Next Page: 10000

          

'A Marvelous Life' Holds Stan Lee High As The Man Who Made Superheroes Matter

 Cache   

In 2018, Marvel Studios released Black Panther. The film grossed 1.3 billion dollars and was nominated for 7 Oscars including Best Picture (a first time for a superhero film).

Beyond the money and awards, the release of Black Panther was a global event. The story of a super-powered African king, leader of the most technologically advanced nation on Earth, allowed the film to address racism and the history of colonial oppression in entirely new and unexpected ways. If anyone was still raising questions about comics mattering for culture, Black Panther meant the definitive end of the argument. Marvel comics and their characters were culture.

So how did we get here? How did superhero comics, the supposed realm of nerdy teenagers, end up conquering the world?

The answer, in many ways, comes down to a single name — Stan Lee. Across a lifetime of creativity, collaboration and endless hustle, Stan Lee saw possibilities no else could imagine and made them real. And if you want to understand how Lee and Marvel did it, Danny Fingeroth's new book A Marvelous Life is the place to start. As a lifelong fan of Spider-Man, The X-Men, Star-Lord and the rest, it was delightful introduction to a guy I'd never met but felt I'd known my whole life.

Fingeroth, who did his own award-winning time at Marvel, begins by laying out the contours of Stan Lee's early life as the son of a Jewish New York immigrant family (Lee was born in 1922 as Stanley Martin Lieber). Through the 1950s, Lee managed to build a solid if unimpressive career working in comics. But then in the late 1950s, the comics industry crashed as TV gave teenage boys a different venue for their interests. By 1960, Lee felt stymied and trapped. He was planning on quitting comics once and for all to do something "important." It was that frustration that led Stan Lee to what Fingeroth calls "a midlife crisis heard 'round the world."

Seeing that other publishers were having some success reviving superhero teams, Lee's boss tasked him with coming up with a new comic. Lee took the assignment, but he didn't just want to create just another group of costumed do-gooders. Instead, he set out to imagine a different vision what it meant to be a superhero.

In this and the work that followed, Lee asked himself what would happen if an ordinary person got superpowers. Would it make their lives better or would it make them harder? What Lee was picturing were superheroes who weren't gods from another world or perfect, infallible examples of human righteousness. Instead, he wanted stories of flawed men and women, full of neurosis and anguish, who suddenly found they could fly or stretch or punch their way through brick walls. What would happen then?

What happened was The Fantastic Four. And then The Hulk. And then Thor and Spiderman and Doctor Strange and Iron Man and The X-men. Over the next few years, Lee along with the equally legendary Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, managed to create a large fraction of what we now call the Marvel Universe. Many of the characters had huge, real-life challenges like Tony Stark (aka Iron Man) and his drinking problem. That meant these characters lived in a recognizable world. "I wanted to make it as realistic as possible" says Lee in an interview quoted in the book. "Instead of [superheroes] living in Gotham City or Metropolis, I felt I will have them live in New York City." Just as important, these new Marvel characters lived in the same world where they crossed paths, formed alliances (or broke them), had romances (and broke those too), all of which formed one, giant, seamless story.

It wasn't just the stories that were new. Lee saw something few others could recognize — a nascent adult audience for superhero comics. Rather than just a backwater of teenage fantasy, Lee understood that with the right stories, superhero comics could gain relevance in the rapidly emerging world of ever-present mass media. Then Lee went further. He not only saw the change coming, he understood how to become its personification.

Most folks only know Stan Lee through his charming and quirky cameos in modern Marvel films. But if you were serious about comics back in the day (for me "the day" was the mid-1970s when I was 11 years old), Stan Lee was a constant presence. One of Lee's great innovations in Marvel comics was to develop a relationship with his readers through the "Bullpen Bulletins." These were a kind of editor's news and information page where Lee drew back the curtain to let you see what was happening at Marvel's offices. And as Lee described it, something amazing was always happening including the occasional visit from a rock star or famous movie director who'd popped by to express their Marvel admiration.

That was Lee's genius. "Little by little [he] was making himself and Marvel into celebrities" writes Fingeroth. By becoming a regular presence within Marvel's pages Lee was "mythologizing what he and his peers did for a living, making himself and them as important as the characters whose stories they told." But Lee was making us, his readers part of that story too. He was convincing us that we, too, were part of something very important just by buying those slim volumes of The Avengers, Silver Surfer or Nick Fury and His Howling Commandos.

A Marvelous Life gives us strong insights into the forces that drove Lee and Marvel to success. But Stan Lee was also a complex man who could be both beloved and reviled. In particular, Lee's conflicts with collaborators, who felt he had stolen credit for their work, is also an important part of his story. This was particularly true for Jack Kirby. Fingeroth spends some time in the book unpacking Lee's long running dispute with Kirby and others. He also mentions abuse allegations previously noted by media. These sections were not particularly compelling to me, but they are an important part of Lee's legacy and Fingeroth handles them with grace.

One small criticism of the book is that it tells us very little of Lee's response to the founding and runaway success of Marvel Studios (beginning with Iron Man in 2008). That seems a strange omission given how much of Lee's later story is him trying to get Hollywood to pick up Marvel properties.

Taken as a whole though, A Marvelous Life is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand how Stan Lee set Marvel on the path to world domination (in a good way).

Adam Frank is an astrophysics professor at the University of Rochester and author of Light of the Stars: Alien Worlds and the Fate of the Earth. You can find more from Adam here: @adamfrank4.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

          

Willie Soon Gate

 Cache   
Willie Soon Gate

The Willie Soon Controversy

There’s been a lot of talk about the Willie Soon Controversy. Bottom line: Soon was an author on a paper that failed to disclose his extensive funding by the petroleum industry and its friends (over a million dollars to date, I believe) as required. I don’t have time to craft a detailed expose or commentary, but I wanted to get a bunch of resources in one place. I should mention that this is not all about Willie Soon, but rather, about climate science denialists more generally, a few specific others besides Soon, about how crap gets published now and then much to the giddiness of the denialist community, and about the ethical issues plaguing Soon, which have led to, among other things, tens of thousands of people signing a petition to get him sacked from his position at Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysics lab.

The Monckton-Soon-Legates-Briggs paper

It all starts with this paper:

Why models run hot: results from an irreducibly simple climate model, published in the Science Bulletin of the Chinese Academy of Sciences

The paper is by Christopher Monckton, Willie Soon, David Legates and William Briggs.

The paper has been examined by a number of scientists and others, and found wanting. Here is a selection of the critiques:

On getting bad climate science published in peer reviewed journals

About Soon’s apparent failure to follow disclose, and his funding sources:

gregladen Sat, 01/31/2015 - 14:28
          

'A Marvelous Life' Holds Stan Lee High As The Man Who Made Superheroes Matter

 Cache   
Stan Lee attends the premiere of "Captain America: Civil War" at Dolby Theatre on April 12, 2016 in Hollywood, Calif.
Stan Lee attends the premiere of "Captain America: Civil War" at Dolby Theatre on April 12, 2016 in Hollywood, Calif.
Jason LaVeris / FilmMagic

In 2018, Marvel Studios released Black Panther. The film grossed 1.3 billion dollars and was nominated for 7 Oscars including Best Picture (a first time for a superhero film).

Beyond the money and awards, the release of Black Panther was a global event. The story of a super-powered African king, leader of the most technologically advanced nation on Earth, allowed the film to address racism and the history of colonial oppression in entirely new and unexpected ways. If anyone was still raising questions about comics mattering for culture, Black Panther meant the definitive end of the argument. Marvel comics and their characters were culture.

So how did we get here? How did superhero comics, the supposed realm of nerdy teenagers, end up conquering the world?

The answer, in many ways, comes down to a single name — Stan Lee. Across a lifetime of creativity, collaboration and endless hustle, Stan Lee saw possibilities no else could imagine and made them real. And if you want to understand how Lee and Marvel did it, Danny Fingeroth's new book A Marvelous Life is the place to start. As a lifelong fan of Spider-Man, The X-Men, Star-Lord and the rest, it was delightful introduction to a guy I'd never met but felt I'd known my whole life.

Fingeroth, who did his own award-winning time at Marvel, begins by laying out the contours of Stan Lee's early life as the son of a Jewish New York immigrant family (Lee was born in 1922 as Stanley Martin Lieber). Through the 1950s, Lee managed to build a solid if unimpressive career working in comics. But then in the late 1950s, the comics industry crashed as TV gave teenage boys a different venue for their interests. By 1960, Lee felt stymied and trapped. He was planning on quitting comics once and for all to do something "important." It was that frustration that led Stan Lee to what Fingeroth calls "a midlife crisis heard 'round the world."

Seeing that other publishers were having some success reviving superhero teams, Lee's boss tasked him with coming up with a new comic. Lee took the assignment, but he didn't just want to create just another group of costumed do-gooders. Instead, he set out to imagine a different vision what it meant to be a superhero.

In this and the work that followed, Lee asked himself what would happen if an ordinary person got superpowers. Would it make their lives better or would it make them harder? What Lee was picturing were superheroes who weren't gods from another world or perfect, infallible examples of human righteousness. Instead, he wanted stories of flawed men and women, full of neurosis and anguish, who suddenly found they could fly or stretch or punch their way through brick walls. What would happen then?

What happened was The Fantastic Four. And then The Hulk. And then Thor and Spiderman and Doctor Strange and Iron Man and The X-men. Over the next few years, Lee along with the equally legendary Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, managed to create a large fraction of what we now call the Marvel Universe. Many of the characters had huge, real-life challenges like Tony Stark (aka Iron Man) and his drinking problem. That meant these characters lived in a recognizable world. "I wanted to make it as realistic as possible" says Lee in an interview quoted in the book. "Instead of [superheroes] living in Gotham City or Metropolis, I felt I will have them live in New York City." Just as important, these new Marvel characters lived in the same world where they crossed paths, formed alliances (or broke them), had romances (and broke those too), all of which formed one, giant, seamless story.

It wasn't just the stories that were new. Lee saw something few others could recognize — a nascent adult audience for superhero comics. Rather than just a backwater of teenage fantasy, Lee understood that with the right stories, superhero comics could gain relevance in the rapidly emerging world of ever-present mass media. Then Lee went further. He not only saw the change coming, he understood how to become its personification.

Most folks only know Stan Lee through his charming and quirky cameos in modern Marvel films. But if you were serious about comics back in the day (for me "the day" was the mid-1970s when I was 11 years old), Stan Lee was a constant presence. One of Lee's great innovations in Marvel comics was to develop a relationship with his readers through the "Bullpen Bulletins." These were a kind of editor's news and information page where Lee drew back the curtain to let you see what was happening at Marvel's offices. And as Lee described it, something amazing was always happening including the occasional visit from a rock star or famous movie director who'd popped by to express their Marvel admiration.

That was Lee's genius. "Little by little [he] was making himself and Marvel into celebrities" writes Fingeroth. By becoming a regular presence within Marvel's pages Lee was "mythologizing what he and his peers did for a living, making himself and them as important as the characters whose stories they told." But Lee was making us, his readers part of that story too. He was convincing us that we, too, were part of something very important just by buying those slim volumes of The Avengers, Silver Surfer or Nick Fury and His Howling Commandos.

A Marvelous Life gives us strong insights into the forces that drove Lee and Marvel to success. But Stan Lee was also a complex man who could be both beloved and reviled. In particular, Lee's conflicts with collaborators, who felt he had stolen credit for their work, is also an important part of his story. This was particularly true for Jack Kirby. Fingeroth spends some time in the book unpacking Lee's long running dispute with Kirby and others. He also mentions abuse allegations previously noted by media. These sections were not particularly compelling to me, but they are an important part of Lee's legacy and Fingeroth handles them with grace.

One small criticism of the book is that it tells us very little of Lee's response to the founding and runaway success of Marvel Studios (beginning with Iron Man in 2008). That seems a strange omission given how much of Lee's later story is him trying to get Hollywood to pick up Marvel properties.

Taken as a whole though, A Marvelous Life is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand how Stan Lee set Marvel on the path to world domination (in a good way).

Adam Frank is an astrophysics professor at the University of Rochester and author of Light of the Stars: Alien Worlds and the Fate of the Earth. You can find more from Adam here: @adamfrank4.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
Story does not include AP content Books Arts Normal
          

Measuring Nutrient Density with Dan Kittredge

 Cache   

Before we present our newest episode, we have a request for you. As we complete our second season of the Regenerative Agriculture Podcast, we have a supporting base of over 5,000 listeners who engage with our episodes shortly after we post them. We now ask for your feedback on the podcast, whether there are topics you’d like to hear more about, and what suggestions you have for improvement. We’ve put together a survey that allows you to tell us what you think. Here’s the link: advancingecoag.com/podcast. We are appreciative of your feedback and we look forward to implementing it to make the Regenerative Agriculture Podcast ever better!

Thank you for permitting the interruption…now, on to the show notes!

In this episode of the podcast, John interviews Dan Kittredge, the Executive Director of the Bionutrient Food Association, whose development of sustainable agriculture techniques has connected him to farmers worldwide.

In this interview, John and Dan delve into the science of growing crops as it relates to human nutrition, describing how agricultural production practices can produce a better nutrient profile in our foods and the potential this holds for human health. He explains why a balanced, as well as a higher nutrient density in crops, is desirable. He discusses the complex relationships between the sun, soil, and plants that lead to these higher and balanced levels of nutrition. Dan explains that across the same food types, i.e., all carrots, wheat, milk, etc., there can be discrepancies in the reported nutritional values and how nutritional data on food packages can be wildly incorrect.

Over the past few years, Dan has been working on the development of a BioNutrient Meter, a handheld spectrometer which tests mineral levels in fruits and vegetables. Dan describes the science of spectroscopy, which is based on the frequencies emitted by each chemical element --this same technology helps scientists and astrophysicists determine the composition of stars six light-years away in our solar system. By measuring the frequencies and light particular elements emit, they can measure the percentage of hydrogen, helium and other gases. With the science of spectroscopy, and other new technology, Dan and his team at the BioNutrient Food Association have built a first-generation model of a miniaturized consumer-priced spectrometer for testing the nutrient levels in crops.

Listen to this provocative conversation between two pioneers who are truly passionate about growing food as medicine to learn:

  • How Dan founded BFA, and how this non-profit provides support and education for farmers about the use of biological systems
  • The science behind plant resistance to insects, and why these resistant crops make good, in fact better, food for humans.
  • The differences in nutrient density between instances of the same crop when grown on different soil under different conditions
  • How soil and plant health correlates to nutrient density
  • How the compounds that correlate with flavor and aroma are those that make the plant indigestible for an insect or disease
  • The science of spectroscopy, and how the new BioNutrient Meter works

Resources

The BioNutrient Food Association is having their annual Soil & Nutrition Conference in Massachusetts on November 13 to 17, 2019. For more information, visit soilandnutrition.org

For more information on the BioNutrient Meter, visit the BioNutrient Food Association website.

Our community impact spot for this episode is provided by Hourglass Films. Hourglass Films has developed a documentary about regenerative agriculture called Sustainable, a film about the land, the people who work it and what must be done to sustain it for future generations. The film features some regenerative growers who work with AEA, and is currently available on Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, and more. We hope you watch this documentary and find it engaging and useful.


We’ve put together a survey; here’s the link: advancingecoag.com/podcast. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us!


          

[원서] (Cambridge Astrophysics) J. A. Peacock - Cosmological physics-Cambridge University Press (1998)

 Cache   



Download : (Cambridge Astrophysics) J A Peacock Cosmological physics Cambridge University Press (1998).djvu




, [원서] (Cambridge Astrophysics) J. A. Peacock - Cosmological physics-Cambridge University Press (1998)기타솔루션 , 솔루션
솔루션/기타

[원서] (Cambridge Astrophysics) J. A. Peacock - Cosmological physics-Cambridge University Press (1998)
순서

- 프리뷰를 참고 바랍니다.





솔루션,기타,솔루션
[원서] (Cambridge Astrophysics) J. A. Peacock - Cosmological physics-Cambridge University Press (1998)

다.



설명






(Cambridge%20Astrophysics)%20J%20A%20Peacock%20%20Cosmological%20physics%20Cambridge%20University%20Press%20(1998)_djvu_01.gif (Cambridge%20Astrophysics)%20J%20A%20Peacock%20%20Cosmological%20physics%20Cambridge%20University%20Press%20(1998)_djvu_02.gif (Cambridge%20Astrophysics)%20J%20A%20Peacock%20%20Cosmological%20physics%20Cambridge%20University%20Press%20(1998)_djvu_03.gif (Cambridge%20Astrophysics)%20J%20A%20Peacock%20%20Cosmological%20physics%20Cambridge%20University%20Press%20(1998)_djvu_04.gif (Cambridge%20Astrophysics)%20J%20A%20Peacock%20%20Cosmological%20physics%20Cambridge%20University%20Press%20(1998)_djvu_05.gif (Cambridge%20Astrophysics)%20J%20A%20Peacock%20%20Cosmological%20physics%20Cambridge%20University%20Press%20(1998)_djvu_06.gif

Download : (Cambridge Astrophysics) J A Peacock Cosmological physics Cambridge University Press (1998).djvu( 72 )



[원서] (Cambridge Astrophysics) J. A. Peacock - Cosmological physics-Cambridge University Press (1998) - 미리보기를 참고 바랍니다.
          

Nobody named Brian is ever competent

 Cache   
It’s an uncomfortable but unconscious truth that some first names are not associated with success. Those which immediately spring to mind include; Wayne, Kevin, and Nigel. Brian is another example. Yes, the guitarist from Queen is highly competent in the fields of music and astrophysics, but he’s the exception, like Farage is amongst all the […]
          

Assistant/Associate Professors--Physical Science and Data Science

 Cache   
Job Summary The College of Science at Purdue University invites applications for multiple positions in ---Physical Science and Data Science--- at the Assistant or Associate Professor level beginning August 17, 2020. Assistant Professor candidates with exceptional qualifications may be considered for an early career endowed professorship. This opportunity is coordinated with concurrent searches in ---Computer Science, Mathematics, and Statistics focused on Data Science--- and ---Data Science in the Life Sciences.--- Qualifications These positions come at a time of new leadership and with multiple commitments of significant investment for the College of Science. We particularly encourage candidates who demonstrate the potential for collaboration across multiple disciplines. We expect that most faculty hired through this search will have interdepartmental joint appointments. College of Science Departments hosting research related to Physical Science include: Chemistry, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, and Physics and Astronomy, as well as Computer Science, Mathematics, and Statistics. Candidates must have a Ph.D. (or its equivalent) in a closely related field. Successful candidates are expected to develop a vigorous, externally funded, internationally recognized theoretical, computational, experimental, and/or observational research program that addresses research questions of fundamental importance. They are also expected to teach undergraduate and/or graduate courses to a diverse student body and supervise graduate students. Successful candidates will combine an outstanding record of research excellence with a commitment to effective and engaged teaching in both physical science and data science. Candidates should have a broad understanding of the numerical and analytic methods in data science, including machine learning, for physical science subject matters, along with the software systems that implement them. The candidate's program is expected to complement existing research within the home department and teaching needs at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The potential to develop one or more of the following areas is desirable. Development and application of data science and machine learning methods to all areas of chemistry, including computational chemistry, measurement science, analytical chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, and biological chemistry, or Development and application of data intensive computations in the fields of numerical astrophysics and cosmology, or Development of techniques in big data/astrostatistics in a variety of astronomical sub-fields with increasingly large data sets, or Development and application of advanced data science methods to areas of atmospheric sciences, including but not limited to computational geofluid dynamics, clouds and convection, climate systems, severe weather, subseasonal-to-seasonal prediction, atmospheric chemistry, and remote sensing of Earth or other planetary atmospheres, or Development and application of data science methods to large-scale problems in solid-earth geosciences, including but not limited to those of theoretical and applied geophysics, seismology, geodynamics, tectonophysics, geochemistry, and energy science. The University, College and Departments Purdue University is a public land-grant university in West Lafayette, Indiana. Purdue Discovery Park provides open, collaborative research environments with over 25 interdisciplinary centers, institutes, and affiliated project centers, most notably the Integrative Data Science Initiative. The Rosen Center for Advanced Computing offers advanced computational resources and services with local HPC clusters, research data storage, and data networks. It is the campus liaison to NSF XSEDE and Open Science Grid. As a part of the Physics and Astronomy department, the Astrophysics group has a strong funding record by the major agencies. NSF is strongly invested in LSST, advanced LIGO, and IceCube; all areas of research focus in the group. Inter-departmental efforts to connect with faculty in Computer Science and Statistics in the broad scope of Data Science are underway to develop a state-of-the-art classification and strategy engine for LSST. The group has leadership in theoretical and data intensive numerical modeling of Astrophysical sources making extensive use of the Purdue as well as NASA and NSF clusters. The Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences has a Geodata Science Initiative that merges geosciences and data science strategically in research and education. Select participants conduct transdisciplinary collaborative research in the nexus of weather, climate, environment, resources, energy, and society, supported by HPC clusters with GPU, Hadoop, or Spark systems. The Geodata Science for Professionals MS program is an agent for industrial partnerships. Application Procedure: Applicants should submit a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, a teaching statement, and a description of proposed research electronically at https://career8.successfactors.com/sfcareer/jobreqcareer?jobId=8002&company=purdueuniv&username=. Additionally, applicants should arrange for three letters of reference to be e-mailed to the search committee at physdatasci@purdue.edu, specifically indicating the position for which the applicant is applying. Applications will be held in strict confidence and will be reviewed beginning December 1, 2019. Applications will remain in consideration until positions are filled. Inquiries can be sent to physdatasci@purdue.edu. Purdue University's College of Science is committed to advancing diversity in all areas of faculty effort, including scholarship, instruction, and engagement. Candidates should address at least one of these areas in the cover letter, indicating past experiences, current interests or activities, and/or future goals to promote a climate that values diversity, and inclusion. Salary and benefits are competitive, and Purdue is a dual-career friendly employer. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities, and veterans are encouraged to apply. YourMembership.Category: Education, Keywords: Associate Professor
          

Wrong eating habits directly related to health of the knee joint

 Cache   

What to eat to keep your knee joints healthy

Eating food rich in carbohydrates makes us overweight. When we eat carbohydrates, our body will create glucose from it – it’s blood sugar from which you can get (fast) energy. However, the human body cannot handle huge amounts of blood sugar, so the body will produce insulin hormone, which will remove excessive amounts of blood sugar from the bloodstream. Insulin will store removed blood sugar in fat cells. This is why we will gain weight by eating food rich in carbohydrates. When eating food rich in carbohydrates, we also are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Just because the body cells will finally create resistance to normal levels of insulin, that is because the body cells have been long-bombarded with insulin hormones. By eating high-fat dairy products, fruits, vegetables and berries low in carbohydrates, meat products containing saturated fat, etc. Our body is generating (slower) energy which will not rise significantly blood sugar levels. It’s very clear that obesity is a huge risk factor for knee osteoarthritis.

 It’s no secret that overweight people eat low-fat products and a lot of carbohydrates. Official dietary guidelines recommend you eat low-fat dairy products, fruits and vegetables and whole grain products. Wheat products are the main source of carbohydrates as well as some vegetables, such as potatoes. These products dominate our food table. However, since Senator McGovern’s committee established these guidelines in 1977, which are followed throughout the Western world, we have more health problems and more overweight people than ever. I think we should have alarm bells ringing by now!

Wheat products contain a protein called gluten, which is officially related to more than 200 known diseases, including mental disorders, cancer and rheumatoid arthritis, the inflammatory type of arthritis. Many people also have wheat allergies, intolerances and celiac disease. Wheat also increases hunger, so you will eat more. By eating high-fat products and avoiding wheat and high-carbohydrate vegetables, you will notice a decrease in your appetite, and you won’t need any snacks between meals. Some people develop schizophrenia, and others will get rheumatoid arthritis by eating grain products. Also, some people will live happily by eating all kinds of grain, but the same can happen with smoking: Some smoke 40 years and nothing happens, which does not mean smoking is not directly related to many diseases. Moreover, wheat is claimed to behave like opiate – you will be addicted to it, but it does not make you “high.” Instead, it will make you hungry.

I know it’s hard to believe but think about it: Wheat does not need any mammal to eat the seeds in order to spread the seeds around, so it protects itself by being poisonous. Compared with berries or fruits like apples, which are using mammals to spread their seeds, they provide energy to animals in exchange for spreading the seeds (that’s why they have nutritive substance surrounding their seeds). The seeds will end up deposited in a natural fertilizer, which will in turn end up growing into new big trees. No, you will not die immediately when you eat grain products, because not all poisons are strong enough to kill you right away. Instead, the “animal” will get the second chance, and it works as a sign to stop eating the ”grass” seeds.

 

The wheat proteins can leak into the bloodstream and trigger autoimmune disorder. The problem is that wheat proteins mimic the normal body proteins, so the autoimmune system of the human body will produce antibodies to attack foreign proteins that instead attack self-proteins (the body’s own proteins), which can cause rheumatoid arthritis as well as many other chronic diseases. Finnish orthopedist Antti Heikkila has told his patients to change their eating habits and avoid grain products. Those patients who had quit eating grain have reported significant improvements in their overall health, not to mention that many have cured their rheumatoid arthritis.

 

We have not changed genetically since we were living in caves, hunting animals and collecting berries. In fact, every anthropologist will tell you by just looking at the human skeleton whether this person was a hunter-gatherer or belonged to a farming community. Hunter-gatherers had better teeth, were taller and had thicker bones as a clear indication of muscle strength.

 

We have studies that have found a correlation between eating high-fat products and heart disease, but I’m not convinced at all. For example, the great “France Paradox:” French are famous for eating lots of saturated fat products, and still their heart disease rates are half of what the United States has. But, if you select some area from the former Soviet Union, where people drank a lot of alcohol and had lot of stress — many people didn’t have jobs, for example — there also are high rates of heart disease. If they also happen to eat a lot of saturated fat, can you conclude that it’s due to their eating habits? Of course not! You cannot use the facts out of context. It’s called the manipulation of truth! Margarines containing trans fats are the only ones without doubt proven to be directly related to heart disease.

Also, you should not take snacks between meals, and two or three meals per day is enough. Digestion process and using the energy are two different processes. You should eat and then use the energy (the body), but when you eat all the time, you are overusing your body and as a result will feel tired. When you eat all the time, your body will perform slowly, like a computer with too many processes running in the background.

You should be aware that most highly processed, ready-to-eat meals contain monosodium glutamate — sodium salt, also known as flavour enhancer. Sodium salt is an addictive neurotoxin that simulates the taste buds, so it makes you to desire the taste, and you’ll keep on buying and eating the product. Literally, this supplement makes inferior quality food taste good, and it’s therefore loved by companies producing fast foods. Of course, it should come as no surprise that sodium salt is related to many neurological diseases. Also, you should throw out the microwave oven from the kitchen window, as it is changing the food at molecular level so the body cannot recognize it anymore.

Critics are claiming that by avoiding grain products, you are not consuming enough fiber. Well, there is no clear evidence that fiber is crucial for health, but in every case, it would be no problem, because you’ll get sufficient fiber from berries, fruits and vegetables. Other critics will tell you that producing meat will produce way too many greenhouse gases, which are destroying the planet, and we cannot feed the world if we are not all eating grains. Come on, guys. We all know that right now we produce enough food to feed three times the current world’s population. Problem is, we are not distributing it around the world but instead are throwing it away. Nobody wants to address the problem of food distribution so we can finally eliminate hunger. Instead, some ”gurus” want to produce more wheat to throw away locally. If we really would care about our planet, we would not use airplanes to go for a holiday for a week to other side of the planet to drink beer and sunbathe. We would not keep the Christmas lights on while we sleep, and we would not spend hours in traffic jams while driving to work alone in our car. We would ask our senators and presidents to invest in renewable energy, although it would mean higher energy prices. Our leaders lack the political will to change things because we don’t demand them, as we would not like to pay the price. To quote the famous astrophysicist Carl Sagan: “There is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.”

In summary, good food is natural and unprocessed food. Now you are able to make your own conclusions. I know it’s not easy to change old eating habits. Amongst other things, it requires a lot of willpower, but it’s worth it. Denying fast food and all kinds of “cookies” requires determination, but you have to lose something if you want to gain something. The good news is, however, that natural meals low in carbohydrates is really delicious.


          

Ciencia: Enlaces y Recursos (59)

 Cache   

Anterior Post

Long-Lived Stellar Blast Kindles Hope of a Supernova We’ve Never Seen Before
https://www.quantamagazine.org/long-lived-stellar-blast-kindles-hope-of-a-pair-instability-supernova-20190912/

Two neutron stars collided near the solar system billions of years ago
https://phys.org/news/2019-05-neutron-stars-collided-solar-billions.html

The Sun Is Stranger Than Astrophysicists Imagined
https://www.quantamagazine.org/gamma-ray-data-reveal-surprises-about-the-sun-20190501
/

Quantum Supremacy Using a Programmable Superconducting Processor
https://drive.google.com/file/d/19lv8p1fB47z1pEZVlfDXhop082Lc-kdD/view
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1-7_CzhOF7wruqU_TKltM2f8haZ_R3aNb/view

Planet WASP-12b Might Be on a Death Spiral into its Parent Star
https://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/planet-wasp-12b-death-spiral/

Evidence Found for a New Fundamental Particle
https://www.quantamagazine.org/evidence-found-for-a-new-fundamental-particle-20180601/

Are We All Wrong About Black Holes?
https://www.quantamagazine.org/craig-callender-are-we-all-wrong-about-black-holes-20190905/

Strange Metal-like Bonds Discovered in Customized Crystals
https://www.quantamagazine.org/strange-metal-like-bonds-discovered-in-colloidal-crystals-20190903

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez


          

[02mydafsoup-01 @ 02mydafsoup-01] Wettbewerb: Wer kann die Kernfusion am besten erklären? [Astrodicticum Simplex]

 Cache   

Ich hätte gern, das mir jemand erklärt wie Kernfusion funktioniert. Also jetzt nicht die Sache mit den Kraftwerken. Sondern die Grundlage: Wenn man die Kerne leichter Atome, wie zum Beispiel des Wasserstoff nahe genug aneinander bringt, verbinden sie sich zu Kernen schwerere Atome, wie etwa Helium. Dabei wird Energie frei. Warum ist das so?

Ich hab das natürlich während meines Studiums gelernt; ich kenne die entsprechenden physikalischen und mathematischen Gleichungen und das Thema eigentlich verstanden. Aber ich bin mir nicht sicher, ob ich es wirklich auf einer so fundamentalen Ebene so absolut verstanden habe, dass ich auch in der Lage bin, es Leuten ohne entsprechende Vorbildung anschaulich zu vermitteln. Und genau das ist der Punkt um den es mir geht!

Ein Beispiel: Im Lehrbuch “Einführung in Astronomie und Astrophysik” von Arnold Hanslmeier steht zu dem Thema:

“Vor einem Kernfusionsprozess sei die Masse der betroffenen Kernen i Σ Mi, nach der Fusion Mp. Die Masse der fusionierten Kerne ist leichter als die Masse der Ursprungskerne und der fehlender Betrag, Massendefekt, ΔM, beträgt ΔM=Σ Mi-Mp und dieser wird nach Einstein in Energie umgewandelt: E=ΔMc²

Gut, so weit, so klar und das ist ja eine der Standarderklärungen die man zu dem Thema findet. Die Masse des fusionierten Kerns ist geringer als die Gesamtmasse der Kerne die vor der Fusion vorhanden waren. Und diese überschüssige Masse ist genau die Energie, die bei der Fusion frei wird. Was hier aber nicht erklärt wird: WIESO ist die Masse des fusionierten Kerns geringer?

Hier muss man jetzt über die Bindungsenergie sprechen. Das ist die Energie durch die die Bausteine des Atomkerns aneinander gebunden sind. Es braucht Energie, wenn man so einen Atomkern in seine Bestandteile zerlegen will und diese Energie ist die Bindungsenergie. Die Wikipedia sagt zum dem Thema zum Beispiel:

“In der Kernphysik ist die Bindungsenergie die Energiemenge, die aufgewandt werden muss, um den Atomkern in seine Nukleonen zu zerlegen. Umgekehrt wird eine ebenso große Energie frei, wenn sich Nukleonen zu einem Kern vereinigen. Die Bindung kommt durch die anziehende Kraft der starken Wechselwirkung zwischen benachbarten Nukleonen zustande. Diese überwiegt die gegenseitige Coulomb-Abstoßung der elektrisch positiv geladenen Protonen im Kern. Die maximale Bindungsenergie pro Nukleon wird bei Nickel-62”

Dazu gibt es dann meistens Bilder wie das hier zu sehen:

Bild: Roderich Kahn, CC-BY-SA 4.0)

Leichte Kerne haben also eine geringe Bindungsenergie; schwerere Kerne eine größere (und hinter Nickel dreht sich das ganze wieder um) Bindungsenergie. Aber auch hier kriege ich Probleme, wenn ich mir das anschaulich vorstellen will. Ich habe zwei leichte Kerne mit geringer Bindungsenergie. Daraus mache ich einen Kern mit größere Bindungsenergie. Wo in diesem Prozess aber kommt nun die Energie her, die frei wird? Wenn ich zum Beispiel zwei Kerne mit einer Bindungsenergie von je 2 Energieeinheiten zu einem Kern fusionieren, der eine Bindungsenergie von 6 Energieeinheiten habe, dann fehlen mir ja eigentlich 2 Energieeinheiten. Wieso wird dann Energie frei?

Weil die Bindungsenergie eine negative Größe ist und damit am Ende eben was übrig bleibt; das ist das was mir die entsprechende Mathematik sagt. Aber wie kann man das veranschaulichen? Es geht mir explizit nicht darum, das Phänomen der Kernfusion an sich zu erklären; für sowas gibt es Lehrbücher, ein Studium, und so weiter. Ich suche nach einem Weg wie man diese absolut nicht intuitiven Vorgänge anschaulich machen kann. Was soll es bedeuten, dass die Bindungsenergie eines Atomkerns negativ ist? Wie kann man sich das vorstellen; ohne komplizierte Diagramme und mathematische Formeln?

Ich habe diese Frage kürzlich auf Twitter gestellt und daraus hat sich eine heftige Diskussion entwickelt. Da war alles dabei: Erklärungsansätzer die noch tiefer in komplexe Themen abgetaucht sind wie Tröpfchenmodell des Atomkerns oder Quantenfelder. Versuche das ganze durch den Vergleich mit Schulden, Gravitationspotentiale oder Seifenblasen anschaulich zu erklären. Und so weiter. Aber so richtig und absolut zufriedenstellend war das alles nicht. Am Ende blieb immer ein kleiner, nerviger Gedanke im Gehirn der darauf beharrt, dass da irgendwas nicht stimmen kann.

Die Kernfusion ist physikalisch verstanden; sehr gut sogar – in der Hinsicht gibt es keine Probleme. Aber ich bin immer noch auf der Suche nach einer anschaulichen Erklärung. Und ich lasse auch “Man kann halt nicht alles anschaulich erklären!” nicht gelten. Ja, es gibt Sachen die man nicht anschaulich erklären kann, weil sie nicht anschaulich sind; alles was mit irgendwelchen höherdimensionalen Räumen usw zu tun hat. Aber ich bin mir absolut sicher, dass man für die Sache mit der Kernfusion ein Bild finden kann, das auch Menschen ohne Physikstudium klar macht, wieso man Energie gewinnen kann wenn man zwei leichte Atome zu einem schweren Atom zusammenpappt!

Was passiert dort, wo der “Bang” im Bild ist?! (Bild: gemeinfrei)

Ich habe jede Menge Ansätze durchprobiert; ich hab versucht die Bindungsenergie mit Schulden zu vergleichen; mit einer zu zahlenden Miete bzw einer Mietkaution, die nach einem Auszug wieder ausgezahlt wird; ich hab über Kugeln aus geschmolzenen Gummibären nachgedacht die aneinanderkleben und bei der Trennung Teile von sich selbst verlieren, und so weiter. Am Ende bin ich zu einer Erklärung und einem Bild gekommen, mit dem ich mehr oder weniger (aber auch nicht zu 100 Prozent) zufrieden bin. Das könnt ihr am Freitag in der kommenden Folge 363 meines Sternengeschichten-Podcasts hören (bzw. in der Transkription hier im Blog dann auch lesen). Aber ich dachte, ich stell die Frage einfach mal auch dem Rest der Welt!

Ich weiß, dass in der Leserschaft meines Blogs jede Menge schlaue Menschen zu finden sind. Und rufe euch daher auf: Erklärt die Kernfusion! Wie funktioniert dieser Prozess bei der man aus leichten Atomen schwere Atome macht und dabei Energie gewinnen kann? Und mit welchen Bildern, Vergleichen (oder vielleicht sogar Experimenten?) kann man das anschaulich darstellen? Ihr könnt eure Erklärung hier in die Kommentare schreiben; ihr könnt auch einen Text schreiben und ihn mir per Email schicken – den veröffentliche ich dann gerne hier als Gastbeitrag. Ihr könnt auch ein Video aufnehmen; ein Bild zeichnen oder was euch sonst noch so einfällt um diese Sache mit der Fusion anschaulich zu erklären!

Als Anreiz gibt es auch was zu gewinnen! Die Erklärungen die mir am besten gefallen werden mit Preisen belohnt. Es gibt Bücher (mein neues Buch zum Beispiel, aber auch andere). Ich hab auch noch ein paar Freikarten für Shows der Science Busters und andere nette Sachen die ich als Preise vergeben kann. Ich würde mich freuen, wenn ihr mitmacht. Am meisten würde ich mich aber freuen, wenn ich danach diese Sache mit der Kernfusion endlich vernünftig verstanden habe 😉

[Reposted from 02mysoup-aa]


          

Air Showers High Energy Phenomena And Astrophysical Aspects A Tutorial Reference Manual And Data Book Astrophysics And Space Science Library By Peter

 Cache   
Air Showers High Energy Phenomena And Astrophysical Aspects A Tutorial Reference Manual And Data Book Astrophysics And Space Science Library By Peter
          

Memex: Galileo (pt.39)

 Cache   
Quali sostanze chimiche si trovano all’interno delle spezie? E’ vero che i meteoriti contengono granelli di polvere cosmica? E come viene prodotta? Perché la cimice asiatica - anche definita “cimice diabolica” - è considerata tra gli insetti più temuti al mondo? E poi ancora: in quale modo la realtà aumentata può venire in soccorso, per esempio, di fronte a una situazione di scarsa visibilità in aeroporto? In questa puntata di Memex “Galileo” Marco Martinelli, biotecnologo della Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna di Pisa, ci racconta le - tantissime - sostanze che si trovano nelle spezie. E ci porta sulle “tracce chimiche” di ognuna di loro. Paolo Prati (Università di Genova e INFN) ci spiega perché i meteoriti contengono granelli di polvere cosmica e lo fa riportando i risultati ottenuti dall’esperimento LUNA - Laboratory for underground Nuclear Astrophysics – installato presso i Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell'Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. Con Lara Maistrello del Laboratorio di Entomologia Applicata (Laboratori BIOGEST- SITEIA di Reggio Emilia) scopriamo il “comportamento” della cimice Asiatica Halyomorpha halys, “un alieno invasivo perfetto”, e il suo impatto - devastante - sull’agricoltura. In studio Valerio Rossi Albertini dialoga anche con Sara Bagassi, ricercatrice presso il Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale dell’Università di Bologna a proposito di realtà aumentata in relazione alla scarsa visibilità in aeroporto. In particolare, ci soffermiamo sugli strumenti di visione artificiale che permettono di visualizzare - attraverso i vetri della torre di controllo - l’intero traffico aeroportuale: questa è l’idea alla base di “Retina”, un progetto europeo coordinato proprio dall’Università di Bologna. Con Pietro Greco, giornalista scientifico e scrittore, compiamo infine un affascinante viaggio nella vita di Trofim Denisovič Lysenko, il teorico della vernalizzazione.  
          

The Science Behind Dark Energy

 Cache   
Major scientific breakthroughs happen precisely because of this singular psychological manifestation: scientists get excited about what they don’t know. Now, long the butt of jokes by laymen who don’t know the first thing about astrophysics, scientists may just have the last laugh.  A “super telescope” is about to reveal the secrets of time and space.  And if you didn’t realize you were obsessed with time and space, think again. We are a race consumed with time and space, as enshrined in our long-standing…
          

Astrophysics Carroll Solutions

 Cache   
Astrophysics Carroll Solutions
          

Starożytni astrologowie wspomogli dzisiejszą astronomię

 Cache   

3000 lat temu astrologowie pracujący dla króla imperium asyryjskiego uważnie obserwowali i rejestrowali to co udało im się dostrzec na niebie. Szczególnie interesujące odkrycia, były następnie zapisywane na tabliczkach z pismem klinowym. Okazuje się że ich wkład w badania nieba mogą dać niezwykle cenny wgląd w takie zjawiska, jak rozbłyski słoneczne i inne wydarzenia kosmiczne, które są tak samo istotne dzisiaj, jak wówczas gdy były widziane po raz pierwszy.

 

Okazuje się, że ​​około 2700 lat temu astrologowie zaobserwowali coś, co przykuło ich uwagę i zarejestrowali to wydarzenie na kamiennych tablicach:

(Astrologowie) pisali o niezwykłym czerwonym blasku na niebie. Zespół z University of Tsukuba odkrył, że istnieją co najmniej trzy starożytne tabliczki klinowe, które wspominają o takim zdarzeniu, czasami określane jako „czerwona chmura” lub opisywane jako„czerwień pokrywająca niebo.

Według Science Daily obserwacje te porównano ze stężeniami węgla-14 w pierścieniach drzew z tego samego okresu, a ich odkrycia były niewątpliwie czymś niezwykłym:

„Były to prawdopodobnie przejawy tego, co dziś nazywamy stabilnymi czerwonymi łukami zorzy polarnej, składającymi się ze światła emitowanego przez elektrony w atmosferycznych atomach tlenu po wzbudzeniu przez intensywne pola magnetyczne. Podczas gdy zorza polarna jest zwykle ograniczona do północnych szerokości geograficznych, w okresach silnej magnetycznej aktywności, takich jak np. wyrzut masy ze Słońca, można zaobserwować znacznie dalej na południe. Ponadto, ze względu na zmiany pola magnetycznego Ziemi w czasie, Bliski Wschód był znacznie bliżej bieguna geomagnetycznego w tym okresie historii. ”

Oznacza to mniej więcej tyle, że Asyryjczycy mogą podać pomocną dłoń współczesnym naukowcom, którzy również badają słońce. Naukowcy piszący w Astrophysical Letters Journal wyjaśniają, że wydarzenia słoneczne są teraz jeszcze większym zagrożeniem niż tysiące lat temu a wszelkie dane na ten temat są kluczowe w ich przewidywaniu oraz przeciwziałaniu ich konsekwencjom. 

Okazuje się więc że zainteresowanie kosmosem przejawiane przez ludy żyjące na bliskim wschodzie jest źródłem istotnej dla całej rasy ludzkiej wiedzy. Nie ma w tym zresztą nic dziwnego, a już od dawna wiadomym było, że babilońscy astronomowie opracowali między innymi empiryczne podejście do przewidywania ruchu planet już w VIII wieku pne. Ich badania zostały później przyjęte i opracowane przez starożytnych Greków i zawierały kilka przedstawień starożytnych Babilończyków wykorzystujących zaawansowane metody matematyczne. Na przykład używali rachunku różniczkowego do śledzenia Jowisza - kluczowej planety w ich umysłach ze względu na połączenie, między Jowiszem, a ich bogiem, Mardukiem.

Człowiek rozważa swoje miejsce we wszechświecie od stuleci, a ostatecznie nasze zainteresowanie gwiazdami doprowadziło do programu kosmicznego, który zaprowadził nas do miejsc w naszym Układzie Słonecznym, które kiedyś były tylko snem. Nasi pradawni przodkowie wytyczyli ścieżkę dla tego, co później nastąpi, i jesteśmy im winni wdzięczność za poświęcenie czasu na utrwalenie tego, co zobaczyli, gdy oni również patrzyli w nocne niebo.

 


          

Astronomia - Un'analisi della cometa interstellare 2I/Borisov suggerisce che abbia acqua in grandi quantità (NetMassimo)

 Cache   
NetMassimo scrive nella categoria Astronomia che: In un articolo in pubblicazione sulla rivista "Astrophysical Journal Letters" viene riportata la rilevazione di quelle che sono state interpretate come tracce di acqua emessa dalla cometa interstellare 2I/Borisov.
vai agli ultimi aggiornamenti su: cometa interstellare
1 Voti

Vai all'articolo completo » .Un'analisi della cometa interstellare 2I/Borisov suggerisce che abbia acqua in grandi quantità.
Un
          

Kosmisches Karussell

 Cache   
Die neue Computersimulation TNG50 zeigt, wie sich das Universum entwickelte und aus Chaos allmählich Ordnung entstand - Galaxien gelten als die größten Bausteine im Universum. Wie aber wurden sie geboren? Wie haben sie sich entwickelt? Um den Antworten auf diese Fragen näher zu kommen, hat ein internationales Team – darunter auch Forschende aus den Max-Planck-Instituten für Astronomie und Astrophysik – das All in den Computer gepackt. Das Ergebnis heißt Illustris TNG50 und ist die bisher detailreichste kosmologische Großsimulation. Sie zeigt erstmals, dass die Geometrie der kosmischen Gasflüsse in und um Galaxien die Struktur dieser Sternsysteme beeinflusst. Umgekehrt ergeben sich die Eigenschaften der Gasflüsse aus der Entwicklung der Galaxien. 
          

Prof G. Mugesh from IISc and five others win Infosys Prize 2019

 Cache   
Read time: 5 mins
The Infosys Prize winners for 2019. Top (L–R): Manu V. Devadevan, G Mugesh, and Majula Reddy. Bottom (L–R): Siddhartha Mishra, Anand Pandian, and Sunita Sarawagi.

The Trustees of the Infosys Science Foundation (ISF) announced the winners of the Infosys Prize 2019 at an event held today at the Infosys campus in Electronic City, Bengaluru. The awards were presented in six categories — Engineering and Computer Sciences, Humanities, Life Sciences, Mathematical Sciences, Physical Sciences and Social Sciences. The winners include Dr. Manu V. Devadevan, Dr. G Mugesh, Dr. Majula Reddy, Dr. Siddhartha Mishra, Dr. Anand Pandian and Dr. Sunita Sarawagi.

The Infosys Prize 2019 for Engineering and Computer Science was awarded to Dr Sunita Sarawagi, Institute Chair Professor, Computer Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay. She was awarded for her research in databases, data mining, machine learning and natural language processing, and for important applications of these research techniques. The prize recognizes her pioneering work in developing information extraction techniques for unstructured data. Prof. Sarawagi’s work has practical applications in helping clean up unstructured data like addresses on the web and in repositories, easing the handling of queries.

In the Humanities category, the Prize was awarded to Dr Manu V. Devadevan, Assistant Professor, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Mandi. His work critically reinterprets much of the conventional wisdom about the cultural, religious and social history of the Deccan and South India. Dr. Devadevan's primary research interests include political and economic processes in pre-modern South India, literary practices in South India and the study of ancient inscriptions from the region.

Dr Manjula Reddy, Chief Scientist, Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), Hyderabad, received the award in the Life Sciences category for her groundbreaking discoveries concerning the structure of cell walls in bacteria. Dr. Reddy and her colleagues have revealed critical steps of cell wall growth that are fundamental for understanding bacterial biology. This work could potentially help in creating a new class of antibiotics to combat antibiotic resistant microbes. 

The 2019 prize for Mathematical Sciences was awarded to Dr Siddhartha Mishra, Professor, Department of Mathematics, ETH Zürich, for his outstanding contributions to Applied Mathematics, particularly for designing numerical tools for solving problems in the real world. Prof. Mishra's work has been used in climate models, astrophysics, aerodynamics, and plasma physics. He has produced computer programs for complicated realistic problems such as tsunamis generated by rock slides, and waves in the solar atmosphere.

In the Physical Sciences category, Dr G. Mugesh, Professor, Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru, received the award for his pioneering work in the chemical synthesis of small molecules and nanomaterials for biomedical applications. His work has contributed to the understanding of the role of trace elements, selenium and iodine, in thyroid hormone activation and metabolism, and this research has led to major medical advances.

The Infosys Prize 2019 in the Social Sciences category went to Dr Anand Pandian, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, USA, for his work on ethics, selfhood and the creative process. Prof. Pandian's research encompasses several themes such as cinema, public culture, ecology, nature and the theory and methods of anthropology.  His writing pushes the boundaries of how anthropologists render into words the worlds they encounter. 

(L–R): Salil Parekh – Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director, Infosys Limited; S. Gopalakrishnan (Kris) – Co-founder, Infosys Limited, Co-founder, Axilor Ventures, Trustee - Infosys Science Foundation; Nandan Nilekani - Co-founder and Non-Executive Chairman of the Board, Infosys Limited, Trustee – Infosys Science Foundation; S.D. Shibulal - Co-founder, Infosys Limited, Co-founder, Axilor Ventures Private Limited, President – Board of Trustees, Infosys Science Foundation; Narayana Murthy – Founder, Infosys Limited, Trustee – Infosys Science Foundation; K. Dinesh – Co-founder, Infosys Limited, Trustee – Infosys Science Foundation; Srinath Batni – Former Director, Infosys Limited, Co-founder Axilor Ventures, Trustee – Infosys Science Foundation. Photo: Infosys Science Foundation.

Addressing the gathering, Mr. S. D. Shibulal, Co-Founder, Infosys Limited and the President of the Infosys Science Foundation, said, “The Infosys Prize continues to recognize exemplary work in scientific research and enquiry. Many Infosys Prize laureates have gone on to contribute significantly in key areas like healthcare, genetics, climate science, astronomy and poverty alleviation, amongst other things. Their work has immediate implications for the human race and the planet. We hope it catalyzes social development.” 

Mr. N. R. Narayana Murthy, founder of Infosys and trustee of the Infosys Science Foundation, called on the need for helping youngsters pursue fundamental research enthusiastically. “They should be encouraged and equipped to become contributors to solving huge problems that confront us every day. I want India to be a place where discovery and invention happen every month,” he said.

There was also a brief interaction with the media and students, where some of the trustees fielded some of the questions related to the prize. Ms. Nandita Jayaraj, an independent free-lance science journalist while congratulating the winners noted that there was better representation this time. She further mentioned that she would like to see the Chair of the Jury also be well represented, to which, Mr. Kris Gopalakrishnan responded saying 30% of the jury committee members were women. 

The winners will be awarded on 7th January 2020 at a separate function at Infosys, Bengaluru. The award includes a pure gold medal, a citation and a prize purse of USD 100,000 (or its equivalent in Rupees). 

(With inputs based on a press release from the Infosys Science Foundation).


          

Astrophysics Baggage Screen XIS-100X

 Cache   
The XIS-100X is a versatile X-Ray Inspection System with a tunnel size of 101.6 x 101.3 cm (40” x 40”). The XIS-100X is designed for screening oversized luggage, large parcels and small cargo. One of the most desired systems in the XIS Series, it is a flexible, mid-sized system that offers diverse screening capabilities. The XIS-100X x ray inspection system retains high throughput while providing a bigger tunnel size for larger scale object screening. Thus, the system offers improved efficiency for medium sized screening needs. Ultimately, the XIS-100X is the cost effective screening solution for airports, customs facilities, and high security sites Due to our continued product research and development, Astrophysics Inc. reserves the right to amend all the technical specifications without prior notice
          

A Review of “Love and Quasars: An Astrophysicist Reconciles Faith and Science” by Paul Wallace, Part 2.

 Cache   
A Review of “Love and Quasars: An Astrophysicist Reconciles Faith and Science” by Paul Wallace, Part 2. In Chapter 1- Two Ways of Seeing the Sun: Through the Eyes of Faith or the Eyes of Science? Wallace describes the childhood experience he had when driving with his family.  As they crossed the Mississippi River, the […]
          

Astrophysiker Heino Falcke bei SPRING

 Cache   
"Wenn ich die Schöpfung untersuche, dann entdecke ich auch etwas über Gott selber“ ...
          

Astrophysiker Heino Falcke bei SPRING

 Cache   
„Die Welt ist eine Schöpfung, ein Ausdruck Gottes - und wenn ich die Schöpfung untersuche, dann entdecke ich auch etwas über Gott selber!“ So hat der Astrophysiker Professor Dr. Heino Falcke bei SPRING, dem großen Festival für Christen und ihre Freunde, seine Motivation zur Miterforschung des „schwarzen Loches“ beschrieben. ...
          

SPRING: Das christliche Festival startet in Willingen

 Cache   
Zehn Jahre SPRING Festival in Willingen (Upland) – mit 3.600 Teilnehmern startet heute das christliche Ostertreffen für Christen und ihre Freunde mitten in Deutschland. Unter dem Motto „DA.FÜR“ werden mehr als 300 Bibelarbeiten, Workshops, Seminare und Konzerte für Jung und Alt geboten. Einer der Höhepunkte ist der Vortrag des Astrophysikers Professor Heino Falcke, der vor zwei Wochen in Brüssel das erste Bild eines „schwarzen Loches“ ...
          

In weary haste

 Cache   
Apologies for the slight delay in transmission - no blog last week because I've been so busy. Lots of new lectures to write, a PhD examination to prepare and various other more tedious things getting in the way of me coming up with any new opinions on anything worth sharing with you all. The more heated public discussions become the less I want to participate. Oh well, at least my dentist's appointment was cancelled!

Still, however exhausting teaching was, it's been fun. A Streetcar Named DesireHaroun and the Sea of Stories (up there with The Phantom Tollbooth in my view) and Caitlín Moran's How To Be A Woman all generated interest and opinion from the students (young Marlon Brando still brings a good many of the students to the yard). It was One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest today (not enough people had read it to get a good discussion going but we did introduce them to Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters), Comet in Moominland and The Owl Service tomorrow, and The Handmaid's Tale on Friday. The problem with The Owl Service is that while it's one of the most complex and disturbing adolescent novels ever written, Garner got his structuring mythical interpretation of the core Welsh myth from Robert Graves, whose Triple Goddess theory is both bizarre and deeply misogynist.



I did manage to read a couple of things apart from course texts this week. Ken MacLeod's Descent has an awful lot of fun merging near-future Scottish post-crash economics, close encounters of the third kind, genetics, religious exploration and surveillance culture to make a clever, witty and thought-provoking novel. John Le Carré's new one, Agent Running in the Field was a bit disappointing. Some nice characterisation, some satisfying rants, but the central twist is unintentionally obvious from the first few pages – a bit problematic when the narrator is meant to be an elite spy. I liked Michael Frayn's The Russian Interpreter – a 1966 comic novel about an inept English graduate student in Moscow getting tangled up in espionage – very much. It hasn't really dated at all and is very funny. My next book will be Stuart Turton's The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle because it sounds clever and funny. Just what I need.

In the meantime, tomorrow sees the departure of my friend Dean for ever. Exhausted by the relentless hostility and incompetence of British HE (not my institution this time), he's heading back to Canada for the first time in 20 years, determined never to darken the doors of a university ever again. I'll miss his sense of the outrageous, his idea of what constitutes a well-balanced whiskey and ginger, his habit of hate-reading the Financial Times at weekends, his dry sense of humour and scathing disregard for any astrophysics on a smaller scale than galaxy interactions, which is his speciality. Having shared an office with a Nobel winner, he's allowed to describe most of his field as 'parochial' and 'planet-chasers'! He'll be much missed.
          

Astrophysique: un mini-trou noir aurait été détecté pour la première fois!____¤201911

 Cache   
  Une étude, dont les résultats intitulés « A noninteracting low-mass black hole–giant star binary system » sont publiés dans la revue Science , laisse penser qu'un mini-trou noir a été détecté pour la première fois.   Concrètement, comme, depuis quelque temps, on imagine qu'il peut...
          

Unas simulaciones explican la existencia de exoplanetas gigantes con órbitas excéntricas y cercanas a sus estrellas

 Cache   
Unas simulaciones explican la existencia de exoplanetas gigantes con órbitas excéntricas y cercanas a sus estrellas 5/11/2019 de University of California Santa Cruz / The Astrophysical Journal Letters Ilustración de artista de la colisión de dos planetas rocosos. De forma análoga, las colisiones de planetas gigantes de gas pueden conducir a la formación de planetas […]
          

TESS revela un planeta improbable

 Cache   
TESS revela un planeta improbable 4/11/2019 de Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA3) / The Astrophysical Journal Ilustración de artista de TESS en el espacio. Crédito: NASA/GSFC. Empleando datos asterosísmicos del satélite TESS de NASA, un equipo internacional de astrónomos liderado por el investigador Tiago Campante (Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço, […]
          

Incluso los exoplanetas “Ricitos de Oro” necesitan una estrella que se porte bien

 Cache   
Incluso los exoplanetas “Ricitos de Oro” necesitan una estrella que se porte bien 4/11/2019 de Rice University / The Astrophysical Journal Simulación del transporte de flujo magnético en una estrella, arriba. Abajo, líneas del campo magnético de la corona de la estrella que alcanzan el espacio interplanetario. Cortesía de Alexander Group. Un exoplaneta puede parecer […]
          

Lincoln Laboratory welcomes Natalia Guerrero for Hispanic Heritage Month event

 Cache   
How unique is our solar system? This is a question that scientists have been trying to answer for a long time. It is also the question that Natalia Guerrero posed during her keynote address at MIT Lincoln Laboratory's recent Hispanic Heritage Month event. Guerrero is a researcher from MIT's Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space...
          

Keeping the Dome Open

 Cache   
TheSpaceWriter's Ramblings: Yerkes Observatory in the 21st Century There are a number of observatories around the world that fall into the category of “venerable and still usable”. Think of Mount Wilson and its 100-inch Hooker telescope. Or consider Palomar’s collection of scopes, including the 200-inch Hale. It also showcases the historic Samuel Oschin Telescope, a survey instrument that has produced mind-boggling images of the universe. Then, there are the facilities at Pic du Midi, in England, the observatories in Australia, and South Africa. These (and many others) are places where astronomy’s scientific advances into astrophysics began. And, of course, there’s Yerkes Observatory, one of the most venerated in the U.S. For multiple generations of astronomers, it was among the best places to do their science. They spread out to other observatories to teach their own students and continue the exploration of the universe. Yerkes Observatory as photographed by Wikipedia user Mumford. The facility is in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, and has been run by the University of Chicago for many years. A new agreement may see it transferred to a private foundation to continue its astronomy and education mission. I learned of the Yerkes history when I first visited it in the 1990s. ...
          

"And the Oscar goes to...Robert Pattinson's French accent."

 Cache   
Robert Pattinson: The Movie Star Who Became a Character Actor [The Ringer] The narrative of Pattinson's rebranding from multiplex sex symbol to art-house axiom is by now well-established: Both he and Kristen Stewart have, largely through their own confident and self-possessed artistic decisions, emerged from the Twilight zone as critically acclaimed actors. Their incredible successes at a young age mean they've had the career security to follow their whims. While some might wince at Pattinson's after-the-fact contempt for his star-making role, the choices he's made since the franchise came to an end are those of an actor less interested in living something down than measuring up to standard: In his best work, Pattinson stands tall." • How Robert Pattinson became an unlikely arthouse superstar [The Guardian]
"Yet look closer at these roles and performances, and Pattinson's elegant reshaping of his own stardom looks a little less plainly reactive, and more like a subversion: the softness is still there, just in harder surroundings. In the caffeinated, tarmac-pounding New York heist thriller Good Time, he's cast seemingly against type as a crude, scuzzy, coked-up fuckup, though as his character's rickety criminal plans fall apart from the get-go, his gaping, unloved vulnerability is as glaring as his peroxided hair. In Claire Denis's ingenious sensual space odyssey High Life, he's an introverted, celibate criminal turned tenderly doting father, though only through being summarily raped by Juliette Binoche's controlling astrophysicist; joining victimhood and paternal protectiveness in one fraught swoop, it's a character arc unlike that of any male protagonist in the movies. [...] He's cultivated a rich, riveting line in outwardly hardened men a little too beautiful, a little too fragile, for the harsher worlds in which they find themselves – upending expectations of what a leading man can do, or more pointedly can't do, on screen."
• It's Officially Time to Stop Thinking of Robert Pattinson as Edward Cullen [Cosmopolitan]
"The year was 2008. I was an acne-faced eighth grader who had just emerged from the first Twilight movie with all my friends, and pretty much the only thing we could talk about for the next three weeks was how horny we were for Robert Pattinson. Sure, the actual writing of the movie was brutal, and the storyline had pretty sex-negative undertones, but to 13-year-old me, it didn't matter because I had a new celebrity crush. Like a lot of hot young actors who play someone like Edward Cullen in five different films, it seemed like, once it was over, Robert was never going to escape the stereotypes of the Twilight fandom. But it's been 11 years. He is altogether a different man, and we need to show some damn respect. Since his time playing a sparkly vampire, Robert's been turning himself into an artsy dude behind your back,"
• How Robert Pattinson Has Become A Master Of Reinvention [Uproxx]
"He's not meant to be the star of this film, but he pulls focus anyway, committing to all the eccentricities that he's suplied his character with and then over-delivering on them. And that is, perhaps, what Pattinson should be applauded for – more than his desire to chase after boundary-pushing material or work with cinematic auteurs. He's constantly pushing himself, testing his own sense of comfort and demanding audiences do the same. If you cringe at his antics, if you can't stomach his shameless characterizations, he's doing something right. He's reinventing himself with every scene, pressing us to look past his celebrity and find whatever strange, magnetic force he's inhabiting at any given time. He's seeking and redefining in a way that feels exciting to watch, forcing us to guess which bizarre role, which peculiar film he'll pop up in next."
• And the Oscar Goes to: Robert Pattinson's French Accent [The Cut]
"The Dauphin is a deranged French prince played by Robert Pattinson, antagonist to Timothée Chalamet's stoic Henry V. The two meet days before they're set to engage in a very serious war, and since the film has been a very serious period drama so far, you expect Pattinson to play a very serious monarch. But then he takes a wild turn, and Pattinson as Dauphin the poncy prince emerges. It's a role he described to Vulture last year: "There are all these kind of rugged men, and I'm in this little frilly frock." And mon dieu, does he deliver. Pattinson is always in rare form. You never for a moment believe he is acting — he simply is a vampire; a Hogwarts student; a depraved lighthouse keeper. And while no one can seem to decide if Pattinson's froofy French accent as the Dauphin is good or even accurate, plenty of people seem to agree it makes the movie."
• Why Robert Pattinson — yes, the former vampire — is a promising pick to play Batman [The Washington Post]
"The so-called "Bat-fleck" Era has temporarily lowered some of the expectations for the role — while also increasing the craving for one of Batman's most intriguing facets: revelations of his weirdness. Although Affleck had the bulk and square jaw to physically become the Gotham City superhero, he often resonated as too vanilla to be believably dark. Pattinson, by contrast, has shown he can credibly inhabit shadowy layers of intrigue. [...] the latest entry in the franchise could well reveal Pattinson as a tormented, and thus compelling, Batman. Perhaps nothing has professionally rankled and motivated Pattinson more than waiting for the opportunity to prove that "Twilight" has turned to Dark Knightfall — and that Edward Cullen disappeared over the actor's horizon long ago."
• The King proves that Robert Pattinson has done what Timothée Chalamet has yet to [Polygon]
"What is Timothée Chalamet's transition from young heartthrob to leading man going to look like? Every young star has to go through something of a crucible in order to establish his bona fides as a leading man rather than just a handsome face. Robert Pattinson is the most recent example of someone who's managed to do this successfully, leaving Cedric Diggory and Edward Cullen in the dust by working with some of the strangest auteurs (David Cronenberg, the Safdie brothers) in performances that have been stranger still. [...] That his Henry is not particularly compelling — and that the accent he's affecting can't quite be placed — isn't helped by the fact that he's surrounded with much more colorful characters. Pattinson steals the show despite only showing up for roughly 15 minutes over an hour into the movie, sporting a so-terrible-it's-great wig and a French accent that could be described exactly the same way. His character is mean and a little creepy — he's a perfect antithesis to the dreamy image that Pattinson has previously been known for, helping usher Pattinson from dreamboat territory to an actor who has demonstrated his ability to do anything."



Next Page: 10000

© Googlier LLC, 2019