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Fermilab Cosmologist Dr. Dan Hooper

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Dr. Dan Hooper is a Senior Scientist and the Head of the Theoretical Astrophysics Group at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois. He is also a Professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin.

Dan told me about how his early aspirations as a youth were actually in music. It wasn’t until he took a class as an undergraduate in Relativity that the astrophysics bug bit him. Hard. Dan explained how he landed a post-doc position at Oxford and how he was later hired at Fermilab. Later, we chatted about his interest in the interface between particle physics and cosmology, Dark Matter and what neutrinos can tell us about the early universe. We finished with an overview of his new astrophysics book that explores the mysteries of the origin of the universe.


          

Astrophysiker Heino Falcke bei SPRING

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"Wenn ich die Schöpfung untersuche, dann entdecke ich auch etwas über Gott selber“ ...
          

Astrophysiker Heino Falcke bei SPRING

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„Die Welt ist eine Schöpfung, ein Ausdruck Gottes - und wenn ich die Schöpfung untersuche, dann entdecke ich auch etwas über Gott selber!“ So hat der Astrophysiker Professor Dr. Heino Falcke bei SPRING, dem großen Festival für Christen und ihre Freunde, seine Motivation zur Miterforschung des „schwarzen Loches“ beschrieben. ...
          

SPRING: Das christliche Festival startet in Willingen

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Zehn Jahre SPRING Festival in Willingen (Upland) – mit 3.600 Teilnehmern startet heute das christliche Ostertreffen für Christen und ihre Freunde mitten in Deutschland. Unter dem Motto „DA.FÜR“ werden mehr als 300 Bibelarbeiten, Workshops, Seminare und Konzerte für Jung und Alt geboten. Einer der Höhepunkte ist der Vortrag des Astrophysikers Professor Heino Falcke, der vor zwei Wochen in Brüssel das erste Bild eines „schwarzen Loches“ ...
          

Forty-Four Delegations have Met so Far – Astrophysicists, Environmentalists, Healers, etc.

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In my reading with Archangel Michael on Nov. 26 through Linda Dillon, he gave us a very full discussion of the meetings of the delegations. There have been forty-four separate meetings. They’re arranged into what we used to think of as “special interest groups.” These groups include astrophysicists, political leaders, spiritual leaders, healers, environmentalists, homemakers, […]
          

An UrFU Astrophysist Created a New Approach to Quick-Search the Fireballs

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Combining two parameters, Maria Gritsevich developed a computer program showing meteoroids that may have survived atmospheric entry
          

A new theory for how black holes and neutron stars shine bright

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Astrophysicists employed massive super-computer simulations to calculate the mechanisms that accelerate charged particles in extreme environments. They concluded their energization is powered by the interplay of chaotic motion and reconnection of super-strong magnetic fields.
          

Video: Interview with ‘Cosmic Revolutionary’ Geraint Lewis

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Interview with ‘Cosmic Revolutionary’ Geraint Lewis from CUP Academic on Vimeo.   TRANSCRIPT: Geraint Lewis: I’m Geraint Lewis and I’m a professor of astrophysics at the University of Sydney and I am the author with Luke Barnes of A Cosmic Revolutionaries Handbook (or: How to Overthrow the Big Bang)   What reader did you have […]
          

Sydney to get its first senior high school for science whiz kids

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At Sydney Science College in Epping, teachers will include an astrophysicist and former university lecturers.
          

Confirming Herschel Candidate Protoclusters from ALMA/VLA CO Observations

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Confirming Herschel Candidate Protoclusters from ALMA/VLA CO Observations

Gomez-Guijarro, C., Riechers, D. A., Pavesi, R., Magdis, G. E., Leung, T. K. D., Valentino, F., Toft, S., Aravena, M., Chapman, S. C., Clements, D. L., Dannerbauer, H., Oliver, S. J., Perez-Fournon, I. & Valtchanov, I., 20 Feb 2019, In : Astrophysical Journal. 872, 2, 21 p., 117.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Article number117
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume872
Issue number2
Number of pages21
ISSN0004-637X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Feb 2019

          

Sydney to get its first senior high school for science whiz kids

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At Sydney Science College in Epping, teachers will include an astrophysicist and former university lecturers.
          

Get to know 10 early-career experimentalists

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Junior faculty in experimental particle physics and astrophysics talk about how they got into physics, their favorite parts of the experimental process and how they spend their time outside the lab.
          

Researchers Discover Highest-Energy Light From a Gamma-ray Burst

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Newswise imageAn international team of researchers, including two astrophysicists from the George Washington University, has observed a gamma-ray burst with an afterglow that featured the highest energy photons--a trillion times more energetic than visible light--ever detected in a burst.
          

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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(A day late, I know; I crashed after work yesterday.)


  • Antipope's Charlie Stross has a thought experiment: If you were superwealthy and guaranteed to live a long health life, how would you try to deal with the consequence of economic inequality?

  • Vikas Charma at Architectuul takes a look at the different factors that go into height in buildings.

  • Bad Astronomy notes S5-HVS1, a star flung out of the Milky Way Galaxy by Sagittarius A* at 1755 kilometres per second.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly shares photos from two Manhattan walks of hers, taken in non-famous areas.

  • Centauri Dreams looks at habitability for red dwarf exoplanets. Stellar activity matters.

  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber shares words from a manifesto about data protection in the EU.

  • Dangerous Minds shares photos from Los Angeles punks and mods and others in the 1980s.

  • Bruce Dorminey notes a ESA report suggesting crew hibernation could make trips to Mars easier.

  • Gizmodo notes that the Hayabusa2 probe of Japan is returning from asteroid Ryugu with a sample.

  • Imageo shares photos of the disastrous fires in Australia from space.

  • Information is Beautiful reports on winners of the Information is Beautiful Awards for 2019, for good infographics.

  • JSTOR Daily explains how local television stations made the ironic viewing of bad movies a thing.

  • Kotaku reports on the last days of Kawasaki Warehouse, an arcade in Japan patterned on the demolished Walled City of Kowloon.

  • Language Hat notes how translation mistakes led to the star Beta Cygni gaining the Arabic name Albireo.

  • Language Log reports on a unique Cantonese name of a restaurant in Hong Kong.

  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money links to an analysis of his suggesting the military of India is increasingly hard-pressed to counterbalance China.

  • The LRB Blog notes the catastrophe of Venice.

  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper suggesting states would do well not to place their capitals too far away from major population centres.

  • Justin Petrone at North! remarks on a set of old apple preserves.

  • The NYR Daily looks at how the west and the east of the European Union are divided by different conceptions of national identity.

  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections reports from his town of Armidale as the smoke from the Australian wildfires surrounds all. The photos are shocking.

  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog lists some books about space suitable for children.

  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Canadian film music stand, inspired by the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike.

  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper noting that, in Switzerland, parenthood does not make people happy.

  • The Signal notes that 1.7 million phone book pages have been scanned into the records of the Library of Congress.

  • Starts With A Bang's Ethan Siegel explains the concept of multi-messenger astronomy and why it points the way forward for studies of astrophysics.

  • Strange Maps looks at how a majority of students in the United States attend diverse schools, and where.

  • Strange Company explores the mysterious death of Marc-Antoine Calas, whose death triggered the persecution of Huguenots and resulted in the mobilization of Enlightenment figures like Voltaire against the state. What happened?

  • Towleroad hosts a critical, perhaps disappointed, review of the major gay play The Inheritance.

  • Understanding Society's Daniel Little looks at the power of individual people in political hierarchies.

  • Window on Eurasia shares an opinion piece noting how many threats to the Russian language have come from its association with unpopular actions by Russia.

  • Arnold Zwicky explores queens as various as Elizabeth I and Adore Delano.



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290 - Paul Wallace (Love and Quasars)

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I interview Paul Wallace about his new book Love and Quasars: An Astrophysicist Reconciles Faith and Science. Paul holds advanced degrees in science and theology, and is involved in teaching both. It's an interesting, sometimes frustrating conversation covering Paul's professional work in both realms, how he interprets truth claims in the Bible, and how he sees faith not as an alternative to science, but rather as an all-encompassing worldview that includes science.

For more about Paul and his work visit pwallace.net.

Theme music courtesy of Body Found.

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Contact: john@americanfreethought.com


          

Astrophysiker Heino Falcke bei SPRING

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"Wenn ich die Schöpfung untersuche, dann entdecke ich auch etwas über Gott selber“ ...
          

Astrophysiker Heino Falcke bei SPRING

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„Die Welt ist eine Schöpfung, ein Ausdruck Gottes - und wenn ich die Schöpfung untersuche, dann entdecke ich auch etwas über Gott selber!“ So hat der Astrophysiker Professor Dr. Heino Falcke bei SPRING, dem großen Festival für Christen und ihre Freunde, seine Motivation zur Miterforschung des „schwarzen Loches“ beschrieben. ...
          

SPRING: Das christliche Festival startet in Willingen

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Zehn Jahre SPRING Festival in Willingen (Upland) – mit 3.600 Teilnehmern startet heute das christliche Ostertreffen für Christen und ihre Freunde mitten in Deutschland. Unter dem Motto „DA.FÜR“ werden mehr als 300 Bibelarbeiten, Workshops, Seminare und Konzerte für Jung und Alt geboten. Einer der Höhepunkte ist der Vortrag des Astrophysikers Professor Heino Falcke, der vor zwei Wochen in Brüssel das erste Bild eines „schwarzen Loches“ ...
          

Flipper Gone Wild: How NASA Funded Dolphin Sex Experiment Involving LSD in a Bid to Contact Aliens

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In 1961, Dr John C. Lilly published a book called “Man and Dolphin” outlining his ideas about interspecies communication and inspired famous American astronomer and astrophysicist Frank Drake to search deeper into interactions with other civilisations.
          

Studierende*r (m/w/d) Duale Hochschule BWL Fachrichtung Industrie

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Das Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) ist mit ca. 300 Mitarbeitern eine der führenden astrophysikalischen Forschungseinrichtungen in Deutschland. Wir suchen zum 1. September 2020 eine/n Studierende/n (m/w/d) der Duale Hochschule, Studiengang BWL- Industrie
          

Netzwerk- und Systemadministator*in (m/w/d)

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Das Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) ist mit rund 300 Mitarbeitern eines der weltweit führenden astrophysikalischen Forschungsinstitute. Zur Verstärkung unserer IT-Abteilung suchen wir zum nächstmöglichen Zeitpunkt eine/n Netzwerk- und Systemadministator*in (m/w/d).
          

Новая математическая модель поможет предсказывать космическую погоду.

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Международная группа ученых, в состав которой вошел научный сотрудник Сколтеха, разработала модель для описания изменений в солнечной плазме. Эта модель помогает понять солнечную динамику и дает предпосылки для более точных предсказаний космической погоды. Результаты исследования были опубликованы в журнале The Astrophysical Journal.


β плазма – важная величина при взаимозамещающих эффектах плазмы и магнитного давления на солнечную атмосферу. Она связана как с солнечным магнитным полем, так и с такими динамическими явлениями, как солнечный ветер, выбросы корональной массы и вспышки на солнце. Все перечисленные явления оказывают непосредственное влияние на космическую погоду. 

 

Дженни Родригес – сотрудник Космического центра Сколковского института науки и технологий – и ее коллеги из Института физики Солнца имени Лейбница (Германия) и Национального института космических исследований (Бразилия) разработали модель для оценки того, как β плазма изменяется в солнечной атмосфере. В частности, они получили описание β плазмы в солнечной короне в течение последних солнечных циклов (~ 22 года). Они обнаружили, что наибольшее влияние на этот параметр оказывают солнечные факелы и тихие регионы Солнца.

Солнечные факелы и области «тихого Солнца» управляют изменениями магнитного и кинетического давления в солнечной короне. Это может напрямую повлиять на космическую погоду и на возможности ее прогнозирования. Эти результаты представляют интересный взгляд на динамику солнечного цикла.

«β – важный параметр солнечной плазмы, характеризующий солнечную атмосферу. Солнечная атмосфера – это лаборатория физики плазмы, которая позволяет нам узнать о ее динамике и понять, сколько событий происходит на Солнце. Мы считаем, что наши результаты помогут понять динамику событий на Солнце и помогут прогнозировать космическую погоду», – рассказывает доктор Дженни Родригес.

     

Источник: physcareer.ru


          

Hole-d On!

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TweetMy son, Thomas, is home for the Thanksgiving break from his graduate studies in astrophysics. Just yesterday he told me that an unusual black hole has just been discovered. This newly discovered black hole is unusual because it is of a size that has not so far been observed: its mass is much greater than […]

The post Hole-d On! appeared first on Cafe Hayek.


          

Black Holes 5: Inklings & Obsessions

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by Shane L. Larson There are many exotic phenomena in astrophysics — some pervade the public consciousness, and others do not. Most folks have heard of the “Big Bang” and probably about “dark matter.” Fewer people have heard of the … Continue reading
          

Comment voir moins flou ? Récit d'une quête astronomique (Rediffusion)

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Comment voir plus loin ? C’est la quête de tous les astronomes. Depuis Galilée, jusqu’au cœur des trous noirs. Une histoire de flou racontée par l’astrophysicien humaniste et engagé Pierre Léna.
          

Babbage: AI: The end of the scientific method?

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Economist — Researchers are using artificial intelligence techniques to invent medicines and materials—but in the process are they upending the scientific method itself? The AI approach is a form of trial-and-error at scale, or “radical empiricism”. But does AI-driven science uncover new answers that humans cannot understand? Host Kenneth Cukier finds out with James Field of LabGenius, Demis Hassabis of DeepMind, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, tech venture capitalists Zavain Dar and Nan Li, philosophy professor Sabrina Leonelli, and others. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer Please complete our survey at www.economist.com/podsurvey For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
          

10 great physics courses you can take online right now, for free

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  • You can find numerous physics courses currently available online for free.
  • Courses are taught by instructors with amazing credits like Nobel Prizes and field-defining work.
  • Topics range from introductory to Einstein's theory of relativity, particle physics, dark energy, quantum mechanics, and more.



The internet has in many ways fulfilled its educational promise and can be an amazing resource to learn pretty much anything. This is especially true if you have an interest in physics, the study of matter, energy and the fundamental interactions and forces of our universe. There are hundreds of great free courses available, with field-leading and even Nobel Prize-winning instructors.

To get you started, we distilled through the resources to come up with a list of 10 courses you can take right now and get your physics journey under way.

Here we go:

1. How Things Work: An Introduction to Physics


A great intro course that looks at physics in the context of everyday objects and processes. How does skating work? Why do things fall? The course uses the cases of ramps, wheels, bumper cars and more to illuminate the physics of life around you. It is taught by the University of Virginia physics professor Louis A. Bloomfield, a noted science educator, lecturer, author, as well as tv host.

ENROLL HERE

2. Fundamentals of Physics I


If you want to brush up on the essential concepts of physics, this course from Yale University might be for you. Taught by the physics professor Ramamurti Shankar, the lessons cover the principles and methods of physics, focusing on problem solving, quantitative reasoning and such concepts as Newtonian mechanics, special relativity, gravitation, waves, and thermodynamics.

ENROLL HERE

3. Astrophysics: The Violent Universe


Would you like to know about some of the most mysterious phenomena in the Universe? This fun course will bring you up to speed on white dwarfs, supernovae, neutron stars and black holes.

The 9-week course from the Australian National University has over 60,000 people enrolled, and is taught by Brian Schmidt, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist for his work on discovering dark energy. His co-teacher is the science educator and astrophysics researcher Paul Francis, who has a PhD from the University of Cambridge and has worked with NASA. He is particularly known for working on the spectra of quasars.

ENROLL HERE

4. From the Big Bang to Dark Energy


Want to get a general introduction to some of the main ideas about how the Universe was formed and where it's going? The Big Bang, the formation of the elements, the Higgs Boson, dark matter, dark energy and anti-matter all feature prominently in this 14-hour course, offered by the University of Tokyo.

It is taught by Hitoshi Murayama, a University of California, Berkley physics professor and the Director of Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe.

ENROLL HERE

5. Physics: Intro to Electricity & Magnetism


Want to understand Electricity and Magnetism? Take this course that currently has over 16,000 online students! This course was created by Scott Redmond, who worked previously in support of the International Space Station as a Mission Operations Analyst and conducted astronaut training before turning to teaching physics. The course offers 46 lectures in over 4 hours of video content and additional materials.

ENROLL HERE

6. Understanding Einstein: The Special Theory of Relativity


This interesting 8-week course, taught by Stanford University's Academic Director and historian of science Larry Randles Lagerstrom, goes deep into how Einstein came up with his famous theory. While setting up the background in both history and theory, the class provides a richer understanding of the theory of relativity itself.

ENROLL HERE

7. Quantum Mechanics: Wavefunctions, Operators, and Expectation Values


This advanced 7-week course from MIT will teach you the basics of quantum mechanics, introducing such concepts as wavefunctions, the Schrodinger equation, uncertainty relations and the properties of quantum observables. The course is intended for people with previous college-level calculus and physics courses under their belt.

The currently archived but available course is taught by the MIT physics professor Barton Zwiebach, a specialist in string theory and theoretical particle physics, along with MIT physics lecturer Jolyon Bloomfield.

ENROLL HERE

8. Particle Physics: an Introduction


If learning about the workings of very small things sounds appealing and you love supercolliders, this is the course for you. In this class you will learn about subatomic physics, including the properties of atomic nuclei, how to detect and accelerate particles, as well as about electromagnetic, strong and weak interactions. And, of course, the Higgs Boson makes an appearance. The lessons will also talk about how to connect particle physics to astrophysics and the larger questions of the Universe.

This 31-hour course from the University of Geneva is taught by professor Marin Pohl, who works in experimental particle physics on European colliders like the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) in Switzerland. His current focus is astroparticle physics in space. The course's second teacher is assistant professor Anna Sfyrla, an experimental particle physicist, who teachers at the University of Geneva.

ENROLL HERE

9. Fundamental Lessons from String Theory


Is the Universe made of strings? If you're ready to dive into some of the headier explanations for everything in existence, take this great master class which can be completed in a few hours. It is taught by the Harvard University physics professor and string theory expert Cumrun Vafa, and was developed with the world-renowned string theorist Andrew Strominger.

ENROLL HERE

10. Relativity and Astrophysics


If you want to further under understanding of Einstein's theory of relativity, you'd be interested in its connection to astronomy as explored in this course from Cornell University. Taught by astronomy professor David F. Chernoff, an expert in theoretical astrophysics, the lessons will deepen your knowledge by zeroing in on special and general relativity as well as experimental tests you can carry out to study them. You will also get to analyze paradoxes in special relativity and learn how relativity affects daily situations.

The prerequisite for this 4-week (currently archived but available) course requires at least high school level math and physics or an intro college course in both.

ENROLL HERE


          

Astrophysicists discover why black holes and neutron stars shine bright

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  • Columbia University astrophysicists discovered the cause of the unusual glow coming from regions of space with black holes and neutron stars.
  • The researchers ran some of the largest computer simulations ever to reach their conclusions.
  • They found that turbulence and reconnection of super-strong magnetic fields are responsible for the light.


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Demonstrating again that space is a limitless reservoir of scientific wonders, a new study discovered why areas hosting black holes and neutron stars emit strange bright glows. Astrophysicists found that turbulence and reconnection of super-strong magnetic fields are behind the cosmic mystery.

The cause of the phenomenon, which illuminates these super-dense parts of space, has been attributed previously to high-energy electromagnetic radiation. Scientists speculated that it's created by electrons moving at just about the speed of light. The new study from researchers at Columbia University explained why these particles accelerate.

Astrophysicists Luca Comisso and Lorenzo Sironi carried out the research by running some of the largest super-computer simulations ever conducted in this area. They managed to calculate the trajectories of hundreds of billions of charged particles.

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Comiso, a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia, explained their conclusion:

"Turbulence and magnetic reconnection—a process in which magnetic field lines tear and rapidly reconnect—conspire together to accelerate particles, boosting them to velocities that approach the speed of light," said Comisso in a press release.

As Comiso further described, the space region that is home to black holes and neutron stars is also full of a super-hot gas of charged particles. Their chaotic motion affects magnetic field lines and results in "vigorous magnetic reconnection". This, in turn, creates an electric field which accelerates particles to energies that are "much higher than in the most powerful accelerators on Earth, like the Large Hadron Collider at CERN," added Comisso.

Amazing astronomy: How neutron stars create ripples in space-time


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Interestingly, the simulations showed that the particles gathered most of their energy through the process of random bouncing at super-high speeds.

"This is indeed the radiation emitted around black holes and neutron stars that make them shine, a phenomenon we can observe on Earth," said Sironi, the study's principal investigator and an assistant professor of astronomy at Columbia.

Next, the scientists plan to confirm their findings by comparing them to the electromagnetic spectrum from the Crab Nebula, a bright remnant of a supernova.

You can check out the study published in the December issue of The Astrophysical Journal.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson: Scientists’ brains are wired to see differently

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  • There are many people who have discomfort engaging with a scientific perspective of the world — for some, for instance, it conflicts with what they were taught during their religious upbringings.
  • We can all gain a greater view of life — the cosmos — by getting to know scientists, especially when we're at an impasse in our lives.
  • Scientists' view of the world retains a "distance" to it — it's observational, fact-driven. This helps with finding consistent principles in nature.

          

Christianity for People Who Aren't Christians - Uncommon Answers to Common Questions - White, James Emery

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Are you tired of getting the standard cookie-cutter answers to questions you aren't even asking? This candid book offers uncommon answers to both classic and bleeding-edge questions you may have about Christians and Christianity, such as · Is there a God? · Why do the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus matter? · Why is there so much suffering in the world? · Why do Christians think there is only one way to know God? · How do I reconcile the Bible's picture of Christ's followers with the actual Christians I know who have disappointed me? Covering such topics as astrophysics, social justice, and acceptance of the LGBTQ community, this one-of-a-kind book is perfect for anyone skeptical of Christianity who values honest answers to their honest questions.
  • ISBN: 9780801094590
  • Producer: Baker Book House
  • Product Code: 10068767
  • Dimensions: 140 x 216 mm
  • Binding: Paperback
  • Number of pages: 240
  • Release Date: 01.12.2019

          

Revived Fossil Plasma Sources in Galaxy Clusters

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Revived Fossil Plasma Sources in Galaxy Clusters

Mandal, S., Intema, H. T., Weeren, R. J. V., Shimwell, T. W., Botteon, A., Brunetti, G., Gasperin, F. D., Brüggen, M., Gennaro, G. D., Kraft, R., Röttgering, H. J. A., Hardcastle, M. & Tasse, C., 5 Nov 2019, (Accepted/In press) In : Astronomy & Astrophysics.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
JournalAstronomy & Astrophysics
Journal publication date5 Nov 2019
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 5 Nov 2019

          

Low-frequency radio absorption in Tycho's supernova remnant

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Low-frequency radio absorption in Tycho's supernova remnant

Arias, M., Vink, J., Zhou, P., Gasperin, F. D., Hardcastle, M. J. & Shimwell, T. W., 7 Nov 2019, (Accepted/In press) In : The Astrophysical Journal.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Astrophysical Journal
Journal publication date7 Nov 2019
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 7 Nov 2019



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