronauts add new pumps to cosmic detector

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Spacewalking astronauts add new pumps to cosmic detectorSpacewalking astronauts attached new pumps to a cosmic ray detector outside the International Space Station on Monday in a bid to extend its scientific life. It was the third spacewalk in nearly three weeks for Italy’s Luca Parmitano and NASA’s Andrew Morgan. NASA compares this series of four spacewalks — the most complex since the Hubble Space Telescope missions — to heart bypass surgery because they are designed to bypass the old, degraded pumps.



          

43 Calls for Submissions in December 2019 - Paying markets

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Wikimedia
There are more than three dozen calls for submissions in December. All of these are paying markets, and none charge submission fees. As always, every genre, style, and form is wanted, from short stories to poetry to essays.

I post calls for submissions on the first day of every month. But as I am collecting them, I post them on my page, Calls for Submissions. You can get a jump on next month's calls for submissions by checking that page periodically throughout the month. (I only post paying markets.)

Also see Paying Markets for hundreds of paying markets arranged by form and genre.

Happy submitting!

______________________


Eternal Haunted SummerGenre: Original poetry and short fiction about the Americas. Also reviews, interviews, and essays. Payment: $5. Deadline: December 1, 2019.

HavokGenre: Flash fiction on theme of Answering the Call. Payment: $10 via PayPal for each story published in an Anthology. Deadline: December 1, 2019.

Gothic Fantasy Short Stories: Bodies in the Library (Crime & Mystery) and Footsteps in the Dark (Horror & Suspense)Genres: Crime/Mystery and Horror/Suspense. Payment: 8 cents for each word (SFWA qualifying market rate) and 6 cents for reprints. Deadline: December 1, 2019. Accepts reprints.

SliceGenre: Fiction, nonfiction and poetry on the theme of Persistence. Length: Up to 5,000 words for prose. Payment: $250 for stories and essays, $75 for poems. Deadline: December 1, 2019.

Bethlehem Writers RoundtableGenre: Poetry and fiction on When Hell Freezes Over. Payment: $20 for featured author stories; $10 for stories published on &More page $5 for poems. Deadline: December 1, 2019.

Compelling Science FictionGenre: Science fiction. Payment: 6 cents/word for original stories. 1 cent/word for reprints. Deadline: December 1, 2019.

MythridateGenre: Poetry, fiction, art and nonfiction which explores the theme of "Decadence."  Payment: $15 per poem; $20 per short story; $10 to $20 for nonfiction. Art pays $10-$40 per accepted piece. Deadline: December 2, 2019.

Speculative CityGenre: Fiction, poetry, and essays within the theme of Horror. Speculative City publishes provocative works that are centered within a cityscape. Payment: $20-$75. Deadline: December 2, 2019.

FiresideGenre: Fiction. Payment: 12.5 cents per word. Deadline: December 6, 2019. Opens to submissions on December 2.

ScumGenre: Feminist-friendly work of any variety, but as a general rule your piece should be under 2000 words (50 lines for poetry, max. 3 poems) and able to be classified as “fiction”, “culture”, “memoir”, “column”, “poetry”, and/or “review”. Payment: $60 AUD. Deadline: December 7, 2019. Opens to submissions on December 1.

Into the Void. Genre: Flash fiction (750 words max) and poetry. Payment: CA$5 per printed page of the magazine + a contributor copy. Deadline: December 7, 2019. Opens on December 1.

Revolute. Genre: Fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and micro reviews. Payment: $25. Deadline: December 9, 2019.

Cast of Wonders PodcastGenre: Speculative fiction for teens. Length: 3,000 words max. Payment: 6 cents/word. Deadline: December 15, 2019.

Underground Writers. Restrictions: Preference given to Australian writers. Genre: Short stories and poems on theme of Romance. Length: Limit of 40 lines for poems, and 2000 words for short stories, flash fiction and reviews. Payment: $50 AUD. Deadline: December 15, 2019.

Frozen WaveletsGenre: Speculative flash fiction and poetry. Length: 750 words max. Payment: 8 cents/word. Deadline: December 15, 2019. Accepts reprints.

ShenandoahGenre: Poetry. Payment: $100 per poem. Deadline: December 15, 2019.

Chicken Soup for the Soul: You Go, GirlGenre: True stories about women."You are in charge of your life and the decisions you make. A woman doesn’t have to lose her femininity or become a bully. A woman doesn’t have to be single or divorced to be looked upon as independent. Married women and women in relationships are independent, too. We are looking for your true stories on how you are running your life, how you became empowered and achieved independence. Your story will help young women feel stronger, more capable, and more confident… more empowered." Payment: $200, publication, and 10 author copies. Deadline: December 15, 2019.

The Journal of Compressed Creative ArtsGenre: Fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, mixed media, visual arts, "and even kitchen sinks, if they are compressed in some way.” Payment: $50. Deadline: December 15, 2019.

Eye to the Telescope 35, Hard Science Fiction Tropes. Genre: Speculative poetry on theme of Hard Science Fiction Tropes. Payment: US 3¢/word rounded up to nearest dollar; minimum US $3, maximum $25. Payment is on publication. Deadline: December 15, 2019.

Offing. Genre: Short fiction on theme of Insight. Payment: $20–$60. Deadline: December 16, 2019.

Newfound. Genre: Fiction, Flash Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Poetry, Translation, and Visual Arts on theme of Virtual Realities. Payment: $25. Deadline: December 21, 2019.

Blood Crown: Sword and Sorcery. Genre: Fiction involving blood and crowns. Length: 4000-15,000 words. Payment: Profit sharing. Deadline: December 30, 2019.

Modern Poetry in TranslationGenre: Translations of poetry. Send up to six poems. Payment: Not specified. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Chicken Soup for the Soul: Stories about Self-care and Me TimeGenre: True stories. "Taking care of yourself is not just about your physical health but includes your emotional, mental and spiritual wellbeing too. Self-care includes that all-important “me time” whether that means exercising or reading or meditating or having lunch with friends. Whatever your psyche needs is your “me time.” We are looking for your stories about how you neglected your self-care and then how you realized its importance and so you now engage in it." Payment: $200, publication, and 10 author copies.  Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Carrion Blue 555: Seasons of RotGenre: Horror, fantasy, scifi, experimental, and bizarro fiction, poetry, and art for four seasonal volumes, collectively called ‘Seasons of Rot’ Payment: $0.02/word, up to $100. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Workers Write! Literary Journal: Stories from the WorkplaceGenre: Stories and poems from the workplace. Payment: $5 - $50. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Heroic Fantasy QuarterlyGenre: Sword and sorcery fantasy. Payment: $100 for stories and $25 for poems, upon publication. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

The 3288 ReviewRestrictions: Open to current or former residents of West Michigan. Genre: Fiction, poetry, nonfiction, art. Payment: Poetry – $5.00 per poem published, up to 10 poems; Prose 1,000 to 5,000 words – $25.00; Prose 5,001 to 10,000 words – $50.00; Collections of Photography, Illustration or Artwork – $5.00 per piece published, up to 10 pieces Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Autonomous Press: Spoon Knife 5 – LiminalGenre: Fiction, poetry, and memoir that explores thresholds and liminalities of all kinds. The work must further intersect with themes of neurodivergence, queerness, and/or the intersections of neurodivergence and queerness. Payment: 1 cent/word. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

ExistereGenre: Poetry, prose, postcards, art. Payment: Small honorarium. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Excalibur 2020: Tales From Beyond Tomorrow Volume 3Genre: Speculative fiction. The work must have a thematic connection to Japan and/or the Olympics. Payment: $100. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Year's Best Hardcore HorrorGenre: Hardcore horror short stories. Requirements: The story was originally (or will be) published in a 2019 anthology, single author collection, magazine, or online magazine. Self-published anthologies and collections are acceptable as well. Payment:1 cent a word for reprint rights. ($60 max). Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Zombies Need Brains: Three anthologies APOCALYPTIC, GALACTIC STEW, and MY BATTERY IS LOW AND IT IS GETTING DARK. Genre: Science fiction and fantasy. Payment: Minimum $0.08/word. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Madness Heart Press: Ghastly Gastronomy – A Horror Cookbook AnthologyGenre: Food-based horror stories. Each story should feature a dish. Payment: $5. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Vestal Review: Short, Vigorous Roots – An Anthology of Immigrant Fiction in the Age of DissentGenre: Fiction from writers anywhere who are either immigrants/migrants or who have an immigrant/migrant parent. 1000 words max. Payment: Modest honorarium. Deadline: December 31, 2019. Reprints accepted.

Your Favorite TropeGenre: LGBT stories on Your Favorite Trope. Payment: 50% net royalties from all channels, paid quarterly. Deadline: December 31, 2019. These aren't anthology calls -- stories swill be released as individual ebooks with unique covers

Love WinsGenre: LGBT stories on Love Wins. Payment: 50% net royalties from all channels, paid quarterly. Deadline: December 31, 2019. These aren't anthology calls -- stories swill be released as individual ebooks with unique covers.

Arc Poetry MagazineGenre: Poetry. Payment: $50 per page. Deadline: December 31, 2019. Arc does not accept general submissions from January 1 to March 31 and from August 1 to August 31.

Wax Poetry and Art: 45 Poems of Protest. Genre: Poetry. "The struggle for social justice is real, and poets are not silent. The role of the poet is to critique, celebrate, acknowledge, and inspire, to provoke thought and action, and to speak truth to power. Those are the poems sought for publication in 45 Poems of Protest. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Dominion: An Anthology of Speculative Fiction from Africa and the African Diaspora. Genre: Speculative fiction that grapples with the question: “What is the legacy and the future of Africa and the African Diaspora?” "We want authors and poets from the African continent and the African Diaspora. More specifically, we want horror, science fiction, fantasy, and alternate history in the following sub-genres: Horror Noire, Afrofuturism, Africanfuturism, Sword and Soul, Rococoa, Steamfunk, and Dieselfunk." Payment: POETRY: Any length paid $50USD per poem. REPRINTS: Any length of poetry paid $15USD and 1,000-17,500 words of fiction paid $0.01USD per word. FICTION: 1,000-17,500 words paid $0.08USD per word for the first 1,000 words, and $0.01USD above 1,000 words. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Signs of Life. Genre: Fiction and CNF themed around first- and second-hand experiences of illness and care-giving. "How do experiences of sickness or incapacitation change our bodies, who we are, and how we see the world? And how do they affect the people around us? Writers are asked to write from the point of view of the patient, care-giver (professional or otherwise) or kin."  Payment: $AUD100. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Terraforming Earth for Aliens (a Cli-Fi Anthology of Global Warming Fiction). Genre: Climate fiction. Payment: $20 for each accepted short story, $10 for poems or song lyrics, paid on publication. Deadline: December 31, 2019.

Air: Sylphs, Spirits and Swan Maidens (Elemental Anthologies #3). Genre: Fantasy fiction and poetry. "I want to fit as many airy creatures into this anthology as possible, so in addition to sylphs, spirits and swan maidens I want air dragons, fae, griffins, sirens, rocs, Thunderbird, Pegasus… and because I’m open to combining aether with air in this situation why not also hit me with your angels, phantoms, Yōkai  and nymphs too!" Payment: $50 CDN flat fee and a paperback copy of the anthology for stories. $20 CDN flat fee and a paperback copy of the anthology for poems. Deadline: December 31, 2019.



          

MagAO-X 2019B Day 3: The Telescope Proper

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Today marked MagAO-X’s last day in the clean room at the halfway house and its first night in the Magellan Clay dome. The day started with a lift (now almost mundane) of the optics table off its legs and onto the transport cart. We pushed it out the clean room doors and onto the back …
          

MagAO-X 2019B Day 2: Chillin’ in Chile

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Hello XWCL! This is my inaugural blog post so buckle up because it is going to be a sleep-deprived ride. Laird and Alex spent the day prepping the instrument for transport to the telescopes while Jared, Joseph, Kyle, and I were putting the “finishing touches” on various pieces of code. Kyle, Joseph and I were …
          

Air guns Optics Riflescope MP5 G3 1x20 Compact Claw Red Dot Rifle Scope Reflex Sight Telescope scope for guns AEFD76915

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Air guns Optics Riflescope MP5 G3 1x20 Compact Claw Red Dot Rifle Scope Reflex Sight Telescope scope for guns AEFD76915
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  • Brand Name: spike
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New Portable 50x50 Binoculars Handheld Telescope Indoor Outdoor Army Military Hunting Telescope Support Night Vision WYYS92939

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New Portable 50x50 Binoculars Handheld Telescope Indoor Outdoor Army Military Hunting Telescope Support Night Vision WYYS92939
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  • Brand Name: OUTAD
  • Type: Binoculars
  • Model Number: ZM1017500
  • Color: army green
  • Lens type: Red Film
  • Field Of View: 168feet
  • Diopter range: ±4 diopter
  • Eye-distance Adjustable range: 56-74mm
  • Magnification: 7 times
  • Field of view: 8 degrees 31 '
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Military HD 8x40 Binoculars Professional Hunting Telescope High Quality Vision No Infrared Eyepiece Army Green IPTH77002

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Military HD 8x40 Binoculars Professional Hunting Telescope High Quality Vision No Infrared Eyepiece Army Green IPTH77002
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Visionking 7x32WD Mini Monocular For Hunting Camping Outdoor Professional BaK4 Telescope Waterproof Prismaticos Free Shipping XWEV77468

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Visionking 7x32WD Mini Monocular For Hunting Camping Outdoor Professional BaK4 Telescope Waterproof Prismaticos Free Shipping XWEV77468
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  • Brand Name: Visionking
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  • EXITPUPIL: 5.3mm
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Visionking HD 10X26 Binocular Profession Hunting Telescope BaK4 Roof Prism Wide Angle Powerful Zoom Outdoor Birdwatch Telescope HQGF23929

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Visionking HD 10X26 Binocular Profession Hunting Telescope BaK4 Roof Prism Wide Angle Powerful Zoom Outdoor Birdwatch Telescope HQGF23929
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  • Brand Name: Visionking
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13X50 Monocular Telescope Prism Scope Wide-Angle Waterproof Outdoor Birdwatching Hunting Lens Monocular Telescope LBOZ85835

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13X50 Monocular Telescope Prism Scope Wide-Angle Waterproof Outdoor Birdwatching Hunting Lens Monocular Telescope LBOZ85835
Item specifics
  • Brand Name: outlife
  • Type: Monocular
  • Model Number: 13X50
  • Objective lens: 50mm
  • Magnification: 13x
  • Eye relief: 18.5mm
  • Exit pupil diameter: 4mm
  • Field of view: 114 - 1000m
  • Lens coating: FMC
  • Nitrogen filled: Yes
  • Number: 223208901
  • Size: Approx 260 x 140cm
  • Package Contents: 1xMonocular Telescope, 2xCover,1xCloth,1xBag,1xStraps,1x user Manual
  • Color:Black


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12x42 High Magnification Zoom Binoculars Telescope with High Definition Low Light Handheld Telescopes for Travelling Hunting WZSS86422

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12x42 High Magnification Zoom Binoculars Telescope with High Definition Low Light Handheld Telescopes for Travelling Hunting WZSS86422
Item specifics
  • Brand Name: Vwinget
  • Type: Binoculars
  • Model Number: Zoom Binoculars
  • Magnification: 10 times / 12 times
  • Objective diameter: 42 mm
  • Prism type: BAK4
  • Field of view: 95M / 100M
  • Exit pupil diameter: 4.2MM
  • Eyepiece diameter: 23MM
  • Lens coating: FMC broadband multi-layer coating
  • Size (inches): 5.2x2.2x5.9
  • Weight: 780G


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EYESKEY CM168-8X16 Monocular Mobile camera telescope ultra-wide field BAK4 Prism FMC Coating Portable Telescop Outdoor Sports QVDN13050

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EYESKEY CM168-8X16 Monocular Mobile camera telescope ultra-wide field BAK4 Prism FMC Coating Portable Telescop Outdoor Sports QVDN13050
Item specifics
  • Type: Monocular
  • Model Number: CM168-8X16
  • Brand Name: EYESKEY
  • Magnification: 8X
  • Objective Lens Dia: 16mm
  • Prism Type: Bak4
  • Lens Coating: Fully multi coated
  • Eye Cup: Twist-up
  • Dimensions: 80X31mm(3.15x1.22in)
  • Weight: 49g(1.73oz)
  • Color: Black/white


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Mini Pocket Folding 20x50 High Powered Binocular Telescope Bird Wildlife Hunting with All-optic Objective Lens Carrying Bag OEQG11189

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Mini Pocket Folding 20x50 High Powered Binocular Telescope Bird Wildlife Hunting with All-optic Objective Lens Carrying Bag OEQG11189
Item specifics
  • Brand Name: Beileshi
  • Type: Binoculars
  • Model Number: 20x50 Folding High Powered Binocular
  • Color:Army Green


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High Power 8x40 binoculars , tourism sports Large eyepiece waterproof high times Travel Vision Scope telescopes For Hunting GAUD73530

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High Power 8x40 binoculars , tourism sports Large eyepiece waterproof high times Travel Vision Scope telescopes For Hunting GAUD73530
Item specifics
  • Brand Name: TOCHUNG
  • Model Number: 8x40 binoculars
  • Type: Binoculars
  • Color: black
  • Magnification: 8X
  • Objective Diameter: 40mm
  • Prism System: Porro Prism
  • Eyepiece Diameter: 22mm
  • Exitpupil Diameter: 5mm
  • Lens Coatting: FMC
  • Prism Material: BAK4, Porro prism
  • Gross weight: 970g
  • Packaging Dimensions / Piece: 20x8x20 cm


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2016 New arrival 10x50 binocular Zoom Field glasses Great Handheld Telescopes hot sale Powerful hunting binoculars free shipping IEOP36031

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2016 New arrival 10x50 binocular Zoom Field glasses Great Handheld Telescopes hot sale Powerful hunting binoculars free shipping IEOP36031
Item specifics
  • Brand Name: Bresee
  • Model Number: 10X50
  • Type: Binoculars


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MUOU Newtonian 1.25 inch Next Generation Eyepiece Laser Collimator Alignment for Telescope 2adapter (without Battery) MAFG43431

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MUOU Newtonian 1.25 inch Next Generation Eyepiece Laser Collimator Alignment for Telescope 2adapter (without Battery) MAFG43431
Item specifics
  • Model Number: MUOU
  • Brand Name: MUOU
  • Type: Laser Collimator


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20x50 Powerful Binoculars Professional Hd Telescope Wide-angle Long Range Binocular with Smartphone holder for Camping Concert RKWF47777

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20x50 Powerful Binoculars Professional Hd Telescope Wide-angle Long Range Binocular with Smartphone holder for Camping Concert RKWF47777
Item specifics
  • Model Number: 20x50
  • Brand Name: maifeng
  • Type: Binoculars
  • Magnification: 20x
  • Near focus distance: 5m
  • lens: All optical lenses
  • Coating: FMC Full-band coating
  • Prism system: Porro
  • Color: Black
  • Objective lens : 50mm


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High precision Bahtinov mask fixed diameter telescope accessories. 215-260mm HPNM35775

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High precision Bahtinov mask fixed diameter telescope accessories. 215-260mm HPNM35775
Item specifics
  • Brand Name: MUOU
  • Type: Monocular
  • Model Number: 0205-200MM


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Gold Box Deal: Save up to 40% on Telescopes, Binoculars, Cameras & More #amazon

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Amazon has up to an extra 40% off a bunch of things with lenses - Telescopes, Binoculars, Cameras & More for one of today's deals of the day. Free shipping with Prime. Don't have Prime? Get a free 30-day trial, otherwise get free shipping on $25 or more.


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