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Linea 135, deviazione in corso

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30-11-2019

I bus della linea 135 stanno deviando da via Lanciani per viale XXI Aprile, via di Santa Costanza, viale Eritrea, viale Libia e viale Somalia, in seguito alla limitazione della circolazione su una parte della circonvallazione Nomentana. (red)


          

Outspoken but Unheard

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There is limited understanding on the relationship between diaspora in Europe and refugees and migrants in mixed migration flows along the Central Mediterranean Sea route (CMR). Hence, this new research report aims to explore the relationship by looking at the way diaspora in Europe shape the decision making of refugees and migrants from Mali, Eritrea...

The post Outspoken but Unheard appeared first on Mixed Migration Centre.


          

How Religion Influences Belonging: The Importance of Church to Eritrean Refugees in Denmark

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How Religion Influences Belonging: The Importance of Church to Eritrean Refugees in Denmark

Jennie Feldrup Kristoffersen

Global Refugee Studies, Kandidat, (Kandidatuddannelse) 4. semester, 2019

Studenteropgave: Speciale (inkl. HD afgangsprojekt)

  • Jennie Feldrup Kristoffersen
4. semester, Global Refugee Studies, Kandidat (Kandidatuddannelse)
Focusing on how Eritrean refugees in Denmark spend their time, I uncovered a trend that the vast majority of them regularly attend church, and the majority are Eritrean Orthodox Christian. This thesis sets out to examine why religion, and specifically Christianity, is important to and prioritized by Eritrean refugees in Denmark, with the guiding sub-research questions: “How does religion influence Eritrean refugees' feeling of belonging?” and “How might coming from a totalitarian dictatorship effect Eritrean refugees’ involvement in church?”

The empirical data of this thesis is based on interviews conducted with Eritrean refugees living in Denmark, as well as participant observation. To explain and understand the trends seen in the fieldwork, the thesis draws on Charles Hirshman’s (2004) theory on belonging to look at Eritrean refugees’ participation in church in Denmark. It is suggested that participation in church in Denmark can be seen as a way to feel a sense of belonging, and as a way for them to continue to participate in the community familiar to them from their home country.

This thesis also draws on Michael Bernhard and Ekrem Karakoç (2007) to look at the effects of coming from a totalitarian dictatorship, which helped explain the extent that Eritreans’ participation in Danish society revolves around the church rather than other social activities. It explained that church is one of the only organized activities that is permitted in Eritrea, and it continues to be the primary activity that they participate in after moving to Denmark.

Through the research carried out for this thesis, some insight was gained into why and how religion might be approached as a key factor in where Eritrean refugees find their belonging and spend their time in Denmark. The thesis demonstrates that Eritrean refugees’ experience of living in a totalitarian dictatorship has led to lasting effects whereby there is a longer adjustment period in which they adapt to the freedom they now have to participate in a wide variety of social organizations and activities without any restriction.
SprogEngelsk
Udgivelsesdato15 okt. 2019
Antal sider61

          

Appeal overturned after bus stop rant by court interpreter

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An asylum appeal by an Eritrean woman, initially rejected by an immigration judge, has been overturned by the Upper Tribunal after it emerged the court interpreter embarked on a political rant to the woman’s barrister at the bus stop outside court afterwards. The case is TS (interpreters) Eritrea [2019] UKUT 352 (IAC). Complaints about the quality of the interpreter were made during the original First-tier hearing. As a matter of good practice, the solicitors had employed an interpreter to attend the tribunal to interpret for the appellant and her barrister before the hearing and then to stay for the hearing. It was alleged by the solicitor’s interpreter and the appellant...
          

Successful Eritrea exhibition in Bristol sparks lively debate

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Exhibition on Eritrea opened by Thangam Debonnaire MP The evening was cold and rainy, but inside the University of Bristol Geography department there was an excellent turnout for a series of most informative presentations from Eritrean experts. Thangam Debbonair, who is standing to be a […]
          

Eritrea accuses Qatar of ‘subversion’

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As it will be recalled, the GOE had issued several statements in the past that elucidated Qatar’s deplorable schemes of subversion using the Sudan as a springboard. In this particular year in which the prospects of using the Sudan as a suitable venue for launching terrorist activities has become increasingly slimmer, the desperation of Qatar, its sponsors and minions has accordingly become higher.

In the event, the 10-point scheme of subversion that Qatar has mapped out consists of: (the scheme also includes fueling ethnic clashes in Port Sudan)*

1. To regroup Eritrean opposition political leaders; unify their associations and extend requisite support to the latter;

2. To give special focus to Eritrean youth; unify their associations and incite them to engage in acts of rebellion against the Eritrean government;

3. To instill religious extremism on Eritrean Islamist opposition elements and thereby induce an uprising of Eritrean Muslims against their compatriots;

4. To sow the seeds of ethnic cleavage and hatred among the Eritrean people;

5. To launch efforts to induce protests and demonstrations in Eritrean cities against the Government;

6. To give military training (in the Sudan) to “Muslim Brotherhood” opposition elements in the planting of landmines, ambushes and assassination of prominent government officials; to facilitate their infiltration into Eritrea to conduct these operations;

7. To assassinate influential Eritrean leaders;

8. To conduct acts of economic sabotage in Eritrea;

9. To intensify hostile propaganda;

10. To publicize human rights violations in Eritrea in international organizations and foreign countries; to disseminate documents and videos to that effect.

The above constitutes, in brief and skeletal form, Qatar’s nefarious, even if inconsequential, agenda.


Asmara

28 November 2019

*(The specific scheme of inciting ethnic conflict in Port Sudan will be revealed soon with all relevant details)



          

Eritrean Investors Provided South Sudan Capital With First-Ever Electricity

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Eritrean businessmen are aiding in the development of African countries


Eritrean investors are continuing to pour millions of dollars in investments in South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda and Angola.

By Eritrean Press

South Sudan has received electricity for the first time marking a new era.

The Ezra Group from Eritrea has invested as much as US$289 million in a power plant that will provide 100 megawatts for Juba when completed, according to Managing Director of the company Mr Ghebrengus Ezra told reporters during the launch.

Yesterday, the grid and power distribution system was launched in the country’s capital Juba.

The government and other private institutions have been using their own generators.

Speaking at the launch (pictured), President Salva Kiir said war is over and the focus will now be on development to deliver services to people.

He said electricity will eradicate pollution that comes with large scale use of diesel in the environment, and assured the country that the government will focus on developing hydroelectric power and the renewable energy sector.

The Government Spokesman for the Republic of South Sudan has applauded the Eritrean business community in his country for the vast investment they have made and described it as exemplary in fostering the already existing excellent ties between the two people and governments.

The first phase of the 30 megawatts shall be complete in four phases over the next two years.

Eritrean investors are continuing to pour millions of dollars in investments in South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda and Angola.

According to Uganda Investment Authority (UIA), from financial year 2011/12 up to 2017/18, Eritrea has appeared among Uganda's Top 10 investment source countries, beating many traditional as well as developed source countries for foreign direct investment (FDI).

Interestingly, prior to 2011/12 financial year, Eritrea never featured in the Top 10 FDI source countries, raising eyebrows why the sudden jump.

The assurance was given to the Eritrean investors in 2011 after Uganda invited Eritrea's leader, President Isaias Afwerki, to a state visit.


          

Schools teach refugee, migrant kids skills to succeed in U.S.

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PHOENIX – International flags flutter from the ceilings of the outdoor hallways at Valencia Newcomer School, where more than 200 children from around the world are learning English skills and American classroom customs they need to succeed.

When the school year begins, the refugee and immigrant children often don’t know the rules. A kid might be fascinated with a light switch they excitedly turn off and on. Another is startled by a whistle or a helicopter buzzing overhead that recalls conflict back home.

But fears melt away as the kids adjust, said Valencia Principal Lynette Faulkner, who calls the school their “safe place.” Soon, they stand in line, raise their hand, keep their feet on floor. As they learn English, students make friends across cultures.

Since fall 2018, the public school has welcomed students from countries including Myanmar, Eritrea, Indonesia, Afghanistan and Cuba for an extra year of attention before transferring to mainstream schools. This year’s kindergarten through eighth grade students come from 21 countries and speak 15 languages.

Valencia is among a handful of U.S. public schools dedicated to helping some of the thousands of children who arrive in the country each year, even as the Trump administration has proposed pushing down the annual cap for refugees to a historic low of 18,000. No refugees were settled in the U.S. last month.

The schools aren’t necessarily in cities with more refugees, but where local education officials took the initiative to create them.

Similar schools are in Indianapolis; Houston; Fort Worth, Texas; Greensboro, North Carolina; and Providence, Rhode Island.

Arizona ranks eighth among states for refugee resettlement.

The number plunged from 4,110 people in fiscal 2016 to 998 in 2018, then rose slightly to 1,216 for the 12-month period that ended Sept. 30. About half are kids.

Gov. Doug Ducey hasn’t weighed in yet on President Donald Trump’s executive order allowing states and cities to reject refugees. At least five states have signaled they will accept refugees, and no governor has said they plan to keep them out.

Several agencies sued last week seeking to halt the order.

“There may be less, but they’re still coming,” Valencia teacher Kristine Jones said. “And we have to be there for them, whether it’s academically or getting them services like immunizations.”

It’s unclear if the lower cap on refugees will affect already limited funding for school districts from the Office of Refugee Resettlement’s Refugee School Impact Program.

The Arizona Department of Economic Security last year distributed about $635,000 to help 1,026 school-age refugees statewide with things like interpretation, tutoring and school supplies.

Immigrants and other children newly arrived from abroad can attend newcomer schools if they need help with basic English, including those born in the U.S., taken out of the country and returned.

“As long as you have kids struggling with English, there will always be a place for these kinds of programs,” said Deborah Short, a Washington-based English learning specialist who has written about newcomer education. She noted some mainstream schools have newcomer classrooms.

Rebecca Kawa, 10, didn’t learn English at the refugee camp in Uganda where she was born and spent most of her life, studying in a classroom with up to 200 students. But she needed no interpreter after only two months at Valencia.

“I like this school because they teach you English, and you learn it fast,” said the daughter of Congolese refugees.

There are often huge challenges for children who trudged across several countries, lived in camps or witnessed extreme violence.

Refugee and other immigrant children who lose a home or parent can suffer from toxic stress, a term used by child development experts for the body’s response to long-term adversity, said Sarah Smith, senior director of education for the nonprofit International Rescue Committee.

“Infants might cry for long periods of time,” Smith said. “Children in school might have a hard time concentrating.”

Newcomer school teachers and social workers strive to ensure children get the social and emotional time they need to talk through feelings and make new friends. Valencia social worker Michelle Frias said that over the last year, she’s referred about 10 kids to psychologists for extra care.

At Valencia, the day starts with teachers greeting students as they step off the buses. Samuel Lavi, a teaching assistant from Congo who speaks seven languages, is the first to give each kid a hug or high-five.

“My most important role is to make sure the students get what they’re supposed to get,” he said.

Inside the classrooms, brightly colored letters adorn the walls. Small groups of children face each other at round tables as they listen to an instructor trained to teach English to non-native speakers. They also have math, art, music and physical education.

Outside, kindergartners with plastic jugs water the flower and vegetable gardens built with materials donated by the Arizona Cardinals football team. The Diamondbacks baseball club paid to spruce up the school before it opened and donated trees.

Faulkner, the Valencia principal, said the Alhambra School District looked into newcomer programs after seeing new arrivals struggle to meet state English language standards. She visited Las Americas newcomer school in Houston.

Las Americas has some 400 students in fourth through eighth grades who come from up to 32 countries and speak 29 languages, Principal Marie Moreno said.

“We wanted to provide them a space where they can get grounded, whenever they feel traumatized or whenever they remember something from the past,” Moreno said as she showed off the school’s “peace garden.”

“We try to support them by helping them understand where they came from and where we want them to go,” she said.


          

New Issue: International Journal of Transitional Justice

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The latest issue of the International Journal of Transitional Justice (Vol. 12, no. 3, November 2019) is out. Contents include:
  • Editorial Note
    • M Brinton Lykes & Hugo van der Merwe, Critical Reflexivity and Transitional Justice Praxis: Solidarity, Accompaniment and Intermediarity
  • Articles
    • Larissa van den Herik & Mirjam van Reisen, International Commissions of Inquiry in a Networked World: Unveiling the Roles of Diasporas through an Eritrean Case Study
    • Fidelma Ashe, Sexuality and Gender Identity in Transitional Societies: Peacebuilding and Counterhegemonic Politics
    • Adriana Rudling, What’s Inside the Box? Mapping Agency and Conflict within Victims’ Organizations
    • Philipp Wesche, Business Actors, Paramilitaries and Transitional Criminal Justice in Colombia
    • Andrea Purdeková, Rectified Sites of Violence from Westgate to Lampedusa: Exploring the Link between Public Amnesia and Conflict in Ongoing Confrontations
    • Cynthia E Milton & Anne-Marie Reynaud, Archives, Museums and Sacred Storage: Dealing with the Afterlife of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
    • Elizabeth A Cole & Pamina Firchow, Reconciliation Barometers: Tools for Postconflict Policy Design
    • Dustin N Sharp, What Would Satisfy Us? Taking Stock of Critical Approaches to Transitional Justice
    • Elham Kazemi, Transitional Justice in Tunisia: When Religion Meets State
  • Review Essay
    • Kiran Grewal, The Role of Victims in Transitional Justice: Agency, Cooption and Exclusion

          

Jan 01, Eritrea: New Year's Day

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New Year's Day is a public holiday in all countries that observe the Gregorian calendar, with the exception of Israel. For more information on this holiday, visit the link.
          

Police arrest 10 migrants at Brussels Gare du Nord station

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The federal police in Brussels arrested 10 migrants on evening at around 7:30 PM at Gare du Nord station in Brussels. Seven of the migrants, all of whom are male, are from Eritrea, two from Ethiopia and one from Sudan. Two of them are minors. “According to the police, they were at Gare du Nord ...
          

Weekly IntSum 27FEB2017

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It is strongly advised to avoid travel to the Southern Red Sea area of Eritrea due to a large buildup of troops on the Eritrea-Djibouti border. This area has been highly contested at times and military action occurred in June of 2016 on this border, resulting in a large number of deaths. Due to the risk of outright combat during these border disputes, it is VERY STRONGLY advised that any personnel in this area depart immediately and restrict travel to the area even for official business.All pers [...]
          

Kenya retains seat at global maritime council

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Kenya has retained its seat on the Council of the International Maritime Organisation, giving it a chance to continue playing a role in global shipping rule making. The vote on Friday evening in London saw 174 member states take part with Kenya retaining its seat under Category C of 20 countries usually reserved for those with special interest in maritime transport or navigation. In Africa, Morocco, South Africa, Liberia and Egypt are the other members of Category C. Kenya holds special interests in maritime transport and navigation as the coastal, port and flag state “whose strategic location along the Eastern Africa coast makes it a most important cog in the wheel of steering global shipping,” according to Maritime Principal Secretary Nancy Karigithu who led the delegation to the polls. “Our re-election to Council will ensure continued representation of a major geographic area in Eastern Africa and the Great Lakes region consisting of the countries Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda,” she said on Saturday. Kenya’s High Commissioner to the UK Manoah Esipisu, also the Permanent Representative to the IMO, said he was delighted by the vote result. “It confirms the world’s confidence on our leadership around maritime transport and safety, and our commitment to the Blue Economy,” he said. Kenya joined the IMO in 1973 and was first elected to the Council under Category “C” in 2001 and has been re-elected in subsequent elections to date, the last being in 2017. It is one seat at a UN agency where Kenya has dominated lately. But this election saw heavy lobbying. Some marine and shipping giants like Sweden, Nigeria and Liberia lost their bids. Qatar, a wealthy oil producer as well as Saudi Arabia also lost out. The IMO is the specialised agency that determines rules on shipping safety and environment. With more than 80 per cent of global trade running on seas, the IMO’s regulatory framework determines how shipping lines and ports operate. By The Eastafrica 

The post Kenya retains seat at global maritime council appeared first on Alleastafrica.


          

Kenya takes up Nile Basin leadership

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Kenya is now chair of the Nile Council of Ministers and will be led by Water Cabinet Secretary Simon Chelugui. Mr Chelugui takes over from Burundi’s Minister of Environment, Agriculture and Livestock, Dr Deo-Guide Rurema. The handover was done at a pre-conference in Nairobi on Wednesday, where the Council outlined an ambitious plan for the Nile Basin Initiative (NBI). Regional system On Friday, the Council of Ministers led by NBI Secretariat under the executive director of NBI Prof Seifeldin Hamad Abdalla launched the $5.5 million Nile Basin Regional Hydro-Met System that will enable NBI member states to share reliable data for monitoring of the Nile Basin resources as well as collect data to inform planning to prevent potential conflicts over the use of the Nile waters, said Mr Chelugui. The launch was attended by Water ministers from NBI member states, the Nile Technical Advisory Committee, stakeholders and civil society organisations. The Hydro-Met System project funded by the European Union and the government of Government, will include 79 hydrological monitoring stations, 322 meteorological monitoring stations and upgraded water quality laboratories. To-do list As the chair, Kenya will lead the initiative for a period of one year and is seeking to transform it into a co-operation like other basins around the world. “We want to transform it to a co-operation where equitable use of water resources is practised,” said Mr Chelugui. Top of the to-do list for Mr Chelugui is bringing back Egypt to the Initiative. Egypt left in 2010 to protest the signing of the Co-operative Framework Agreement (CFA) by some member countries, a pact that it was opposed to. Currently, six countries have signed the CFA—Uganda, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya and Burundi—of which only four—Ethiopia, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda — have ratified while Kenya is in the process of ratifying after signing it on May 19, this year. Ethiopia has already deposited the CFA with the African Union, while Sudan reviewed its position in 2010. “We intend to employ persuasion and diplomacy to bring back Egypt. We want to reach consensus and reconciliation on the issues which made the state leave,” Mr Chelugui added. Egypt, on the other hand, wants an alternative agreement which will allow other Nile Basin countries to do projects along the River Nile. The country still stands by the 1929 Nile Waters Agreement and the 1959 agreement between itself and Sudan. Other members of the NBI are South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo and Eritrea as an observer state. River Nile upstream countries have been pushing joint projects, and there is an interconnection and power generation project between Kenya and Uganda (Lessos-Tororo- Bujagali), which is expected to increase cross-border power trade and access to reliable and affordable energy and reduce operational costs, said Mr Chelugui. By The Eastafrica

The post Kenya takes up Nile Basin leadership appeared first on Alleastafrica.


          

Dejen Issac - Believe Yourself | ነብስኻ እመን - New Eritrean Music 2019 (Official Video)

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Eritrean Music : Dejen Issac (Deju P) - Believe Yourself | ነብስኻ እመን - New Eritrean Tigrigna Music 2019 (Official Video)
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Copyright ©2019 Hope Entertainment
          

Cahiers d'études africaines -Numéro 2019/4 - n° 236 - Paroles de papier

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Page 949 à 966 : Rémi Dewière - Paroles de papier. Matérialité et écritures en contextes africains | Page 949a à 966a : Silvia Bruzzi, Rémi Dewière - Words of Paper. Materiality of Writing and its Discourses in African Contexts | Page 967 à 992 : Alexandros Tsakos - Materiality and Physicality of Medieval Manuscripts from Christian Nubia | Page 993 à 1024 : Didier Nativel - « Réversibilités documentaires » | Page 1025 à 1046 : Anne K. Bang - Islamic Incantations in a Colonial Notebook | Page 1047 à 1090 : Rémi Dewière - Les lettres du pouvoir au Sahel islamique | Page 1091 à 1118 : Ghislaine Lydon - Paper Instruments in Early African Economies and the Debated Role of the Suftaja | Page 1119 à 1154 : Anouk Cohen - What is a “Moroccan Qur’an”? | Page 1155 à 1158 : Laure Carbonnel - Bornand Sandra. — Noces en paroles chez les Zarma (Niger) | Page 1158 à 1161 : Rémi Dewière - Cohen Anouk. — Fabriquer le livre au Maroc | Page 1161 à 1163 : Silvia Bruzzi - Dore Gianni. — Amministrare l’esotico : l’etnografia pratica dei funzionari e dei missionari nell’Eritrea coloniale | Page 1163 à 1167 : Anouk Cohen - Hull Matthew S. — Government of Paper: The Materiality of Bureaucracy in Urban Pakistan | Page 1167 à 1171 : Elke E. Stockreiter - Brigaglia Andrea & Nobili Mauro (eds.). — The Arts and Crafts of Literacy: Islamic Manuscript Cultures in Sub-Saharan Africa ; Krätli Graziano & Lydon Ghislaine (eds.). — The Trans-Saharan Book Trade: Manuscript Culture, Arabic Literacy and Intellectual History in Muslim Africa | Page 1171 à 1173 : Ghislaine Lydon - Messick Brinkley. — Sharīʿa Scripts: A Historical Anthropology | Page 1174 à 1180 : Alexandros Tsakos - Piquette Kathryn E. & Whitehouse Ruth D. — Writing as Material Practice. Substance, Surface and Medium ; Kay Sarah. — Animal Skins and the Reading Self in Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries. | Page 1180 à 1184 : Knut S. Vikør - Warscheid Ismail. — Droit musulman et société au Sahara prémoderne. La justice islamique dans les oasis du Grand Touat (Algérie) aux XVII e -XIX e siècles.
          

Eritrea host Women Coaching Course

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Lausanne, Switzerland, November 29, 2019 – The Eritrean Volleyball Federation linked up with the FIVB and Olympic Solidarity to host a level 1 volleyball coaching course as part of the Women’s Empowering Programme.
          

Eritrea accuses Qatar of state sponsored terrorism

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Asmara (HAN) November 29, 2019. Regional Security and Stability NEWS. As it will be recalled, the GOE had issued several statements in the past that elucidated Qatar’s deplorable schemes of subversion using the Sudan as a springboard. In this particular year in which the prospects of using the Sudan as a suitable venue for launching […]

The post Eritrea accuses Qatar of state sponsored terrorism appeared first on Geeska Afrika Online.


          

How Religion Influences Belonging: The Importance of Church to Eritrean Refugees in Denmark

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How Religion Influences Belonging: The Importance of Church to Eritrean Refugees in Denmark

Jennie Feldrup Kristoffersen

Global Refugee Studies, Master, (Master Programme) 4. term, 2019

Student thesis: Master thesis (including HD thesis)

  • Jennie Feldrup Kristoffersen
4. term, Global Refugee Studies, Master (Master Programme)
Focusing on how Eritrean refugees in Denmark spend their time, I uncovered a trend that the vast majority of them regularly attend church, and the majority are Eritrean Orthodox Christian. This thesis sets out to examine why religion, and specifically Christianity, is important to and prioritized by Eritrean refugees in Denmark, with the guiding sub-research questions: “How does religion influence Eritrean refugees' feeling of belonging?” and “How might coming from a totalitarian dictatorship effect Eritrean refugees’ involvement in church?”

The empirical data of this thesis is based on interviews conducted with Eritrean refugees living in Denmark, as well as participant observation. To explain and understand the trends seen in the fieldwork, the thesis draws on Charles Hirshman’s (2004) theory on belonging to look at Eritrean refugees’ participation in church in Denmark. It is suggested that participation in church in Denmark can be seen as a way to feel a sense of belonging, and as a way for them to continue to participate in the community familiar to them from their home country.

This thesis also draws on Michael Bernhard and Ekrem Karakoç (2007) to look at the effects of coming from a totalitarian dictatorship, which helped explain the extent that Eritreans’ participation in Danish society revolves around the church rather than other social activities. It explained that church is one of the only organized activities that is permitted in Eritrea, and it continues to be the primary activity that they participate in after moving to Denmark.

Through the research carried out for this thesis, some insight was gained into why and how religion might be approached as a key factor in where Eritrean refugees find their belonging and spend their time in Denmark. The thesis demonstrates that Eritrean refugees’ experience of living in a totalitarian dictatorship has led to lasting effects whereby there is a longer adjustment period in which they adapt to the freedom they now have to participate in a wide variety of social organizations and activities without any restriction.
LanguageEnglish
Publication date15 Oct 2019
Number of pages61

          

Marsa murder accused pleads not guilty

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Forensic experts at the scene of the crime. Photo: Malta Police Force

A man accused of stabbing a man to death in Marsa on Friday night has pleaded not guilty to the crime.  Kinaan Abdinasir Noor, a 23-year old from Somalia, was arrested after an eyewitness allegedly identified him as the person who attacked the victim, a 25-year-old man from Eritrea.  The incident happened at around 11.30pm on Friday night. Police found a man lying on a pavement on Triq Dicembru 13, bleeding from stab wounds on his chest. Sources said the man had been stabbed with a pair of scissors.  Mr Noor explained in court on Monday that he was currently homeless after being thrown out by his former landlord when he failed to pay the rent. Inspectors James Grech and Wayne Camilleri said they had spoken to a person who said they had witnessed the crime and identified Mr Noor as the aggressor. There had even been a confrontation between the suspect and the eyewitness in the presence of the police, Inspector Grech added.  Mr Noor pleaded not guilty to having maliciously put the life of his victim in manifest jeopardy, causing his death, as well as having been armed with a weapon without a police licence at the time of commission of the offence. Legal aid lawyer Noel Bartolo...
          

ERITREA : Nevsun won't see documents demanded from former agents

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Afwerki, Hemetti Held Talks on Bilateral Relations, Sudan’s Peace Talks

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BY SUDAN TRIBUNE Sudan’s Vice-Chairman of the Sovereign Council and head of the Rapid Support Forces (RSF), Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Daglo “Hemetti”, was in Asmara on Sunday for talks with the Eritrean officials. The visit comes three days after statements by the Eritrean government accusing Qatar of carrying out subversive activities and using Sudan as…

The post Afwerki, Hemetti Held Talks on Bilateral Relations, Sudan’s Peace Talks appeared first on TesfaNews.


          

Eritrean Gov’t Accused Qatar of ‘Unbridled Acts of Hostility’

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BY MINISTRY OF INFORMATION (PRESS RELEASE) As it will be recalled, the GOE had issued several statements in the past that elucidated Qatar’s deplorable schemes of subversion using the Sudan as a springboard. In this particular year in which the prospects of using the Sudan as a suitable venue for launching terrorist activities has become…

The post Eritrean Gov’t Accused Qatar of ‘Unbridled Acts of Hostility’ appeared first on TesfaNews.


          

Sudan’s Prime Minister Hamdok Arrives Asmara for One-Day Official Visit

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BY TESFANEWS A high-level Sudanese delegation led by Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok arrived on Monday to Eritrea’s capital of Asmara for an official visit upon the invitation of President Isaias Afwerki. Upon arrival at the Asmara International Airport, the delegation was accorded warm welcome by HE Yemane Gebreab, Head of Political Affairs and Presidential Adviser.…

The post Sudan’s Prime Minister Hamdok Arrives Asmara for One-Day Official Visit appeared first on TesfaNews.


          

The Value of Eritrean Customary Laws

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BY STELLA AMANUEL | ERITREA PROFILE Customary laws set acceptable standards and norms in a given society, and the Eritrean people practice dispute resolution mechanism by using customary laws with a view to achieving reconciliation. It is common for the elderly to act as mediators, conciliators and arbitrators in all kinds of disputes. Unlike the…

The post The Value of Eritrean Customary Laws appeared first on TesfaNews.


          

SLIKKET 12-ÅRING I SKRITTET PÅ BUSSEN

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Em 47 år gammel mann fra Eritrea måtte i dag svare for seg i Haugaland tingrett etter gjentatte overgrep mot barn på rutebusser i byen. En 12 år gammel jente var blant de som ble utsatt for mannen.


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