Next Page: 10000

          

Lakwena says:

 Cache   
Thanks Dr. Ssentongo, especially for the sense of humor about the high probability of a random stone-throw landing on a beggar. In other words, just as the donor communities in the West have hit the donor fatigue and exhaustion button, so have many Ugandans with fundraising for this and that. Moreover, attending some of the functions towards which one has contributed is becoming a bore and nuisance; considering the long-hour waiting, the plastic attitude and showbiz that goes with it. At the end of the function, instead of satisfaction; one departs with a sense of void/emptiness.
          

Ensi eno! says:

 Cache   
Great piece indeed, Ugandans need to style up and stop this begging culture, it takes us no where and other serious countries laugh at us! My annual budget for begging meetings is 200k only and once exhausted, I cant give any more.
          

Timothy Ainebyona says:

 Cache   
I have always loved the humor that comes with your articles Jimmy and most especially the touch of reality that always beautifully tones every experience you capture. I actually thought that I was one of the few that will actually hate this practice up to tomorrow. The poverty and pomp in Uganda goes to extremes. I have however failed to find your earlier article where you have estimated that 'a stone would probably hit a beggar in a crowd'. Would love to have a piece of it as well. Good stuff mate!
          

Akot says:

 Cache   
Well, it seems Uganda is a well governed country that doesn't need change of leader as they have Education for ALL, Subsidised/Mondernised Agriculture, National Healthcare, good roads/housing...! Ugandans are attached to tradition, culture, tribal belonging, yet are tribalistically divided & ruled by Museveni who has no tribal land in the zone, yet owns tax money & doesn't bother Ugandans. Ugandans continue going to polls to legalise, officialise, constitutionalise Museveni & parliament, to reaffirm their satisfaction as to how they are governed! Uganda sounds the most peaceful well governed country in today troubled world in which people are out in UNITY as & when needed to bring change of leaders to ensure they are served.
          

The Global Franchise Market Concludes in Dubai Today

 Cache   
Nov 06, 2019
Picture: 

Dubai - United Arab Emirates, 6 November 2019 --( ASIA TODAY )-- The 4th edition of The Global Franchise Market – TGFM concluded today on a high-note attracting more than 1600 investors and franchisees coming from different parts of the world while also featuring the participation of 80 leading brands, representing a variety of business industries and sectors. The event succeeded in showcasing new franchise concepts and emerging key trends that are rapidly transforming the franchise landscape across many fields and sectors.

Throughout the 2 days, the exhibition floor witnessed a number of successful meetings and lucrative business partnerships and agreements. Golden Fork Seafood Restaurants, a 33-year old Dubai based seafood restaurants chain, signed a master franchise agreement with Uganda based Rawda Holdings Limited. The agreement was signed in the presence of Mohammed Shanavas, Managing Director, Golden Fork Seafood Restaurants LLC and Tarig Mohamed, Chairman of Rawda Holding Ltd, Uganda. Through this agreement, Golden Fork Seafood Restaurants will develop 25 outlets across 5 countries in Central Africa, where the first fine dining outlet is expected to open at Kampala city in Uganda by January, 2020. Golden Fork currently has 20 operating outlets and plans to expand to 20 countries by 2022 targeting 100 outlets.

Besides that, Ruky perfumes, the Dubai based perfume brand, signed a regional franchise development agreement, which involves a 30-outlet expansion across Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Kuwait. The agreement was signed in the presence of Dr. Shanith Mangalat, MD, Ruky Perfumes LLC and Mohammed Salem of Al Salem Group, Al Ain. Ruky Perfumes currently has 20 operating outlets and it aims to expand to 300 outlets across Arab Gulf region by 2025.

On another note, Rolf G. Kirst, Board Member, Franchise Pool International, commented on their participation saying, “On behalf of Franchise Pool International, it gives me great pleasure to attend TGFM, which has truly evolved into a major franchise event in the region. TGFM is a unique platform to meet with the ever-growing list of potential investors and leading franchise brands from the UAE, Middle East and the globe who prefer face-to-face interactions. Over the years, Dubai has grown immensely to become a lucrative competitive market in the franchise landscape and it retained its status as the top destination for franchising in the region. Moreover, Dubai is the best location for us franchise exhibitors, as it is home to those visitors who have the capital to start a real business and the imagination to succeed and expand their business.”

On her part, Romany Ward, Marketing Executive, Coffee Planet, Dubai said, “With a strong and established trading base across our foodservice, retail and C-store platforms in Dubai, it is indeed a great opportunity for us to be a part of a regionally focused franchise event such as TGFM here in Dubai, the homeland of our business and roastery. At TGFM, we met many serious F&B investors looking to partner with us, and we hope to continue growing the success story of our brand in the UAE and wider GCC countries.”

She added, “Dubai is the place where franchisors can make their dreams come alive and it offers both an inspirational and aspirational place to set up a shop. In today’s franchise market, only the very best operational brands setting up the highest retailing standards can survive the demands of the knowledgeable and culturally diverse breadth of customers in this region. We are constantly increasing our efforts to succeed and continue to drive more to share our coffee experience and expertise.”

Commenting on their participation, Umair Tariq, CFO, Kido Schools, said, “This is the first time we participate in TGFM, and it was indeed a great opportunity for us to meet and connect with many potential partners and investors who could help us in expanding the Kido Brand to the lucrative markets in the UAE and other parts of the GCC region. Since its inception in 2014, with its first school in Hong Kong, Kido School has today opened more than 24 schools spanning many cities such as Dubai, London and 4 cities in India. By 2020, we plan to open our first branch in Houston, Texas and another 10 schools across many countries worldwide.”

He added, “The UAE has historically led the wave of growth in the region’s education sector and still represents an attractive market opportunity. Dubai and Abu Dhabi are among the largest and the most popular markets for educational investors. While the franchise industry is rapidly evolving in many countries of the GCC and MENA regions, the UAE remains a preferred destination for franchisors and franchisees, given its easy accessibility, stability of its legal and regulatory systems and its openness to foreign investment.”

The Global Franchise Market (TGFM) is held under the patronage of Dubai Economy and is organized annually by INDEX Conferences and Exhibitions – a member of INDEX Holding. The event witnesses the support of Ministry of Economy – National Program for Small and Medium Enterprises and Projects and the strategic partnership of Franchise Souq and Francorp Middle East as Platinum Sponsor.

- The End -

Category: 
Business Services
Event
Exhibition
FeaturedNews: 
Show in Featured News
TopPicture: 

          

The Book of Mormon – Musical in englischer Originalfassung: Tickets ab 19,90 €

 Cache   
Ein Erfolgsmusical in englischer Originalfassung bekommt ihr in diesem Monat im Musical Dome in Köln zu sehen. The Book of Mormon – Musical in englischer Originalfassung: Tickets ab 19,90 € Musical Dome Köln Termine 07. bis 17. November 2019 Nach restlos ausverkauften Shows in New York, London, Melbourne und Sydney kommt The Book of Mormon, die unverschämte Musical-Komödie von Trey Parker und Matt Stone (South Park) sowie Robert Lopez, erstmals nach Deutschland: vom 06. bis 17. November 2019 wird das Broadway-Erfolgsmusical in englischer Originalversion im Musical Dome Köln zu erleben sein. Das Musical erzählt die Geschichte zweier Mormonen, die in einem fremden Land, weit weg von ihrem Zuhause in Salt Lake City, ihre Mission erfüllen sollen. In diesem Dorf in Uganda herrscht ein brutaler Warlord und die beiden gehen mit viel Optimismus und auch Naivität an ihre Aufgabe, ihre Religion zu verbreiten. Ihr erhaltet die Tickets bei Eventim aktuell für ab 19,90 € pro Person.
          

Veckans nyord: klimatkolonialism

 Cache   
Sverige och andra länder i västvärlden anklagas ibland för klimatkolonialism. Då är det befolkning i andra länder som på något sätt drabbas av klimatfrämjande åtgärder.Klimatkolonialism är belagt i svenskan sedan 2008. Sedan dess har ordet förekommit sporadiskt. Den senaste tiden har debatten – och därmed också användningen av ordet – tagit fart.Dagens Nyheter rapporterade nyligen om hur människor i Uganda fördrivits från sina hem när marken skulle användas till tallplanteringar. David Kureeba vid den ugandiska miljöorganisationen NAPE anklagade Sverige och Energimyndigheten för att ägna sig åt en ny typ av kolonialism:Det här är kol-kolonialism, klimatkolonialism.Skogsplanteringen ingick i ett program för klimatkompensation. Fenomenet diskuterades i Smålandsposten:Beskyllningar om klimatkolonialism är något man vill undvika. Få saker är så brandfarliga som att ta plats på redan utsattas bekostnad och att fly undan sitt klimatansvar, i klimatkolonialismen förenas dessa två storheter till en lättantändlig legering.AndersFoto: Unsplash
          

В Кении самолет совершил экстренную посадку из-за поломки шасси

 Cache   
Пассажирский самолет авиакомпании Silverstone Air совершил экстренную посадку после того, как одно колесо его шасси отпало через несколько минут после взлета в округе Туркана на севере Кении. Об этом передает Daily Monitor Uganda. По информации издания, заднее правое колесо шасси упало на...
          

AFRICAN SINGER-SONGWRITER VINKA & INTERNATIONAL DANCE MUSIC SUPERSTAR INNA RELEASE GLOBAL SMASH HIT ‘BEBE’

 Cache   
INNA & VINKA released their new single, “Bebe”, to a global audience and premiere events across Africa, Europe and the USA. “Bebe” is an instant smash hit, a song composed with French, Swahili, Luganda and […]
          

На западе Уганды перевернулась лодка с 19 пассажирами

 Cache   
По меньшей мере 12 человек могли погибнуть после того, как в понедельник, 4 ноября, лодка, на которой они плыли, перевернулась на озере Альберт в западной части Уганды. Об этом передает Daily Monitor Uganda. Все пропавшие без вести в результате крушения — торговцы из Камине, Сунгарао и Китебере в...
          

Commentaires sur Armel Guerne – Sainte solitude (extrait) par imago270

 Cache   
renoncer ou les pompes de Satan OR minerais richesses à perte de vue c'est à la porte il n'y a qu'à signer pétrole il peut jaillir en Grèce plus encore au Niger au Gabon en Ouganda et d'autres plus de recettes fiscales de routes de centres commerciaux d'automobiles de jeux de luxe d'écrans plus d'accidents plus de pauvreté de drogue plus de barricades de miradors plus de corruption de violences du pôle Nord au pôle Sud animaux fleurs paysages massacrés handicapés femmes enfants exploités sans vergogne la même fable monstrueuse nous écrase et asphyxie la terre pourquoi faire simple quand on peut faire compliqué labyrinthe de montages pour paradis financiers cherchez les coupables ils se refont de belles virginités je renonce à Satan, à ses pompes et à ses oeuvres c'était... une prière de communion solennelle ! On peut ne pas être dévôt... ...mais qui connait ?
          

Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Joannah Nanjekye

 Cache   

This week we welcome Joannah Nanjekye (@Captain_Joannah) as our PyDev of the Week! Joannah is a core developer of the Python programming language. She is also the author of Python 2 and 3 Compatibility. You can find out more about Joannah on here website. Let’s take a few moments to get to know her better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I am Joannah Nanjekye, I live in Canada, Fredericton but I am originally from Uganda in East Africa. I am a CS grad and doing research related to Python in one of the Python IBM labs at UNB. I went to University in Uganda and Kenya where I studied Software Engineering at Makerere University and Aeronautical Engineering at Kenya Aeronautical College respectively. I am also the Author of Python 2 and 3 compatibility, a book published by Apress. I do not have any serious hobbies but I love flying aircraft. Very expensive hobby heh!!

Why did you start using Python?

I started to use Python because I had to in my first programming class in 2009. Like any CS class Python is simple but some professor decided to make the class so hard. After failing a few assignments in the course, I managed to read my first programming book cover to cover which was a Python book– how to think like a computer scientist and managed to pass my final exams. Nevertheless, my real significant use of Python was in 2012 where I worked on a Django project. I continue to use Python because of its simplicity that allows me to focus on solving the problem at hand.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

I have good command and proficiency in Golang, Ruby and C. I would say my favourite would be C because I write more C code in general.

What projects are you working on now?

I full time work on a project related to Python the language itself and may be one of its alternate implementations that I can not go into detail because of some NDA restrictions. I am currently working on aspects related to garbage collection. I also give my time to Cpython and other open source projects.

Which Python libraries are your favorite (core or 3rd party)?

I think currently am very interested and curious in how subinterpreters in Cpython will evolve and solve some current shortcomings we have in the language.

What portion of code do you take care of in Python as a core developer?

I would not say take care of because am not assigned to these areas as an expert. I plan to look more at subinterpreters and garbage collection as far as Cpython is concerned. During the recent core developer sprints, I was able to get some good mileage on the high level subinterpreters module implementation which is PEP 554 with Eric Snow’s guidance. In the same sprint, I talked to Pablo Salgado about GC and what areas of improvement we can look at. I just pray for bandwidth and good health to be able to help.

Do you have any advice for other aspiring core developers?

Cpython needs help from everyone individuals and companies otherwise, we will be building on top of a crumbling infrastructure. The process of becoming a core developer is a very transparent one for Cpython. For anyone interested, join the discussion on different aspects of the project of your interest
and contribute in any way. There are many areas where your skills can benefit Python.

Thanks for doing the interview, Joannah!

The post PyDev of the Week: Joannah Nanjekye appeared first on The Mouse Vs. The Python.


          

Secondary school construction: update 3

 Cache   

You can see how construction is progressing on our secondary school in this 2-minute video. We’re still on target for completing in time for the new school year in Jan/Feb and, as you’ll see, buildings are taking shape nicely.
          

Eesti hakkab e-riikluse lahendusi eksportima

 Cache   
Eesti riik käivitab Globaalse Digiühiskonna Fondi, mille abil soovitakse eksportida Eesti digiühiskonna lahendusi ja luua uusi ärivõimalusi meie IKT-ettevõtjatele. Majandus- ja kommunikatsiooniministeerium ning Ettevõtluse Arendamise Sihtasutus sõlmisid täna leppe, et asutada Globaalne Digiühiskonna Fond. Ühiste kavatsuste leppe allkirjastanud ettevõtlus- ja infotehnoloogiaminister Rene Tammisti sõnul on Globaalne digiühiskonna Fond sündinud viimase paari kuu jooksul toimunud mõttevahetustest Eesti ettevõtjate ja rahvusvaheliste ekspertidega. “Maailmas tuntakse suurt huvi Eesti e-riigi kogemuse vastu, seda on näidanud nii meie riigiasutuste kui ettevõtjate kogemus, kes juba teist aastakümmet Eesti digiühiskonna lahendusi ekspordivad,” sõnas minister. Eestis käib igapäevaselt delegatsioone kogu maailmast, kes soovivad siinset digivalitsemise ja -ühiskonna arendamise kogemust enda riigis rakendada. “Sageli ei järgne sellele huvile aga reaalset koostööd, mille üheks põhjuseks on asjaolu, et huvilised valitsused ei oma selleks piisavat rahastust. Rahvusvaheline fond, kuhu panustavad maailma jõukamad riigid, aitab parandada kehvemal järjel maade elujärge,” selgitas Tammist fondi käivitamise eesmärki. „Eesti riik on küll väike, kuid digiühiskonna mõistes oleme ülejäänud maailmas peajagu ees. See on meie võimalus toetada teiste riikide arengut ning samas tuua uusi kliente meie IT-ettevõtjatele,“ lisas Tammist. President Kersti Kaljulaid ütles oma sõnavõtus, et Eesti digipöörde teinud ühiskond on teistsugune ja seda on märgatud. “Eesti eesmärk on luua vähese bürokraatiaga ja kiirelt kasutusele võetav ning erarahal põhinev fond. See aitaks tagant tõugata riike, kellel on tahtmine, aga ei ole veel teadmist või ka võimalust ja teha nii suuremaks mitte ainult Eesti maine, vaid ka meie majandus. Meil on unikaalne kogemus, mille jagamisel on vaid taevas piirajaks, madalamalt ei ole mõtet mõelda,” lisas riigipea. Net Groupi juhatuse esimees Priit Kongo arvates on fondi loomine tervitatav. “See on minu arvates väga hea algatus. Et eristuda, tuleks uue fondi puhul keskenduda digiühiskonna täislahenduste loomise toetamisele, mis sisaldavad kolme olulist komponenti: seadusloome, protsessimuudatused ja tehnoloogilised lahendused. See on Eestis õpitu, mida saab maailmas jagada ja mis omakorda toetab Eesti IT ettevõtete ekspordi arengut.” Näitena riikidevahelisest koostööst nimetas ettevõtja Uganda riigiga. “Uganda on juba teist aastat edasi lükanud oma andmevahetusprojekti, sest neil puuduvad rahalised vahendid riigisisese tehnoloogilise uuenduse tegemiseks. Maailmapank ja teised rahvusvahelised fondid pakuvad raha tehnoloogia ostmiseks, mitte aga muudatuste elluviimiseks. Muudatuste juhtimine on sama kallis, kui tarkvara ostmine ning neid tuleb teha samaaegselt,” sõnas Net Groupi juhatuse esimees. Digiriigi sihtfond on plaanis käivitada 2020. aastal avaliku ja erasektori koostöös ning selle peakorterit kavandatakse Tallinnasse. Fondiga saaks rahastada nii lühikesi ja kiireloomulisi digiriigi võimekuse tõstmise algatusi, aga ka pikemaid arenguprogramme. Fondi tööd hakkab juhtima EASi e-Eesti esitluskeskus. Rahvusvahelisse sihtfondi saavad panustada nii riikide valitsused kui ettevõtted üle maailma. Eesti riigil tuleks esimese sammuna panustada 350 000 eurot fondi käivitamiseks. Lisaks oleks riigil vaja eraldada 5 miljonit eurot fondi seemneinvesteeringuks. Rahastuse saamise eelduseks on ministri sõnul sihtriigi omafinantseering, mille suurus sõltuvad riigi majanduslikust arengutasemest. Rahastamisotsus tuleks rahvusvahelise kogemusega ekspertpaneelist. Pilte tänaselt ürituselt leiab siit, fotode autor: Mattias Tammet/presidendi kantselei.
EST

          

Head of Carpentry Job in Uganda (80K)

 Cache   

Job Title: Head of Carpentry

Industry: Manufacturing

Location: Uganda

Net Salary: 60K – 80K

Our client is a leading manufacturer of durable furniture products and largest foam mattresses brand in East and Central Africa.

They seek to recruit a head of carpenter who will assist in coming up with designs, assign and explain tasks to the project team, respond to clients’ requests for emergency repairs, and regularly inspect the work done by the project team to ensure that it conforms …

Click on Head of Carpentry Job in Uganda (80K) for more details and info on how to apply.


          

15.000 elever trækker i arbejdstøjet for unge med handicap i Uganda

 Cache   
Onsdag ventes det, at 15.000 elever vil samle op mod fire millioner kroner ind til unge med handicap i Uganda.
          

MTN Eastern Uganda Run 2019

 Cache   
Highlights from the MTN Eastern Uganda run that took place on Sunday 3rd at Independence grounds in Soroti town. Did you participate? Take part in the #MTNMarathon happening on Sunday 24th at Kololo Independence grounds in Kampala. Dial *165*77# to register at 23k only.
          

World: Knowledge for Children in Africa: 2019 Publications Catalogue

 Cache   
Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Foreword

Every year, UNICEF and partners generate a wealth of evidence on the situation of children in Africa. Knowledge and evidence are essential to informing the development, implementation, and monitoring of relevant policies and programmes for the realization of children’s rights. To this end, UNICEF Regional Directors in Africa are pleased to present the 2019 edition of the Knowledge for Children in Africa Publications Catalogue.

The 2019 edition of the catalogue features 107 reports and studies on the situation of children, young people, and women in Africa. These publications represent the collective knowledge generated by UNICEF Country and Regional Offices during the year, and capture the work of UNICEF and partners to support the rights and well-being of children across the continent.
The publications cover a wide range of topics. Publications are listed under the following categories:

  • Child Poverty
  • Child Protection
  • Child-Sensitive Social Protection
  • Education and Early Childhood Development
  • Financing for Development: Public Finance for Children
  • HIV and AIDS
  • Humanitarian Action, Resilience and Peacebuilding
  • Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
  • Nutrition
  • Situation Analysis and Socioeconomic Development
  • Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

Many of the publications are, or will be, available online. The entry for each study or report includes a short description, as well as information on the authors and contributors, planned publication date, and contact details for obtaining additional information.
Evidence plays a critical role in shaping successful initiatives in support of children and women.
We sincerely hope that you will find the publications listed in this catalogue to be a helpful resource for evidence-based decision making and programming.

Ted Chaiban Regional Director UNICEF Middle East and North Africa

Mohamed Malick Fall Regional Director UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa

Marie-Pierre Poirier Regional Director UNICEF West and Central Africa


          

Mali: WHO AFRO Outbreaks and Other Emergencies, Week 44: 28 October - 3 November 2019 Data as reported by: 17:00; 3 November 2019

 Cache   
Source: World Health Organization
Country: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, South Sudan, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia

Overview

This Weekly Bulletin focuses on public health emergencies occurring in the WHO African Region. The WHO Health Emergencies Programme is currently monitoring 68 events in the region. This week’s main articles cover key new and ongoing events, including:

  • Measles in Lesotho

  • Hepatitis E in Namibia

  • Humanitarian crisis in Mali

  • Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo.

For each of these events, a brief description, followed by public health measures implemented and an interpretation of the situation is provided.

A table is provided at the end of the bulletin with information on all new and ongoing public health events currently being monitored in the region, as well as recent events that have largely been controlled and thus closed.

Major issues and challenges include:

  • The hepatitis E outbreak first identified in Namibia in December 2017 continues, despite response efforts made to date to halt ongoing transmission of the virus. The major drivers of the outbreak remain the same, limited access to safe drinking water, inadequate sanitation and poor personal and food safety practices. Novel initiatives are therefore needed to address the outbreak such as finalising the review of the relevance and feasibility of a vaccination intervention. There is also a need to sustain conventional control activities, particularly in the informal settlements, and strengthen surveillance and coordination mechanisms in all the affected areas.

  • The humanitarian situation in Mali remains complex and volatile. The number of IDPs has continued to rise as a result of the deteriorating security context and the impact of floods experienced earlier in the year. As well as supporting the immediate needs of the population, the resilience of the health system to epidemics and public health emergencies needs to be reinforced.
    Furthermore, local and international authorities and partners must continue to advocate for peace in the region in order to relieve the suffering of this vulnerable population.


          

Free State-Potchefstrom Call for Pure SSD Chemical Solution +27672493579 for Cleaning Black Coated Notes in Durban,Gauteng,Limpopo,Free State,Mpumalanga,KwaZulu

 Cache   

Free State-Potchefstrom Call for Pure SSD Chemical Solution +27672493579 for Cleaning Black Coated Notes in Durban,Gauteng,Limpopo,Free State,Mpumalanga,KwaZulu Natal,Eastern Cape,Western Cape,North West,Northern Cape,Pretoria,Johannesburg,Harare,Sasolburg,South Africa,USA,Canada,Malawi,Ghana,United Kingdom,Italy,Morocco,Uganda,Rwanda,Kenya,Norway,Belgium,Switzerland,Zambia,Kenya,Qatar,Afghanistan,Sudan,Peru,Mexico,Morocco,Libya,Iran,Iraq,Zimbabwe,Ghana,Austria,Australia,Italy. we […]

The post Free State-Potchefstrom Call for Pure SSD Chemical Solution +27672493579 for Cleaning Black Coated Notes in Durban,Gauteng,Limpopo,Free State,Mpumalanga,KwaZulu appeared first on Anuncios gratis en Ecuador.


          

Comment on The Uganda Martyrs by Will S.

 Cache   
Perhaps.
          

Comment on The Uganda Martyrs by feeriker

 Cache   
<i>I’m sure that there will be similar martyrs in the post-modern, post-Christian West, one day…</i> "One Day?" Try <i>within the next year or two, if not sooner</i>, given the current pace of degeneracy and collapse.
          

ASARECA in talks with Center for Global Development on Biotechnology Research and Development

 Cache   

By Alis Okonji

ENTEBBE, UGANDA--With the evolution and adoption of biotechnology in many states around the world, countries in Eastern and Central Africa are still contemplating the risks versus the benefits of incorporating biotech for agricultural research and development.


          

Protected: How to tour Africa from the comfort of your Nairobi hotel - Charlotte Beauvoisin (Uganda)

 Cache   
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.The post Protected: How to tour Africa from the comfort of your Nairobi ho...
          

I was thinking of getting myself a Muzungu, he said - Charlotte Beauvoisin (Uganda)

 Cache   
Any colour will do - as long as its white... apparently.The post I was thinking of getting myself a Muzungu, he said app...
          

How to eat like a Rwandan10 snacks (I bet youve never tried) - Charlotte Beauvoisin (Uganda)

 Cache   
As well as the regular biscuits and sodas, the small bus park in Musanze (stop off point for tracking the gorillas in Rwanda) ha...
          

Suzi Analogue’s Photo Diary Shows Why She Has Fallen in Love with Uganda

 Cache   

The Miami-based recording artist Suzi Analogue is in the midst of a world tour and has just unveiled a new video for “LOUDR,” her first foray into electropunk, which stars the professional ...
          

UGANDA : Tilenga: Total hauls its Ugandan partner Atacama over the coals

 Cache   
none
          

UGANDA : If Total doesn't hurry up with pipeline, Museveni will take the train

 Cache   
none
          

From Virunga to Uganda: Keep the Oil in the Ground – Save Murchison Falls!

 Cache   
Time is running out, we are losing our most precious wild places at an unbelievable pace. Last week it was the turn to Lower Zambezi National Park in Zambia, the government has given green light for mining activities to start in this rich ecosystem compromising its diverse fauna and flora. Yesterday it was Virunga National… Read More
          

Porn. Panic. Ban.

 Cache   

Authored by: 

Organization: 

Point of View
AttachmentSize
PDF icon Thematic Datta953.02 KB

#PornBan. It’s like a rash, this impulse to ban porn all over the world – despite protests that are going viral. The Twitter hashtag #pornban sprung up in July 2015 as the Indian government blocked 857 porn sites, 1 and then backtracked a bit, 2 asking internet service providers (ISPs) to unblock those that don’t contain child pornography. Which makes service providers the arbiters of our constitutionally guaranteed right to freedom of expression, deciding what we may or may not see. Seriously?

The United Kingdom recently banned a number of sex acts online, 3 including female ejaculation, even while there were almost 250,000 hits on porn sites from IP addresses in the buildings housing parliament. 4 The UK government is now asking porn sites to collect proof 5 that their visitors are adults. Will this data be stored privately and not used for other purposes? A valid question in an age of mass surveillance, hacks on “cheating” sites 6 and hacker releases of private information, including sexual preferences. 7

Iceland 8 has been threatening to ban “violent” online porn since 2013. Indonesia 9 and Turkey 10 have blocked lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) content in the name of banning porn. The Philippines 11 has outlawed cybersex and cam girls, while a religious lobby in Australia 12 is pushing for anti-piracy laws to be extended to porn. Porn possession is illegal in Botswana, 13 Egypt 14 and Uganda. 15 And even as the Israel-Palestine conflict escalated in 2012, Hamas managed to ban “full” internet porn in the Gaza Strip. 16 Whatever that means.

Porn. Panic. Ban. That’s pretty much the policy response in many parts of the world.

But what is it about porn that terrifies so many governments, derails feminist sensibilities, offends the religious right, and attracts so many users? How can we change the way we “see” porn?

***
Lesbian. Threesome. Squirt. Change the words and you change the lens. From the user’s perspective, porn leads to pleasure, not panic. That’s what porn has always been about, from ancient times, when it found its first mention in the word porneia. 17 This Greek word was varyingly defined as fornication, whoredom, promiscuity and adultery, all of which have two things in common: sex and pleasure. For most users, that’s what porn is really about: sexual pleasure. (Dirty, dirty.) Arousal. (Dirty, dirty.) Orgasm. (Dirty, dirty.) Problem is that in the parental gaze called policy, sex is kinda dirty. (Dirty, dirty.)

Problem is that in this global policy gaze, the sexual pleasure-seeker aka Porn User is always a man. Even though globally a quarter of porn viewers are women. 18 Make that 35% in Brazil and the Philippines, 24% in France, 23% in India and Argentina, and come on, Japanese women, you 17% laggards. 19 A 2015 survey of Pornhub and Redtube, 20 which gets 40 million viewers each month, shows that women like watching women. (And Kim Kardashian, James Deen, pussy-licking and rough sex.) “What immediately jumps out is that ladies prefer to take their time, with their average visits to the site lasting a lavish 10 minutes and 10 seconds, compared to men who go for just 9:22,” notes the cocky analysis. “Treat yourselves, ladies!”

So one gender gap is slowly closing as porn moves indoors from the publicness of peepshows and DVD parlours to the relative privacy of one’s own home. (We should be celebrating, not lamenting this “normalisation” of porn, no?) And don’t forget how notions of privacy shape behaviour here. No Peeping Toms. No looking over one’s shoulder. No idea of what we get off on so long as porn sites don’t start matching individual viewers to their viewing habits. Which means that even though “lesbian”, “threesome” and “squirt” are the top three terms that women searched for on Pornhub and RedTube in 2015, the data is anonymised and secure. (Hopefully.) No one’s going to land up at their doorsteps to blackmail them. (Hopefully.) They’re not going to be branded with the scarlet letter P, the digital equivalent of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s analog adulteress, 21 forced to wear the letter A in the 17th century.

Yes. Porn is becoming a bit of a Scarlet Letter – a private act portrayed as a public menace. Privacy is the right to be let alone, wrote Justices Warren and Brandeis of the United States (US) Supreme Court in their iconic 1890 essay. 22 That too was in a context when new media technologies – “instantaneous photographs”, “newspaper enterprises”, “mechanical devices” – were producing panic. Technological change has, of course, always given rise to panic: even the sewing machine was once thought to create deviant desires in women, as they rhythmically moved their legs up and down to its gentle whirr. And women, of course, have always been subjected to moral panics and moralistic privacy 23 when it comes to sexuality, notes law professor Anita L. Allen. One that is associated with “heightened modesty”, self-concealment, and chastity. (Don’t show yourself. Don’t watch other women. In short, no pornification.) Porn’s genteel cousin, erotica, has also faced similar panics. Remember the ban on D. H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover 24 in the 1960s?

Problem is, in the policy gaze, women are still stuck in the passenger seat when it comes to sex. It imagines the hubby coming home, all pumped up, and asking the missus to go beyond the missionary position. Just like he saw on his iPad mini. (Dirty, dirty.) You see? Man, driver. Woman, passenger. From the first utterance of porneia, men have been seen as the drivers of sex, women its passengers. Never mind that this is rooted in another P – Patriarchy – which insists that women must have no sexual desire, let alone know pleasure-enhancing postures. (Dirty, dirty). Never mind that many women still can’t refuse men sex, or get them to wear condoms. Never mind every inequality between men and women that pops up everywhere, including in the bedroom. If there was greater equality between the genders, fewer women would feign headaches when they don't want to have sex.

That’s gender inequality. That’s what we need to fix. But it’s so much easier to blame porn for patriarchy, no?

***
Multi-million. Dollar. Industry. This is how anti-porn crusaders often refer to porn. It’s a magic bullet, this phrase, guaranteed to derail logic. Guaranteed to make folks see red. As if we’re not doing all sorts of things like buying biscuits and Maggi noodles and data connections from multi-million dollar enterprises.

Of course we’re all proponents of the small, the stand-alone, the artisanal. But. Can porn be damned just because it’s big business? Let’s stop eating Glucose biscuits first. And must we start loving all independent 25 or homemade porn, right from consenting cam girls to non-consensual hidden cam porn in cyber cafés? Nah. Like in other industries, porn production is “ethical”, when there are no unfair or exploitative contractual or labour practices. When performers are not being pushed to perform sex acts beyond the contract or without condoms. But that’s not enough. Porn is legit, first and foremost, if it’s based on consent. And consent cuts all the way down the line: from those who are paid to perform porn to those who freely turn their images into porn for private pleasure. That some of these images end up as non-consensual porn – often called revenge porn – is a problem that policy makers in some countries have finally begun to tackle, notably in the US where revenge porn is a crime in several states. 26

But try asking anti-porn campaigners to use consent as a yardstick. No. In the anti-porn worldview, ALL porn causes harm to ALL women: those who consume it and those who don’t. All porn objectifies and dehumanises women, never mind women who have starred as “personified” subjects! In this camp, there’s only one kind of porn – in which men treat women as instruments to satisfy their sexual desires. In which porn is the villain with a capital P, mutating “healthy” sexual desires and relationships into “unhealthy” ones. 27 It’s never about mutual pleasure or that there are as many kinds of porn as there are sexual desires. Including queer crip porn. 28 It’s rarely about porn performers who don’t see themselves as victims. Or the issues porn performers themselves raise. “My stage name is less about withholding parts of myself or maintaining privacy than it is a symbol of the idea that I am more than just my job or any other isolated slice of my identity,” says US porn performer, Stoya. 29 “Yes, there’s a paradox here in that I willingly engage in work that reduces me to a few sexual facets of myself but expect to be seen as a multifaceted person outside of that work. I participate in an illusion of easy physical access…”

If objectification is the charge that some feminists typically hurl at porn, addiction is its moralist cousin. In the digital porn discourse, access is often vilified as “addiction” with untold consequences. Portrayed as a drug. A petitioner to India's parliament argues that online porn must be banned before we turn into the equivalent of “Motherless or Fatherless America”. 30 This trend is “related to those ‘orphaned’ children, whose father or mother, though alive, are addicted to cyberpornography and don’t take any care of their children or the family,” the petitioner argues. Another #pornban petitioner in India's Supreme Court raises this bombast to untold heights. 31 “Nothing can more efficiently destroy a person, fizzle their mind, evaporate their future, eliminate their potential or destroy society like pornography,” he argues. “It is so terrible that many do not even recognize it until it is too late, and most refuse to admit it. It is worse than Hitler, worse than AIDS, cancer or any other epidemic. It is more catastrophic than nuclear holocaust, and it must be stopped.”

This #pornban petition goes on to hold online pornography accountable for increasing violence against women, an emotive charge (like “multi-million dollar industry”) that unites moralists and many feminists. Does porn cause rape? Or, as feminist Robin Morgan famously argued in the 1970s, is “porn the theory, rape the practice”? 32 No. Even those who campaign against porn warily agree there’s no evidence to back this charge. 33 In the 1990s, one research study looked at four countries where porn was freely available in the previous two decades, including “aggressive porn”. 34 In all four countries, the availability of pictorial porn – including violent porn – had gone from “extreme scarcity to relative abundance” in the study period. It noted that other studies have shown that “rapists' and nonrapists' immediate sexual reactions to presentations of pornography showed generally greater arousal to non-violent scenes.” It concluded that in none of the countries did “rape increase more than nonsexual violent crimes. This finding in itself would seem sufficient to discard the hypothesis that pornography causes rape.” 35

Disregarding such evidence, anti-porn feminists continue to insist that porn is an act of sexual violence, that porn is not “words” and “images”, that porn is not speech to be protected. 36 Not media. This positioning is, of course, part of the problem, since it exceptionalises porn, locating it in a category by itself, unlike other speech or media. But seriously, what is porn – composed of words, sounds and images, albeit of naked bodies – if not media? Innumerable studies indicate that there is no causal relationship between media representations and realities, that spectators hold diverse and different positions to what they view. 37 Do we hold on-screen rape depictions in feature films responsible for causing actual rapes? No. Do we hold on-screen depictions of murder responsible for causing actual murders? No. Then why hold on-screen porn responsible for real-life rape and sexual assault? Why blame the representation for the reality in this one case alone? What’s so unique about porn – another media representation – that it must be singled out thus? Are naked bodies inherently harmful? Or what?

***
In a 2009 TED talk that went viral, Cindy Gallop, a 50-something fan of hardcore porn, described how she sees online porn. 38 “I have sex with younger men…” in their 20s, she says, “and encounter directly the effect of a flood of hardcore porn.” One of these effects is the misbelief that women love men coming on their faces, a porn staple. “There’s an entire generation growing up that believes that what you see in hardcore pornography is the way that you have sex,” says Gallop. “Hardcore porn has become sex education.” But why has hardcore porn become sex education? One, because it’s easily available. Two, because there’s no other sex education. Three, because we’re so puritanical about sex, we won’t talk about it to our kids. Ergo, vacuum. Enter, online porn. As a “mature experienced self-confident older woman,” Gallop is adept at telling her 20-something lovers: “No, thank you very much. I’d rather you did not come on my face.”

As a user, how would Gallop change porn? “Reorient, reeducate, rehabilitate” is her motto. In other words, resocialise minds, reshape headspaces, rewire neutrons away from the dungheap of patriarchy. Towards a more equitable gender-friendly porn. Sounds like sex-positive feminism to me. Her site 39 busts a bunch of porn myths including balloon boobs, while understanding that porn is play, a pleasure-enhancer, like sex toys. A form of sexual expression. In another TED talk that went viral, erotic filmmaker Erika Lust talks about how it’s time for porn to change. 40 Change. Not vanish. How it’s time to fight unethical porn with ethical porn, counter-porn, porn that makes women and transpersons 41 the subjects of their sexual journeys, pleasures and destinations.

That’s right. Change porn, not ban it. Think about it. Seriously. Think how we try to change other media representations – through critique, debate, dialogue and alternative representations. Not through bans, right? If policy makers understood porn as sexual expression, why would they want to ban it?

***
So what should we really think about when we think about porn? Consent. We need to respect the consent of those who enact porn – if it’s given, even to enacting “rape porn”, dare we cavil? And we need to start getting justice for those who never dreamed they’d end up as digital porn – without their consent. Any image that turns into porn without consent can cause actual harm, not the imaginary variety – harm that wrecks lives, jobs, careers, relationships, self-image and identities. Harm that causes real damage, both on and offline. Harm that is harmful enough to be called out and punished as a crime. When actual rapes turn into digital porn, spreading from phone to phone, as is the case in Pakistan and India, that’s harm. And that’s three counts of consent being violated: one, in forcing sex without consent; two, in filming forced sex without consent; three, in circulating this clip without consent. When physical rape turns into digital porn we know one thing for sure: it’s time to start talking consent. It’s time to start talking harm.

If we really want to “do something” about porn, it’s time we stopped talking about its imagined harms. It’s time we started talking about actual harms. It’s time we started talking along the fault lines of consent.

References

1 Government of India, Ministry of Communication & IT, Department of Telecommunications. (2015). DOT Order Blocking 857 Websites on Grounds of Decency and Morality. cis-india.org/internet-governance/resources/dot-morality-block-order-2015-07-31/view

2 Reuters. (2015, 5 August). India withdraws order to block pornography sites. Reuters. in.reuters.com/article/2015/08/05/india-porn-ban-idINKCN0QA0KK20150805

3 Saul, H. (2015, 13 September). UK porn legislation: What is now banned under new government laws. The Independent. www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/uk-porn-legislation-what-is-now-banned-under-new-government-laws-9898541.html

4 Withnall, A. (2015, 27 July). Porn in Parliament: Palace of Westminster computers made 250,000 attempts to 'access pornography last year. The Independent. www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/parliament-computers-made-250000-attempts-to-access-pornography-at-palace-of-westminster-10418449.html

5 Doctorow, C. (2015, 3 August). David Cameron will publish the financial details and viewing habits of all UK porn watchers. BoingBoing. boingboing.net/2015/08/03/david-cameron-will-publish-the.html

6 Elgot, J, Hern, A, & Weaver, M. (2015, 21 July). Ashley Madison adultery site hack: Will I be found out? The Guardian. www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jul/21/ashley-madison-adultery-site-hack-will-i-be-found-out-what-you-need-to-know

7 Fox-Brewster, T. (2015, 19 August). Location, Sexual Preference, Weight: Embarrassing Ashley Madison customer date published by hackers. Forbes. www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2015/08/19/ashley-madison-breach-is-awful

8 The Economist. (2013, 23 April). Why does liberal Iceland want to ban pornography? The Economist. www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2013/04/economist-explains-why-iceland-ban-pornography

9 Institut Pelangi Perempuan. (2014). Queering Internet Governance in Indonesia. erotics.apc.org/research/queering-internet-governance-indonesia

10 Tremblay, P. (2015, 27 April). 'Unnatural' porn becomes ticket to jail in Turkey. US News & World Report. www.usnews.com/news/articles/2015/04/27/unnatural-porn-becomes-ticket-to-jail-in-turkey

11 BBC News. (2012, 20 September). BBC outlaws cybersex and 'cam girls'. BBC News. www.bbc.com/news/technology-19659801

12 Turner, A. (2015, 24 June). Porn will be next on Australia's website blocking agenda. Sydney Morning Herald. www.smh.com.au/digital-life/computers/gadgets-on-the-go/porn-will-be-next-on-australias-websiteblocking-agenda-20150624-ghw60w.html

13 APA. (2015, 13 March). Botswana: Three arrested for cyber porn material. Star Africa. en.starafrica.com/news/botswana-three-arrested-for-cyber-porn-material.html

14 RT. (2015, 20 May). Egypt's top court bans porn sites, demands enforcement. RT Question More Live. www.rt.com/news/260609-egypt-ban-porn-websites

15 Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa. (2015). Anti-pornography Act: Human rights activists and civil society organisations challenge the legality of the act in Constitutional Court, Uganda www.sihanet.org/news/anti-pornography-act-human-rights-activists-and-civil-society-organisations-challenge-legality

16 Daily Mail. (2012, 3 September). Hamas bans internet porn in Gaza Strip as Islamic hardliners crack down on Palestinian freedoms. www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2197876/Hamas-bans-internet-porn-Gaza-Strip-Islamic-hardliners-crackdown-Palestinian-freedoms.html

17 Biblehub. biblehub.com/greek/4202.htm

18 IANS. (2015, 1 August). Boys ain't having all the fun: Indian women watch more porn now. Hindustan Times. www.hindustantimes.com/sexandrelationships/boys-ain-t-having-all-the-fun-indian-women-watch-more-porn-now/article1-1375150.aspx

19 Pornhub Insights. (2015, 25 July). More of what women want. www.pornhub.com/insights/women-gender-demographics-searches

20 Ibid.

21 McCrum, R. (2014, 6 January). The 100 Best Novels: No 16 – The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne. The Guardian. www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jan/06/scarlet-letter-nathaniel-hawthorne-100-best-novels

22 Warren, S. D., & Brandeis, L. D. (1890). The Right to Privacy. Harvard Law Review, 4(5), 193-220. www.jstor.org/stable/1321160

23 Allen, A. L. (2000). Gender and Privacy in Cyberspace. Faculty Scholarship, Paper 789. scholarship.law.upenn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1788&context=faculty_scholarship

24 Robertson, G. (2010, 22 October). The trial of Lady Chatterley's Lover. The Guardian. www.theguardian.com/books/2010/oct/22/dh-lawrence-lady-chatterley-trial

25 Morris, C. (2014, 17 January). The economics of being an independent porn star. CNBC. www.cnbc.com/2014/01/17/the-economics-of-being-an-independent-porn-star.html

26 End Revenge Porn. www.endrevengeporn.org/revenge-porn-laws

27 Massey, A. (2015, 3 April). Porn is not coming for our sex lives. Pacific Standard. www.psmag.com/books-and-culture/its-all-ok-you-can-watch-some-porn-right-after-you-read-this-article

28 Loree Erickson, Porn Star Academic. femmegimp.org

29 Stoya. (2014, 8 March). Can we learn about privacy from porn stars? New York Times. www.nytimes.com/2014/03/09/opinion/sunday/can-we-learn-about-privacy-from-porn-stars.html?hpw&_r=0

30 Prabhudesai, A. (12 June 2013). Petition to ban pornography by amending IT Act filed in Parliament. Trak.in. trak.in/random/ban-pornography-petition-1203

31 Singh, M. (2015, 10 July). Kamlesh Vaswani v. Union of India & Ors. One Law Street. onelawstreet.com/2015/07/pornography-ban-kamlesh-vaswani

32 Morgan, R. (1977). Going Too Far: The Personal Chronicle of a Feminist. New York: Random House.

33 Jensen, R., with Okrina, D. (2004). Pornography and Sexual Violence. National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women. www.vawnet.org/sexual-violence/print-document.php?doc_id=418&find_type=web_desc_AR

34 Kutchinsky, B. (1991.) Pornography and rape: theory and practice? Evidence from crime data in four countries where pornography is easily available. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 14(1-2), 47-64. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2032762

35 Ibid.

36 MacKinnon, C, & Dworkin, R. (1994, 3 March). Pornography: An Exchange. New York Review of Books. www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/1994/mar/03/pornography-an-exchange

37 Tait, S. (2008). Pornographies of Violence? Internet Spectatorship on Body Horror. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 25(1), 91-111. www.researchgate.net/publication/232838902_Pornographies_of_Violence_Internet_Spectatorship_on_Body_Horror

38 Gallop, C. (2009, 2 December). Make love, not porn. TEDTalk. www.youtube.com/watch?v=FV8n_E_6Tpc

39 Porn world vs Real world. makelovenotporn.com/myths/facial

40 Lust, E. (2014, 1 November). It's time for porn to change. TEDx Vienna. erikalust.com/ted-talk

41 Nadika, N. (2015, 1 April). Supporting ethical queer porn. The Orinam Blog. orinam.net/supporting-ethical-queer-porn

42 BBC News. (2015, 26 February). How a rape was filmed and shared in Pakistan. BBC News. www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-31313551

43 Nelson, D. (2015, 13 April). Indian campaigner inundated by gang rape videos. The Telegraph. www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/india/11533852/Indian-campaigner-inundated-by-gang-rape-videos.html

44 Datta, B. (2015, 29 May). Porn. Panic. Ban. GenderIT. www.genderit.org/feminist-talk/porn-panic-ban

Themes: 


          

New transmission model for Ebola predicted Uganda cases

 Cache   
A new risk assessment model for the transmission of Ebola accurately predicted its spread into the Republic of Uganda, according to the researchers who developed it.
          

Több civilt megöltek Kongó keleti részén

 Cache   
Vélhetően ugandai fegyveresek voltak az elkövetők.
          

Odgovorio/la: Pozivni brojevi drzava

 Cache   
+1 Kanada
+1 Sjedinjene Američke Države
+1 (242) Bahami
+1 (246) Barbados
+1 (264) Angvila
+1 (268) Antigva i Barbuda
+1 (284) Britanska Devičanska Ostrva
+1 (340) Američka Devičanska Ostrva
+1 (345) Kajmanska Ostrva
+1 (441) Bermudi
+1 (473) Grenada/Carricou
+1 (649) Turks i Caicos Ostrva
+1 (664) Montserrat
+1 (670) Severna Marijanska ostrva
+1 (671) Guam
+1 (758) Sveta Lucija
+1 (767) Dominika
+1 (784) Sveti Vincent i Grenadini
+1 (787) Portoriko
+1 (809) Dominikanska Republika
+1 (868) Trinidad i Tobago
+1 (869) Sveti Kristofor i Nevis
+1 (876) Jamajka
+1 (939) Portoriko

 

+20 Egipat
+212 Maroko
+213 Alžir
+216 Tunis
+218 Libija
+220 Gambija
+221 Senegal
Južni Sudan
+222 Mauritanija
+223 Mali
+224 Gvineja
+225 Obala Slonovače
+226 Burkina Faso
+227 Niger
+228 Togo
+229 Benin
+230 Mauricius
+231 Liberija
+232 Sijera Leone
+233 Gana
+234 Nigerija
+235 Čad
+236 Srednjoafrička Republika
+237 Kamerun
+238 Zelenortska Republika
+239 Sveti Toma i Princip
+240 Ekvatorska Gvineja
+241 Gabon
+242 Republika Kongo
+243 Demokratska Republika Kongo
+244 Angola
+245 Gvineja Bisau
+246 Diego Garcia
+247 Ascension
+248 Sejšeli
+249 Sudan
+250 Ruanda
+251 Etiopija
+252 Somalija
+253 Džibuti
+254 Kenija
+255 Tanzanija
+256 Uganda
+257 Burundi
+258 Mozambik
+260 Zambija
+261 Madagaskar
+262 Reunion
+263 Zimbabve
+264 Namibija
+265 Malavi
+266 Lesoto
+267 Bocvana
+268 Svazi
+269 Komori i Mayotte
+27 Južna Afrika
+290 Sveta Helena
+291 Eritreja
+297 Aruba
+298 Farska Ostrva
+299 Grenland

+30 Grčka
+31 Holandija
+32 Belgija
+33 Francuska
+34 Španija
+350 Gibraltar
+351 Portugal
+352 Luksemburg
+353 Irska
+354 Island
+355 Albanija
+356 Malta
+357 Kipar
+358 Finska
+359 Bugarska
+36 Mađarska
+370 Litvanija
+371 Letonija
+372 Estonija
+373 Moldavija
+374 Jermenija
+375 Belorusija
+376 Andora
+377 Monako
+378 San Marino
+379 Vatikan
+380 Ukrajina
+381 Srbija
+382 Crna Gora
+385 Hrvatska
+386 Slovenija
+387 Bosna i Hercegovina
+389 Makedonija
+39 Italija

+40 Rumunija
+41 Švajcarska
+420 Češka
+421 Slovačka
+423 Lihtenštajn
+43 Austrija
+44 Velika Britanija
+45 Danska
+46 Švedska
+47 Norveška
+48 Poljska
+49 Nemačka

+500 Folklandska Ostrva
+501 Belize
+502 Gvatemala
+503 Salvador
+504 Honduras
+505 Nikaragva
+506 Kostarika
+507 Panama
+508 Sveti Petar i Mikelon
+509 Haiti
+51 Peru
+52 Meksiko
+53 Kuba
+54 Argentina
+55 Brazil
+56 Čile
+57 Kolumbija
+58 Venecuela
+590 Francuski Antili
+591 Bolivija
+592 Gvajana
+593 Ekvador
+594 Francuska Gvajana
+595 Paragvaj
+596 Martinik
+597 Surinam
+598 Urugvaj
+599 Holandski Antili

+60 Malezija
+61 Australija
+62 Indonezija
+63 Filipini
+64 Novi Zeland
+65 Singapur
+66 Tajland
+670 Istočni Timor
+673 Brunej
+674 Nauru
+675 Papua Nova Gvineja
+676 Tonga
+677 Solomonska Ostrva
+678 Vanuatu
+679 Fidži
+680 Palau
+681 Wallis i Futuna
+682 Kukova Ostrva
+683 Niue
+684 Američka Samoa
+685 Samoa
+686 Kiribati
+687 Nova Kaledonija
+688 Tuvalu
+689 Francuska Polinezija
+690 Tokelau
+691 Mikronezija
+692 Maršalova Ostrva

+7 Kazahstan
+7 Rusija

+800 Međunarodni besplatni telefon
+808 Usluge s podeljenim troškovima
+81 Japan
+82 Južna Koreja
+84 Vijetnam
+850 Severna Koreja
+852 Hong Kong
+853 Makao
+855 Kambodža
+856 Laos
+86 Kina
+870 Usluga Inmarsat "SNAC"
+871 Inmarsat (istočni Atlantik)
+872 Inmarsat (Tihi okean)
+873 Inmarsat (Indijski okean)
+874 Inmarsat (zapadni Atlantik)
+878 Univerzalne službene telekomunikacije
+880 Bangladeš
+881 Globalni mobilni satelitski sistem
+886 Tajvan

+90 Turska
+91 Indija
+92 Pakistan
+93 Avganistan
+94 Šri Lanka
+95 Burma (Mianmar)
+960 Maldivi
+961 Liban
+962 Jordan
+963 Sirija
+964 Irak
+965 Kuvajt
+966 Saudijska Arabija
+967 Jemen
+968 Oman
+970 Palestina
+971 Ujedinjeni Arapski Emirati
+972 Izrael
+973 Bahrein
+974 Katar
+975 Butan
+976 Mongolija
+977 Nepal
+979 Međunarodne usluge s dodanom vrednošću
+98 Iran
+991 ITPCS
+992 Tadžikistan
+993 Turkmenistan
+994 Azerbejdžan
+995 Gruzija
+996 Kirgistan
+998 Uzbekistan
          

Uganda eyes new Lake Albert FID date after offering 'solution'

 Cache   
Minister Irene Muloni puts ball back in Total, Tullow and CNOOC's court over stalled oilfield scheme
          

How Bridge uses technology to support low-income countries

 Cache   
How Bridge uses technology to support low-income countries
The global shortage of learning is truly shocking. Today, most children in the world are not reaching even basic levels…

Former British Prime Minister and now chair of the global Education Commission, Gordon Brown, has called the learning crisis the ‘civil rights struggle of our time’. World leaders are rightly calling on every sector to join the fight — to use all the tools and resources at our disposal to tackle this effectively. To win this struggle would prevent another generation from being deprived of basic abilities and reduce many drivers of instability and conflict.

Globally there is a shortage of about 69 million teachers and the teachers who are working in low or middle income countries are frequently under supported. Often they teach in rural, remote areas; many of the classrooms have poor learning materials and many teachers feel abandoned and can struggle to understand for themselves the content that they are teaching.

These are all very significant challenges, but not insurmountable. There is a global effort underway to tackle this, centred around UN Sustainable Development Goal 4 for 2030. On current trajectories the SDG4 target will be missed, but progress will be made towards it.

A social enterprise called Bridge International Academies, or Bridge, is focused on helping to achieve this UN goal of quality education for all in Africa and Asia. We serve communities living in extreme poverty and have helped to educate three quarters of a million children over the last ten years at nursery and primary level. Bridge is significantly improving learning outcomes by putting teaching best practice straight into the hands of local teachers around the world, using technology and in-person teacher training and coaching. The vast majority of the work Bridge does is with government teachers in government schools, and some of the work is in our own community schools and nurseries.

A Bridge teacher in class at Bridge International Academies.

After government teachers have been through an intensive up-skilling and training scheme, they are ready to use hand-held tablets that give them access to very high quality lesson guides based on their local curriculum. They are trained to use best practice teaching techniques. In addition, we support them with regular in-person coaching inside the classroom every one or two weeks. In this way, both technology and continuous professional development help these teachers to deliver more child-centred lessons that result in higher learning outcomes for children.

Our approach is to treat learning as a science as we implement best practice across all the schools we run or support. We are focused on how children learn, tweaking, adapting and iterating lessons and teacher training in the light of data and evidence, to make sure children learn as much as possible.

A government school classroom in Nigeria supported by Bridge training and technology.

By collecting information at scale on what lessons work best, and how children learn, local academics in-country work to improve lessons for all children. The approach means that not only can a few schools be served in a few areas but that tens of thousands of schools and millions of children can benefit anywhere in the world.

The use of technology to deliver quality education is bearing fruit in children’s lives. The results have been very encouraging. Kenyan pupils who sat their primary school leavers’ exam have surpassed their peers in other schools for the four consecutive years. In Uganda children have outperformed the national average in the two consecutive years they have sat the national exam. Children’s learning gains in Liberia, where we support government schools, showed pupils learning at twice the speed of their immediate peers. In Nigeria, a DFID report showed equity of high attainment at Bridge schools for children from all types of socio-economic backgrounds. Children in Bridge supported government schools are learning far more than previously. In India we are running community schools in the southeast region in partnership with the local government.

Social enterprises doing this sort of work is an idea supported by the majority of the UK public, and it’s also now part of the official UK Aid strategy for education. From the poorest regions of India to the low-income communities of Nairobi and even areas affected by the terrorist group al-Shabaab, well-supported teachers are thriving and making an impact.

{youtube}xpUq7Wv8avY{/youtube}


          

More than just musical plays : intersections of politics and folklore in Byron Kawadwa's theatre

 Cache   

A lot has been written about Byron Kawadwa's work and its contribution towards developing and Ugandanising the Kampala theatre scene and bringing into it a critical element - Kawadwa was a playwright, actor and director, and Director of the National Cultural Centre, whose play, , represented Uganda at the Festival of African culture (FESTAC 1977) in Nigeria. This paper attempts to explain why since independence, Byron Kawadwa is the most significant playwright in Ugandan theatre, and what makes his contribution distinct as both a playwright and director.


          

Zinaalirawa by Sam Kasule Venue : The National Theatre, Kampala, dir.Kaya Kagimu Date : 4th December 2009 : performance review

 Cache   

Going back through the history of the Baganda, land was and continues to be a man's greatest and most valuable possession because without land, the people cannot survive. It was therefore apt that this serious yet entertaining play by Dr. Sam Kasule was chosen as part of the celebration to mark fifty years of the Uganda National Cultural Centre and the National Theatre in Kampala.


          

Quality Photography Isn’t Just for Big Budget Campaigns

 Cache   
High-quality images are key to most marketing and communications campaigns, but it can be expensive to hire photographers. How can a small organization with limited resources produce quality images? This was a question I had to answer at a very small nonprofit in rural Uganda where the annual operating budget for my department was about $10,000.00.
          

Uganda Denies Plan To Reintroduce 'Kill The Gays' Bill

 Cache   
Uganda's government has denied there is a plan to reintroduce the death penalty for gay sex

          

Kilimall Warehouse Casuals Jobs in Nairobi, Kenya

 Cache   

Job Vacancy: Warehouse Casuals

Location: Nairobi

Starting date: Immediately

Who are we?

Kilimall is Kenya’s largest online shopping mall. It was launched in July 2014 with the mission of becoming No.1 E-commerce platform in Africa, and has sites strategically distributed in the three countries namely: Kenya, Uganda and Nigeria.

Kilimall serves a retail-customer base that continues to grow exponentially, offering products that span various categories designed to ensure optimum levels of convenience and customer satisfaction with the retail process; order …

Click on Kilimall Warehouse Casuals Jobs in Nairobi, Kenya for more details and info on how to apply.


          

Marketing Officer (Recruitment, Training and Conferencing Services) Job in Kenya

 Cache   

Job Vacancy: Marketing Officer – Recruitment, Training and Conferencing Services

Background Information: Career Options Africa is a HR Consultancy firm offering Recruitment, HR outsourcing and Immigration Support Services in the East African Region (Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Rwanda).

We seek to fill the above position with a suitably qualified and competent person at the earliest time possible.

Main Tasks and Responsibilities

  • Developing marketing strategies for open and in-house training programs, and conferences
  • Coming up with innovative campaigns to grow awareness

Click on Marketing Officer (Recruitment, Training and Conferencing Services) Job in Kenya for more details and info on how to apply.


          

Nordfynske gymnasielever knokler: Flere end nogensinde arbejder for handicappede

 Cache   
Årets Operation Dagsværk støtter unge med et handicap i Uganda. På Nordfyns Gymnasium har det fået flere end nogensinde til at hoppe i arbejdstøjet på dagen.
          

Presidente y líder de la oposición de Sudán del Sur se reúnen en Uganda

 Cache   

Kampala, 7 nov (EFE).- El presidente de Sudán del Sur, Salva Kiir, y el principal líder de la oposición, Riek Machar, llegaron este miércoles a Uganda, para reunirse por tercera vez desde la firma del acuerdo de paz en agosto de 2018 para intentar salvar ese pacto y tratar de formar un Gobierno de unidad nacional.

Kiir y Machar se encuentran reunidos en el palacio presidencial de Entebbe, junto al presidente ugandés, Yoweri Museveni. según informó el secretario de Prensa del jefe de Estado ugandés, Don Wanyama.

Machar aterrizó en el Aeropuerto Internacional de Entebbe, próximo a Kampala, acompañado del presidente del Consejo Soberano de Sudán, Abdelfatah al Burhan, que también presenciará la reunión.

Se trata de un encuentro bajo presión, ya que las dos partes tienen hasta el 12 de noviembre para intentar formar un gobierno de unidad nacional.

El pasado septiembre, Kiir acordó con Machar crear ese gabinete de unidad transitorio, que se mantendrá en el poder 36 meses.

El gabinete de pensamiento Crisis Group advirtió de que Sudán del Sur podría 'deslizarse' de nuevo hacia la guerra si el Gobierno no es formado o lo es con la ausencia de Machar, que lideró la rebelión armada contra Kiir hasta el alto el fuego de 2018, que sigue en vigor a día de hoy, siendo el más duradero.

Altos funcionarios del Gobierno de Estados Unidos dijeron el mes pasado que no aceptarían más demoras y que podrían imponer sanciones si no se cumplen los plazos para la formación de este Gobierno, y una delegación del Consejo de Seguridad de la ONU, que visitó el país a finales de octubre, pidió que se resuelvan 'los asuntos pendientes'.

Se trata de la tercera vez que los dos rivales se vean cara a cara, después de la firma, el 12 de septiembre de 2018, de un acuerdo que acabó con cinco años de guerra y estableció la formación de un Gobierno transitorio con Kiir al frente y Machar como vicepresidente primero para mayo de 2019, que luego se pospuso para el 12 de noviembre.

La Autoridad Intergubernamental para el Desarrollo en el Este de África (IGAD), que actúa de mediador en el conflicto desde su estallido en 2013, también ha invitado mañana a las dos partes a seguir con la negociación en Adís Abeba (Etiopía).

El conflicto en Sudán del Sur se desató en diciembre de 2013, dos años después de la independencia del país de Sudán, cuando Kiir acusó a su entonces vicepresidente Machar de orquestar un golpe de Estado. EFE


          

Al menos 10 civiles mueren en un ataque de rebeldes ugandeses en RD del Congo

 Cache   

Kinshasa, 6 nov (EFE).- Al menos diez civiles murieron en la madrugada de este miércoles en un ataque de presuntos rebeldes ugandeses de la milicia islamista Fuerzas Democráticas Aliadas (ADF) en el noreste de la República Democrática del Congo (RDC), informaron a Efe fuentes del Ejército congoleño.

El ataque ocurrió en la localidad de Kokola, ubicada a pocos kilómetros de la ciudad de Beni, en la provincia de Kivu del Norte, dijo por teléfono el portavoz de las Fuerzas Armadas de la República Democrática del Congo (FARDC), comandante Mak Hazukai.

'Hubo una incursión de rebeldes ugandeses de las ADF en Kokola. Yo voy para allá. Estoy de camino, pero nuestras fuerzas ya están allí', manifestó Hazukai, quien lamentó que el Ejército fuera informado tarde de la tragedia, si bien ya persigue a los atacantes.

El activista de la sociedad civil de Beni Kizito Hango también confirmó a Efe este ataque.

'Ya estábamos pensando en la pacificación de nuestro territorio y ciudad, pero ahora estos individuos nos han vuelto a matar. La ciudad de Beni no se despertó bien. Por el momento, nada funciona. Todo está paralizado', declaró Hango por teléfono.

'La localidad de Kokola se ha vaciado de habitantes, que huyen hacia las localidades circundantes', añadió el activista.

Las ADF empezaron su campaña violenta en 1996 en el oeste de Uganda, como contestación política al régimen del presidente ugandés, Yoweri Museveni, pero la presión militar forzó su repliegue a la frontera con la RDC, desde donde efectúan incursiones en Kivu del Norte, sobre todo para saqueos y lograr aprovisionamientos.

Su agenda no es muy conocida, más allá de una posible conexión con la organización yihadista Estado Islámico (EI) y un repetido 'modus operandi', ocultándose y escapando a las operaciones militares gracias a una geografía montañosa.

Un informe publicado a finales de 2018 por el Grupo de Investigación sobre el Congo (CRG), un proyecto de investigación independiente con sede en la Universidad de Nueva York, reveló que las ADF habían conseguido el pasado noviembre financiación del EI.

De hecho, el EI se ha atribuido ya varios ataques letales en esta zona de la RDC que estaban, en un principio, atribuidos al ADF, grupo que no suele reivindicar sus acciones.

A principios de este milenio, los ejércitos ugandés y congoleño casi lograron acabar con esta insurgencia, pero los rebeldes no desaparecieron por completo, se reorganizaron y empezaron a radicalizarse, llegando a ser el grupo más letal de Kivu del Norte en 2018.

En lo que va de año, solo en esta provincia del noreste congoleño se han producido más de 300 ataques, en los que han muerto más de 700 personas (una treintena vinculadas a las ADF), según la herramienta de seguimiento Kivu Security Tracker, gestionada por el CRG.

El noreste de RDC lleva años sumido en un largo conflicto alimentado por las milicias rebeldes y los ataques de soldados del Ejército regular, todo ello bajo la supervisión de la Misión de Paz de la ONU en el país (Monusco). EFE


          

The African Fintech’s Final Destination. What to expect.

 Cache   
  keynote speech delivered by Ndubuisi Ekekwe today in the ongoing Africa Fintech Festival in Kampala, Uganda. Quite informative…
          

Africa discusses legal system vs culture

 Cache   

Kampala, Uganda – As Africa battles with the problem of child marriages, the President of Uganda Yoweri Museveni, has challenged the continent to change its judicial systems such that they address cultural norms because the two seem to be clashing thereby making it difficult for people to understand when they break the law when practising …

The post Africa discusses legal system vs culture appeared first on The Reporter Lesotho | News You Can Use.


          

E-Learning für Krankenschwestern und Hebammen in Uganda | Cordaid

 Cache   

Gesundheitswesen in Uganda ist immer noch nicht dies, welches es sein sollte. Um die Qualität welcher Beschäftigten im Gesundheitswesen zu verbessern, werden in diesem Projekt insbesondere Hebammen und Krankenschwestern Ausbildungseinrichtungen möbliert. Die Studierenden lernen Theorie und Realität durch E-Learning. — Funktionieren in und an Fragilität Cordaid ist eine globale Entwicklungsorganisation, deren Mission es ist, florierende, […]

Der Beitrag E-Learning für Krankenschwestern und Hebammen in Uganda | Cordaid erschien zuerst auf SecurityAusbildung24.de - Das Original.


          

Kiir, Machar arrive in Entebbe for tripartite talks

 Cache   
South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir and opposition leader Riek Machar have arrived on separate flights this morning in Entebbe, Uganda.
          

Soudan du Sud: rencontre Kiir-Machar en Ouganda en vue de la formation d’un gouvernement

 Cache   

Le président sud-soudanais Salva Kiir et le chef rebelle Riek Machar doivent se rencontrer jeudi en Ouganda pour discuter de questions cruciales, notamment sécuritaires, en vue de la formation d'un gouvernement d'union prévue dans quelques jours à peine.

La formation de ce gouvernement de transition était initialement prévue en mai, mais avait été repoussée au 12 novembre en raison de désaccords sur des questions cruciales qui n'ont à ce jour toujours pas été résolues, comme la formation d'une armée unifiée et les frontières des Etats régionaux au sein du Soudan du Sud.

Les observateurs craignent que ne pas résoudre ces questions pourrait déboucher sur une reprise des combats à grande échelle dans ce pays en proie à une guerre civile depuis 2013.

M. Machar est arrivé en fin de matinée au palais présidentiel d'Entebbe, au sud de Kampala, sans s'adresser à la presse, a constaté un journaliste de l'AFP. Un responsable ougandais, sous couvert de l'anonymat, a indiqué à l'AFP que M. Kiir était lui aussi arrivé à Entebbe.

MM. Kiir et Machar "vont discuter de la question du futur de l'accord de paix", a déclaré à l'AFP à Juba Ateny Wek Ateny, porte-parole du président Kiir.

Le mouvement du chef rebelle, exilé au Soudan, a pour sa part souligné que "la période étendue de pré-transition arrive à terme sans beaucoup de progrès".

La rencontre, parmi les rares entre MM. Kiir et Machar depuis la signature d'un accord de paix en septembre 2018 à Addis Abeba, doit avoir lieu dans le cadre de la médiation menée par l'organisation régionale Igad et dont le président ougandais Yoweri Museveni est un acteur-clé.

Aux termes de l'accord de paix de septembre 2018, les combattants de toutes les parties doivent être entraînés et déployés au sein d'une armée unifiée de 83.000 hommes, un processus qui a été entravé par les retards et le manque de financement.

Autre question épineuse, la question du nombre d'Etats régionaux ainsi que leurs frontières. En 2015, M. Kiir avait augmenté le nombre d'Etats, une mesure largement vue comme un moyen d'augmenter le nombre de ses alliés placés à des postes à responsabilités.

- Insuffisants -

Les observateurs jugent difficile à l'heure actuelle de prédire ce qui se passera le 12 novembre, mais tous s'accordent pour juger que les progrès dans la mise en place de l'accord de paix, qui a entraîné une forte baisse des combats, sont insuffisants.

Riek Machar avait appelé le 20 octobre à un nouveau report de la formation du gouvernement de transition, au sein duquel il doit occuper la fonction de premier vice-président.

Il estime que si les questions sécuritaires ne sont pas réglées, le pays connaîtrait des combats comme en 2016, lorsqu'un accord de paix antérieur avait échoué, le contraignant à fuir le pays et aggravant le conflit.

M. Kiir a menacé de former un gouvernement sans Riek Machar si ce dernier ne souhaite pas y participer dès le 12 novembre.

Le Conseil de sécurité de l'ONU, dans une déclaration adoptée à l'unanimité, a réclamé mercredi soir des "progrès immédiats" dans l'application de l'accord de paix.

S'exprimant à la presse au nom du Conseil de sécurité, le représentant du Royaume-Uni Jonathan Allen a semblé insister plus sur l'application de l'accord de paix que sur la date du 12 novembre.

Précédemment, les Etats-Unis, un des parrains de l'indépendance du Soudan du Sud, en 2011, avaient menacé de réévaluer leur relation avec ce pays si le gouvernement n'était pas formé d'ici au 12 novembre.

Le groupe de réflexion International Crisis Group a mis en garde début novembre contre le danger de pousser MM. Kiir et Machar à former un gouvernement sans que les questions cruciales soient résolues, sous peine de replonger le pays dans un conflit à grande échelle.

Le Soudan du Sud a sombré dans la guerre civile en 2013, deux ans après son indépendance du Soudan, lorsque M. Kiir, un Dinka, a accusé M. Machar, alors son vice-président, membre de l'ethnie nuer, de fomenter un coup d'Etat.

Le conflit a fait plus de 380.000 morts et poussé plus de quatre millions de Sud-Soudanais à fuir leurs foyers.


          

South Sudan rival leaders meet in Uganda for peace talks

 Cache   

KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — South Sudan President Salva Kiir and opposition leader Riek Machar have gone into a meeting in Uganda Thursday to try to salvage the peace deal designed to prevent the country from sliding back into civil war. The rival leaders have said they are not ready to form a coalition government on […]
          

Uganda Rugby Cranes Ready!

 Cache   
(MENAFN - African Press Organization) Coach Tolbert Onyango yesterday announced the Uganda Rugby () Men’s Sevens squad that will take part in the 2019 Rugby Africa Men&rsquo...
          

Job Opportunity - Instructors  for International Mobile Education Team and Civil-Military Relations course (IMET) activities

 Cache   

Strategic Opportunities International or SOI  is looking for Instructors/Facilitators to assist in an upcoming proposal. SOI's focus is on Sub Sahara Africa. Please submit resumes/CV to below listed email and/or website. Interested personnel will be required to sign a non-binding letter of Intent. Resumes/CVs need to list security clearance held (if any), foreign languages spoken and degree of fluency as well as educational level.

A series of  one to two-week long mobile events from the following course offerings, tailored to individual country requirements and developing needs over time to include:  Civil-Military Relations, Civil-Military Relations for Junior Military Leaders, Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration, Security Forces and the Electoral Process, Local Focus Program on Civil-Military Relations, National Security Planning Global Commons Security, Intelligence and Policymakers, Intelligence Fusion Centers, Women Integration in the Armed Forces, Cyber Security Policy and Practice, International Defense Transformation, Threat Assessment, Integrated Education And Outreach Programs, Managing Ethnic Conflict and Religious-Based Violence, and other courses. These tailored course series offerings are conducted to all levels of partner nation military officers and civilian leaders and are held abroad as necessary. These events occur in a wide variety of countries including, but not limited to: Cameroon, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Jordan, Mozambique, South Africa, Tunisia, Uganda. Please specify country/countries as well as topics of interest

 Submit Resume/CV to:

 paubrey@strategicopportunities.net

  - or - 

Submit resume/CV via portal on company website:  www.strategicopportunities.net



          

Uganda za ta fara fitar da danyen mai

 Cache   
Nan ba da jimawa ba Uganda za ta bi sawun kasashen da ke fitar da danyen man fetur, inda ake sa ran ta fitar da shi a karon farko daga tekun Albert zuwa kasuwannin kasashen waje.
          

*%*+27715451704 (*GOOD NEWS FOR YOU*) HOW TO JOIN ILLUMINATI SECRET SOCIETY 666, FOR MONEY, POWER, W

 Cache   

%+27715451704 (GOOD NEWS FOR YOU) HOW TO JOIN ILLUMINATI SECRET SOCIETY 666, FOR MONEY, POWER, WEALTH AND FAME 100%, USA,sudan,Sebokeng Soshanguve Springbok Stellenbosch Tembisa Thohoyandou Umlazi Upington
Welcome Witbank Katlehong Soweto Pretoria Centurion Mamelodi Vanderbijlpark, Vereeniging, Germiston, Boksburg, Durbun, United Kingdom Welcome Bellville Cape Town
Durban George Ibhayi Kempton Park
Khayelitsha Kimberley Klerksdorp Mitchell's Plain Mthatha Nelspruit Newcastle Pietermaritzburg Pinetown
Polokwane Port Elizabeth Potchefstroom Randburg Roodepoort Rustenburg
Eastern Cape Free State Gauteng KwaZulu-Natal Limpopo Mpumalanga
North West Northern Cape Western Cape Gauteng KwaZulu- Natal Limpopo Mpumalanga
North West Northern Cape Western Cape I want to join Illuminati Uganda, Kampala, how to join Illuminati in Australia, Equatorial Guinea, Tunisia, Join Illuminati in Luxembourg, Macau, Singapore, join Illuminati in Gabon + 27715451704, Join Illuminati in Brunei,Norway , Libya, Join Illuminati in Kuwait, San Marino, Trinidad and Tobago + 27715451704, join Illuminati in Seychelles, Vincent and the Grenadines, Netherlands, Illuminati in Iceland, Durban, Illuminati in Dubai, Illuminati in Mauritius, join Illuminati Lesotho, Illuminati Members in Lesotho, Illuminati in UAE, Dubai, Antigua and Barbuda +27715451704 Join Illuminati in South Sudan, Gabon, Chad, Join Illuminati in Liberia, Guinea, Illuminati in Libya,Andorra , Join Illuminati in Sprain, France, Paris, Join Illuminati in Kosovo, Illuminati in Italy,Germany +27715451704 Illuminati in Oman +27715451704 Illuminati in Malaysia, Illuminati in Botswana, Illuminati in Sandton, Illuminati in Tembisa, Germiston, Join Illuminati in Sweden, Finland, Join Illuminati in Norway, Poland, Illuminati in Centurion, Illuminati in Denmark +27715451704 in Sydney, Join Illuminati in Comoros, Moroni, Join Illuminati in Netherlands, Amsterdam, Join Illuminati in Switzerland, Cape Verde, Join Illuminati in Germany, Berlin, Join Illuminati in Niger, Mali, Join Illuminati in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Join Illuminati in Ukraine , Belarus, Join Illuminati in Syria, Join Illuminati in Kuwait, Baku, Osaka, Tokyo, Illuminati members in Johannesburg, Illuminati churches in Johannesburg, how to join Illuminati for money in south Africa, Illuminati celebrities in south Africa, join Illuminati in Johannesburg, Join Illuminati in Mongolia, Nepal,Illuminati churches in Johannesburg, Illuminati symbolism in south Africa, benefits of joining Illuminati in south Africa, requirements to join the Illuminati, Illuminati in sa music industry, Illuminati in sandton, Illuminati office in Johannesburg + 27715451704, Illuminati in sa music industry, Illuminati temple in Sandton, Illuminati in Tembisa, requirements to join the Illuminati, Illuminati church in Musgrave Durban, Illuminati jobs in Durban, Illuminati WhatsApp number, how to join Illuminati for money in south Africa, Illuminati temple in sandton +27715451704, how to join Illuminati in Soweto, Illuminati in Midland, Illuminati office in Johannesburg + 27715451704, Illuminati clubs, Illuminati churches in Johannesburg, list of secret societies in south Africa + 27715451704, join Illuminati in Midland, African secret society Hugh masekela,Illuminati temple in cape town, Illuminati in Centurion, Illuminati in Vanderbilt park, Illuminati church in cape town, i want to join illuminati in cape town, illuminati in south africa churches, join illuminati society in cape town, illuminati signs in cape town, south African Illuminati rappers, Illuminati in Belleville, Illuminati in Singapore, Illuminati in Saudi Arabia, Illuminati in Qatar, Doha how to join the Illuminati + 27715451704, how to join Illuminati online, how to join the Illuminati for money, how to join the Illuminati and become rich, benefits of joining the Illuminati, I want to join Illuminati what can I do, how to join the Illuminati for fame, what is bad about Illuminati +27715451704, I want to join Illuminati and become rich, I want to join the Illuminati where do i sign up + 27715451704, Illuminati sign up form,how to join the Illuminati for money + 27715451704, I want to join Illuminati right now + 27715451704, I want to join Illuminati and be rich forever, I want to join Illuminati what can I do, Illuminati sign up form, I want to join Illuminati and become rich, illuminating to join, how much does it cost to join Illuminati, how to join the Illuminati for money, what happens when you join the Illuminati, I want to join Illuminati right now + 27715451704, I want to join Illuminati what can i do, join illuminati real, how to join the illuminati music industry, how to join illuminati for wealth, how can i join illuminati society, how can i join illuminati society +27715451704, join illuminati secret societies, how to join illuminati for wealth and fame +27715451704, join the Illuminati new world order, Illuminati how to join, who can join the Illuminati,who can join Illuminati, join Illuminati, Illuminati join us, why join the Illuminati, why join Illuminati, how to join the Illuminati, how do you join the Illuminati.+27715451704

BENEFITS GIVEN TO NEW MEMBERS WHO JOIN THE ILLUMINATI. 1. A CASH REWARD OF USD $ 500,000 USD 2. A NEW SLEEK DREAM CAR VALUE AT $ 300,000 USD 3. A DREAM HOUSE BUILT IN THE COUNTRY OF YOUR OWN CHOICE 4. ONE MONTH HOLIDAY (FULLY PAID) TO YOUR DREAM TOURIST DESTINATION. 5. ONE YEAR GOLF MEMBERSHIP PACKAGE AV.P 6. TREATMENT IN ALL AIRPORTS IN THE WORLD 7. A TOTAL LIFESTYLE CHANGE ACCESS TO BOHEMIAN GROVE 8. MONTHLY PAYMENT OF $ 1,000,000 INTO YOUR BANK ACCOUNT EVERY MONTH. 9. ONE MONTH BOOKED APPOINTMENT WITH TOP 5 WORLD LEADERS AND TOP 5 CELEBRITIES IN THE WORLD.

call or watsupp Agent elives on +27715451704

Email: illuminatielives@gmail.com


          

((**CALL DR GAVA +27670236199**) BRING BACK LOST LOVE SPELL CASTER/ EX ''AND مشاكل مالية WITH BRAC

 Cache   

((CALL DR GAVA +27670236199) BRING BACK LOST LOVE SPELL CASTER/ EX ''AND مشاكل مالية WITH BRACK MAGIC SAME DAY GUARANTEE,Qatar,New York, Limpopo, London, Venezuela, Chile , Sweden, Denmark, Rwanda, Oman, , Dubai, Poland New Castle, Namibia, Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa, Limpo¬po, JORDAN, Turkey, Belgium, Saudi Arabia, Australia, Malaysia, to Johannesbu Zambia, Swaziland, Madagascar, Zimbabwe, Le sotho, Uganda, rg, Lebanon, Berhrain USA, California, Dallas, England, German, Spain, Jamaica, Brazil, Germany, Austria, Vancouver , Denmark, Hong Kong, China ,, Pretoria, Durban, Australia, Wales, France, Cairo GHANA, Namibia, Botswana, China, Norway, Sweden, Capet own, Tanzania, Northern Cape, Canada,
.Ancestral And Astrological Specialist For all problems troubling the African lineage I have got specialty in Healing CAPTURING AND DESTROYING EVIL OR NEGATIVE POWERS. BRING BACK YOUR LOST LOVE OR SOULMATE SAME DAY WINNING AND DESTROYING ALL COURT CASES QUICK EMPLOYMENT (JOB) BUSINESS BOOSTING AND CUSTOMER ATRACTIONS QUICK MARRIAGE OR RELATIONSHIP * DIVORCE STOPPING OR AVOIDING RESOLVE FAMILY FIGHTS OR MISSUNDERSTANDINGSAfricans with the stated problemsPeople who have lost friendsPeople who need luckPeople who need business boostPeople who need korobela People who need success in their lifePeople who need ancestral and astral guidancePeople with trouble in familyPeople leaving unhealthy lives People with bad dreams People who need physical wellnessPeople who need spiritual guidance * NB. * Uses * 100% * traditional and spiritual guidance (AFRICAN)BRINGING AFRICA BACK TO THE ROOTS YOU CAN CONTACT DR ON OR YOU CAN SO CONNECT WITH DR JOHN GAVA ON+27670236199 I AM A TRUSTED AND RELIABLE DEDICATED AFRICAN TRADITIONAL HEALER AND TRUE SPELL CASTER. GIFTED AND QUALIFIED HERBAL * * EXPERT. * Ancestral And Astrological SpecialistFor all problems troubling the African lineage* I’ve got specialty in Healing * * CAPTURING AND DESTROYING EVIL OR * NEGATIVE POWERS * * * BRING BACK YOUR * * LOST LOVE OR * ** SOULMATE SAME DAY * * * WINNING AND * ** DESTROYING ALL COURT CASES * * QUICK EMPLOYMENT * (* JOB ) * BUSINESS BOOSTING AND CUSTOMER * ** ATRACTIONS * * QUICK MARRIAGE OR RELATIONSHIP * * * DIVORCE STOPPING OR AVOIDING ** * * RESOLVE FAMILY FIGHTS OR MISSUNDERSTANDINGS ** * Africans with the stated problemsPeople who have lost friendsPeople who need luckPeople who need business boostPeople who need korobela People who need success in their lifePeople who need ancestral and astral guidance* NB. * Uses * 100% * traditional and spiritual guidance (AFRICAN)BRINGING AFRICA BACK TO THE ROOTS
Call or watsupp dr john gava +27670236199
Email: johngava88@gmail.com


          

الأفضل pure Gold nuggets and Gold Bars for sale''+27715451704 '' in Sweden, Swaziland, Canada, Mad

 Cache   

الأفضل pure Gold nuggets and Gold Bars for sale''+27715451704 '' in Sweden, Swaziland, Canada, Madagascar, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Limpopo, JORDAN, Kuwait, Turkey, Belgium, Saudi Arabia Australia, Qatar, Botswana, Canada, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Zambia, Malaysia, Lebanon, Berhrain USA, California, Dallas, England, German, Spain, Jamaica, Brazil, Germany, Austria, Vancouver, Denmark, Hong Kong, Uganda China ,, Pretoria Durban, Wales, France, Cairo GHANA, Namibia, China, Norway, Cameroon, Capet own, Tanzania, Northern Cape, New York, Limpopo, London, Venezuela, Chile, Sweden, Rwanda, Oman, Dubai, Poland, Johannesburg Pretoria Bellville Benoni Bloemfontein Boksburg Cape Town
Vaal Centurion Durban East London Empangeni George Germiston Ibhayi Katlehong Kempton Park
Khayelitsha Kimberley New Castle Klerksdorp Mamelodi Mitchells Plain Mthatha Nelspruit Newcastle Pietermaritzburg Pinetown
Polokwane Port Elizabeth Potchefstroom Randburg Roodepoort Rustenburg
Sebokeng Soshanguve Soweto Springbok Stellenbosch Tembisa Thohoyandou Umlazi Upington Vanderbijlpark
Vereeniging Welkom Witbank Eastern Cape Free State Gauteng KwaZulu-Natal Limpopo Mpumalanga
North West Northern Cape Western Cape, natural rough diamond as well as polished diamond.

We sell and deliver all over the World. We have in stock four (4) Standard categories of Gold "24 Carat - 95% Gold" 18 Carat - 75% Gold "18 Carat - 58.3% Gold" 12 Carat - 50% Gold Firstly, it's worthwhile to note that gold (Au ) in itself is a commodity that's been highly coveted ever since the World knew of beauty and economics - as far back as biblical times. Uganda is an impoverished country with a long history of civil conflicts. The country itself is highly endowed with natural resources. It's claimed that more than 90% of the Uranium used to build the nuclear warheads that were deployed by the United States on the two cities of Japan came from Kampala (Now Uganda) and yet this country is still quite poor. Buy from us and you see your business grow 1) Gold in Africa.

We are dealing with Buyers but not Dealers.

Kindly contact us if you are interested,
For more info Call or watsupp us on +27715451704
Email: goldsales88@gmail.com


          

*%% +27715451704 (UK,USA,KUWAIT) BEST AUTOMATIC SSD CHEMICAL SOLUTIONS AND ACTIVATION POWDER

 Cache   

*%% +27715451704 (UK,USA,KUWAIT) BEST AUTOMATIC SSD CHEMICAL SOLUTIONS AND ACTIVATION POWDER FOR CLEANING BLACK NOTES MONEY FOR ALL CURRENCIES in Soshanguve, Pietermaritzburg Pinetown
Polokwane Pretoria Randburg Roodepoort Rustenburg
Sebokeng Soweto Springbok Stellenbosch Thohoyandou Umlazi Upington Vanderbijlpark
Vereeniging Welkom Tembisa Kempton Park Port Elizabeth Bellville Boksburg Benoni Bloemfontein Cape Town
Centurion Durban East London George Empangeni Katlehong Germiston Johannesburg Ibhayi
Khayelitsha Kimberley Klerksdorp Mamelodi Mitchells Plain Mthatha Nelspruit Newcastle Witbank Eastern cape,
Free State Gauteng KwaZulu-Natal Limpopo Mpumalanga Namibia, Botswana, Mozambique, Zambia, Swaziland, Madagascar, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Uganda, Limpopo, JORDAN, Kuwait, Turkey, Belgium, Saudi Arabia, Australia, to Johannesburg ,, Germany, Austria, Vancouver, Denmark, Hong Kong, China ,, Pretoria, Durban, Australia, Wales, France, Cairo GHANA, Namibia, Botswana, China, Norway, Sweden, Capet own, Tanzania, Northern Cape, New York, Limpopo, London, Venezuela, Chile, Sweden, Denmark, Rwanda, Oman, Qatar, Dubai, Poland, Canada PotchefstroomNorth West Northern Cape Western Cape Call +27715451704 to purchase Best SSD Solution Clean Black Notes Dollars
WE ALSO? SALE CHEMICALS LIKE SSD AUTOMATIC SOLUTION FORM
CLEANING BLACK CURRENT DOLLARS.
I hereby use this media to inform you, that our company can clean out black
deface currency, (stained money) bank notes, We have all kinds of chemicals
used for cleaning of black money or stained money in currencies such as US
Dollar, Euro, Pound, and all local currencies, even if your defaced note is
25 years old,
WE SALE CHEMICALS LIKE TOURMALINE, SSD Chemical / Solution, CASTRO X
OXIDE, A4. AND MANY Like ACTIVATION POWDER & SSD SOLUTION FOR CLEANING
BLACK MONEY Chemical and Allied product incorporated is a major
manufacturer of industrial and pharmaceutical products with key
specialization in the production of SSD Automatic solution used in the
cleaning of black money, defaced money and stained bank notes with anti
breeze quality.OTHERS FOR DAMAGED NOTES, BILLS LIKE USD, EURO, POUNDS,
TRANSFERRING COLORS FROM USE NOTE TO NEW WHITE BILLS, AND BLACK NOTES, WE
WORK ON COMMISSION WE ALSO OFFER MACHINES TO DO THE BIG CLEANINGS, AND WE
DO DELIVERY OF PRODUCTS TO BUYERS DESTINATIONS AFTER A CONSULTATION FEE.
DEPENDING ON DIFFERENT CASES. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE DO CONTACT US IN
OUR DIFFERENT OFFICES.SPAIN, INDIA,

Call us or watsupp +27715451704.
Email: gavachemicals88@gmail.com


          

World: Opening statement at the 70th session of the Executive Committee of the High Commissioner’s Programme

 Cache   
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Mexico, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World

By Filippo Grandi, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
07 October 2019

Mr. Chairman,
Deputy Secretary-General,
Distinguished Delegates,
Ladies and Gentlemen,

The modern concept of refugee protection was born in the middle of the last century, as the world emerged from two devastating global conflicts and was preparing to enter the Cold War. Millions had been uprooted from their homes, as wars cast people adrift, empires disintegrated, borders were redrawn, and minorities and political opponents were persecuted and expelled. Ensuring the safety of those displaced, and resolving displacement, were among the earliest priorities of the United Nations.

Seven decades on, forced human displacement remains a global concern. The context is different, but the complexity remains immense. Today’s refugee crises are part of a growing flow of human mobility, driven by many overlapping elements.

Resource-based conflicts that transcend borders, shaped by a mosaic of local, regional and international interests; fueled by extremism, criminal networks and urban gangs.

Loss of hope, as global advances in prosperity, education and the fight against hunger and disease fail to reach those most in need.

Conflicts premised on ethnic and religious differences, stoked by others for political and financial gain.

Collapsing eco-systems and weather-related disasters that destroy homes and livelihoods, forcing millions further into poverty.

Damaging forms of nationalism, and hate speech that – often through cyberspace – have found a new legitimacy in public discourse.

Refugees emerge from these widening fault-lines – a warning of things going wrong. This is why tackling forced displacement calls again for a bigger, broader ambition than we have managed to muster in the recent past.

This was the vision that drove the development of the Global Compact on Refugees. Addressing refugee crises cannot be done in isolation from larger global challenges, and from effective migration policies. The two compacts – on refugees, and on safe, orderly and regular migration – were designed to complement each other, and for good reason.

Look at the Sahel – a situation of enormous complexity, where insecurity, poverty and loss of traditional livelihoods are fracturing and uprooting entire communities, across the region and beyond. Protecting refugees and the internally displaced is vital. But this must be accompanied by a deeper and wider scope of action that cuts across the political, security, migration and development spheres.

Two aspects of the Global Compact on Refugees stand out.

One is its comprehensive approach. It accelerates a long-awaited shift in responses – from a traditional humanitarian angle, as the Deputy Secretary-General said, to one that preserves the humanitarian imperative, but matches it with a broader set of tools more adapted to the dynamics of today’s refugee flows.

This means peacemaking and peacebuilding, development action and private sector investment. It means sustained, strategic support to address the root causes of refugee movements and mixed population flows. The Deputy Secretary-General has just highlighted how this dovetails with the work to bring about a UN system that can best catalyze progress collectively towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Synergies between the compact and UN reforms are therefore relevant and strong.

Also, the compact makes tangible the commitment to international solidarity that underpins the refugee protection regime, but has never been fully realised. You will hear more about this from our new Assistant High Commissioner for Protection, Gillian Triggs, whom I am happy to introduce to you today.

Securing the refugee compact – a practical, concrete tool – proved that beyond the damaging, unilateral approaches that sometimes surface, a commitment to addressing refugee flows through international solidarity still prevails. At UNHCR, we are fully committed to this effort, and we count on all of you – our closest partners – to do the same. It is possible! The Global Refugee Forum, to be convened in December in this building, will be the opportunity to showcase what has been achieved, and make fresh commitments to further progress.

Mr Chairman,

The last year has underscored why the compact is needed, and how it is starting to re-shape our collective response. Let me share my thoughts on seven related challenges.

First, while much of the discussion on forced displacement has focused on arrivals in the global North, the most profound consequences by far are in host countries in the global South. Preserving asylum there, and helping host communities, requires more substantial and sustained international support. More than four million Venezuelans, for example, have left the country, the majority taking refuge in 14 nations in Latin America and the Caribbean. Most of these states have shown commendable solidarity, despite immense pressures. Colombia’s recent decision to grant citizenship at birth to the children of Venezuelans in the country is an example, and the Quito Process is helping shape a regional approach.

Sustaining this solidarity is vital, including through support to the services, infrastructure and economy of impacted countries. I welcome the engagement of the Inter-American Development Bank, and the World Bank’s decision to extend support to Colombia – and potentially also Ecuador – through its Global Concessional Financing Facility. I urge them to accelerate their contributions. The forthcoming Solidarity Conference convened by the European Union, together with UNHCR and the International Organisation for Migration, will be an opportunity to take stock and commit more.

Second, responses to 'mixed flows' of refugees and migrants continue to generate very divisive debates. Widespread political rhetoric exploits the anxieties prevailing among those excluded from the benefits of globalization, and directs those fears towards refugees and migrants – themselves among the most disenfranchised people on the planet. Pitting exclusion against exclusion is not only cynical and immoral – it rarely offers practical solutions to either. And measures taken or invoked to reduce flows – pushbacks, externalization of asylum processing, policies of deterrence – all erode refugee protection without really addressing the root causes of mixed flows, or the challenges of integration.

These situations are enormously complex – we must recognise that. I saw this last week in Mexico, where impressive examples of refugee integration are coupled with increasing migratory pressures from the region but also from Africa. A range of actions is undoubtedly needed to address these “mixed” flows. Several are included in that region under the MIRPS, a regional framework for protection and solutions which we have promoted; and we will contribute to UN efforts to support initiatives such as a regional development plan for Mexico and northern Central America, currently being discussed. In this context, saving lives and safeguarding the dignity and rights of all those on the move must remain central, together with access to international protection for those with valid claims. There and elsewhere, legal migration pathways would help prevent the abuse of asylum systems as substitutes of migration channels.

We observe these challenges not only in northern Central America and at the southern border of the United States, but also in southern Africa, and south-east Asia. In Europe, public confidence in asylum and migration management has been diminished, and must be restored through fast and fair procedures, good migration management that avoids overloading asylum systems, and investments in integration for those with a right to stay. Cooperation between governments is needed – including on the return of those who do not qualify for international protection or other stay arrangements.

I welcome the recent decisions of four EU States to establish a temporary cooperation mechanism for disembarking those rescued in the Mediterranean, and hope that this will galvanise broader EU engagement and revitalize rescue at sea arrangements. But this must also be matched by a broader ambition – investments in addressing the root causes of refugee flows, and supporting the efforts of refugee-hosting and transit countries. UNHCR continues to evacuate the most vulnerable from Libya – efforts for which Niger and now Rwanda are providing life-saving channels. Hopefully, others will join. We work closely with the International Organisation for Migration in these efforts, as elsewhere. But these operations pose enormous dilemmas, and can only be sustained as part of a comprehensive, responsibility-sharing approach that has the preservation of life, and access to international protection as central imperatives. There, as in several other operations, UNHCR colleagues and our partners are working – let us not forget that – under extremely dangerous conditions.

Third, long-standing and recurring displacement crises continue to persist, in the absence of political solutions. And other major crises are now becoming protracted too. In this context, the compact’s emphasis on inclusion, resilience and development action – pending solutions – is critical. This year marked the fortieth anniversary of the start of the Afghan refugee crisis. Regrettably, peace efforts seem once again to have stalled. I welcome Afghanistan’s decision to apply the comprehensive refugee response model in support of its initiatives to solve displacement, but solutions remain compromised by drought, insecurity and governance failures. Just 15,000 refugees returned home last year. The hospitality displayed by Pakistan and Iran, and their work on refugee inclusion and self-reliance, as well as on legal migration and stay options, are ground-breaking, but must receive more international support while the Afghan crisis continues.

In Somalia, too, while the commitment of the government to reduce forced displacement is evident and commendable, conflict and drought are still inhibiting solutions and driving new displacement. In this context, the regional application of the comprehensive response model by IGAD helps strengthen asylum, access to rights, and refugee inclusion in health, education and national economies.

Governments in the East and Horn of Africa have been in the forefront of the application of the comprehensive refugee response model. Ethiopia, Djibouti, Kenya and Uganda, among others, have made enormous strides with the support of the World Bank’s expertise and financing, bilateral development support and private sector investments. These are already transforming the lives of many refugees, as well as refugee-hosting communities across the region, and proving the validity of the model enshrined in the compact. They are giving concrete meaning to the African Union’s decision to declare 2019 the year of refugees, displaced people and returnees in Africa.

Fourth, the issue of repatriation continues to be the subject of much attention. A question we are increasingly asked is – how to advance solutions, when security in countries of origin remains fragile, and there is no end of hostilities? Can people return to their home countries in the absence of political settlements?

The answer is that returns must be driven by people, not by politics. Across UNHCR’s operations, we have an ongoing dialogue with refugees on return, and on the complex factors that influence their decisions. We work with governments to help create the conditions paving the way for returns. These must be voluntary and sustainable.

Take the example of Syria. Some 200,000 Syrian refugees have returned since 2016, and over three quarters of the almost six million refugees in neighbouring countries say they hope to return one day. We must continue to be guided by their views and decisions, and provide support to those who choose to return to avoid exposing them to further hardship.

Our policy is not to stand back and wait. We work with the Government of Syria to help address barriers to return and support confidence-building measures; hoping of course that recent political advances are consolidated; and that further humanitarian crises – especially in Idlib – can be avoided through concerted action by all parties.

In the meantime, international support to asylum countries must be sustained. Their outstanding generosity, and continuous donor support have helped Syrian refugees contend with long years in exile, even in places like Lebanon where the ratio of refugees to nationals continues to be the highest in the world. The achievements are significant: last year, 1.3 million Syrian refugee children were attending school, and 110,000 work permits were issued in Jordan and Turkey. However, acute poverty and vulnerability are weighing on people’s lives, and on host communities, and inevitably influencing their decisions.

In Myanmar, too, the Government has recognised the right of refugees in Bangladesh to return, and has started an important dialogue with the refugees, to build confidence and enable informed decisions. UNHCR and UNDP are working on social cohesion projects in northern Rakhine State to help pave the way for eventual returns. These are important steps, but need to be accompanied by more visible changes on key issues of refugee concern – freedom of movement, solutions for the internally displaced, clear information on a pathway to citizenship.

A second bilateral initiative to commence repatriation in August did not result in any refugees coming forward. But it sent important messages: the door is open, and voluntariness was respected. My hope is that this can now pave the way for a more strategic approach, in which refugee voices and choices are central. UNHCR stands ready to advise and support. There, and in other places, for example with Burundian refugees in Tanzania, and Nigerian refugees in the Lake Chad region, we are available to facilitate dialogue and solutions through tripartite approaches which include UNHCR.

Fifth, and closely linked to my previous point, we need to seize opportunities to accelerate solutions. Conflicts moving towards peace are rare, but when there is a chance, we have to pursue it. In this respect, we are closely following events in Sudan and South Sudan. The political transition in Sudan and the new Government’s commitment to a peace process have important implications for hundreds of thousands of Sudanese refugees, and for the internally displaced. The renewed momentum in the South Sudan peace process is also encouraging. Spontaneous refugee returns to South Sudan have already surpassed 200,000, and IDP returns are also under way.

Over the last two years, UNHCR and IGAD have been promoting the inclusion of refugees and internally displaced people in the South Sudan peace process. I hope that these recent developments will pave the way to a definitive end of the cycle of violence and displacement that has blighted the lives of generations of Sudanese and South Sudanese people.

Resettlement is another solution – albeit for very few. While some countries are stepping up their programmes, the overall number of places has plummeted. I am very disappointed by this. Resettlement saves lives and offers stability to refugees who are most vulnerable and at risk. I propose that we use more deliberately our new three-year strategy to intensify resettlement efforts, and expand private sector and community involvement.

The sixth major challenge relates to our engagement with the internally displaced. At the end of 2018, over 41 million people were living in displacement in their own countries. Major IDP operations, in Iraq, Syria, Yemen, the Lake Chad Basin, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Ukraine, remain among our most politically and operationally complex – but all are among our priorities. I wish to flag in particular that together with our partners, we are responding with more resources to the Ethiopian government’s call for support to address recent large-scale internal displacement in the country.

In sum, we are trying to better align our efforts to advance solutions for refugees and IDPs, and to design our operations more effectively, in the context of inter-agency efforts. Our new policy on internal displacement reflects our firm and revitalized commitment. This places particular emphasis on protection leadership, and aligning our interventions with those of our partners.

Mr. Chairman,

A few days ago, at the start of the 74th session of the General Assembly in New York, we heard calls to accelerate our responses to the climate emergency, before it is too late. Greta Thunberg, speaking for the next generations, and António Guterres, speaking as the world’s conscience, were adamant in asking all of us to take action – now.

These calls concern us, too, as we gather here to discuss issues of forced displacement. I have just presented six key displacement-related challenges. The seventh intersects and underpins them all.

Climate-related causes are a growing driver of new internal displacement, surpassing those related to conflict and violence by more than 50%. Climate is often also a pervasive factor in cross-border displacement.

The term “climate refugee” is not based in international law, and does not reflect the more complicated ways in which climate interacts with human mobility. But the image it conveys – of people driven from their homes as an outcome of the climate emergency – has rightly captured public attention.

I am often asked how the UN refugee organization can help respond to this challenge. I wish to take this opportunity to share a few thoughts for your consideration.

For some years, UNHCR has worked to highlight relevant legal frameworks and the protection gaps resulting from cross-border displacement in the context of climate change. We will continue to help steer international discussions and the legal and normative debate in this area, including through engagement with the Platform on Disaster Displacement, and other multilateral fora.

Forced displacement across borders can stem from the interaction between climate change and disasters with conflict and violence – or it can arise from natural or man-made disasters alone. Either situation can trigger international protection needs.

In the first case, these would normally be met through recognition as a refugee under the 1951 Convention or regional refugee frameworks. In the second, temporary protection or stay arrangements, on which UNHCR has expertise, can provide flexible and speedy responses.

Even more specifically, where disaster-related displacement occurs, a strong operational response, guided by protection considerations, is often needed. Here too, UNHCR will continue to work in inter-agency contexts to support governments – building on our strong expertise in emergency responses. The Global Compact on Refugees by the way calls for preparedness measures and evidence-based forecasting, and the inclusion of refugees in disaster risk reduction strategies.

There are other considerations. Climate factors drive people out of their homes – but large-scale refugee movements – whether or not climate-induced – have themselves in turn an environmental impact, and refugees are frequently located in climate hotspots. I am determined to make these considerations more relevant to the way we prepare for and respond to refugee crises.

At UNHCR, we have worked for years to reduce the environmental impact of refugee crises through renewable energy options, reforestation activities, and access to clean fuels and technology for cooking. We have now launched a revitalized energy strategy and are improving our tools to address these challenges. Private sector partners such as the IKEA Foundation have been invaluable in helping us develop new approaches.

And finally like other organizations, we recognise that our own operational footprint has an environmental impact, and are taking action accordingly. We are working, for example, to increase energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

Mr. Chairman,

Work to respond to these challenges is made possible by the strong confidence that UNHCR continues to receive from donor partners. We expect funds available this year to reach an estimated 4.82 billion US dollars. The United States’ contribution has continued to be the most substantial, and has been decisive in many challenging situations, and for this I am very grateful. I wish to thank the European Commission and Germany for their particularly strong support; and Sweden, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Norway and the Netherlands for providing critical, substantive unearmarked funding; and of course all other donors as well.

The gap between requirements and available resources nonetheless continues to grow in absolute terms and will reach around 3.82 billion US dollars this year. Private sector income is projected to increase by 11% over last year’s figure, to 470 million US dollars. We continue to work to diversify our funding base, in the spirit of responsibility-sharing and to ensure a stable platform for our work. Most importantly, our partnership with development organizations is becoming much stronger, and is helping us find ways to target our resources in ways that leverage those bigger programmes.

I am aware that donor generosity must be matched by constant improvements in how we manage the organization. In late 2016, I initiated a reform process to ensure an agile and effective UNHCR, with country operations equipped to pursue context-driven strategies, innovate, and respond to local and regional dynamics, as part of UN Country Teams. This was the rationale for our regionalisation and decentralization process, which is giving greater authority and flexibility to country offices, helping us get closer to refugees, and front-loading support through Regional Bureaux located in their regions.

We are entering the last phase of structural changes, which will involve adjustments to Headquarters Divisions and other entities in line with the new rebalanced authorities.

Of course, transformation is not only about structures and accountabilities, and is not a one-time exercise – it is also about transforming our organisational culture, investing in the quality of work, improving and streamlining systems and processes, and creating space for innovation.

We are working on evidence-based planning, on how we describe impact, and on increasing efficiency, in line with our Grand Bargain commitments and as an active participant, as the Deputy Secretary-General noted, in broader UN reforms. I recently endorsed a Data Transformation Strategy, and the new UNHCR/World Bank Joint Data Centre will be inaugurated this week in Copenhagen by the Secretary-General – a milestone of humanitarian/development cooperation.

We also continue to embed a strong risk management culture across the organisation, and to strengthen systems and tools for preventing and responding to misconduct. This includes sexual exploitation and abuse, and sexual harassment, for which we have implemented a broad range of measures and to which I am personally committed, also as Champion for this issue in the Inter-Agency Standing Committee. There is no place in the organization for perpetrators, and we will keep survivors and victims at the center of our response.

Mr. Chairman,

In 2011, my predecessor, the Secretary-General, convened a ministerial meeting on the 60th anniversary of the 1951 Refugee Convention, and the 50th of the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness. It is fair to say that until then, the statelessness mandate had been a rather peripheral aspect of UNHCR’s work. Clearly, you didn’t see it that way. More than 60 states and regional entities came forward with pledges aimed at reducing statelessness, and that groundswell of political will and commitment became the catalyst for the #IBelong campaign, launched in 2014. Spurred on by the energy that had emerged, we decided to fix a time limit – ten years – to bring statelessness to an end.

Now, as we mark the halfway point, it’s time to take stock and renew the commitment that set us on the path towards that bold ambition. This is the aim of the High-Level Segment that will follow in a few moments, as part of this Executive Committee meeting.

When we talk about statelessness, we often find ourselves speaking of laws, documents and other technicalities. These are critical, and are where the hard work has to happen, but when we frame statelessness purely in legal terms, we lose sight of the all-encompassing blight it casts on people’s lives, pushing them to the margins of society, denying them basic rights and a sense of identity. This is an area in which – for relatively little investment – wide-reaching impact is within our reach.

Some of you, last year, were present at an EXCOM side event at which a young woman who had grown up stateless became the citizen of a country for the first time. It was a deeply emotional experience for everyone present – and that moment, more than any speech or list of pledges, captured what it means to finally belong, after years spent living on the margins. She and a number of formerly stateless people are present here today, and I encourage you to talk to them and understand what citizenship has meant to them. Their stories are what will inspire us as we move ahead.

There have been important achievements in the first half of the campaign – tackling gender discrimination in nationality laws, introducing laws to avoid childhood statelessness, and developing procedures to find solutions for people who would otherwise be stateless. Certain protracted situations were finally resolved. Fifteen states acceded to one or both of the Statelessness Conventions. Kyrgyzstan became the first State to formally announce that all known cases of statelessness on its territory had been resolved – an achievement that should inspire others. I look forward to honouring a Kyrgyz champion of this campaign, Azizbek Ashurov, at the Nansen Award ceremony this evening.

I also wish to acknowledge the work of UNICEF, UNFPA, the World Bank, and civil society and academic networks – and especially the Geneva-based ‘Friends’ of the campaign, who have been persistent in their advocacy and support. The regional preparatory meetings have been characterized by energy and commitment. I am pleased to share that we have received 171 pledges ahead of today’s event, which has also galvanised other initiatives that may become concrete pledges later.

At a time when we are asking a lot of you, this is particularly commendable. At UNHCR, we will also step up our efforts even more to achieve the ambitious collective goal of ending statelessness once and for all.

Mr Chairman,

The first Global Refugee Forum will be convened in this building in just over two months. It comes at the end of a turbulent decade, in which people and communities have been uprooted across all regions. Nobody foresaw, ten years ago, the convergence of trends and events that would lead to a doubling in the number of people forcibly displaced, and the prominence that refugee and migrant flows would assume in domestic and international politics. Addressing and resolving forced displacement has rightly emerged as an urgent priority intertwined with other 21st-century global challenges, including climate change.

The big question now is – what are we going to make of the next decade? Will it be one that sees us in retreat – turning our backs on the hard-learned lessons of the twentieth century – or one in which we will have the courage of joining forces in spite of our different perspectives and interests, embracing the challenges and opportunities of international cooperation to address the plight of exile? These are the fundamental questions that the Forum will have to tackle. I hope – of course – that it will respond by clearly showing the second way. I encourage all of you to ensure high-level representation from States, share positive experiences, and make significant and impactful commitments that will greatly improve the future of refugees and host communities.

I believe that in the Global Compact for Refugees, we have grounds for optimism. The momentum is there. We have a powerful tool that was born of a narrative of possibility. The Forum will be the occasion, I hope, to show that we do not shy away from the enormous responsibility placed on all of us – one that stems not only from the refugees and host communities looking to us for action, but also from the opportunity that we have to inspire new generations, and demonstrate, in so many practical, concrete ways, why international cooperation matters, and how it can be made to work.

Thank you.


          

World: Education Above All Foundation, World Bank Partner to Ensure Education for Two Million Out of School Children Around the World

 Cache   
Source: World Bank, Education Above All
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Haiti, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zambia

WASHINGTON DC, September 20, 2019 - This week, Education Above All Foundation (EAA) and the World Bank announced a ground-breaking partnership to enrol two million out of school children from more than 40 countries by 2025. During a meeting with World Bank President David Malpass, Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, Founder and Chairperson of Education Above All Foundation, stressed the importance of this framework agreement.

The agreement commits up to $250 million in funding for developing countries striving to enable access to quality primary education for all of their still out-of-school children. Unlike traditional philanthropic efforts of organizations like EAA who usually fund local non-profits directly, this innovative funding model aims to take lessons learned in the field to scale, through direct support to participating countries with implementation, evaluation, and reporting - enabling accountability and systemic change at the national level.

Out of school children (OOSC) are among the hardest to reach in each country due to the many and often compounding barriers to education including extreme poverty, distance to school, and conflict. This new agreement calls on governments to utilise funds to prioritise out of school children by ensuring their access to quality primary education through results-based financing. The agreement highlights the importance of multi-stakeholder partnerships in supporting developing nations, in providing education for all, and meeting the UN Sustainable Development Goals, particularly SDG 4 (ensuring inclusive and quality education for all and promoting lifelong learning).

"The World Bank is committed to addressing the global learning crisis. The partnership with Education Above All is critically important in this effort. There are still too many out of school children around the globe. Together we will bring these children into school and help them learn and fulfil their potential. Learning for all is a foundation for building strong human capital for every country," said Jaime Saavedra, Global Director for Education at the World Bank.

"Our partnership with Qatar and Education Above All will play an especially important role in the Middle East and North Africa," said Ferid Belhaj, World Bank Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa. "As access to quality education is critical for the region to unlock the huge potential of its large youth population, whose energy and creativity could become a new source of dynamic and inclusive growth."

Through this new funding structure, EAA and The World Bank will support financing opportunities for resource mobilization, education advocacy, and poverty reduction in developing countries across three continents. Proposed targeted countries include Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Haiti, India, Iran, Iraq, Kenya, Laos, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, and Zambia.

About Education Above All (EAA) Foundation

The Education Above All (EAA) Foundation is a global education foundation established in 2012 by Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser. The Foundation envisions bringing hope and real opportunity to the lives of impoverished and marginalized children, youth and women, especially in the developing world and in difficult circumstances such as conflict situations and natural disasters. It believes that education is the single most effective means of reducing poverty, generating economic growth and creating peaceful and just societies, as well as a fundamental right for all children and an essential condition to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). For more information, visit educationaboveall.orghttp://educationaboveall.org/.

About World Bank Group Work on Education

The World Bank Group is the largest financier of education in the developing world. We work on education programs in more than 80 countries and are committed to helping countries reach Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4, which calls for access to quality education and lifelong learning opportunities for all by 2030. In 2018, we provided about $4.5 billion for education programs, technical assistance, and other projects designed to improve learning and provide everyone with the opportunity to get the education they need to succeed. Our current portfolio of education projects totals $17 billion, highlighting the importance of education for the achievement of our twin goals, ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity.

For more information, please visit: worldbank.org/educationhttp://.worldbank.org/education educationaboveall.orghttp://www.educationaboveall.org


          

World: Global Humanitarian Overview 2019 [EN/AR/ES/FR/ZH]

 Cache   
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Bangladesh, Brazil, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Guyana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mexico, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Global trends and challenges

More than 1 per cent of people across the planet right now are caught up in major humanitarian crises. The international humanitarian system is more effective than ever at meeting their needs – but global trends including poverty, population growth and climate change are leaving more people than ever vulnerable to the devastating impacts of conflicts and disasters.

Humanitarian needs are increasing despite global economic and development gains. In the past decade, the world has made profound development progress. Between 2008 and 2015, the number of people living in extreme poverty fell from 1.2 billion to 736 million. The world is also richer than ever before: global GDP rose from $63.4 trillion in 2008 to $80.7 trillion in 2017.
But in recent years, more than 120 million people each year have needed urgent humanitarian assistance and protection. There are more crises, affecting more people, and lasting longer today than a decade ago. Most humanitarian crises are not the product of any single factor or event, but of the interaction between natural hazards, armed conflict and human vulnerability.

People’s vulnerability to crises is not just about where they live, but also about how they live.
Poverty, inequality, population growth, urbanization and climate change can erode people’s resilience and make them more susceptible to shocks. Although development gains are being made, progress has been uneven. The rate of extreme poverty remains high in low-income countries and in countries affected by conflict. Crises have disproportionate consequences for the poor: people exposed to natural hazards in the poorest nations are at least seven times more likely to die from them than those in the richest nations.

Fragile and conflict-affected areas are growing faster and urbanizing more rapidly than the rest of the world

In the past five years, the world’s population has grown by 400 million people, from 7.2 billion in 2014 to 7.6 billion in 2017. Although global population growth has slowed compared with previous decades, the rate has been uneven. Today, an estimated 2 billion people live in fragile and conflict affected areas of the word, where they are extremely vulnerable to the impact of conflicts and disasters. This number is projected to increase, as the population in these areas is growing twice as fast as the rest of the world, with an annual growth rate of 2.4 per cent, compared with 1.2 per cent globally. And the urban population in fragile areas grows by 3.4 per cent each year, compared with the world average of 2 per cent. These trends can compound resource scarcity and increase vulnerability to disasters. Urban population density can also amplify the impact of disasters and conflicts. In 2017, when explosive weapons were used in populated areas, 92 per cent of casualties were civilians, compared with 20 per cent in other areas. The populations of countries affected by fragility, conflict and violence are also younger than the global average. Whereas the proportion of the world’s population under 14 years of age has been steadily declining to about 25 per cent today, the average for countries in fragile situations is 40 per cent. As a result, one in every four children in the world is living in a country affected by conflict or disaster, facing threats of violence, hunger and disease. In 2017, more than 75 million children experienced disruptions to their education because of humanitarian crises, threatening not only their present well-being, but their future prospects as well.

More people are being displaced by conflicts

By the end of 2017, war, violence and persecution had uprooted 68.5 million men, women and children around the world – the highest number on record, and nearly 10 million more people than in 2014. Just over 40 million people were internally displaced by violence within their own countries, and 25.4 million refugees and 3.1 million asylum seekers were forced to flee their countries to escape conflict and persecution. The levels of new displacements far outstrip returns or other solutions. In 2017, 5 million people returned to their areas or countries of origin, but 16.2 million people were newly displaced – an average of one person displaced every two seconds, and the highest level of new displacement on record.

The rise in forced displacement is not the result of an increase in conflicts. In fact, after peaking in 2014, the number of political conflicts worldwide decreased by about 10 per cent, from 424 in 2014 to 385 in 2017, although there are still more conflicts compared with a decade ago (328 in 2007). However, during the same period, the proportion of violent and highly violent conflicts, which are more likely to cause human suffering, destruction and displacement, increased from 53 per cent to 58 per cent of all conflicts worldwide.5 The total economic impact of conflict and violence has also increased, from $14.3 trillion in 2014 to $14.8 trillion in 2017.6 The major share of both the human and economic cost of conflicts is borne by developing countries, which host 85 per cent of refugees.


          

World: U.S. Agency for International Development Administrator Mark Green's Remarks at a "Celebrating World Humanitarian Day" Event

 Cache   
Source: US Agency for International Development
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Mexico, Myanmar, Nigeria, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, United States of America, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

For Immediate Release
Monday, August 20, 2018 Office of Press Relations
Telephone: +1.202.712.4320 | Email: press@usaid.gov

Center for Strategic and International Studies
Washington, DC
August 20, 2018

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Good morning, everyone. Thank you, Dan, for that kind introduction and thanks to all of you for being here to help mark this very important occasion.

As we begin, as we call it in Congress, I'd like to start with a point of personal privilege. I'd like to take this opportunity this morning to express our sadness over the death of Kofi Annan. He was a giant who has spent his entire life advocating for peace, and the for the protection of humanitarian workers, something that we'll be talking about today. As he so often said, "People, not states, should be at the center of what we do." His passing makes this World Humanitarian Day even more poignant.

This morning, on behalf of USAID, I hope to convey two important messages to all of you. The first is, as Dan was alluding to, relates to the rapidly-evolving nature of humanitarian relief and assistance.

The second, as we mark this day, is simply our deep, deep admiration and gratitude for the many heroes of our humanitarian work. They, and many of you, are truly extraordinary and heroic.

I have to say that before I joined USAID, I didn't really appreciate the scope and range of what it is that we do in our humanitarian work. You can see it in some of the numbers. In 2017, USAID responded to 53 crises in 51 countries. For only the second time in our agency's history, we had six DART teams, Disaster Assistance Response Teams, deployed simultaneously around the world. The first time that happened was the preceding year.

At this very moment, we have pre-positioned resources and experts in just about every part of the world. We have seven emergency stockpiles in places like Djibouti, South Africa, and Malaysia. We have full-time response staff in 30 countries. We have six regional offices and 11 adviser offices, located with partners like the military's combatant commands.

One of my most vivid memories from my first year as Administrator was, essentially, a crash course in how some of this works. One day, during last year's UN General Assembly meetings, we received word of a terrible earthquake, the second one that had struck Mexico City. One evening that week, I was walking down the street between back-to-back dinners with two different mobile phones: one with the White House, one with the DART team leader.

I was dodging pedestrians, I'm sure looking ridiculous, while the disaster professionals were helping me navigate something much more serious: how to rapidly mobilize an emergency response team to Mexico City to help our neighbors to the South respond to its second earthquake in just a few weeks' time.

The government said to us that they'd welcome the assistance of a highly-specialized type of international search and rescue team, something really hard to find, especially in a hurry. But, thanks to the White House, our talented team here in D.C., our network of first responders, and the DOD, we were able to transport and stand up just such a team in Mexico City before breakfast the next morning. I'm honored to be part of a network, which includes many of you, that can make something like that happen.

But, as we gather to mark World Humanitarian Day this year, we have to acknowledge that natural disaster responses no longer epitomizes today's humanitarian work. We still do that, to be sure, and I think we do it well. But, these days, we face vast other challenges all around the world.

Our humanitarian resources are increasingly being deployed, not for storms and quakes and the like, but for man-made disasters, from conflict-driven displacement to tyranny-driven economic collapse.

Our DARTs are more likely to be deployed for those types of crises, and by far, most of our humanitarian assistance dollars are being allocated for those kinds of needs. There's the ongoing tragedy in Syria, a horrific conflict in its seventh year and one of the most complex crises of our time. Over 13 million people, more than 80 percent of the current population, need humanitarian assistance. There's the ongoing struggle in Afghanistan, where 3.3 million people need humanitarian assistance. A recent upturn in violence has claimed 1,700 civilian lives this year alone.

A dozen or so years ago, I travelled to Afghanistan as a congressman. And, in those days, our presence was measured by the tens of thousands of military boots on the ground. These days, we still have some troops there, but our boots on the ground are increasingly humanitarian and development workers, some of whom have been back to work in Afghanistan two, three, and even four times.

Nine hundred aid workers have been killed in Afghanistan in the last decade.

There's South Sudan, the most dangerous place of all for humanitarian workers. Seven million people in South Sudan, including 1 million living on the brink of famine, depend on international assistance just to survive.

Then there are the man-made crises far closer to home. One of the most underreported catastrophes in the world today is what's happening in and around Venezuela. More than 2.3 million Venezuelans have already fled. It's the largest single mass exodus in the history of the Western Hemisphere. And it's ongoing. I saw this first hand when I visited Cucuta, in Colombia, and the Bolivar Bridge last month. Five thousand new migrants enter Colombia each and every day. They're desperately seeking food and emergency medical care. They're seeking survival.

This isn't merely Colombia's challenge. Venezuelans are fleeing to places like Brazil and Ecuador, as we read over the weekend, and northward to the Caribbean. The list of man-made, conflict-caused, and regime-driven humanitarian crises goes on and on. After all, there are roughly 70,000,000 displaced people in the world today.

Since humanitarian needs and crises are changing, we're doing our best our to change and to respond to them, with the best tools and ideas that we can find. We're applying lessons learned over and over again. And we're fostering innovation.

This past February, USAID and our British cousins, DFID, joined in launching the first-ever Humanitarian Grand Challenge. The Grand Challenge mechanism is a way for the world's best thinkers, from organizations large and small, for-profit and non-profit, business, academia, to offer new ideas in helping (inaudible) relief to the most vulnerable, hardest to reach communities in the world.

It's a chance for us to identify and invest in the best and the brightest. We've already received 615 applications from 86 different countries, including a third from women and nearly half from lower and middle income countries. We're excited to see and mobilize the results, and they're due out this fall.

Given how much of our humanitarian response is in conflict zones and fragile states, we're paying more attention than ever to the obstacles and challenges that factions, gangs, militias, and corrupt officials are throwing at relief teams. Case in point. In April of this year, a leading humanitarian agency reported that it had encountered no fewer than 70 checkpoints on the 300-mile trip from Aden to Sanaa, in Yemen. I'm sure those were just helpful citizens offering directions along the way.

But it's the kind of situation that caused us to launch the Strengthening Field Level Capacity on Humanitarian Access and Negotiations program last August.

It's aimed at helping relief team members better understand practical negotiation techniques and safe, effective field-level decision making.

Because there is nothing more important to us, nothing more important to me, than the safety and security of our humanitarian network, that's the area that we're especially focusing on. We must stay ahead of threats and potential threats. So we're supporting organizations dedicated to improving security standards and training for NGO staff. We're modifying our policy so that security, costs for equipment, staff, training and site enhancements can be more easily built into your contracts and grant budgets.

We're investing in new tools to help us map and minimize risk to operations at the most basic level, the level of, for example, moving food from a plane to a truck, to a warehouse and distribution center. But, let's face it: we can take every possible step to minimize risk. We can't make it go away.

And many of you here know that all too well. One of the most inspiring and humbling parts of my job is getting to meet the heroes who know the risks but carry on just because they care.

I saw firsthand, when I visited IDP camps just outside of Raqqa. I heard stories of challenges that humanitarian heroes face each day, as they strive to bring water and food and medical care to those who've been victimized by the years of conflict. With Assad's regime still holding sway in parts of the country, there's no real, legitimate government partner with whom to work. And their path is riddled with unexploded ordinance, which is going off at the rate of, roughly, three dozen per day.

The shelters they sleep in at night shake with the dropping of bombs each and every day. And yet, somehow, because of their commitment to others, they wake up the next morning and they do it all over again. These are the heroes that we hold high this World Humanitarian Day.

People like Iraq's Salam Muhammad. When Anbar and Kirkuk were liberated from ISIS at the end of last year, humanitarians were the first ones on the ground, providing food, water, and medical care. Iraq staff with the U.S.-funded NGO spend their days clearing mines and educating their neighbors about the dangers the ordinance poses.

Salam decided to joint this particular NGO after witnessing several tragedies that left some of his relatives and friends injured, or killed. He was one of the NGO's first recruits in Iraq. Every day is challenging for the de-miners; any accident can be fatal. But Salam and his staff love their jobs and show up for work every day filled with passion because they know what they're doing matters.

There's Jay Nash, a regional adviser who has lived and worked for USAID in the Democratic Republic of the Congo for the past 20 years. The DRC is, as you know, no stranger to aid worker attacks, with 210 people being killed, wounded, or kidnapped since 2000.

In 1999, while visiting a university in the DRC, Jay was ambushed by a mob of students who thought he was a spy for neighboring Rwanda. The mob torched the U.S. embassy vehicle he had been driving, but Jay escaped after a group of brave students made a ring around him, guarding him until they were able to duck him into the girls' dormitory.

Sitting in that dorm, trapped for hours with a mob threatening to break down the doors, Jay said he had one thought: he thought of the children with disabilities that he was helping in his free time. DRC has a higher than average rate of disability. And he thought to himself, if he died in that girls' dorm, who would take care of those kids?

After eight hours, he made a run for it, and he didn't look back. Not only did he stay in DRC working for USAID, in 2001, he started his own NGO called StandProud. It provides treatment and equipment to young people with disabilities, helping them gain dignity, mobility, and independence.

There's Fareed Noori, one of the victims of last month's attack on a government building in Jalalabad, Afghanistan. The blast killed 15 people. Fareed had been working in Afghanistan since 2010 for a USAID partner the International Rescue Committee, as a water, sanitation, and hygiene engineer. As his colleagues noted, whenever there was an emergency, Fareed was the first in the field to help with whatever was needed.

Fareed was in an emergency meeting at the time of the attack. He was killed doing the work of helping others, to which he had committed his life. Fareed leaves behind four children, two girls, two boys, all under the age of 9.

Another victim of that attack was Bakhtawara; it's a pseudonym, a bright and impressive 22-year-old woman. She was working for the International Organization for Migration, another USAID partner. She had married very early and had a child by the age of 16. But, despite being a young mother in a conservative community, she fought for her education and learned English. After school, she knew she wanted to help people. She convinced her family to let her, not just get job, but get a career as a humanitarian.

When her husband was killed in a bombing three years ago, she continued working as a 19-year-old single mother. Her job took her to the very government offices that were often targeted by insurgents. On the day she was killed, she was attending one of the meetings that she had hoped would help her find better ways to deliver aid to people in need. The building was bombed and then overrun with gunfire. She died doing what she focused her life on, helping people build a brighter future.

Extremist insurgents in Afghanistan like to target these workers. There's a special place in hell...

There's the story of the seven aid workers killed in South Sudan in March of this year. They were killed when their car was ambushed along the 185-mile route of the badly rutted roads in South Sudan's remote east. Their vehicle had been labeled as belonging to an NGO right down to the license plates. It didn't matter. Six of the seven worked for a small Sudanese NGO called the Grass Roots Empowerment and Development Organization, GREDO, which is supported by USAID and worked to promote sustainable development at the grassroots level.

Three of the victims were helping to build a youth center. Two taught English. One was also a driver and the father of a newborn. Three were new recruits. Humanitarian heroes, one and all. And there were thousands of others. And I stand in awe of what they do.

Final thoughts. Why do they do it? What causes them to go out and take these risks? I learned the answer, and (inaudible), when I visited Bangladesh and Burma with Secretary Pompeo earlier this year. In Bangladesh, I went to a Cox's Bazaar, and I saw the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya who are barely surviving in that camp.

They are vulnerable to monsoons and cyclones and without the humanitarian workers, life would be very different. It's bad enough already.

And then I went to Burma, and I travelled to an IDP camp near Sittwe. And what I saw there was the most disturbing thing I have ever seen in development. I saw young families trapped. I saw young families unable to go to school and completely dependent upon the emergency food assistance that we provide.

So, those workers take the risks because they are all that is standing between an even worse catastrophe and death in these young people, these victims. Today we celebrate them. Thank you.

MODERATOR: Thank you. (inaudible) I'm also the director of the Humanitarian Agenda, as Dan mentioned, which is what this event is a part of, it's a new partnership as as we have this conversation. Firstly, I want to ask you -- well, one, congratulations; it's been about a year now since you've been appointed, and you've been back one year? So, happy anniversary.

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Pretty close. Thank you -- ask my staff.

MODERATOR: (inaudible) We're all very happy that you were chosen to be in this position because, as Dan alluded to, your deep background in international developments. One of the things that you said a lot in this position is talking about, "The purpose of foreign aid is to end the need for its existence." It's one of your key messages that we hear time and time again. So, I want you to elaborate on sort of how that squares with humanitarian assistance. Right? There's a big difference of international developments for, you know, economic growth and being self-reliant. But humanitarian assistance is so often, as you mentioned, driven by tyranny and regimes, and it's about saving lives. So, how do you marry those two?

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Well, first off you're right. What I've said since the day that I was first announced is that the purpose of our foreign assistance must be ending its need to exist. And what I mean by that is, we should look every day at ways of helping people take on their own challenges. Not because we want to do less or walk away, but because we believe in human dignity, and we believe in the innate desire of everyone -- every individual, every family, every community, every country -- to want to craft their own bright future.

In the area of humanitarian assistance, what I always say is, look, we will always stand with people when crisis strikes because that is who we are, that is in the American DNA. But at the same time we'll also look for ways to foster resilience so that we can help countries and communities withstand future shocks. And we've seen promising results in places like Ethiopia. You mentioned on the food security front, Ethiopia's a country that's had six consecutive years of drought and yet not falling into full famine. And that obviously is about much more than the work we're doing, but I think we're making a difference in helping Ethiopians build their ability to withstand consecutive years of drought.

So, I see the two as fitting very well together, and the other piece to it is, on the humanitarian front, again, we have natural disasters and man-made disasters. The man-made disasters are coming at us fast and furious. It's also about preventing the next generation of crisis and conflict. I'm often asked what it is that keeps me up at night, and what keeps me up at night are our children being born in camps, and growing up in camps, and getting educated in camps. And when, God willing, the walls come down and the gate opens up, the question is, are those young people going to be prepared to take on the challenges of the world? Are they connected to the communities around them?

And so with the humanitarian work that we do in many of these places, it's really aimed towards the future. And so I think it fits in well; it's a longer term of view, but I see them -- really is all going in the same direction.

MODERATOR: I'm actually headed out to Nigeria in a few weeks and doing some research looking at Feed the Future portfolio there, but really looking at the nexus between that humanitarian and development assistance, you know, how that would work in an unstable environment. So, I'm anxious to see what I learn from that as well. You know, the Trump administration has called for reduction, of course, of U.S. foreign assistance, but, regardless of that, the U.S. continues to be -- and dominate as the largest donor worldwide.

When you're talking to your colleagues in this administration, what is it that you talk about in terms of why it's so important for us to sustain this leadership? I mean, I could throw out numbers and I'll do a little bit.

In 2018, the U.S. pledged 29 billion foreign assistance. Five billion of that was dedicated to humanitarian assistance. I was looking this morning at how that compares to others, and, I mean, the UK -we're event twice what they do. So, you know, we're such a leader in this space. Why is that so important? Why should we dedicate American tax dollars or more importantly to cleaning up other people's wars?

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Well, first off, you're correct; we're far and away the world's humanitarian leader, and, quite frankly, two or three or four of them together don't really add up to what we're doing. We need other countries to do more because, with those challenges that I laid out, those man-made challenges, I don't see an end in sight, quite frankly, in any of them. So, these are open-ended challenges, and while we are proud to be the world's leader, we need others to step up to the plate. I will tell you, what I worry about is, because these man-made disasters, man-made, often regime-driven disasters, because they are open-ended, there's a real risk that it will begin to take up so much of our budget that it threatens our ability to do some of the development investments that we all want to do, including quite frankly, some of the resilience work that we want to do.

So, we do need others to step up to the plate. But in terms of, you know, what I say to the rest of the administration, it's not a hard cell, you know, pushing them to open a door. The administration is very supportive of our humanitarian work; we continue to be the world's leader; that's not going to change. And I think it's really -- the arguments for it fall on a number of different fronts. Number one, this is an expression of American values. This is who we are and always have been. It is a projection of the American spirit, in my view. So, I think that is very much alive and well in the American psyche, in the American DNA.

But secondly, it's in our interest. Just take for a moment the assistance that we're providing to Colombians, supporting Venezuelans who have fled the border, doing the same thing in some other countries. There is great American self-interest in supporting the ability of these communities to withstand this migration, to help afford some of those costs, because the instability that results from not being able to provide support, I think, is an issue, is a diplomatic issue, is a national security issue. And, as you heard me mention, I think particularly what is happening in the Western Hemisphere is completely underreported.

When I was at the Summit of the Americas, I heard from a number of countries, including Caribbean states, that they were starting to feel the presence of Venezuelans fleeing. And while they're all supportive of their neighbors, clearly it's not without a cost. But the same thing is true in many other parts of the world. So, the investments that we make on the humanitarian front are oftentimes in our self-interest. I look at the work that we're doing on the humanitarian front with an eye towards providing a lifeline so that those who've been displaced in parts of the Middle East can return. That's in our interest. That's a stated foreign policy priority. So, you know, yes, there is certainly -- I think the morality that we -- the expression of values that we've always supported. But I also believe it's in our interest and our national security interest.

MODERATOR: And thank you for reminding us in your speech about humanitarian heroes and what World Humanitarian Day is about. You talked about the unfortunate situation that in today's crises a lot of the time aid workers are targeted specifically. So, I want to ask you whether you feel like there's an erosion of international humanitarian law over, you know, that you talked about the evolution of humanitarian assistance. And so as the world gets more and more disorderly, we see more and more protracted conflicts. Do you feel that both governments and non-state actors alike are violating this law, and is there anything that we can or should be doing more I guess, particularly from the donor or U.S. government perspective, to hold them more accountable?

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Well, first off, we in the U.S. demand adherence to international law, international humanitarian law. So, we demand that unfettered access is provided, for example, in Rakhine, in Northern Rakhine in Burma. So, that's always been important for us. But if you're asking whether some non-state actors like ISIS are breaking international law, yeah. Having been to both Raqqa and Northern Iraq, what has been done there by ISIS is truly evil. There is simply no other word to describe what they've done: the desecration of graves, the desecration of churches, the disappearances of Yazidis. It's staggering and truly evil. Of course they are breaking every standard that we all know.

Yes, it is a challenge to international law; one of the best ways that we can respond is to say that, and to say it often, and to keep coming back to it. Because I do think the American opinion matters. And to say all across the political spectrum here in this country that we stand united and demand adherence to those standards and that what is happening is unacceptable.

MODERATOR: You brought up demanding unfettered access. I want to let our audience know that the Humanitarian Agenda will be going to the capitol this fall, and we're focusing specifically on the issue of humanitarian access. You brought up, of course, in Yemen, that's 70 choke hold points that David Miliband also talked about when he was here in Yemen -- in April on Yemen. I also want to say we're publishing a policy piece on Yemen here at CSIS that will come out this week.

I have many more questions, but I think we'll turn to the audience, so that we can engage them as well. So, if you have a question, please raise your hand. We will take it in rounds of threes, so announce yourself and where you're from. Please keep it concise, and at the end of it, there should be a question mark. So, who has a question? Yes, sir, right over here. Thanks, gentlemen.

QUESTION: I'll ask a real fast question, my name is Rob, I work for USAID, thank you, sir. My question is about the environment, I'm just back from the Congo, where Ebola is happening and I was just in Madagascar where there was a plague outbreak. A lot of the disasters you talked about have an environmental component, and we're doing some in the United States, but some people think we really need to do more, and that's a little bit against maybe some people in the administration, so I would love for you to talk about your thoughts about that.

MODERATOR: Great question. More? Let's do Julie Howard right there.

QUESTION: Thank you. Mr. Administrator, thank you for your comments. Could you comment on the recent story in the Washington Post about the potential pullback of $3 billion in foreign assistance funds and how that may affect our ability to respond to humanitarian as well as the resilience opportunities you described?

MODERATOR: And, Julie, will you introduce yourself for those that don't know you?

QUESTION: Sorry?

MODERATOR: Would you introduce yourself?

QUESTION: Oh, yes, okay. So, I'm a non-resident senior adviser here at CSIS, thank you.

MODERATOR: Julie and I are also going to be travel partners when I go to Nigeria. It's actually Julie that is leading that study. Let's take one more question right back here. Yes, thank you.

QUESTION: Hi, my name's (inaudible) a reporter from Voice of America. There are a number of humanitarian assistance and also food aid to North Korea spended by the United States Government. What are the key principles that all the United States Government providing assistance to North Korea and under which scenario can assistance to North Korea be resumed?

MODERATOR: Thank you.

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Sure.

MODERATOR: Easy questions, right?

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: On North Korea, simply put, there have been no discussions that I'm aware of regarding assistance into North Korea. I certainly haven't been part of any such discussions.

Secondly, on the pullback, while we haven't received official notification of anything, I've heard of nothing that would change our status as the world's leader in humanitarian assistance. I haven't seen anything. Third, on -- first off, it's interesting that you visited Ebola country and you talked about conservation, because their linked, obviously.

I think that's one of the reasons we've seen the outbreak of Ebola in other formerly, entirely rare diseases in some of the areas where we've seen deforestation and such. What we're trying to do at USAID, many of you are aware, we're developing metrics that are aimed at helping us to better understand a country's capacity and commitment in a number of sectors, and conservation's one of them.

So, we're looking at things like biodiversity and how resources are managed, because we think it's important, and it's something that we hope to be able to incentivize in the future and have conversations around. I have a personal interest in the conservation front and as you know, we recently made some announcements regarding assistance to Colombia and helping them in their natural resource management. So, I think it's an important area that shouldn't be divorced from the rest of development.

We think it is one of those key areas that needs to be assessed and looked at as we help countries, in what we call, as you know, probably ad nauseam as I talk about the journey to self-reliance. One of those areas is, in fact, conservation, biodiversity, and the capacity to manage resources.

MODERATOR: Let's take another round of questions. Raise your hand high. Joel?

QUESTION: Joel (inaudible) from Norwegian Refugee Council, thank you Administrator Green for your excellent remarks. I'm afraid I have to follow up on the rescission question. We're not going to let you off so easily.

What's been reported is that there's going to be a cut of a billion to UN peacekeeping operations, and that has the potential to not only disrupt work in South Sudan and Somalia and the Congo, but it also has the potential to disrupt, through further chaos in refugee flows, neighboring countries that we care about that are our allies, such as Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda, and so on.

I guess -- the argument is that, even if USAID itself doesn't lose funding or doesn't lose out through the rescission, the work will lose out, I feel, if this really goes ahead. So, if you could just offer more thought on -- I mean, you said you're pushing on an open door when it comes to international work, and, honestly, it's not always obvious to see that from the outside. Thank you.

MODERATOR: Thanks, Joel. Let's do these two right here in the front, Haley, yep.

QUESTION: Thank you. Hi, good morning. Nicole (inaudible), I'm a senior associate here at CSIS. Thank you, Administrator Green, for your great comments. You mentioned briefly -- you touched on young people and so, given the disproportionate (inaudible) of people in these countries and how often humanitarian crises can disproportionately affect children and young people, can you talk a little bit more about some of the focus that you're keeping in these initiatives and on the work that you're doing to remedy the situation for youth? Thanks.

MODERATOR: Great, and I think there was a question right behind you if there still is, yeah.

QUESTION: Hello, my name is Jessica (inaudible), and I'm a Jeane Kirkpatrick Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. You mention in your remarks about the man-made nature of a lot of the ongoing conflicts, and I was wondering if you could speak to USAID's role not only in providing humanitarian response in that context, but also the active role that the agency is taking in countering and preventing ongoing violent extremism.

MODERATOR: Great question.

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: That's a great question. Joel, on the budget front, I really don't have much more that I can provide. Part of it is I'm not attempting to duck, I just literally don't have more, I'd refer you to OMB quite frankly. But again, you know, they is simply looking at the numbers of the last year and what we're doing on the humanitarian front. There is simply no argument that we have backed away from our role as the world's leading humanitarian assistant. Just objectively, we are far and away the largest humanitarian donor.

We're the largest humanitarian donor in Syria; we're the largest humanitarian donor in conflict after conflict. I do think it is fair for all of us to talk about how it is that these resource needs can be met in the future. I don't mean just the immediate future, but the open-ended nature of these conflicts and this instability and this displacement is staggering.

It is what worries me, because these conflicts that we're seeing -- South Sudan; Yemen -- you and I have talked about Yemen a great deal in recent months. It's open-ended, and I do worry about that. I do worry about our ability to meet resource needs and, you know, the world meeting these resource needs. They're significant.

On the question of young people, particularly in displaced settings, we are looking at a number of ways of accelerating crisis situation education, conflict community education. We've received generous support from Congress, along with generous directives from Congress, in the area of education. What we've been trying to do, and Congresswoman Lowey has long been a great leader on this front, is to try to make sure that we are able to prioritize these crisis needs, and I do think that it's a crisis. It does worry me a great deal.

So, we're looking at some of the use of innovative technologies to see if that can help us in these settings, but it is a very focus and as we develop our basic education strategy going forward, I think you'll see a particular focus on those areas, because it is, as you suggest, very important for the future.

In terms of preventing violent extremism, we have, as you know, an important role under the National Security Strategy. We are investing in trying to identify the drivers of violent extremism.

One of my strong beliefs that comes, actually, from my time at International Republican Institute is that we shouldn't jump to conclusions and try to draw global assumptions and lessons. Instead, we need to look at local drivers. Experience shows us that it's often local drivers, community drivers that become flashpoints for extremism. And so, we're certainly investing research there, and some of the preventative tools that are there; from my days as an Ambassador in Tanzania, I often point out that after the terrible bombing, embassy bombing, the work that we did with our Tanzanian partners in the wake of that, to take on some of the drivers of poverty and despair, I believe was an important down payment for preventing violent extremism. So, I'm a big believer in tackling those drivers and tackling that which can lead to despair. So, that will always be a key part of our work.

MODERATOR: Mr. Green, at Davos this year, you talked about the importance of tapping into the creativity of the private sector, and how innovative financing mechanisms and other innovative technologies can really create better development outcomes. In your speech today, you talked about the Humanitarian Grand Challenges. Are there any specific companies or partnerships or technologies that you're most excited about right now. The things that you see that are happening in the field, you've been in in this career -- I mean, you've had a career for decades that are all related to development --

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Don't say decades.

MODERATOR: Okay, sorry -- you're very young. The last year that you've been an administrator, what are the -- what are the cool, new technologies that we should know about, that are out there, that the mainstream audience has no idea how we're delivering (inaudible) humanitarian assistance?

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Yeah, I mean, to be honest, there are countless. During global innovation we -- which we had last fall, whenever it was, and I had a chance to walk through the marketplace at the Ronald Reagan Building, and take a look at some of the innovations. Everything from lunchbox-size solar batteries allowing us to power work in refugee and displaced persons camps to some of the weather forecasting stations that are created with 3D printers. You go through there and it's extraordinary. And it fills you with great hope for our ability to reach out and touch more people in more settings than ever before. In the area of financing -- we announced in India last fall, the world's first Development Impact Bond for maternal and child health, and the largest development impact bond of its kind. So, what we did through that is to set outcomes that we needed to see in order to repay the investment, but in terms of the means, we turn the private sector loose.

And in the follow-up conversations that we had, you can see that our partners, some of whom are based here in D.C., were terribly excited. Because for the first time they didn't have us micro-managing each step along the way, but saying, "Look, these are the outcomes that we need, you go get them." And really tapping into the private sector, nonprofit and for-profit. Also, in the area of displaced communities on World Humanitarian Day, the use of biometrics to establish identification of refugees and IDPs as well as some of the digital technologies for delivering resources -- assistance so that recipients have modest purchasing power in surrounding communities, thereby not only providing assistance, not only holding onto human dignity and allowing them to make some decisions, but also providing a tangible benefit to those host communities which are often placing a disproportionate burden by those who are there. So, it -- it's really using business principles, human nature, and I'd like to say there are new technologies, but my kids will tell me very quickly they're old technologies, just new to someone like me. Tapping into these, I think, creates enormous, enormous hope for reaching into places we haven't before.

MODERATOR: I want to continue on that "hope" trend for a minute. So, you know, when you think about the crises, many of which are located in Syria, Yemen, in South Sudan --

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Is that the whole part?

MODERATOR: Now, I know. Well, this is where I'm kind of heading with this. Is there a crisis that you have your eyes on that you do see any reversal in terms of reversal trends, or any progress? Is there a place that you do think we're going to be able to see some positive outcomes in the next -- I should say decade there, because I know it takes time. But is there one that you see not going the wrong direction?

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Oh, sure. There are lots of promising stories. I think Ethiopia and Eritrea provide tremendous hope. One of the challenges, again, as an old democracy guy, one of the challenges that I saw was the enabling environment, for civil society and NGOs in a place like Ethiopia, and with the transition to a new government, we're having conversations that we didn't have before, in ways that I think will be very helpful. Also, I think that their willingness to partner with us more and more will help us make some investments in those areas -- in those resilience areas that will not only help Ethiopia and Eritrea, but also, quite frankly, I think will save us money in the long run. So, there are lots of stories like that, I think all around the continent of Africa and elsewhere. But there are -- every hopeful story is replaced by a new challenge. None of these challenges are inevitable, as problems. But they do require us to be innovative. They do require us to be engaged, they do require us to invest up front, and to be innovative in those procuring methods and how we partner. All of those things need to be done if we're going to turn -- either prevent the challenges from becoming crises, or turn problems into solutions.

MODERATOR: Thank you. I lived in Ethiopia for three years, and I have to say it's quite exciting to see the change that's happening there. I'd like to just turn it onto -- are there any more burning questions? No hands are shooting up; let's do one more right here in the front.

QUESTION: Hi, this is Chris (inaudible) with the State Department. Thank you so much for your leadership of USAID and development. I have a question regarding the nexus between humanitarian assistance, you've been mentioning the nexus with conflict development stabilization -- how does humanitarian assistance fit in, or is it just a one piece element that is disassociated from political issues?

MODERATOR: Great, and as you answer that and any other final remarks you'd like to make as well.

ADMINISTRATOR GREEN: Sure. Thank you and again, thanks to all of you. So I think from the National Security Strategy, you see -- also the Stabilization Assistance Review, you see, I think, a clear multi-agency, multi-department approach to many of these challenges. Our relationship with the State Department is as close as it's ever been. I've received nothing but support and affirmation from Secretary Pompeo. We are working, as you know, closely because all of these challenges touch each of us in different ways and we each have different capacities.

You know, I think it's probably never been more clear than in a place like the Burma-Bangladesh crisis. So, you know, when Rohingya in one place their IDPs and when they're in another place, they're refugees, and then of course we all look at that and say, "forget the labels, they're people who we need to help out," and invest in, and so we do. Also, I would say that both State and AID have as close of a working relationship with DoD as we've had in a very long time. As many of you know, we have a couple dozen detailees over at the Pentagon and the Combatant Commands. DoD has made it clear that they don't want to do what we do or State does, and we certainly don't want to do what they do. So, I would think those seamless teams and close communications are helping us. And going back to the budget question, they have to; there's not enough money for duplication. There's not enough money for bureaucracy. We just have to stay in constant communication.

As to (inaudible) final remarks, I really would like to leave off with where my remarks, my opening remarks left off -- or left off. On this World Humanitarian Day, I would ask that we all think of those men and women who are in places in far places in world, in conflict zones, in fragile settings, day after day, delivering emergency medical assistance, food assistance, water and hygiene under the most trying of circumstances, difficult security situations. They do it because they care. They're my heroes. I'm sure they're your heroes. They are patriots. And what a wonderful expression of values and our priorities that with what they're doing each and every day. Thank you.


          

World: Forced Migration Review Issue 58: Economies: Rights and access to work

 Cache   
Source: Forced Migration Review, University of Oxford
Country: Afghanistan, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Ecuador, Eritrea, Germany, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Myanmar, Pakistan, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, World, Zambia

From the editors

When people are forced by conflict or other circumstances to leave their homes, they usually also leave behind their means of economic activity and subsistence. In their new location, they may not be able, or permitted, to work to support themselves. This has wide-ranging implications not only for people’s immediate earning capacity and well-being but also for community relations, economic development and the capacity of future generations to lead fulfilling lives. In our main feature on Economies, authors explore the complex interactions of the constraints and opportunities involved, drawing on case-studies from around the world and highlighting the roles of new actors, new technologies and new – or renewed – approaches.

We are also pleased to include two ‘mini-features’ in this FMR, one on Refugeeled social protection and one on Humans and animals in refugee camps. (See the back cover if you are interested in collaborating with FMR on a mini-feature – or a full feature.)

We would like to thank Karen Jacobsen (Tufts University) and Khalid Koser (Global Community Engagement and Resilience Fund) for their assistance as advisors to the Economies feature theme. We are also grateful to the following donors for their support of this issue: ESRC-AHRC (Economic and Social Research Council and Arts and Humanities Research Council) Global Challenges Research Fund, the Global Program on Forced Displacement of the World Bank Group, Mercy Corps, UNHCR Division of Resilience and Solutions (Livelihoods Unit) and the Wellcome Trust.

See www.fmreview.org/economies to access the magazine, its accompanying ‘digest’ and all individual articles. A podcast of each article is also available. FMR 58 will be available in English, Arabic, Spanish and French. For printed copies, please email us at fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk.

Forthcoming issues (see www.fmreview.org/forthcoming)

• FMR 59: Twentieth anniversary of the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement (October 2018)

• FMR 60: Education (February 2019)

Follow us on Facebook or Twitter or sign up for email alerts at www.fmreview.org/request/alerts.

Marion Couldrey and Jenny Peebles
Editors, Forced Migration Review


          

World: UNHCR Mapping of Social Safety Nets for Refugees: Opportunities and Challenges

 Cache   
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Colombia, Ecuador, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Malaysia, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Rwanda, Sudan, Turkey, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Purpose

The aim of the mapping of social safety nets (SSN) was to explore the potential for alignment between humanitarian cash assistance and SSN in forced displacement situations. It considered various aspects of SSN, including programme design, targeting and the legal and regulatory framework. The mapping categorised 18 countries based on the opportunities and challenges with including refugees in the national social safety nets.

Rationale

While recognising an increasing trend in inclusion in national systems, refugees in particular rarely enjoy the same rights as citizens. Only in every second UNHCR operation, refugees can choose their place of residence; in less than 50% they access national health care systems; in two third they access the national education systems; and in less than 40% they are allowed to work according to law and policy and in practice. In approximately 10% of UNHCR operations, refugees are included in the national or local development plans. Initiatives related to shock-responsive social protection rarely address conflict and include displaced people.

UNHCR is placing more emphasis on the additional value of cash beyond the monetisation of humanitarian assistance through promoting financial inclusion, social protection and socio-economic development. Implemented as part of the basic needs approach, multi-purpose cash grants, which represent 60% of UNHCR’s cash and link multi-sectoral cash assistance with the provision of essential services and protection, present important opportunities for leveraging social safety nets to include forcibly displaced people.

Key findings

Opportunities

• Growing opportunities for inclusion of displaced people in national social protection systems.

• The mapping found that inclusion can happen in 4 countries; may be possible in 10 countries; and will be challenging in the near future in 4 countries.

• In 6 countries, UNHCR’s cash assistance was to some extent aligned with the government’s in terms of targeting, transfer mechanisms, transfer value and monitoring.

• The interest in funding SSN in forced displacement contexts is growing among external stakeholders, notably as a potential exit strategy from humanitarian assistance and a more efficient means of managing protracted displacement.

• The Global Compact on Refugees and the World Bank IDA 18 Refugee and Host Community SubWindow provide opportunities for enhancing SSN for refugees.

• Refugees are increasingly accessing national services in certain contexts.

Challenges

• The majority of national social safety nets are not accessible to non-nationals. When refugees are granted partial access to SSN, full access is often limited due to restrictive legal frameworks.

• Governments rarely have capacity, tools and processes in place that can adapt to the impacts of mass displacement shocks.

• Complex targeting, across multiple safety nets, coordinated by numerous ministries make data analysis, accountability and coordination challenging.

• Funding of humanitarian and government safety nets often differ in terms of duration, political requirements, objectives and conditions, making alignment challenging.

• Refugees do not always have access to national services.


          

World: FPMA Bulletin #3, 10 April 2018

 Cache   
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Benin, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Eswatini, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, World, Zambia

KEY MESSAGES

↗ International prices of wheat and maize rose in March for the third consecutive month and averaged more than 10 percent above their levels in December 2017. Prices were mainly supported by concerns over the impact of prolonged dryness in key-growing areas of the United States of America and Argentina, coupled with strong demand. International rice prices remained relatively stable.

↗ In South America, severe dry weather and strong demand underpinned the domestic prices of grains in key exporting country, Argentina, while the price of yellow maize spiked also in Brazil in March.

↗ In East Africa, in the Sudan, the strong upward surge in prices of coarse grains faltered in March but they remained at record or near-record highs, reflecting the removal of the wheat subsidies and the strong depreciation of the local currency.

↗ In Southern Africa, in Madagascar, prices of locally-produced and imported rice declined in February from the record highs reached in January with the harvesting of the minor season paddy crop and following an appreciation of the Malagasy Ariary.


          

World: FPMA Bulletin #2, 9 March 2018

 Cache   
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Eswatini, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

KEY MESSAGES

↗ International prices of wheat and maize increased further in February, mainly supported by weather-related concerns and currency movements. Export price quotations of rice also continued to strengthen, although the increases were capped by subsiding global demand for Indica supplies.

↗ In East Africa, in the Sudan, prices of the main staples: sorghum, millet and wheat, continued to increase in February and reached record highs, underpinned by the removal of the wheat subsidies and the strong depreciation of the Sudanese Pound.

↗ In Southern Africa, in Madagascar, prices of rice hit record highs at the start of the year, as a result of tight supplies following a sharp drop in the 2017 output to a substantially below-average level and a weaker currency.

↗ In West Africa, prices of coarse grains continued to generally increase in February and reached levels above those a year earlier despite the good harvests gathered in late 2017, due to a strong demand for stock replenishment, coupled with localized production shortfalls and insecurity in some areas.


          

World: FPMA Bulletin #1, 16 February 2018

 Cache   
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Eswatini, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Key messages

  • International prices of wheat and maize were generally firmer in January, supported by weather-related concerns and a weaker US dollar. Export price quotations of rice also strengthened mainly buoyed by renewed Asian demand.

  • In East Africa, in the Sudan, prices of the main staples: sorghum, millet and wheat, rose sharply for the third consecutive month in January and reached record highs, underpinned by the removal of wheat subsidies and the strong depreciation of the Sudanese Pound.

  • In West Africa, prices of coarse grains were at relatively high levels in January, despite the good harvests gathered in late 2017, due to strong demand for stock replenishment and insecurity in some areas.


          

World: FPMA Bulletin #11, 11 December 2017

 Cache   
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Eswatini, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Key messages

↗ International prices of wheat and maize remained relatively stable in November, reflecting good supply conditions, while export quotations of rice strengthened amid increased buying interest and currency movements.

↗ In East Africa, prices of cereals in November continued to decline in most countries with the ongoing 2017 harvests and were at levels around or below those a year earlier with a few exceptions. By contrast, in the Sudan, prices surged and reached record highs in some markets, mainly underpinned by the sharp depreciation of the Sudanese Pound in the parallel market.

↗ In Central America, after the sharp increases recorded in the previous month, prices of white maize eased in November as market flows returned to normal, after disruption caused by severe rains in the previous month. Good domestic availabilities kept prices at levels below those a year earlier.


          

World: Education in Emergencies - ECHO Factsheet

 Cache   
Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Armenia, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Key messages

Education is lifesaving. Education is crucial for both the protection and healthy development of girls and boys affected by crises. It can rebuild their lives; restore their sense of normality and safety, and provide them with important life skills. It helps children to be self-sufficient, to be heard, and to have more influence on issues that affect them. It is also one of the best tools to invest in their long-term future, and in the peace, stability and economic growth of their countries.

Education in emergencies actions can help prevent, reduce, mitigate and respond to emergency-related academic, financial, social, institutional, physical and infrastructural barriers to children's education, while ensuring the provision of safe, inclusive and quality education.

In 2017, the EU dedicates 6% of its annual humanitarian aid budget to education in emergencies, one of the most underfunded sectors of humanitarian aid. In 2018, this amount will increase to 8%.

4.7 million girls and boys in 52 countries have benefited from EUfunded education in emergencies actions between 2012 and 2017.


          

World: FPMA Bulletin #10, 10 November 2017

 Cache   
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Eswatini, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Key messages

  • The benchmark US wheat price declined in October mostly because of higher supply prospects while maize quotations firmed due to rain-induced harvest delays. International rice prices strengthened in October, mainly reflecting seasonally tight Japonica and fragrant supplies.

  • In East and West Africa, cereal prices declined in October with the 2017 ongoing or recently-started harvests. However, concerns over crop outputs and civil insecurity kept prices at high levels in some countries, particularly in Ethiopia, Nigeria and South Sudan.

  • In Central America, heavy rains in October led to unseasonal increases in maize and bean prices. They remained, however, at levels well below those a year earlier as a result of adequate domestic supplies, following the overall good outputs in 2016 and the 2017 first season harvests.


          

World: FPMA Bulletin #9, 10 October 2017

 Cache   
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Eswatini, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Key messages

  • International prices of wheat increased in September mostly because of weather-related concerns, while maize quotations fell further on crop harvest pressure. International rice prices remained generally firm, supported by seasonally tight availabilities of fragrant rice and strong demand for higher quality Indica supplies.

  • In East Africa, prices of cereals remained at levels above those of a year earlier in most countries, particularly in Ethiopia reflecting seasonal tightness amid concerns over the impact of the Fall Armyworm infestation on the main harvest and in South Sudan mainly due to the ongoing conflict.

  • In Asia, prices of rice in Bangladesh increased again in September and reached record highs, with seasonal patterns exacerbated by the reduced 2017 main season output and concerns over the impact of the July-August floods on the second season crop, to be harvested from November.


          

Uganda and Equatorial Guinea pave the way for Africa’s oil future

 Cache   
Download logo Africa Oil Week (www.Africa-OilWeek.com) got off to a high profile start with a prestigious Ministerial and VIP Symposium on the 28th floor of First National Bank’s corporate headquarters in Cape Town’s Waterfront district. Over 200 senior executives from IOC and NOCs along with ministerial delegations from leading African nations joined to look for […]
          

South Sudan Rival Leaders Meet in Uganda for Peace Talks

 Cache   
Rival leaders have said they are not ready to form a coalition government on November 12
          

AFRICA - Una pastorale basata sull'eredità dei Santi africani

 Cache   
Kara – In Africa oggi “è necessario che i Santi africani occupino un posto fondamentale nei programmi di evangelizzazione in generale, e in particolare della catechesi, in modo che siano meglio conosciuti dagli stessi africani, per ispirare continuamente le loro azioni”. E’ quanto ha scritto a Fides il teologo ivoriano p. Donald Zagore, sacerdote della Società per le Missioni Africane, ricordando l’esperienza dei Santi Martiri dell'Uganda, Santa Giuseppina Bakhita del Sudan, la Beata Marie Clementine Anuarite dell'ex Zaire, il Beato Ghebre-Micheal dell'Etiopia. “L'Africa è davvero presente in Paradiso. Questi Santi africani sono l'espressione tangibile della vitalità spirituale del continente africano, ma rimangono molto spesso sconosciuti e quindi tagliati fuori dalla vita concreta della popolazione” rileva. “I nostri Santi – afferma - devono avere un impatto concreto sulla vita del nostro popolo. I Santi possono e devono svolgere un ruolo importante nel rinnovamento del continente africano. Il loro modello di virtù, esemplarità, integrità e fede – conclude il teologo - rimane un lascito fondamentale per forgiare la coscienza e l'azione dei nostri cristiani africani in tutti gli ambiti della vita, specialmente in quei contesti socio-politici fortemente segnati da violenza, odio, divisione e corruzione”.



          

MISSION UGANDA 2020

 Cache   
Do you have a heart for helping others? Do you love experiencing new people and places? Are you open to a life changing experience? Then Mission Uganda 2020 could be for you!Join a group of 10 young adults alongside a chaplain and travel to Uganda for a 2 week encounter of service, mission and community. If you are a young adult aged 18-30 who is open to reaching into the unknown and throwing yourself into a transformative meeting [...]
          

Digital Rights and Inclusion Learning Lab (DRILL) Fellowship at Paradigm Initiative, Deadline : 20 December 2019

 Cache   

Digital Rights and Inclusion Learning Lab (DRILL) Fellowship at Paradigm Initiative, Deadline : 20 December 2019

Paradigm Initiative (PIN) is a social enterprise that builds ICT-enabled support systems and advocates for digital rights in order to improve the livelihoods of under-served young Africans. Our digital inclusion programs include a digital readiness school for young people living in under-served communities (LIFE) and a software engineering school targeting high potential young Nigerians (Dufuna). Both programs have a deliberate focus to ensure equal participation for women and girls.

Our digital rights advocacy program is focused on the development of public policy for internet freedom in Africa, with offices in Abuja, Nigeria (covering the Anglophone West Africa region); Lome, Togo (Francophone West Africa); Yaoundé, Cameroon (Central Africa); Arusha, Tanzania (East Africa) and Lusaka, Zambia (Southern Africa). Our policy advocacy efforts include media campaigns, coalition building, strategic litigation, capacity building, research, report-writing and hosting the annual, bilingual, Digital Rights and Inclusion Forum where more than 200 digital rights stakeholders from over 35 countries (mostly African countries) meet to discuss, network and advance work in digital rights.

Paradigm Initiative has worked in communities across Nigeria since 2007, and across Africa from 2017, building experience, community trust and an organizational culture that positions us as a leading social enterprise in ICT for Development and Digital Rights on the continent. We have a robust partnership network made up of non-profit organizations, youth groups, local businesses, international organizations and government agencies who provide opportunities to the communities we work with. The organization has organized the Digital Rights and Inclusion Forums in Nigeria since 2013, with an average of 200 participants participating each year and over 30 African countries represented.  Paradigm Initiative also championed the drafting, advocacy for and eventual passage of the Digital Rights and Freedom Bill Nigeria by the House of Representatives and the Senate in Nigeria. The organization has strong competencies in advocacy, media and communications, capacity building, research and coalition building. It has organized Internet Policy Trainings/Digital Rights Workshops in Cameroon, Gambia, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, Uganda and Zambia.

 

Program Background

There are both enormous challenges and opportunities for realizing the ambitious task of creating an inclusive, healthy, safe and open Internet in the coming decade for all Africans, including marginalized and vulnerable populations such as women and girls, people with lower income levels or living in rural communities, sexual minorities, the elderly and persons with disabilities. Connecting the next billion who mostly live on the African continent requires not only technological and commercial innovations, but also new models of collaboration among all stakeholders.

Paradigm Initiative will host a Digital Rights and Inclusion Learning Lab (DRILL) from February 2020, at its headquarters in Lagos, Nigeria. DRILL has a mission to host innovative learning around digital rights and inclusion in Africa, and serve as a space for both practice and reflection, aimed to involve and connect different stakeholders and create dialogue amongst researchers, social innovators, policymakers and actors, the private sector, as well as civil society.

As a lighthouse for digital rights and inclusion advocacy in Africa, learning activities will take place at the lab in order to evolve new thinking on digital rights and inclusion strategy for Africa. There are a variety of activities that will take place, including but not limited to, focused future-facing research; presentations; ecosystem meetings and discussions focused on digital rights and/or inclusion hosted within the ecosystem; and general communication about the lab’s activities.

DRILL will offer a space for big thinking, evaluation of digital rights and digital inclusion programs, and future-proofing ecosystem activities. DRILL will host innovators, researchers and/or entrepreneurs-in-residence at the PIN HQ so they can host biweekly ecosystem/sector meetings (to share insight/ideas), biweekly presentations (to share outcomes of their research and/work) and work with the Executive Director to record a monthly DRILL podcast on topical issues.

Call for DRILL Fellows

Paradigm Initiative is opening calls for a pioneer fellow of the Digital Rights and Inclusion Learning Lab to work at the Paradigm Initiative headquarters in Lagos, Nigeria, from February 2020 for a 3- or 6-months period. The fellowship is for a period of three months at a time, but can be renewed for another three months on completion, depending on planned activities and joint review between the Fellow and PIN. As a mid-career fellowship, potential candidates will be expected to have had a minimum of 5 years’ experience as technology or social innovators, researchers, policy experts, and/or entrepreneurs.

Fellows’ Responsibilities

Applicants will be required to briefly discuss their intended focus for the fellowship period during the application process. Paradigm Initiative will expect to receive a two-page project plan from shortlisted candidates. For the successful candidate, this would be discussed and agreed on with the PIN leadership team, no later than two weeks after the fellowship start date. The successful fellow will commit a minimum of 16 hours per week to the fellowship, working from the PIN HQ in Lagos.

  • The fellow will be expected to host biweekly ecosystem/sector meetings at the PIN HQ (to share insight/ideas), biweekly presentations (to share outcomes of their research and/work) and a monthly DRILL podcast to be recorded with the Executive Director of Paradigm Initiative
  • The Fellow will host a side session on a topical and relevant digital rights and/or inclusion theme, in the specific area of their interest, at the annual Digital Rights and Inclusion Forum
  • The last month of the fellowship will feature a final meeting, a final presentation and the final podcast from the selected fellow. There will be an exit interview and opportunity to reflect on what has been achieved in the 3- to 6-month period with PIN’s leadership team

The fellowship is open to potential fellows living outside Lagos, where Paradigm Initiative’s headquarters, the home of the Digital Rights and Inclusion Learning Lab, in located. However, there are no relocation allowances or travel support costs provided for the inaugural fellowship.

PIN Responsibilities

For the inaugural fellowship, Paradigm Initiative will not provide remuneration to the selected fellow. However, Paradigm Initiative will support selected individuals with recommendation letters or such as may be required towards possible fundraising, as long as income is declared and a public report will be published at the end of their project. PIN will cover costs associated with learning activities at the Digital Rights and Inclusion Lab and provide office space, an opportunity to be embedded within our team, access to the ecosystem and feedback on projects throughout the duration of the fellowship.

Application and Timeline

This call for applications is open until December 20, 2019. The selection process will commence in January 2020 with the first fellow of the Digital Rights and Inclusion Lab expected to resume in February 2020. Selection will be supported by an External Advisory Group made up of ecosystem leaders, including Alberto J. Cerda Silva (Ford Foundation), Anriette Esterhuysen (Association for Progressive Communications), John Dada (Fantsuam Foundation), Nnenna Nwakanma (World Wide Web Foundation), and Oreoluwa Somolu Lesi (Women’s Technology Empowerment Centre), who will help shape the program and work with the PIN team to review Fellowship applications.

Please use the application form at https://bit.ly/drillfellow by midnight (GMT+1) on December 20, 2019. You will need the following in order to submit your application:

  • Your resume (not more than 3 pages)
  • Your cover letter detailing your interest in the DRILL fellowship (not more than 500 words)
  • A brief indication of tentative focus of your fellowship (not more than 500 words)

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

 

More from my site

The post Digital Rights and Inclusion Learning Lab (DRILL) Fellowship at Paradigm Initiative, Deadline : 20 December 2019 appeared first on mucuruzi.com.


          

The 2020 TRACE Prize for Investigative Reporting: Uncovering Commercial Bribery, Deadline : January 31st 2020

 Cache   

The 2020 TRACE Prize for Investigative Reporting:
Uncovering Commercial Bribery, Deadline : January 31st 2020

“Every year, we receive  extraordinary examples of investigative journalism that expose corruption with the goal of advancing accountability and transparency. We look forward to receiving this year’s submissions and honoring the journalists undertaking this important work.”

Alexandra Wrage, President and Founder, TRACE.

 

“Corruption is a global virus, and the battle against it must be, too. The TRACE prize uniquely recognizes and encourages the courageous, meticulous journalism that is part of that fight, anywhere it finds a voice.”

Diana Henriques, TRACE Prize for Investigative Reporting judge.

 

 

The TRACE Prize for Investigative Reporting recognizes journalism that uncovers business-related bribery and financial crime with the goal of increasing commercial transparency and good governance. We are now accepting submissions for the 2020 award through 31 January 2020.

Nominees may be print, broadcast or online reporters from any country who have investigated commercial bribery schemes, business activities that create serious conflicts of interest or similar commercial misconduct. Team entries and multiple submissions per author are permitted. Book-length entries are not accepted.

A panel of independent judges will review the submissions and select up to two winning entries, each of which will receive a cash prize of US$10,000. Reporter(s) will be invited to an award ceremony hosted by TRACE. The judges may also name up to two honorable mentions, who will each receive US$1,000.

For questions about eligibility or the application process, please contact Gigi O’Connell at goconnell@TRACEinternational.org.

Download the application

2020 Judging Panel:

  • William Gumede, Associate Professor, School of Governance, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Founder and Chairman of the Democracy Works Foundation.
  • Diana B. Henriques, Financial writer and author, formerly with The New York Times.
  • Rosebell Kagumire, Writer and digital communication strategist, public speaker and award-winning blogger based in Kampala, Uganda.
  • Peter Klein, Executive Director of the Global Reporting Centre in Vancouver, BC.
  • Donatella Lorch, Freelance reporter, formerly with The New York Times, NBC News and Newsweek, currently based in Ankara, Turkey.
  • Jorge Luis Sierra, President of the Border Center for Journalists and Bloggers, journalist security consultant and formerly a Knight International Journalism Fellow with the International Center for Journalists, based in Texas.

More from my site

The post The 2020 TRACE Prize for Investigative Reporting: Uncovering Commercial Bribery, Deadline : January 31st 2020 appeared first on mucuruzi.com.


          

Full Masters Scholarships offered by Commonwealth (Deadline: 18 December 2019)

 Cache   

Full Masters Scholarships offered by Commonwealth (Deadline: 18 December 2019)

Commonwealth Shared Scholarships are for candidates from least developed and lower middle income Commonwealth countries, for full-time Master’s study on selected courses, jointly supported by UK universities.

Funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), Commonwealth Shared Scholarships enable talented and motivated individuals to gain the knowledge and skills required for sustainable development, and are aimed at those who could not otherwise afford to study in the UK.

These scholarships are offered under six themes:

  1. Science and technology for development
  2. Strengthening health systems and capacity
  3. Promoting global prosperity
  4. Strengthening global peace, security and governance
  5. Strengthening resilience and response to crises
  6. Access, inclusion and opportunity

For more information on other scholarships offered by the CSC, visit the CSC Apply page.

Eligibility
Terms and conditions
Selection Process
How to apply
Enquiries

Eligibility

To apply for these scholarships, you must:

  • Be a citizen of or have been granted refugee status by an eligible Commonwealth country, or be a British Protected Person
  • Be permanently resident in an eligible Commonwealth country
  • Be available to start your academic studies in the UK by the start of the UK academic year in September/October 2020
  • By September 2020, hold a first degree of at least upper second class (2:1) standard, or a second class degree and a relevant postgraduate qualification (usually a Master’s degree). The CSC typically does not fund a second UK Master’s degree. If you are applying for a second UK Master’s degree, you will need to provide justification as to why you wish to undertake this study.
  • Not have studied or worked for one (academic) year or more in a high income country
  • Be unable to afford to study in the UK without this scholarship

The CSC aims to identify talented individuals who have the potential to make change. We are committed to a policy of equal opportunity and non-discrimination, and encourage applications from a diverse range of candidates. For further information on the support available to candidates with a disability, see the CSC disability support statement.

The CSC is committed to administering and managing its scholarships and fellowships in a fair and transparent manner. For further information, see the CSC anti-fraud policy and the DFID guidance on reporting fraud.

Eligible Commonwealth countries

Bangladesh
Cameroon
Eswatini
The Gambia
Ghana
India
Kenya
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
Nigeria
Pakistan
Papua New Guinea
Rwanda
Samoa
Sierra Leone
Solomon Islands
Sri Lanka
Tanzania
Tuvalu
Uganda
Vanuatu
Zambia

Terms and conditions

For full terms and conditions – including further details of the scholarship themes, value of the scholarship, and general conditions – see the Commonwealth Shared Scholarships terms and conditions 2020.

Selection process

Each participating UK University will conduct its own recruitment process to select a specified number of candidates to be awarded Commonwealth Shared Scholarships. Universities must put forward their selected candidates to the CSC in March 2020. The CSC will then confirm that these candidates meet the eligibility criteria for this scheme. Universities will inform candidates of their results by July 2020.

Applications will be considered according to the following selection criteria:

  • Academic merit of the candidate
  • Potential impact of the work on the development of the candidate’s home country

For further details, see the Commonwealth Shared Scholarships 2020 selection criteria.

How to apply

You can apply to study one of the taught Master’s courses offered in the Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme. These scholarships do not cover undergraduate courses, PhD study, or any pre-sessional English language teaching, and are usually tenable for one year only. View a full list of eligible courses.

You must also secure admission to your course in addition to applying for a Shared Scholarship. You must check with your chosen university for their specific advice on when to apply, admission requirements, and rules for applying. View a full list of university contact details.

You must make your application using the CSC’s online application system, in addition to any other application that you are required to complete by your chosen university. The CSC will not accept any applications that are not submitted via the online application system.

You can apply for more than one course and/or to more than one university, but you may only accept one offer of a Shared Scholarship.

The CSC particularly welcomes applicants from the following countries:

Eswatini
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
Papua New Guinea
Rwanda
Samoa
Solomon Islands
Tanzania
The Gambia
Tuvalu
Vanuatu

All applications must be submitted by 16.00 (GMT) on 18 December 2019 at the latest.

You are advised to complete and submit your application as soon as possible, as the online application system will be very busy in the days leading up to the application deadline.

Your application must include the following supporting documentation by 16:00 (GMT) on 18 December 2019 in order for your application to be eligible for consideration:

  • Proof of citizenship or refugee status – uploaded to the online application system
  • Full transcripts detailing all your higher education qualifications including to-date transcripts for any qualifications you are currently studying (with certified translations if not in English) – uploaded to the online application system

The CSC’s online application system is now open.

Enquiries

If you have any queries about applying for a Commonwealth Shared Scholarship, you can Contact us. We will not use your email address for any purpose other than responding to your enquiry.

For more information on other scholarships offered by the CSC, visit the CSC Apply page.

 

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

The post Full Masters Scholarships offered by Commonwealth (Deadline: 18 December 2019) appeared first on mucuruzi.com.


          

STUDY IN UK : Full Funded Scholarships from Commonwealth for candidates from least developed and lower middle income, Deadline : 18 December 2019

 Cache   

STUDY IN UK : Full Funded Scholarships from Commonwealth for candidates from least developed and lower middle income, Deadline : 18 December 2019

Shared Scholarships

Commonwealth Shared Scholarships are for candidates from least developed and lower middle income Commonwealth countries, for full-time Master’s study on selected courses, jointly supported by UK universities.

Funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), Commonwealth Shared Scholarships enable talented and motivated individuals to gain the knowledge and skills required for sustainable development, and are aimed at those who could not otherwise afford to study in the UK.

These scholarships are offered under six themes:

  1. Science and technology for development
  2. Strengthening health systems and capacity
  3. Promoting global prosperity
  4. Strengthening global peace, security and governance
  5. Strengthening resilience and response to crises
  6. Access, inclusion and opportunity

For more information on other scholarships offered by the CSC, visit the CSC Apply page.

Eligibility
Terms and conditions
Selection Process
How to apply
Enquiries

Eligibility

To apply for these scholarships, you must:

  • Be a citizen of or have been granted refugee status by an eligible Commonwealth country, or be a British Protected Person
  • Be permanently resident in an eligible Commonwealth country
  • Be available to start your academic studies in the UK by the start of the UK academic year in September/October 2020
  • By September 2020, hold a first degree of at least upper second class (2:1) standard, or a second class degree and a relevant postgraduate qualification (usually a Master’s degree). The CSC typically does not fund a second UK Master’s degree. If you are applying for a second UK Master’s degree, you will need to provide justification as to why you wish to undertake this study.
  • Not have studied or worked for one (academic) year or more in a high income country
  • Be unable to afford to study in the UK without this scholarship

The CSC aims to identify talented individuals who have the potential to make change. We are committed to a policy of equal opportunity and non-discrimination, and encourage applications from a diverse range of candidates. For further information on the support available to candidates with a disability, see the CSC disability support statement.

The CSC is committed to administering and managing its scholarships and fellowships in a fair and transparent manner. For further information, see the CSC anti-fraud policy and the DFID guidance on reporting fraud.

Eligible Commonwealth countries

Bangladesh
Cameroon
Eswatini
The Gambia
Ghana
India
Kenya
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
Nigeria
Pakistan
Papua New Guinea
Rwanda
Samoa
Sierra Leone
Solomon Islands
Sri Lanka
Tanzania
Tuvalu
Uganda
Vanuatu
Zambia

Terms and conditions

For full terms and conditions – including further details of the scholarship themes, value of the scholarship, and general conditions – see the Commonwealth Shared Scholarships terms and conditions 2020.

 

 

Selection process

Each participating UK University will conduct its own recruitment process to select a specified number of candidates to be awarded Commonwealth Shared Scholarships. Universities must put forward their selected candidates to the CSC in March 2020. The CSC will then confirm that these candidates meet the eligibility criteria for this scheme. Universities will inform candidates of their results by July 2020.

Applications will be considered according to the following selection criteria:

  • Academic merit of the candidate
  • Potential impact of the work on the development of the candidate’s home country

For further details, see the Commonwealth Shared Scholarships 2020 selection criteria.

How to apply

You can apply to study one of the taught Master’s courses offered in the Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme. These scholarships do not cover undergraduate courses, PhD study, or any pre-sessional English language teaching, and are usually tenable for one year only. View a full list of eligible courses.

You must also secure admission to your course in addition to applying for a Shared Scholarship. You must check with your chosen university for their specific advice on when to apply, admission requirements, and rules for applying. View a full list of university contact details.

You must make your application using the CSC’s online application system, in addition to any other application that you are required to complete by your chosen university. The CSC will not accept any applications that are not submitted via the online application system.

You can apply for more than one course and/or to more than one university, but you may only accept one offer of a Shared Scholarship.

The CSC particularly welcomes applicants from the following countries:

Eswatini
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
Papua New Guinea
Rwanda
Samoa
Solomon Islands
Tanzania
The Gambia
Tuvalu
Vanuatu

All applications must be submitted by 16.00 (GMT) on 18 December 2019 at the latest.

You are advised to complete and submit your application as soon as possible, as the online application system will be very busy in the days leading up to the application deadline.

Your application must include the following supporting documentation by 16:00 (GMT) on 18 December 2019 in order for your application to be eligible for consideration:

  • Proof of citizenship or refugee status – uploaded to the online application system
  • Full transcripts detailing all your higher education qualifications including to-date transcripts for any qualifications you are currently studying (with certified translations if not in English) – uploaded to the online application system

The CSC’s online application system is now open.

Enquiries

If you have any queries about applying for a Commonwealth Shared Scholarship, you can Contact us. We will not use your email address for any purpose other than responding to your enquiry.

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

The post STUDY IN UK : Full Funded Scholarships from Commonwealth for candidates from least developed and lower middle income, Deadline : 18 December 2019 appeared first on mucuruzi.com.


          

Camp Comedy: Analyzing Season Four of Event

 Cache   
Jinja was on fire over the weekend as Comic Dolibondo was at it again with his camp comedy that saw Uganda’s finest comedians crack ribs at Forever Resort Hotel. One would ask his or herself why camp comedy? Well, it may not be right to say this, but I guess it’s absolutely okay to give […]
          

Excitement As UTB Launches Kampala by ‘Night Party’ Bus

 Cache   
It was all fun and excitement on Friday night as Uganda Tourism Board in partnership with Promote Uganda Safaris launched the Kampala by Night Party Bus Ride. Commissioned by Lilly Ajarova, the Chief Executive Officer Uganda Tourism Board, the ‘Night Party Ride’ and Sightseeing Bus are both a ‘Promote Uganda Safaris’ initiative aimed at giving […]
          

Are ‘Mafias’ Haunting Kenzo Too?

 Cache   
Uganda’s trending musician Edirisa Musuza alias Eddy Kenzo, has cleared the air that he is still a people power advocate but couldn’t turn down the invitation of the president when he was invited to State House early this week. Kenzo’s move to State House left many people wondering whether he had become part of NRM. […]
          

What to Expect at Uganda’s ‘Halloween Spook Fest’ This Friday

 Cache   
Halloween as it sounds may be scary for some people, especially those who have fear for anything with even a bit of horror or monstrous character in it. The festival is widely known in America as over 9 billion dollars is spent on the festival annually, making it among the country’s top commercial holidays with […]
          

Singer Harmonize Explains His ‘Inabana Double Collaboration, Promises Concert In Uganda

 Cache   
Tanzanian bongo flava singer Harmonize has promised to hold a big concert for his local fans in Uganda. While addressing Journalists at Entebbe International Airport, Harmonize explained thus, “tonight is strictly ‘Uno’ night, but very soon I will be announcing my concert in Uganda, I want to sing for my local fans. As you know, […]
          

Cardiovascular risk factors in sub-Saharan Africa: a review

 Cache   
{loadposition interno}

 

Cardiovascular risk factors in sub-Saharan Africa: a review

 

Manuel Monti1, Maria Pia Ruggieri2, Giovanni Maria Vincentelli3, Fernando Capuano4, Francesco Rocco Pugliese5

 

1 Emergency Department - AUSL UMBRIA1 Assisi (Perugia) Via V. Muller 1, Assisi (Perugia), Italy
2 Emergency Department - San Giovanni Hospital Rome
3 Emergency Department - Fatebenefratelli Hospital - Isola Tiberina Via Fatebenefratelli 1 Roma
4 Antel National President Rome
5 Head of Emergency Department - Pertini Hospital Rome

 

 

Abstract

Background: Ischemic heart disease is increasing dramatically in the Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), owing toincreasing prevalence of risk factors, and to some characteristics of the African people that make the African population subject to the effects of major cardiovascular risk factors. The pace and direction of economic development, rates of urbanization, the changes in life expectancy, associated with different pathophysiological factors are causing an increased rate of atherosclerotic disease in these countries.

Results: In the next twenty years, the prevalence of ischemic heart disease in SSA will increase, due to increasedrisk factors,especially hypertension, diabetes, overweight and obesity, physical inactivity, tobacco use and the dyslipidemia, mainly due to an increase in urbanization. Moreover, thanks to new knowledge, it has been pointed out the difference of individual risk factors in the African population and other populations due to genetic differences. It is estimated that age-standardized approach for ischemic heart disease mortality rates will rise by 27% in African men and 25% in women by 2015 and by 70 and 74%, respectively by 2030.

Conclusion: More research is neededin Africa to provide evidence for cardiovascular prevention and treatment to mitigate the oncoming epidemic. Healthinterventions are needed for prevent or reduce the morbidity / mortality need to be addressed in both children and adults, including modifiedscore of the risk stratification, starting early therapy and aggressive, if necessary.

 

 

 

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a disabling growing epidemic that causes premature death and decreased quality of life. Globally, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), which include coronary heart disease (CHD), strokes, rheumatic heart disease (RHD), cardiomyopathy, and other heart diseases, represent the leading cause of death (1).Recent population studies demonstrate an increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related risk factors in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) (2). Despite evidence to suggest that CVD-related mortality rates are increasing in the region,  it is only now being recognized  as an important public health issue in sub-Saharan Africa, with coronary artery disease shown to rise in incidence in sub-Saharan Africa(3-4) . Cardiovascular diseases are the main non-communicable conditions in SSA and now 9.2% of total deaths in the African region are caused by CVD (5) , being the leading cause of death in the population over 45 years of age (6) .Cardiovascular diseases account for 7-10% of all adult medical admissions to hospitals in Africa, with heart failure contributing to 3-7% (7) .When studies on urban and rural populations were analyzed, the prevalence of CVD  was found to be higher in the urban than the rural population (8-9).

Behavioural risk factors

 The important contributors to this transition are the so-called “globalization” of dietary  habits and urbanization. Urbanization is the prime driver for nutrition transition and emergence of obesity, themetabolic syndrome and other NCDs in developing countries, especially SSA. The current average annual growth of the urban population in sub-Saharan Africa is 4.5%. Over the period 1980-2050, the urban population of Africa, as a whole, is expected to increase from 134 million to 1.264.000 million (10). The rural-to-urban migration in many of the developing countries exposes migrants to urbanized diets and lifestyle. Dietary changes associated with urbanization are related to the fact that rural dwellers tend to be more self-reliant in obtaining food and also tend to eat traditional diets that are high in grains, fruit and vegetables, and low in fat. Once they arrive in urban areas, these same people tend to rely more on external forces for sustenance, resulting in a shift from production of their own food to the purchase of processed foods (11).Major dietary changes include a large increase in the consumption of fats, particularly animal fat and added sugar and decrease in cereal and roughageintake (12).  This involves major changes of the main cardiovascular risk factors between the two areas(13) (tab.1). There was evidence of a significant increase in edible oil, indicating a major change in diet; dietary changes include a large increase in the consumption of fats, particularly animal fat and added sugar, associated to the decrease in cereal and fiber intake(14) (Fig.1). In fact, recent global figures from the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that the prevalence of obesity is not just affecting the developed countries, but is also increasing in the developing countries, where over 115 million people suffer from obesity-related problems (15) .

Psychosocial factors

Psychosocial factors increase the number of risk factors. Some studies have shown that the number of countries registering , in recent years, a rise in the number of households owning televisions and computers is directlyproportionate to the reduction in physical activities, contributing arise in obesity in children (16-17). Alcohol and tobacco smoking are risk factors towards heart failure, ischemic stroke, heart disease, and acute myocardial infarction (18). Many studies show how alcohol and tobacco use are related to poverty and low socio-economic positions. Rural areas inhabitants are highly affected by such habits, especially compared to the other risk factors, which are  more common in urban areas(19-20) Smoking tendency is increasing among men and women in SSA, mainly in the age group between 30 and 49, with particular reference in women, increasing together with ageing (21). Furthermore, in many developing countries, psychosocial attitude toward obesity is not seen a negative factor (22-23). Mvo et al. and Puoane et al. reported that even if a large percentage of African women were overweight and obese, only a few perceived themselves so (24-25). Gambian populations were reported to be more obesity tolerant (acceptance of obese body size as normal) than African-Americans, and much more tolerant than white Americans (26) .Moreover, the double burden of under and over-nutrition presents a potentially grave situation, which should deserve more attention from both health and economic agencies engaged in development. While they continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are experiencing a rapid upsurge in disease risk factors, such as obesity and overweight, especially in urban settings. It is not uncommon to find under-nutrition and obesity existing side-by-side within the same country, the same community and the same household. Children in low and middle-income countries are more vulnerable to inadequate pre-natal, infant and young child nutrition. Simultaneously, they are exposed to high-fat, high-sugar, high-salt, energy-dense, micronutrient-poor foods, which is usually lower in cost but also lower in nutrient quality. These dietary patterns, in conjunction with lower levels of physical activity, result in sharp increases in childhood obesity, while undernutrition issues remain unsolved(27). Recently, the rise of obesity and cardiovascular risk factors were also seen in rural areas of some countries of the developing world. It has to be pointed out that many so-called rural areas are no longer genuinely rural: people are becoming more urbanized even in areas far from cities. This phenomenon, to some extent, is linked to the so-called "Remittance economy”. Migrant workers remittance led to a relative wealth, even in rural areas influencing some lifestyles (28).Such epidemiological transition is due, in part, to an improved longevity starting from the 1950s, so that more people are exposed to these risk factors, for long enough periods, to cause CAD. Globally considering risk factors, it has to be highlighted how the risk-factor burden experienced by blacks differs from that of whites. A recent study conducted in Ghana shows low median levels of cardiovascular risk factors and the prevalences of obesity, hypertension, dysglycaemia or diabetes, and dyslipidaemia were low too. The preponderance of moderately elevated levels of CRP was also low.However, the evidence has shown that younger patients (<55 years) were prone to a higher risk of atherosclerotic disease, which decreased ageing (29). Such difference, could be partially explained by the difficult collection of data about the actual incidence of risk factors among African population, which may lie in the complexity of conducting proper surveys in many countries, in order to perform an accurate risk stratification. In addition, women do not smoke or drink publicly, but it can assume that the women exhibit these behaviours privately in smaller proportions (30). Moreover there are some pathophysiological peculiarities in the African population, boosting an increased susceptibility to traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

Arterial hypertension

The prevalence of hypertension among urban dwellers in SSA appears to be particularly high, ranging from 8–25 per cent. At the dawn of the twentieth century, high blood pressure was virtually nonexistent among indigenous Kenyans and Ugandans. Starting from 1975, high blood pressure became established in Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and Uganda (31-32). In December 2006, among the adults living in Addis Abeba, the prevalence of hypertension was 50.9% between males and 47.1% among females (33). In  Cameroon the prevalence of hypertension among people aged 15-99 years in 2004 was 20.8%, a common issue especially among men (34). In Sub-Saharan Africa, age-adjusted hypertension prevalence and age-specific rates of death from stroke are higher among urban blacks than equivalent white populations (35). Yameogo et al showed resistant hypertension is common in black Africans, most affected subjects are people over 60 years old, with limited economic income and living in rural areas (36). Numerous studies have found that such population has an excess prevalence of salt sensitivity, hypervolemia, and low plasma renin activity (37-38).

Diabetes mellitus

In 2010, an estimated 12.1 million people with diabetes mellitus (4.2% of the global estimate of 285 million) were living in sub-Saharan Africa (39). The following year, diabetes prevalence rose to 14.7 million (4.02% of the global 366 million). By year 2030, a 90% projected increase in diabetes prevalence throughout SSA, skyrocketing the number of Africans with diabetes to 28 million. (39) The incidence of diabetes mellitus in IHD remains uncertain because many studies show that, among African population, the main complication of diabetes is the micro-angiopathies compared to Western countries, where the macrovascular complication is the most important (40-41). One common pathogenic mechanism for microvascular disease, is rooted in the chemical by-products of reactions between sugars and proteins occurring over the course of days to weeks, producing irreversible protein cross-linked derivatives AGE (42). The increase in AGE produces growth inhibition and apoptosis of retinal pericytes, also inducing an overproduction of endothelial growth factors and neovascularization, and chronic inflammation too (43-44). Such actions lead to an increased microthrombosis, capillary blockage, retinal ischemia and the activation of endothelial cells, responsible of important shortcomings involving mesangial cells and stimulating glomerular fibrosis (45-46). It has been suggested that, among black population, microvascular damage is due to a different genetic predisposition that stimulates the accumulation of AGEs with all the after-effects (45-46). The strong association between diabetes mellitus and hypertension among the African population, compared to the white population, worsens dramatically microvascular damage (47-48).

Visceral Fat

The phenotype of obesity, found among several ethnic groups in developing countries, appears to be different than among the Caucasian population. Several studies reported a correlation between  visceral fat (VF) and insulin-resistance, rise of triglycerides, blood pressure and metabolic syndrome. Moreover, VF  is correlated to all the conventional cardiovascular disease risk factors and with sedentary life-styles. VF might exhibit a proinflammatory adipokine profile, playing a pivotal role in coronary atherogenesis. The expansion of adipocytes with triglyceride is thought to be trigger the increased expression and production of inflammatory cytokines - such as TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-1β, −6, and −8, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1)  and decreased expression and production of leptin and vasoprotective adiponectin. Furthermore, VF might exhibit a proinflammatory adipokine profile (49-50) (Fig.2). During the International Day for evaluation of abdominal obesity, a study, related to the waist circumference data, involving 63 countries, showed highest prevalence of visceral fat in SSA and South Asians, compared with North Europeans and other Asian ethnic groups (51). In fact, it was shown that a parity of average value of waist circumference and BMI in SSA, especially Nigeria and Cameroon, visceral adiposity is significantly higher than other populations (52). High percentage of body fat with low BMI value could be partly explained by body build (trunk to leg length ratio and slender body frame), muscularity, adaptation to chronic calorie deprivation, and ethnicity (53). Some studies also shown how the populations of SSA have an accumulation of visceral fat in other tissues where usually are not deposited (ectopic fat): this feature has the potential to affect insulin sensitivity (54) . A number of studies highlighted how African populations have a lower amount of epicardial fat than the white population: such matter is of considerable interest, as the epicardial fat is now considered an important emerging independent cardio - vascular risk factor (55) (Fig.3).

The markers of body fat distribution, including waist-hip ratio, abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat diner a heritable component, support the thesis of unique genetic variants associated with ectopic fat depots(56-57-58). Fox et al identified a single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNP) near the TRIB2 locus, which is associated with pericardial fat but not with body mass index or visceral abdominal fat (59). This is the reason why we must carry out studies in order to highlight, among the African population, the genetic variants responsible for the increase in visceral fat but not in epicardial ectopic. This would allow the identification of subgroups among the population, with BMI and amount of visceral fat compiling the standard, who are at greater risk of atherosclerotic disease (60). Other factors, such as genotype, could make the African population very susceptible to visceral fat. Among others genetics, a pivotal role is fulfilled by LOX-1, a type-II membrane protein belonging to the C-type lectin family. The LOX-1 has a crucial part in amplifying local inflammatory responses during atherosclerotic development (61) (Tab.2). The study performed by Predazzi showed a higher frequencies of two polymorphisms associated with the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), among the South-Saharan rural populations (61)   Furthermore, it must be considered the identification of other  deleterious alleles lying on CVD associated genes (GJA4, SERPINE1 and MMP3), which have a higher frequencies in African population in respect to Europeans. (62)

Communicable Diseases

Several studies reported associations between the exposure to various infectious agents and the prevalent coronary disease(63-64-65). In 1891, Huchard was the first to suggest the involvement of infectious agents in the process of atherosclerosis. Subsequently, several reports shown a relationship between the development of atherosclerosis and the presence of infectious diseases (66-67).  Several types of microbes are now also being implicated as possible causative agents in acquired CVD, and a few bacterial agents have been a research topic for several years. Organisms such as the spirochetes Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease) or the Treponema pallidum (syphilis), and flagellated bacteria such as the streptococci, have well-recognized atherosclerotic potential. Interest in the role of infection in atherosclerosis was renewed with the observation that patients with coronary artery disease were more likely than matched controls to have an elevated antibody titer to Chlamydia pneumonia (68-69). Multiple complex processes are involved in the development of CVD. The increased incidence of infectious diseases has highlighted the expression of proinflammatory immune system to survive up to older ages. Although the increase of the protein Cwas not related to an increase of atherosclerotic disease, other acute-phase reactants, including fibrinogen and serum amyloid A, appear to be associated with vascular risk.This selection of a proinflammatory status is confirmed by the higher levels of the proinflammatory cytokine, including the interleukin-6 (IL6) (70). The macrophage is a critical component in the pathway to atherosclerotic inflammation. During an infectious process causes the activation of macrophages, including the  secretion of numerous factors (AGF; TGF; 1,2,4 FGF;VEGF). These substances stimulate the appearance of endothelial cells and are responsible for the creation of a systemic hypercoagulable state (71-72). In addition, mitogenic factors are released through an NF-Kβrelated mechanism, leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation and however there is an increase of monocytes through transendothelial migration at the level of the coronary (73-74). This  means that the activated macrophages stimulate bothlocal lipid accumulation and the instability that presages plaque rupture (75-76-77).

Coronary Heart Disease

IHD remains relatively uncommon in SSA despite an increasing prevalence of risk factors but its incidence is rising. A study of the 1954 have evidenced by 3,500 postmortem studies in Ghana in which only three cases of CHD were found (78). In Uganda, the National Heart Institute at Mulago alone, currently receives at least 100 patients every day with 5-8 being new cases (a total of about 36,500 patients per year with 1,825-2,920 being new cases). In 2011,heart cases increased by 20% bringing the number to 12,000 with  256 new cases registered in January alone (79). The WHO estimated that in 2005, IHD caused approximately 261 000 deaths in the African region, and current projections suggest that this number will nearly 600.000 by 2030. It is estimated that age-standardized mortality rates for IHD will rise by 27% in African men and 25% in women by 2015, and by 70 and 74%, respectively by 2030 (80) (Fig.4). The increase in IHD in Sub-Saharan Africa since the 1980s is presumably because of the increasing prevalence among African populations of the classical risk factors for CAD, include hypertension, smoking, diabetes, abdominal obesity and dyslipidemia. In addition, as a result of developments in combating communicable diseases and a decrease in childhood mortality, life expectancy in Sub-Saharan Africa has risen since the 1950 and  the number of individuals aged over 60 years is predicted to increase from 39 to 80 million by 2025 in SSA. This meaning that more people are exposed to these risk factors for long enough periods to cause CAD (81-82).

Conclusion

This review attempts to assess the prevalence, levels of risk and major risk factors for developing  cardiovascular disease in SSA.This article answered specific research questions and hypotheses on issues relating to sedentary lifestyles, nutritional behaviours, knowledge on CVDs risk factors, and especially some of the key knowledge on the genetic differences between the African population and other populations. Among the socio-economic and behavioral risk profile study variables, the review documented a high prevalence of active smoking, high consumption of edible oil and fat, an increase in physical inactivity and current active alcohol usage. The economic and social important consequences of the CVD Epidemics in the SSA will be devastating. Important gene - environment can play a crucial role in the increased risk of the IHD of the African population. The detection and management of hypertension and diabetes are still unsatisfactory in inner city areas and show variations by ethnic origin. A priority should be the development of scores for the population of Africa, also using the emerging risk factors such as Calcium Score and visceral fat and considering genetic differences. Increasing burden of obesity, the metabolic syndrome, T2DM, and CVD in SSA has created an urgent need to strategize mass health policies and intervention programs to tackle nutrition and continuing efforts to manage undernutrition. There are two major approaches to prevention: public health / community-based and clinic-based strategies with a targeted approach to high-risk patients and combinations of these. There are concerns that in comparison with communicable diseases, cardiovascular and relatively chronic diseases have a low priority in the global health agenda and that requires this additional emphasis. Finally, we must consider, in the light of the differences between races, strategies for the control of CHD and stroke cushion adopted in European countries directed mostly to white rural populations may be inappropriate for the African population. In conclusion, evaluations must be performed carefully for correct risk stratification, the timing of initiation of treatment and the goals of the therapeutic treatment to be achieved in the African population. In addition, further evaluations should be done to perform a correct public health / community-based strategies targeted at risk factors, including decrease in taxes and prices of fruits and vegetables, more playgrounds, parks, walking and bicycle tracks, provide information to parents about nutrition (particularlymothers), the change of food policy through country-specific guidelines for healthy nutrition for adults and children.

 

 

Tables

 

Tab. 1 The main risk factorsof urban and ruralarea

 

Urban

Rural

BMI (kg/m2)

25.8 ± 6.9

19.3 ± 3.2 *

Waist (cm)

85.2 ± 9.9

67.8 ± 9.9 *

Waist-hip ratio

0.88 ± 0.09

0.81 ± 0.08 *

Triceps skinfold (mm)

17.3 ± 6.8

9.8 ± 5.4 *

% overweight

(BMI > 25)

53.4

5.8 *

p <0,001, ageand gender adjusted                                 

 

Tab.2 Cellular effects of ligand-LOX-1

Cellular effects of ligand-LOX-1 interaction on atherogenesis

Endothelial cells Alteration of vascular tone

Increased intracellular oxidative stress

 Induction of apoptosis

Induction of proliferation and angiogenesis by increasing VEGF expression

Increased expression of adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 , ICAM-1 , Selectins)

Increased expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

Induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

Reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

Release of matrix metalloproteinases

Smooth muscle cells Induction of apoptosis

Monocytes Induction of monocyte adhesion and activation

Increased oxLDL uptake and foam cell formation

VEGF Vascular endothelial growth factor; VCAM1 Vascular cell adhesion molecule1; ICAM1 Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1.

 

 

Figures

Fig.1 Date of  consumption of fats (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)

 

Fig.2 Main mechanisms ofcardiovascular damage caused by visceral fat

 

Fig.3 Epicardial fat around the myocardial tissue

 

Fig.4 Projection of death from IHD in men and women in the WHO African regions for the year 2005,2015 and 2030 (WHO,2008)

 

 

{loadposition interno_link} {loadposition interno}

References

           1.      Roger VLGo ASLloyd-Jones DMet al. Heartdisease and stroke statistics--2011 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2011;123(4)

           2.      Hertz JTReardon JMRodrigues CGet al. Acute myocardial infarction in Sub-Saharan Africa: the need for data. PLoS One.2014;  9(5)

 3.     Opie LH. Heart disease in Africa. Lancet. 2006 ; 368(9534):449-50

4.     Ntsekhe M, Damasceno A. Recent advances in the epidemiology, outcome, and prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke in sub-Saharan Africa.Heart. 2013 ;99(17):1230-5.

5.     Sampson UK, Amuyunzu-Nyamongo M, Mensah GA.Health promotion and cardiovasculardisease prevention in sub-Saharan Africa.Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2013;56(3):344-55

4.      Gaziano TA. Economic burden and the cost-effectiveness of treatment of cardiovascular diseases in Africa. Heart 2008;94:140-4.

5.     Mocumbi AO. Lack of focus on cardiovascular disease in sub-Saharan Africa.Cardiovasc Diagn Ther. 2012;2(1):74-7.

8.   Amoah AGB. Sociodemographic variations in obesity among Ghanaian adults. Public Health Nutr2003; 6: 751–7.

9.    Agyemang C, Owusu-Dabo E, de Jonge A et al. Overweight and obesity among Ghanaian residents in The Netherlands: how do they weigh against their urban and rural counterparts in Ghana? Public Health Nutr 2009; 12: 909–16.

10.United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division World Urbanization Prospects: The 2011 Revision Urban Population by Major Area, Region and Country, 1950-2050 (thousands)

11.Drewnowski APopkin BM..The nutrition transition: new trends in the global diet. Nutr Rev. 1997;55(2):31-43

12.  Misra A, Singhal N, Khurana. Obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes in developing countries: role of dietary fats and oils.L.J Am Coll Nutr. 2010;29(3 Suppl):289S-301S.

13.Teo KChow CKVaz M, et al. TheProspective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study: examining the impact of societal influences on chronic noncommunicable diseases in low-, middle-, and high-income countries..Am Heart J.2009;158(1):1-7.

14.Institute of Medicine. Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World: A Critical Challenge to Achieve Global Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2010.

15.Cappuccio FP, Kerry SM, Adeyemo A et al. Body size and blood pressure: an analysis of Africans and the African diaspora. Epidemiology2008; 19:38–46

16.Sturm R. Childhood obesity—what we can learn from existing data on societal trends, part 1. Prev Chronic Dis. 2005;2(1):A12

17.Milton KMacniven RBauman A. Review of the epidemiological evidence for physical activity and health from low- and middle-income countries. Glob Public Health. 2014;9(4):369-81.

18.  Ormel J, Von Korff M, Burger H et al. Mental disorders among persons with heart disease-results from World Mental Health surveys. Gen Hosp Psychiatry 2007;29(4):325-34

19.  Schneider M, Bradshaw D, Steyn K et Al. Poverty and non-communicable diseases in South Africa. Scand J Public Health2009, 37(2):176-86

20.  Christensen DL, Friss H, Mwaniki DL, et al.  Prevalence of glucose intolerance and associated risk factors in rural and urbanpopulations of different ethnic groups in Kenya. Diabetes Res Clin Pract2009, 84(3):303-10

21.  Townsend L, Flisher AJ, Gilreath T, King G. A systematic literature review of tobacco use among adults 15 years and older in sub-Saharan Africa. Drug and Alcohol Dependence2006, 84(1):14-27

22.Litllewood R. Commentary: globalization, culture, body image, and eating disorders. Cult Med Psychiatry 2004; 28:597–602.

23.Flynn KJ, Fitzgibbon M. Body images and obesity risk among black females: a review of the literature. Ann Behav Med 1998; 20:13–24

24.Mvo Z, Dick J, Steyn K. Perceptions of overweight African women about acceptable body size of women and children. Curationis. 1999;22:27-31.

25.Puoane T, Fourie JM, Shapiro M, et al. “Big is beautiful” - an exploration of urban black women in South Africa. S Afr J Clin Nutr. 2005;18:6-15.

26.Siervo M, Grey P, Nyan OA, Prentice AM. A pilot study on body image, attractiveness and body size in Gambians living in an urban community. Eat Weight Disord 2006; 11:100–09

27.  Vorster HH, Kruger A, Margetts BM. The nutrition transition in Africa: can it be steered into a more positive direction?-Nutrients. 2011;3(4):429-41

28.  Prentice AMThe emerging epidemic of obesity in developing countries.Int J Epidemiol.2006 ;35(1):93-9.

29.   Koopman JJvan Bodegom DJukema JWWestendorp RG. Risk of cardiovascular disease in a traditional African population with a high infectious load: a population-based study.. PLoS One; 2012;7(10)

30.  Mensah G. Ischaemic heart disease in Africa. Heart 2008;94: 836–43

31.  Jamison DT, FeachemRG, Makgoba MW, et al. Disease and Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. 2nd edition. Washington (DC): World Bank; 2006.

32.  Wamala JF, Karyabakobo Z, Ndungutse D, Guwatudde D. Prevalence factors associated with hypertension in  Rukungiri district, Uganda- a community based study. Afr Health Sci.2009 ;9(3):153-60.

33.  Tesfaye F, Byass P, Wall S et al. Association of smoking and khat (Catha edulis Forsk) use with high blood pressure among adults in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2006.Prev Chronic Dis. 2008;5(3):A89.

34.Wamala JF, Karyabakobo Z, Ndungutse D, Guwatudde D . Prevalence factors associated with hypertension in  Rukungiri district, Uganda- a community based study. Afr Health Sci.2009 ;9(3):153-60

35.Opie L, Steyn K. Rationale for the Hypertension Guidelines for Primary Care in South Africa. South African Medical Journal. 1995;85(12):1325–28.

36.Yaméogo NVSamadoulougou AKKagambèga LJet al.  Epidemiological characteristics and clinical features of black African subject's resistant hypertensionAnn Cardiol Angiol (Paris).2014;63(2):83-8

37.Jamerson KA. Rationale for angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with low-renin hypertension. Am J Kidney Dis.2000;36:S24-30

38.Ferdinand KCArmani AM. The management of hypertension in African Americans. Crit Pathw Cardiol.2007;6(2):67-71

39.Diabetes Atlas. 4th edn. 2009. International Diabetes Federation.

40.Onen CL. Diabetes and Macrovascular Complications in Adults in Botswana. Makerere University; Kampala: MD thesis 2010.

41.Mbanya JC, Sobngwi E. Diabetes microvascular and macrovascular disease in Africa. J Cardiovasc Risk. 2003;10:97–102

42.Brownlee M, Cerami A, Vlassara H. Advanced glycosylation end products in tissue and the biochemical basis of diabetic complications. N Engl J Med. 1988;318:1315–21

43.Yamagishi SHsu CCTaniguchi Met al. eceptor-mediated toxicity to pericytes of advanced glycosylation end products: a possible mechanism of pericyte loss in diabetic microangiopathy. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1995;213:681–7

44.Stitt AW, Jenkins AJ, Cooper ME. Advanced glycation end products and diabetic complications. Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2002;11:1205–23

45.Yamagishi SAmano SInagaki Yet al. Advanced glycation end products-induced apoptosis and overexpression of vascularendothelial growth factor in bovine retinal pericytes. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2002;290:973–8.

46.Matsumura T, Yamagishi S, Brownlee M. Advanced glycation end products and the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. In: LeRoith D, Taylor S, Olefsky JM, eds. Diabetes Mellitus: A Fundamental and Clinical Text. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2000:983–91

47.Mbanya JCSobngwi E. Diabetes in Africa. Diabetes microvascular and macrovascular disease in Africa. J Cardiovasc Risk.2003;10(2):97-102

48.Mohan V, Seedat YKPradeepa R. The rising burden of diabetes and hypertension in southeast asian and african regions: need for effective strategies for prevention and control in primary health care settings. Int J Hypertens.2013;2013:409083

49.Sacks HS, Fain JN. Human epicardial adipose tissue: a review. Am Heart J 2007;153: 907–17

50.Mahabadi AAMassaro JMRosito GAet al. Associationof pericardial fat, intrathoracic fat, and visceral abdominal fat with cardiovascular disease burden: the Framingham Heart Study.Eur Heart J. 2009;30(7):850-6

51.Balkau B, Deanfield JE, Despres JP et al. International Day for the Evaluation of Abdominal Obesity (IDEA): a study of waist circumference, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes mellitus in 168,000 primary care patients in 63 countries. Circulation 116:1942–51

52.Okosun IS, Rotimi CN, Forrester TE et al. Predictive value of abdominal obesity cut-off points for hypertension in blacks from westAfrican and Caribbean island nations. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 2000;24:180–186

53.Misra A, Wasir JS, Vikram NK. Waist circumference criteria for the diagnosis of abdominal obesity are not applicable uniformly to all populations and ethnic groups. Nutrition 2005; 21:969–76

54.Garg A, MisraA. Hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, and adipose tissue disorders. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2002; 87:3019–22

55.Willens HJGómez-Marín OChirinos JAet al. Comparison of epicardial and pericardial fat thickness assessed by echocardiography in African Americanand non-Hispanic White men: a pilot study.Ethn Dis.2008;18(3):311-6

56.Fox CSMassaro JMHoffmann Uet al. Abdominal visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue compartments : association with metabolic risk factors in the Framingham Heart Study. Circulation 2007; 116: 39-48 .

57.Sellers TADrinkard CRich SSet al - Familial aggregation and heritability of waist- to- hip ratio in adult women : the Iowa Women's Health Study . Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 1994; 18: 607-13 .

58.Kilpeläinen TO , Zillikens MC , Stancakova A et al. Genetic variation near IRS1 associates with reduced adiposity and an impaired metabolic profile . Nat Genet 2011;43: 753-760 .

59.Fox CSWhite CCLohman Ket al.  Genome-Wide Association of Pericardial Fat Identifies a Unique Locus for Ectopic Fat. PLoS Genet.2012;8(5):e1002705

60.Willens HJGómez-Marín OChirinos JAet al. Comparison of epicardial and pericardial fat thickness assessed by echocardiography in African American and non-Hispanic White men: a pilot study.Ethn Dis.2008;18(3):311-6

61.Predazzi IMMartínez-Labarga CVecchione L et al. Population differences in allele frequencies at the OLR1 locus may suggest geographic disparities in cardiovascular risk events. Ann Hum Biol.2010;37(2):136-48.

62.  Lanfear DE, Marsh S, Cresci S et al. Genotypes associated with myocardial infarction risk are more common in African Americans than in European Americans.J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004;7;44(1):165-7.

63.  Saikku P, Mattila K, Nieminen MS et Al. Serological evidence of an association of a novel Chlamydia, TWAR, with chronic coronary heart disease and acute myocardial infarction. Lancet. 1988;2:983–6.

64.  Thom DH, Grayston JT, Siscovick D et Al. Association of prior infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae and angiographically demonstrated coronary artery disease. JAMA. 1992;268:68–72.

65.  Mendall MA, Carrington D, Strachan DP et Al. Chlamydia pneumoniae: risk factors for seropositivity and association with coronary heart disease. J Infect. 1995;30:121–8.

66.  Benditt EP, Barrett T, McDougall JK. Viruses in the etiology of atherosclerosis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1983;80:6386–9.

67.  Grayston JT, Kuo CC, Campbell LA, Benditt EP. Chlamydia pneumoniae, strain TWAR and atherosclerosis. Eur Heart J. 1993;14:66–71.

68.  Dunne M. The evolving relationship between Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis. Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases. 2000;13(6):583–91

69.  Berger M, Schroder B, Daeschlin G et al . Chlamydia pneumoniae DNA in non-coronary atherosclerotic plaques and circulating leukocytes. Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine. 2000;136:194–200

70.  Koopman JJvan Bodegom DJukema JWWestendorp RG. Risk of cardiovascular disease in a traditional African population with a high infectious load: a population-based study. PLoS One.2012;7(10):e46855.

71.  Harmey JHDimitriadis EKay Eet al. Regulation of macrophage production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by hypoxia and transforming growth factor beta-1.Ann Surg Oncol.1998;5(3):271-8

72.  De Cortie KRussell NSCoppes RPet al. Bonemarrow-derived macrophages incorporate into the endothelium and influence vascular and renal function after irradiation.Int J Radiat Biol.2014;1-9

73.  Miller SA, Selzman CH, Shames BD et al. Chlamydia pneumoniae activates nuclear factor kappaB and activator protein 1 in human vascular smooth muscle and induces cellular proliferation. Journal of Surgical Research. 2000;90:76–81.

74.  Molestina RE, Miller RD, Ramirez JA,Summersgill JT. Infection of human endothelial cells with Chlamydia pneumoniae stimulates transendothelial migration of neutrophils and monocytes. Infection & Immunity 1999;67:1323–30

75.  Kuningas MMay LTamm R et Al. Selection for genetic variation inducing pro-inflammatory responses under adverse environmental conditions in a Ghanaian population. PloS One 2009;4 (11): e7795

76.  May Lvan den Biggelaar AHvan Bodegom Det al. Adverse environmental conditions influence age-related innate immune responsiveness. Immun  Ageing .2009;30;6:

77.  Boef AGC, May L, Van Bodegom D et al. The influence of genetic variation on innate immune activation in an environment with high infectious pressure. Genes Immun 2012;13 (2): 103–8.

78.  Edington G. M. Cardiovascular Disease as a Cause of Death in Gold Coast Africa. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 1954;48:419

79.  Maher DWaswa LBaisley Ket Al. Distribution of hyperglycaemia and related cardiovascular disease risk factors in low-income countries: a cross-sectional population-based survey in rural Uganda Int J Epidemiol.2011;40(1):160-71

80.  Onen CL. Epidemiology of ischaemic heart disease in sub-Saharan Africa.Cardiovasc J Afr. 2013;24(2):34-42.

81.  Steyn K, Sliwa K, Hawken S et Al.Risk factors associated with myocardial infarction in Africa: the INTERHEART Africa study. Circulation. 2005; 6;112(23):3554-61

82.Vorster HH. The emergence of cardiovascular disease during urbanization of Africans. Public Health Nutr. 2002;5(1A):239-43

 

Corresponding author           

Manuel Monti

montimanuel@tiscali.it

00393391050122

USL UMBRIA1 U.O. PS/118

Via V. Muller 1

Assisi (Perugia)


          

TIP! EgyptAir - Nigérie - levné letenky Lagos (zpáteční) 11.290,- kč

 Cache   
TIP! EgyptAir - Nigérie - levné letenky Lagos (zpáteční) 11.290,- kč levneletenky.org 30 Říjen, 2019 - 08:53
TIP! EgyptAir - Nigérie - levné letenky Lagos (zpáteční) 11.290,- kč

V rezervačních systémech se objevily raritní spoje do afrických zemí, kam se nemusí být až tak snadné vždy dostat. Příkladem budiž téměř neviditelné akční letenky do Nigérie. Vyjímka potvrzuje pravidlo, nabídka se stále více rozrůstá i díky specialistovi jménem EgyptAir. Aerolinka prodává levné letenky Lagos z Berlína za 11.290,- kč.

Tyhle akční letenky do Nigérie se u nás objevují poprvé v historii. Ukořistit spoj do Lagosu, jednoho z největších měst Afriky je možné díky Egypt Air od 20. února do 27. března. Přílet je na letiště Murtala Muhammed Airport (LOS). Levné letenky Lagos z Německa (Berlín) je nutné objednat bez odkládání.

Ukážeme si také další výhodné letenky do Afriky společnosti EgyptAir. Kromě letenky do Nigérie ještě např. Kigali - Rwanda za 11.490,- kč, Entebbe - Uganda za 11.190,- kč, Johannesburg a Jihoafrická republika za 12.390,- kč.

Rezervace letenky:

  Lagos - Nigérie (z Berlína) 11.290,- kč termíny

Další užitečné odkazy:

  Dovolená vč. ubytování se slevou až 50% Aktuální nabídka
  Jak se dostat levně do místa odletu Rychlý tip, jak na to

Nejvíce vás zajímá:

  Letenky do 1.500,- kč Nejlevnější letenky přehledně
  Akční letenky Aktuální letenky v akci
  Denní zpravodaj Nejnovější přehled levných letenek
 

 

Destinace
Letecké společnosti
Oblíbené lety

          

Wildfires and winds in California

 Cache   
The Santa Ana in the south, and the Diablo in the north, are winds that are fuelling the terrible fires raging in California this week. They’re also blamed for bringing down power lines that sometimes start the fires. Roland Pease talks to Janice Coen of the National Center for Atmospheric Research NCAR who has been developing a highly detailed model to forecast how wind, mountains, and flames interact during a wildfire. The glaring gaps in human genetics are in Africa – much overlooked because the companies and universities sequencing DNA are mostly based in Europe, the US and other advanced economies. A ten-year attempt to fill in some of those gaps came to fruition this week, with the release of a study covering thousands of individuals from rural Uganda. Deepti Gurdasani, of Queen Mary University London, explains the data reveal both new medical stories, and the scale of past migration within Africa. There are also gaps in the climate record from Africa. Knowing past climates could help massively in understanding the prospects for climate change in coming years on the continent. Journalist Linda Nordling has just published an article in Nature that shows that the records exist – old weather data collected since the 19th Century. It’s just they’re scattered, unexamined, in vaults and collections across Africa. Most of us take the ability to speak fluently for granted but for listener Breeda it has been a lifelong struggle. She has asked us to investigate whether there is a cure for stuttering and if not, what is the best way to live with it is. Breeda is not alone as stammering is a neurological condition that affects 70 million people worldwide. (Image: A firefighter sets a back fire along a hillside during firefighting operations to battle the Kincade Fire in Healdsburg, California. Credit: Philip Pacheco/ /AFP via Getty Images)
          

Uganda: Police’s brutal force on citizens and opposition leaders raises concern

 Cache   

The Uganda Police has come under criticism for its use of brutal force on opposition leaders and citizens following the attack on Dr. Kizza Besigye, one of Uganda’s most prominent opposition leaders and members of his party.

The post Uganda: Police’s brutal force on citizens and opposition leaders raises concern appeared first on This is africa.


          

How to tour Africa from the comfort of your Nairobi hotel

 Cache   

The Nairobi Serena’s Architectural, Cultural and Conservation tour takes you on a fascinating voyage of discovery across the continent – try it! On my last trip to Nairobi, I stayed at the fabulous – and recently renovated – Nairobi Serena Hotel. Over breakfast (an event in itself!) I planned a day’s sightseeing but was disappointed […]

The post How to tour Africa from the comfort of your Nairobi hotel appeared first on Diary of a Muzungu | Uganda & East Africa Travel Blog.


          

Mass journalist arrests in Uganda highlight long-term crackdown on press freedom

 Cache   

The International Press Institute (IPI), a global network of editors, media executives and leading journalists for press freedom, today expressed serious concern at the recent mass arrests, assaults and use of teargas against journalists peacefully protesting recent police brutality in Uganda. On Monday, November 4, over twenty journalists from different media unions and organisations were detained […]

The post Mass journalist arrests in Uganda highlight long-term crackdown on press freedom appeared first on International Press Institute.


          

4 ways low-income economies can boost tax revenue without hurting growth

 Cache   

La réalisation des objectifs de développement durable nécessite d’augmenter massivement les investissements dans les dix prochaines années.  Pour certains pays en développement, cela équivaudrait chaque année à pas moins de 8,2 % de leur PIB (a). Déjà considérable pour les pays riches, un tel effort constituerait un fardeau écrasant pour les pays pauvres.

La situation de la plupart des pays pauvres est extrêmement tendue : la moitié des pays éligibles aux ressources de l’Association internationale de développement (IDA) de la Banque mondiale présentent un risque élevé de surendettement ou sont déjà surendettés.  Un certain nombre d’entre eux ont réalisé qu’ils n’allaient pas pouvoir continuer longtemps à emprunter auprès de bailleurs étrangers — et que la mobilisation des ressources intérieures, par le biais de l’impôt, serait décisive pour assurer le progrès économique.

Dans plus d’un tiers (a) des pays emprunteurs de l’IDA — et 70 % des États fragiles et en conflit — le recouvrement des impôts contribue actuellement à moins de 15 % à la richesse nationale. C’est à peine suffisant pour permettre aux gouvernements d’assurer les fonctions les plus essentielles de l’État. Et en risquant d’aggraver la pauvreté et de freiner la croissance, un alourdissement des taux de prélèvement serait contreproductif. Il existe des leviers plus judicieux pour augmenter les recettes fiscales de manière viable.

En voici quatre :

     1. Installer la confiance et apporter la preuve de l’efficacité de l’action publique

Pour que l’impôt fonctionne, les citoyens doivent avoir confiance dans leur gouvernement . Ils doivent avoir la preuve que l’argent qu’ils ont durement gagné est investi de manière judicieuse et qu’à terme, ils bénéficieront des projets financés par le contribuable.

Pour cela, les dépenses publiques doivent être transparentes. Cela peut commencer par l’adoption et la publication, par les autorités, d’une stratégie de revenu à moyen terme qui montrera aux citoyens à quoi sert leur argent.

Il faut aussi leur prouver qu’ils en ont vraiment pour leur argent. Là où la défiance est particulièrement forte, les gouvernements peuvent mobiliser de nouvelles ressources en faveur de projets procurant des avantages sensibles pour tous : la construction d’un nouvel hôpital ou d’une nouvelle école peut faire beaucoup pour restaurer la confiance. Dès lors que le gouvernement parvient à démontrer sa capacité à fournir des biens publics de qualité, il peut renoncer à cibler de nouvelles ressources fiscales sur des projets spécifiques. L’amélioration des services publics renforcera la confiance de la population avec, pour corollaires, la réduction de l’évasion fiscale et l’augmentation des recettes de l’État. Ce faisant, le niveau de prestations des agents publics sera maintenu, instituant un cercle vertueux bâti sur la confiance et des résultats concrets.

     2. Privilégier la simplicité

Une fiscalité complexe entretient la culture de l’évasion et est la porte ouverte à la corruption. En Amérique latine par exemple, une entreprise consacrera en moyenne 547 heures par an pour effectuer 22 opérations (a) en vue d’acquitter ses impôts. Rien d’étonnant à ce que l’évasion fiscale ait privé les pays d’Amérique latine et des Caraïbes de 340 milliards de dollars de recettes (a) en 2015.

Selon un rapport du Groupe de la Banque mondiale de 2014, une réduction de 10 % du nombre d’opérations de paiement et du temps nécessaire pour satisfaire aux obligations entraîne un recul de la corruption fiscale de 9,64 % (a). La simplification du code des impôts peut inciter les petites entreprises à rejoindre le secteur formel imposable . Elle peut aussi rendre l’environnement plus prévisible pour les investisseurs internationaux avec, à la clé, davantage d’opérations et de rentrées fiscales.

Bien conscients de l’intérêt de ces évolutions, les gouvernements sont passés à l’action, pour notre plus grande satisfaction. Désormais, 50 pays n’appliquent plus qu’un seul impôt (a) par assiette fiscale. Et au cours des 13 dernières années, 57 ont fusionné ou supprimé certains impôts.

     3. Prendre le virage du numérique

Plus le régime fiscal est simple, plus l’introduction du paiement électronique des impôts est aisée. 

De plus en plus de pays s’engagent dans cette voie, même si les progrès sont inégaux. Avec l’introduction d’un système de déclaration en ligne pour les entreprises en Côte d’Ivoire (a), le nombre d’heures nécessaires pour préparer et envoyer les documents est passé à 205 heures en 2017, contre 270 auparavant. Mais malgré l’adoption d’un système identique au Gabon, le temps passé pour préparer et soumettre sa déclaration en ligne a au contraire augmenté en 2017.

Pour que l’informatisation des processus soit efficace partout, de nombreux pays vont devoir s’attaquer aux obstacles liés aux infrastructures de télécommunication. Mais une fois les structures de base en place, ils peuvent continuer de progresser en associant l’imposition dématérialisée à d’autres approches innovantes : identification numérique, finance en ligne, suivi informatique des factures et du chiffre d’affaires ou encore feuilles d’impôt pré-remplies que les contribuables n’ont plus qu’à vérifier. Le Kenya a ainsi profité du système de transfert d’argent (a) M-Pesa, omniprésent dans le pays, pour autoriser les contribuables à payer leurs impôts via cette plateforme.

     4. Trouver de nouvelles sources de revenus

Parce qu’ils concernent avant tous les ménages les plus aisés, les impôts fonciers, les droits d’accise et la taxe carbone sont autant de sources possibles de recettes fiscales supplémentaires dans les pays à faible revenu. C’est aussi un moyen de prévenir les comportements indésirables, comme le fait de prendre sa voiture dans des zones au bord de l’asphyxie, de fumer ou de consommer des aliments malsains.

Nous soutenons l’initiative mondiale emmenée par l’OCDE pour remettre à plat les modalités d’imposition des grandes entreprises multinationales, souvent déjà converties au numérique, dans le but de permettre aux pays en développement de tirer un meilleur parti de leurs activités. Pour l’instant, 100 à 600 milliards de dollars (a) échappent à l’impôt, partout dans le monde, à la faveur de formes légales de fraude et d’évasion fiscales. La proposition soutenue par l’OCDE marque un tournant dans les règles fiscales internationales et, à condition d’être correctement mise en œuvre, pourrait réorienter davantage de fonds vers les pays en développement, comme l’analyse un document récent de la Banque mondiale intitulé International Tax Reform, Digitalization and Developing Economies.

Les conditions préalables au changement

Les équipes de la Banque mondiale s’emploient à aider les pays à mobiliser les ressources fiscales (a) dont ils ont besoin pour assurer leur développement. Au Sénégal, nous aidons les autorités à lancer une stratégie de revenu à moyen terme, tandis qu’à Maurice et au Cabo Verde, nous soutenons les efforts du gouvernement en vue de publier des rapports sur les dépenses fiscales et supprimer les impôts inefficaces. En Ouganda, nous avons collaboré avec les autorités pour identifier les produits susceptibles de supporter un droit d’accise. Et en Sierra Leone, nous accompagnons le gouvernement dans la modernisation de ses services des douanes et de la fiscalité intérieure : au cours du premier trimestre 2019, les recettes fiscales ont pratiquement doublé en glissement annuel, ressortant à 211 milliards de leones contre 127 milliards un an auparavant.

Ces améliorations ne tombent pas du ciel. Elles dépendent de conditions difficiles à réunir, qu’il s’agisse de la présence d’infrastructures numériques de base ou de la volonté politique. Malgré tout, les raisons d’espérer sont là : en dix ans, des centaines de réformes (a) ont été adoptées partout dans le monde pour optimiser les régimes fiscaux. Nous devons tous redoubler d’efforts pour mobiliser suffisamment de ressources intérieures aux fins de financer les objectifs de développement durable.

Prenez part au débat


          

Bunge la Uganda lahoji tabia ya serikali kunyanyasa upinzani

 Cache   
Spika wa bunge la Uganda, Rebecca Kadaga amehoji ikiwa bado nchi hiyo ina mfumo wa vyama vingi, akitolea mfano tukio la kupigwa, kunyanyaswa na kukamatwa kwa wanasiasa wa upinzani.
          

Kuda Bank App Earn N200 Money, Airtime And Data For Free Referral Program

 Cache   
Whave seen different type of apps that gives free money airtime and data pass years such as GoNoneyJumia One App, CashkachingOpera NewsZotoGeoPollTopUp Africa and Mcent Browser that gives you free airtime credit without any stress and now another amazing app has finally joined the line, and it called "Kuda Bank App".
Kuda Bank App is the latest free cash earning App in Nigeria that reward you with Naira which you can transfer to your bank account or use for free airtime, real money and funds when you install the app, open it daily and refers friends and family.

With Kuda you can easily make extra money for yourself. All you need is to download Kuda App.

Open the App daily to Earn Free cash, Refer your friends to the App to Earn More.

Kuda Bank is quite similar Chipper Cash App in terms of their referral program. Just that the amount is quite different.

WHAT IS KUDA BANK APP?


Kuda bank is a free mobile-only  bank licensed by the central  bank of Nigeria.  You can send money through this Kuda bank.

No card or account maintenance fees and they only charge #10 for transfers to any bank(they give two free transfer every month). We're sure you will like Kuda bank mobile app.

Kuda gives you a spending account, a debit card accepted worldwide and the option of saving every time you spend. You will be given ATM card to withdraw at any ATM machine.

KUDA BANK ALSO HAS A REFERRAL SYSTEM AND HOW DOES IT WORK?


Their referral system is awesome. For every person you refer to Chipper Cash mobile app you N200 to the app,

Now how to earn on this Kuda bank, you must partner with them by just sending your details to them.

They give #200 per referral (any member that sign up through your link is your referral), if  5 people sign up through your link given to you by Kuda bank, you will be given #200 on each of them and your referrals will also be given 10 free transfers to any bank, that means they will give you #5000 at the end of the week(their is no minimum of amount you are to refer, refer as much as you can) . Your referral link will be given to you after you have registered.

If you refer 20 more people to the app, you will get a whopping N4,000.

Additionally, you can buy airtime for yourself from the app. It’s instantaneous and handy.

Now what are you waiting for? let's get down to business.

HOW TO REGISTER ON KUDA BSNK APP


=> First, Install Kuda Bank Mobile App From Here and launch the app.
Next, enter your mobile number or email for registration and a code will be sent to you, verify the OTP code.

=> Skip the BVN option

 => Then verify your account.

 => Choose your country.

=> If the app is not responding to network kindly connect your vpn such as SkyVpn or StarkVpn and it will respond.

=> Once done, input your email address or phone number and accept all terms and conditions.

=> Once done, create a 6-digit unique code that will help you in every of your activities on the app, especially transactions.

=> After you have successfully signed up, your Chipper Cash account will be credited with 10 Naira, which you can withdraw instantly straight to your bank account.
According to the mail we got from Kuda team! We’ll pay you 200 naira for every single person who opens a Kuda account through your referral link. Your Kuda account will be credited every Monday.

How To Get Free N200 On Kuda Bank App


» Go to Kuda Partner Program.

» Next input your kuda Account number, sent to your email after successfully signed up.

» Select your State and Target Area / LGA.

» Next click Get Started.
We'll pay you up to 200 naira for each person who signs up on Kuda through your referral link.

CAN I WITHDRAW THE MONEY?


=> Yes, you can withdraw the money to your bank account or by data or airtime.

=> Launch the Kuda app

=> At the bottom of the app, tap on payments.

=> Then tap on Send Money => Add Amount => Choose your bank and proceed to cash out.

=> You also top up airtime our data with your balance on the kuda bank app just click on Buy Airtime and then select your option and phone number.

=> Tap on "Buy Airtime" and put your phone number then choose your network and amount. 

HOW CAN I FUND OR DEPOSIT MONEY ON MY KUDA BANK ACCOUNT?


To deposit money, simply tap on “Add Money” button at the top right corner of the app. You can then choose to fund your Kuda account from your bank or by using ATM card method.

HOW CAN I COPY MY REFERRALS LINK?


=> At the bottom of the app.

Tap on the More option located at the bottom

=> Then tap on Refer & Earn. From there copy the referrals link to clipboard and share with your friends.

How To Verify Your Kuda Bank Account


=> When sign-in up the app ask you to take a selfie.

=> At the home page of the app, tap on Ugrade Account.

=> Now take a snapshot of your government issued ID card (National ID, Voters Card or Drivers licence) front. You'll also be asked to take a selfie while holding the ID card + BVN.

=> After that, Submit and wait for at least 2 to 5 business days for verification to be successful.

What are you waiting for you can start referring and earning as well.

          

China is about to Own Uganda

 Cache   

It is called debt-trapping by China. China has been trapping small desperate nations for several years and few are paying attention. Imperialism? Yes on a global scale. Uganda is about to default to China. 39% of the debt in Uganda is owed to China. It could be that beyond Uganda, Tanzania, Ethopia and Kenya could […]

The post China is about to Own Uganda appeared first on The DENISE SIMON EXPERIENCE Blog.


          

De Reve Pour Voir Les Animaux Ouganda Ariane Arpin

 Cache   
De Reve Pour Voir Les Animaux Ouganda Ariane Arpin
          

VOA60 Africa - Uganda will revamp its century-old railway network

 Cache   
Uganda: The country will begin revamping its century-old railway network
          

1st #VdGMForum | Barcelona, 7-8 February 2014

 Cache   

 

 

The Vasco da Gama Movement whishes to thank all participants, speakers and supporters of the first PanEuropean meeting for Trainees and Junior Family Doctors, the #VdGMForum !

 

 

Download the 2014 #VdGMForum programme and abstract booklet by clicking here (PDF, 5MB)

 

Welcome message

The Vasco da Gama Movement invites you to be part of the first PanEuropean meeting for Trainees and Junior Family Doctors !

We are delighted to welcome you to the first Pan European meeting for trainees and junior Family Doctors, the Vasco da Gama Movement Forum, which will be held in the city of Barcelona on 7th-8th February 2014. After organising 8 succesful European PreConferences and co-organising 2 fantastic World PreConferences ahead of the Wonca Conferences between 2005-2013, and alongside preparations for the 2014 VdGM PreConference in Lisbon in July, the Vasco da Gama Movement is ready to take the next step ! 
 
We are organizing the VdGM Forum, a scientific conference rich in contents, under the title “One Strong Voice for the Family Doctors of the 21st Century”. The programme will be focused on the topics of the Future of Family Medicine, Emergency Medicine and Out-of-Hours Services, Career Development, Research Skills and Emerging Technologies.
 
Prior to the VdGM Forum, a vocational exchange will be organized for selected participants, who will have the opportunity to observe GP/FM practices (offices) in Barcelona and learn more about the national organisation of primary care.
 
We strongly believe that the progress of our movement depends on our colleagues, on whether they share our cause, and on the continuity of our platform; a platform in which members meet regularly and they have the chance to establish and develop good professional relationships, which are essential for launching exciting and aspirational new projects. Alongside trainees and newly qualified (5 years) General Practitioners / Family Doctors, we also welcome senior GP/FD, other specialities but also patients and undergraduate medical students.
 
For this very reason we are working with great enthusiasm so that you can enjoy a unique scientific and cultural programme.
 
We warmly invite you all to join us for an amazing conference; we are looking forward to meeting you in Barcelona!
 
The Host Organising Committee of the First VdGM Forum
 
 

Speakers

Confirmed speakers to the VdGM Forum

 

Enric Aragonès  (Spain) 

Enric Aragonès, MD, PhD,is a family physician and general practitioner at Constantí Primary Care Centre (Catalan Heath Institute). He is working in research projects in mental health in the primary care area (mainly in clinical and healthcare topics of depression) and is the manager of the Research Group in Mental Health and Primary Care in Tarragona (Primary Care Research Institute IDIAP Jordi Gol). He is member of the Working Group in Mental Health of the CAMFiC (Catalan Society of Family Medicine) and coordinator of the semFYC Working Group in Mental Health (Spanish Society of Family Medicine).

 

Manuel Campíñez Navarro

(Spain)

Manuel Campiñez Navarro. Family physician in EBA Vallcarca, Barcelona. Master in Primary Health Care, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). Associate Clinical Professor in the Medicine Department, UAB. Directive Member of the Communication and Health Group in the Spanish Family Physicians Association (SEMFYC). PhD Student in UAB.

Magdalena Canals

(Spain)

Magdalena  Canals Aracil is a family and community doctor. She works in a Health Center in the south of Madrid. She’s member of  the Emergencyand ContinuingCare group of semFYC  and is Family Medicine resident´s tutor in Madrid and Associate Professor of practice in the Complutense University. She has a lot of experience learning basic/advanced live support, she makes with her ESVAP program group (Enseñanza de Soporte Vital en Atención Primaria) many courses all over Spain. She is coordinator of ESVAP program in Madrid.

Sonia Cibrián

(Spain)

Family physician un EBA VAllcarca, Barcelona. Member of the Communication and Health Group in the Spanish Family Physicians Association (semFYC). PhD Student in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB).

Lorraine Cleaver

(UK)

Lorraine Cleaver is a Scottish wife and mother who has petitioned the Scottish Parliament for improved Thyroid diagnosis and treatment. The petition has benefited from the involvement of the Minister for Public Health and is progressing well. After her thyroid was removed in 2006 for Graves disease, Lorraine's health declined by an alarming degree, despite being under the care of an Endocrinologist. Her GP was desperate to help but the system of deferring to the consultant and guidelines made this almost impossible. She recovered her health by working alongside her GP but outwith the established Endocrinology model. Gathering evidence for the petition reinforced that the treatment model for chronic diseases is failing many thousands of patients who go on to develop worsening health and a reliance on polypharmacy. She is optimistic that putting patients at the center of their treatment will help to change this, improving patient's health and enabling GP's to have more autonomy in the patient's care.

Xavier Cos
(Spain)
 

Mercedes Fernández

(Spain)

Mercedes Pérez Fernández. GP, specialist in Internal Medicine, Equipo CESCA, Madrid (Spain). President of the Ethical Committee of the Spanish Network of Primary Care, and NoGracias.

Odile Fernández

(Spain)

Odile Fernández. GP. Postgradute in preventive medicine and public health. Author of the book: "Mis Recetas Anticáncer: alimentación y vida anticáncer" ( My recipes anticancer: food and life anticancer). Survivor of stage IV ovarian cancer. She is working in the promotion of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of cancer. 

Aurora Rovira Fontanals

(Spain)

Aurora Rovira Fontanals (Barcelona, 1961). MD (UAB, 1985). Family physician since 1989, working in CAP La Pau (Barcelona) since 1992. Tutor of GP trainees since 1995. Member of Gender Violence network and Primary Care of CAMFiC. Member of Red-CAPS (female healthcare professional’s network).

Berta Garcia Arbol

(Spain)

Medical student at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently studying at the University of Alcalá in a national exchange program. Member of Farmacriticxs, a national project of International Federation of Medical Students Associations of Spain (IFMSA-Spain). Member of the organization committee of the second Farmacriticxs- NoGracias conference “Salut amb Seny” at Barcelona, 2011. One month clinical clerkship at Teresina, Brazil through an International Clinical Exchange Program of IFMSA. Member of Red-CAPS, a female healthcare professional’s network.

Juan Gervas

(Spain)

Juan GERVAS. GP, PhD. Equipo CESCA, Madrid (Spain). Honorary professor, public health, Autonomous University, Madrid. Visiting professor, international health, National School of Public Health, Madrid.

Raquel Gomez-Bravo
(Spain)
Dr Raquel Gómez Bravo is a Spanish young family doctor from Alhaurín el Grande Málaga, where she was graduated in 2004 (UAM). She made her Specialization in Family and Community Medicine in Madrid 2005-2009, being very in the Spanish Scientific Society of Family and Community Medicine SemFYC. Chief of Residents of Universitary of Hospital La Paz 2009-2010. Emergency Department of the University Hospital La Paz (Madrid, Spain) (June, 2009 to August 2012). Mentor of trainees: June 2010-August 2012. Teacher at Autonomous University of Madrid: “TAD de Medicina y Cirugía de Urgencias” during 3 years (Academic years 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2011-2012), specialize in communication skills and new technologies. Expert in Mental Health in Primary Care (University of Alcalá) 2009. European Expert in Quality Management in Health Care (AENOR) 2011. Nowadays she is the Spanish Representative Member in VdGM Europe Council. Coordinator of Beyond Europe Group in VdGM. VdGM Executive. Liaison with EURIPA and member of EURIPA Executive. Liaison with WWPWFM. Member of Family Violence Special Interest Group and actually working in her PhD about Gender Violence. 

Ángel González

(Spain)

Advertising practitioner with 30 years of experience, half of them in the Healthcare sector. He has been co-President of Publicis Healthcare Spain, heading the Madrid office by managing its change and bringing innovation to lead it to being “the reference of the market on a global scale”. Afterwards, he joined the Madrid office of Global Healthcare as partner and managing director with the responsibility of re-launching it onto the Spanish market. In January 2009, Angel set up Ideagoras, the first fully independent Social Media in Healthcare company established in Spain. He was the founder of #hcsmeuES, leading the tweet-chats during its first year.

Angelina González Viana

(Spain)

Registered Nurse at Barcelona University (1996) worked at cardiac units both in Catalan and English hospitals and for Doctors without Borders in Sierra Leone and Uganda in 2003-2004. MPH in 2005 at Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona. Since 2007 I work at Catalan Public Health Agency. Involved on health promotion programs that connect primary health and municipalities into making easy the healthy options at local level as well as involved in impulsing community health projects in vulnerable areas of Catalonia.

Prof Amanda Howe

(UK)

Prof Amanda Howe was elected as WONCA President-Elect in Prague in June 2013. She will become the first woman to be WONCA President in 2016. She was elected RCGP Honorary Secretary in 2009. Prof Howe practices at the Bowthorpe Medical Centre in Norwich, England and has been Professor of Primary Care at the University of East Anglia since 2001. She has been deeply involved with WONCA since 2000, when she facilitated a workshop for their Working Party on Women and Family Medicine. She is on their Executive, chaired the group from 2007-2009, and hosted an international meeting at UEA in 2009. Prof Howe now serves on the newly created Equity Committee, is a member of WONCA Europe’s Bylaws Committee, and (also as part of her role as RCGP Honorary Secretary), often attends WONCA conferences in Europe and around the world to contribute relevant papers and promote the development of family medicine.
 

Sebastian Huter

(Austria)

Sebastian Huter is a medical student from Austria. He is writing his diploma thesis on "the role of the GPs as point of first contact in the Austrian health care system". As a member of the Austrian Medical Students' Association and the Austrian VdGM-membership organisation "JAMÖ" he participated in and coordinated various projects to advocate for better training in general practice, both during and after medical school.

Per Kallestrup

(Denmark)

See more in this link.

Laminu Kaumi

(Spain)

Laminu Kaumi M.D, ETM, MPH, is a final year Resident Doctor in Family and community medicine at Unidad docente Este Madrid, Spain. Graduated at the Latin American school of medicine, Havana with Honours Title (Gold Title, Titulo de Oro) and 7 Academic Awards. Working experience in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa related to global health, tropical medicine and volunteer activities. Presently undergoing a Masters programme in tropical medicine and international health at Universidad autonoma de Madrid. Active Member of the Cuban and Nigerian Medical association.

Oleg Kravtchenko

(Norway)

Born in 1963 to the family of Russian army officer. Graduated Moscow Medical Academy in 1986. Specialized in ENT-surgery at Central Postgraduate University, Moscow, and Eppendorf University, Hamburg. Practiced at the Central Clinical Hospital in Moscow until 1998 when moved to Norway. Studied at Oslo University and then practiced at the Nordland Central Hospital, ENT-dept. and later Ob.-Gyn. dept. Specialized as GP in 2002 and worked in rural practice in Meloey community, Nordland, until summer 2012 when became co-owner at the Fredensborgklinikken, Nordland. Works as a fulltime GP and is an Overseas Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, London, and Vice-President of EURIPA, WONCA. 

Joanne Lane

(UK)

Joanna Lane BA Hons (Oxon).Joanna’s son Chris committed suicide in 2008 at the age of 31. Since then she has been trying her best to raise awareness of neuroendocrine problems after brain injury, with such diverse consequences as getting the issue raised in an Early Day Motion in Parliament, and incorporated into the plot line of a Holby City episode.  She is very willing to speak on post-traumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to any audience, and welcomes emails from anyone who believes they may be affected by this condition. Her website is www.headinjuryhypo.org.uk. Before retirement she taught English as a Second Language. She is married with two surviving daughters and two small granddaughters, and lives in Surrey.

Frederic Llordachs i Marques

Frederic Llordachs

(Spain)

MD with MBA, specialiced in Healthcare Management and Marketing. Direct experience with healthcare insurance, and heathcare management, and interested in medical tourism, innovation in medical devices and new ICT-based healthcare services. Involved in start-ups, like Doctoralia (http://www.doctoralia.com), the global platform for healthcare search and accessibility, and other early stage projects

Francisco Lupiáñez-Villanueva

(Spain)

Associate Professor at School of Information and Communication Science Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and researcher at Internet Interdisciplinary Institute. His research field is focused on Innovative Technologies and eHealth, among others.
He was a scientific Officer at Information Society Unit - European Commission to work on economic evaluation and modelling of Personal Health Systems.

Helena Legido-Quigley

(UK)

Helena Legido-Quigley, is a Lectuer in Global Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. She has conducted research on European health policy, quality of health care, health systems, chronic conditions, and migrant populations. Her latest research focuses on the impact of the financial crisis and austerity measures on health. Her work has been published in peer reviewed journals such as the Lancet, British Medical Journal and PLOS Medicine. It has also been widely covered in International media including the Economist, the Financial Times and Huffington Post.

Juan A Lopez-Rodriguez

(Spain)

Juan A Lopez-Rodriguez, MD, was born in Frigiliana (Malaga-SPAIN) and graduated from Malaga's University in 2009. He is currently a Primary Care Resident at the Madrid Center Multiprofesional Primary Care Teaching Unit and a member of the Working Group in Mental Health at the semFyC (main National Primary Care Society). He worked as an attending Physician in a Substance Misuse clinic and he owns a Master Degree in Psychopharmacology and Drug Abuse by the Universidad Complutense of Madrid. He is currently also a PhD fellow developing his thesis in the field of Addiction treatment tools for Primary Care with the use of social media and computer assisted programs treatments (conducted by Prof. Gabriel Rubio)

Job Metsemakers

(Netherlands)

 
Prof Job Metsemakers became in 2002 professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine, at Maastricht University. At the international level, he has been active as consultant in health care reform in Eastern European countries, and in development of family medicine in Indonesia. He has been on the executive board of The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice and Family Medicine (EURACT), and currently is on the Advisory Board of the European General Practice Research Network (EGPRN). For the last six years (until June 2013) he was the Honorary Secretary of WONCA Europe. From 2010-2013 he served on the WONCA membership committee. He succeeded Tony Mathie (UK), in June 2013, to become President of WONCA Europe 2013-2016.
 
Frederick Miller (Spain) 

Frederick (Rick) Miller is a physician of Family and Community Medicine trained in the United States. He has spent the last 12 years working in both the US and Spain in medicine and community health. He is a founding member of the network AUPA, which comprises over 75 health centres in Catalunya that are doing community health projects, and was the Scientific Secretary for PACAP (Program for Community Health in Primary Care), of the Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine. Currently, he works in Barcelona for Advance Medical, a company that provides expert medical opinions to patients in remote areas of the world, and at Codman Square, a community health center in Boston, as a family physician.

Sergio Minue

(Spain)

 
Sergio Minué is a specialist in Family and Community Medicine and professor of Health Policy and Ethics Department in the Andalusian School of Public Health. At this moment he is Director of Innovation and Research in this institution. He is leading some research project related to clinical decision making in primary care, about diagnostic error, and he is working in some international projects about the impact of the economic crisis in health systems. Sergio carries out functions as semFYC representative in WONCA/CIMF. Member of the semFYC group in patient safety, he publishes two blogs ( “El gerente de Mediado” and "La cara Ve”).
@sminue
 
 Ernesto Mola (Italy)

Ernesto Mola is a family doctor in Lecce (South of Italy), representative of ASSIMEFAC and President Elect of the network of Italian Associations members of WONCA. He is involved in research and in the vocational training for family doctors as coordinator. He collaborated for the Leonardo Project, designed to involve patients in the management of their chronic conditions.

Agostinho Moreira de Sousa

(Portugal)

Agostinho Sousa is a sixth year medical student at the Abel Salazar Biomedical Sciences Institute (ICBAS) of the University of Porto, Portugal. He is now in his second term as Liaison Officer for Medical Education issues. He also serves as the student representative in the World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) and in the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE). His main responsibility is to work with all the external partners that are related to Medical Education.

Marco Noventa

(Italy)

Marco Noventa got his education at University of Padova where in 2002 he got graduated in Science and Agrarian Technologies and attended PhD courses in Michigan State University “management and improvement of animal genetic resources”.  He is responsible beef cattle nutritionist for one of the biggest Italian farmers association (AZOVE)  with more than 50000 heads. He follows all the phases of meat chain production, from selection and purchasing of animals, nutrition, formulation and production of feedstuffs and supplements, premixes and control of meat quality at slaughter houses.

 

Marie Ennis O'Connor

 

Nikos Papachristou

 

Tanja Pekez-Pavlisko

(Croatia)

Luisa Pettigrew

(UK)

Dr Luisa Pettigrew is a young family doctor in London. Whilst in VdGM (2008-2011) she coordinated the ‘Hippokrates’ international exchange programme, helping secure its first European Union funding grant. In parallel in the UK she helped establish the Royal College of General Practitioners' Junior International Committee to enable the future generation of family doctors in the UK to also further in international activities. In 2013 she was elected as a member at large to WONCA's executive board. Luisa has undertaken a Diploma in International Health (2003) and Master in Health Policy (2011). When possible Luisa has taken time to undertake voluntary work for various NGOs and health organisations in Argentina, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico and Mozambique. In addition she has undertaken work for the World Health Organization and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. 

Alba Riesgo

(Spain)

Alba Riesgo, MD, PhD, is a family physician who works in the emergency department of the University Hospital in Oviedo, a medium city in the North of Spain. She is working in research projects in emergency medicine, specially in cardiac acute care and acute stroke. She has participated in different multicentric studies about cardiac acute care in Spain and she has also published several papers about this topic in Spanish medical journals. She also has a lot of experience learning basic/advanced live support, she makes with her ESVAP program group (Enseñanza de Soporte Vital en Atención Primaria) many courses all over Spain. She is coordinator of the semFYC Working Group in emergency medicine (Spanish Society of Family Medicine).

Marta Sastre

(Spain)

Marta Sastre Paz is a young family and community doctor. She was traineed in Vallecas, a district in the south of Madrid. For the last two years, she’s been working in a Health Promotion Centre in Villaverde, also in the south of Madrid; nowadays, her work is more community work than individual consultations, working in Health Promotion Centre, CMS Villaverde - Madrid Salud - Ayuntamiento de Madrid. She’s member of PACAP (Community Activities in Primary Care Programm of semFYC) since 2008. “I believe in the need of engaging with the community, and try to be part of it, to promote health and reduce health inequalities.”

Martin Sattler

(Luxembourg)

Martin Sattler is a family physician working since 2010 in Luxemburg. He completed the GP training in Luxemburg and started the national VdGM group in Luxemburg in 2009. The medical studies he completed in various european countries as Germany, France, Sweden and Italy where her get in contact with the different health care systems and where started his special interest for primary care in europe and worldwide. Personal interests are beside promotion of primary care, alternative medicine and health politics, travelling, languages, sports, music and nature.

Martin Seifert

(Czech Repubblic)

Martin Seifert is a young GP in training from the Czech Republic, currently working in two general practices in Prague. He studied medicine in Prague and gathered his medical experience and skills mainly in the University Hospital in Prague, in Granada (Spain), Ufa (Russia), Jeruzalem (Israel), and Regensburg (Germany), where he worked more than two years in neurological rehabilitation. He has finished a 3-year course of study of traditional Chinese medicine and shiatsu, which he practices and continues to study. Dr. Seifert has additionally been studying and practicing therapeutic yoga in the Czech Republic, Spain, and Nepal for the last 12 years. He practices manual medicine of the famous „Prague school“ and he is in psychotherapeutic training focused on psychosomatics. He has volunteered in many foreign countries, such as Ghana, giving lessons about teenage pregnancy. He teaches as an external assistant at the Department of Family Medicine of Charles University in Prague.

Jordi Serrano Pons

(Spain)

Jordi is a General Practitioner and the founder of the UniversalDoctor Project, the main objective of which is to improve multilingual communication between health professionals and patients.
He is co-founder of Zero Mothers Die, a Global partnership Project using mobile health to improve maternal health.
He recently started working as a consultant to the WHO and TicSalut Foundation and collaborates very frequently with the Geneva Health Forum as advisor on Innovation and Health cited Forum (Forum of Global Health).
     

 

 

Preconference: #DesignThinking for Primary Care Workshop

Design Thinking is about believing we can make a difference, and having an intentional process in order to get to new, relevant solutions that create positive impact.
 
  • It’s human-centred: it begins from deep empathy and understanding of needs and motivations of people
  • It’s collaborative: several great minds are always stronger when solving a challenge than just one.
  • It’s optimistic: Design Thinking is the fundamental belief that we all can create change.
  • It’s experimental: it gives you permission to fail and to learn from your mistakes, because you come up with new ideas, get feedback on them, then iterate.
 
It has five phases that help navigate the development from identifying a design challenge to finding and building a solution.
 
The Five Phases of the Design Thinking Process
 
The Vasco da Gama Movement is developing a fantastic workshop that will enable you to learn firsthand how Design Thinking can be used to innovate in health and healthcare. During this workshop, teams will work together to explore and create solutions to real healthcare challenges.
 
Design Thinking #1
 
The participants will work on problems identified and will use the Design Thinking methods to gain a deep understanding of the problem and develop innovative ‘human-centred’ solutions (ie. solutions that truly meet the needs of users). Methods will include user-interviews, observation, brainstorming and rapid prototyping, with the aim of creating solutions that combine human desirability and usability with business viability and technological feasibility.
 
The workshop will take place in Barcelona just before the 1st #VdGMForum, on 7th February from 9am to 2.30pm. There is only a limited number of places for this workshop. The participation in the workshop will be free of charge. Medical students, other healthcare professionals, people from other professional background and patients are welcome to apply for a place.
 
The deadline for applications is Tuesday 7th January.
 
Design Thinking #2
 

Preconference: Satellite Meetup with the Health 2.0 Barcelona

Are you a technology enthusiast? Do you believe in the potential of technology that will lead to the Creative Destruction of Medicine? We are delighted to invite you to the Preconference Satellite Meetup with the Health 2.0 Barcelona!

Health2.0Bcn is an interdisciplinary group where professionals of the health sector join technology lovers with the aim to improve healthcare through the use of new technologies. Health2.0 wants to encourage projects related to health, developed by startups or individuals, offering them visibility, while inspiring others

This Preconference Satellite Meetup will be held on Thursday 6th February 2014 at 7pm, just a day before the #VdGMForum. A map to the location is available here. The participation is completely free, but we kindly ask you to register here in order to manage the resources that we need for this meetup.

 

The Programme includes:

 

  1. Presentation of the VdGM
  2. Introduction and overview of the latest trends in health2.0 by health2.0Bcn team
  3. Round table of local GPs who will tell us about the use of 2.0 technologies in their day to day, what's available out there and what's missing. 
 
Primary care represents a big market segment with special needs, that are not necessarily covered yet by the new technologies. Let's try to fill that gap. 
 
The confirmed family doctor panelists are:
  • Dra Mireia Sans 
  • Dra Dolors Ruiz  
  • Dra Adriana Bataller 
  • Dr Miguel Angel Mayer 
  • Dr Monica Moro 
  • Dr Jordi Serrano
 
We hope that this session will be a good occasion for startups to size the opportunities and needs of the primary care, and for primary care doctors to share their experience and best practices in order to spread the benefits of those technologies amongst their GP colleagues.

 

We would like to thank the organizers Aline Noizet, Frederic Llordachs, Jordi Serrano Pons and Sophie Park for their enthusiastic support and for making this meeting happen.

 

 

Exchange Programme

It is our pleasure to offer to all European GP trainees/junior GP visitors the opportunity to discover how GPs in and around Barcelona practice medicine, in the Conference Exchange in Barcelona, just before the first Pan European meeting for trainees and junior Family Doctors, the Vasco da Gama Movement Forum! Between 5-6th February, during the Conference Exchange, we will try to show you our art and science to be a doctor. Therefore, we offer 30 places for European visitors in primary health care urban or rural centres.
 
You will enjoy 2 days of rotation before the Vasco da Gama Movement Forum begins, which will be held in the city of Barcelona on 7th-8th February 2014. You can join us and be part of the social program we have prepared just to show the skills, knowledge, technology, art, languages, and awesome Barcelona which is always waiting for you. 
 
We have limited places (12) for those who want to stay in the home of one of our tutors/GP trainers colaborators. Some of them live in rural areas within 2 hours of Barcelona, others in the city of Barcelona.
 
Also, if you want to stay by your own in the city, we can help you to find cheap accomodation in a nice hostel with good transport communication and location.
 
We are working with great enthusiasm so that you can enjoy an unforgettable experience that will not disappoint you ! Please take a look also at the detailed schedule of the Exchange, by clicking here.
 
If you wish to participate in the exchange, please contact your VdGM National Representative.
 
The selection has finished ! Thank you to everyone who applied !
 

You can download the final social programme for the exchange by clicking here.

 
 
 

Place and Time

The Forum venue is the Collegi Oficial de Metges de Barcelona (www.comb.cat). Here is the venue on Google Maps: Map
The Forum will take place on 7th and 8th February 2014.
 

 

Facebook

Join the Facebook Event to be up to date on news - https://www.facebook.com/events/119640248206586

 

Twitter

Join the conversation! We will be tweeting with the #vdgmForum hashtag: http://www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/vdgmforum/
 

Newsletter

You can download the Forum Newsletter here: Announcement Issue

 

 

Scientific Committee

 

Beeindruckende Bilder aus Uganda erwarten Besucher am Sonntag, 22. März 2020 um 18 Uhr bei der Multivisionsshow „Uganda“ in der Stadthalle Gernsbach.


          

Aftermath of marriage of Pastors daughter who married three men at once

 Cache   
A few weeks ago, one Ann Grace Aguti made headlines for marrying three men at once. The 36-year-old woman, identified as Ann Grace Aguti, who is a Pastors daughter, married three men and allocated them three out of the seven tiny huts in her compound in Ngora, Uganda. Her action is reported to have incurred The post Aftermath of marriage of Pastors daughter who married three men at once appeared first on Kemi Filani News.
          

Kenya gives up the fight for Migingo and agrees to share the iron-clad Island not bigger than a football field with Uganda

 Cache   
Kenya gives up the fight for Migingo and agrees to share the iron-clad Island not bigger than a football field with Uganda
          

Woman married to 3 men at same time, gets born again, denies them sex

 Cache   
Nigeria News | Laila's BlogWoman married to 3 men at same time, gets born again, denies them sexThe Ugandan woman Ann Grace Aguti who was in the news days back over her marriage to 3 men at [] Read More >>Woman married to 3 men at same time, gets born again, denies them sexSanya Agunbiade
          

Woman Who Married Three Husbands At The Same Time, Refuses To Sleep With Them After Becoming 'Born Again

 Cache   
A Ugandan woman, Ann Grace Aguti has denied her husbands s*x after making headlines sometime ago by marrying three men at the same time.
          

job opening as Trainee store manager 700 posts at PEP stores

 Cache   
Job Title: Trainee Store Manager (700 No Experience Job Opportunities) Pepstore Uganda deals in clothing and footwear, homeware, FMCG, cellular and airtime products and also [...]
          

Persistent heavy rains trigger floods and landslides in Uganda, at least 6 dead

 Cache   
Incessant heavy rain across Uganda has led to more flooding and landslides, killing at least 6 people in rain-related incidents since October 30, 2019. 4 500 people have been displaced, 950 houses schools were damaged, as well as roads and bridges. In the Eastern...... Read more »

          

Airtel unveils broadband internet bundles, but none is unlimited

 Cache   
The Tulumbe Airtel AFCON Airtel Shop

Airtel Uganda has unveiled new internet solutions targeting homes, and SMEs ie Small and Medium Enterprises but unfortunately these are not the unlimited internet packages of your dreams. For customers who will opt for these packages will be given an Airtel broadband Outdoor Unit, at a cost of UGX 280,000 inclusive of a 50 GB […]

The post Airtel unveils broadband internet bundles, but none is unlimited appeared first on Techjaja.


          

More Supu: MTN’s new voice bundles work across all networks

 Cache   
More Supu voice bundles MTN

Uganda’s telecom giant has unveiled a new voice bundle budded More Supu. The telecom company has today launched a voice bundle that will take it’s customers through this festive season. The new daily voice bundles give customers the freedom to make calls to both MTN customers and those on other networks, using the same voice […]

The post More Supu: MTN’s new voice bundles work across all networks appeared first on Techjaja.


          

How to update Your Identity Information on the Standard Chartered app

 Cache   
Standard Chartered app

As banks in Uganda struggle to ensure all their clientele have up-to-date information in their systems, Standard Chartered is making it easy for their customers to update all their personal details with ease. All you need is a smartphone, the Standard Chartered app for iOS or Android and copy of your National Identity Card to […]

The post How to update Your Identity Information on the Standard Chartered app appeared first on Techjaja.


          

Wildfires and winds in California

 Cache   
The Santa Ana in the south, and the Diablo in the north, are winds that are fuelling the terrible fires raging in California this week. They’re also blamed for bringing down power lines that sometimes start the fires. Roland Pease talks to Janice Coen of the National Center for Atmospheric Research NCAR who has been developing a highly detailed model to forecast how wind, mountains, and flames interact during a wildfire. The glaring gaps in human genetics are in Africa – much overlooked because the companies and universities sequencing DNA are mostly based in Europe, the US and other advanced economies. A ten-year attempt to fill in some of those gaps came to fruition this week, with the release of a study covering thousands of individuals from rural Uganda. Deepti Gurdasani, of Queen Mary University London, explains the data reveal both new medical stories, and the scale of past migration within Africa. There are also gaps in the climate record from Africa. Knowing past climates could help massively in understanding the prospects for climate change in coming years on the continent. Journalist Linda Nordling has just published an article in Nature that shows that the records exist – old weather data collected since the 19th Century. It’s just they’re scattered, unexamined, in vaults and collections across Africa. Adam McKay of Nasa and Alan Fitzsimmons of Queens University Belfast talk to Roland Pease about the latest observations of the interstellar interloper Comet Borisov. (Photo: A firefighter sets a back fire along a hillside during operations to battle the Kincade fire in Healdsburg, California. Credit: Philip Pacheco/AFP/Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Deborah Cohen
          

Ugandan air force improves pilot training facilities

 Cache   
The Ugandan People’s Defence Force - Air Force (UPDF-AF) has upgraded its training facilities at Gulu Air Base in the Northern region, it was revealed when President Yoweri Museveni visited for the graduation of 18 cadet pilots and 20 technicians on 6 November. Photographs released by the
          

News24.com | 'You can't put yourself morally above others' - Mabuza declines to condemn Ugandan anti-gay law

 Cache   
Deputy President David Mabuza refused to condemn human rights violations against members of the LGBTQ+ community across Africa during a question session in the National Council of Provinces.
          

L’Ougandais Ali Sabila Chelanget au sifflet

 Cache   
L’Ougandais Ali Sabila Chelanget au sifflet
          

Pulitzer Center Global Health Reporting Fellowship Info Session

 Cache   

Pulitzer Center Global Health Reporting Fellowship Info Session

Since 2011, twenty-eight Boston University students have participated in fully funded international reporting trips as part of the Program on Global Health Storytelling. PGHS is a collaboration among COM, SPH, the Center for Global Health and Development, the Pulitzer Center and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. COM and SPH students have traveled to Kenya, Cuba, Mali, Zanzibar, Malawi, Myanmar, Haiti, Turkey, Ethiopia, Venezuela, El Salvador, Nepal, Bangladesh, India, Guyana, Uganda, Puerto Rico and the UK, reporting a wide range of public health and development issues including child brides, human trafficking, cholera, female genital cutting, migration, refugees, cash transfers, climate change, and the aftermath of earthquakes in Haiti. If you would like to be the next Pulitzer Fellow, come and learn more about this opportunity and what you need to do to qualify and apply. Pulitzer–funded reporter Maria Zamudio from WBEZ public radio in Chicago will speak about the Pulitzer Center and covering the Immigration beat.

12:30pm on Friday, November 15th 2019

COM 209, 640 Commonwealth Ave.


          

Andela Launches New Centre in Egypt That is Run Remotely

 Cache   

Andela has formally launched in Egypt in a launch ceremony yesterday with a remote centre located in Cairo. This is Andela’s 6th station in the continent, after Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda and Uganda. Andela’s headquarters is in the United States. Senior developers will work remotely from Cairo allowing them to gain experience while actively building […]

Read On Web → Andela Launches New Centre in Egypt That is Run Remotely


          

Asymptotic Distribution and Simultaneous Confidence Bands for Ratios of Quantile Functions

 Cache   
Fabian Dunker, Stephan Klasen, Tatyana Krivobokova.

Source: Electronic Journal of Statistics, Volume 13, Number 2, 4391--4415.

Abstract:
Ratios of medians or other suitable quantiles of two distributions are widely used in medical research to compare treatment and control groups or in economics to compare various economic variables when repeated cross-sectional data are available. Inspired by the so-called growth incidence curves introduced in poverty research, we argue that the ratio of quantile functions is a more appropriate and informative tool to compare two distributions. We present an estimator for the ratio of quantile functions and develop corresponding simultaneous confidence bands, which allow to assess significance of certain features of the quantile functions ratio. Derived simultaneous confidence bands rely on the asymptotic distribution of the quantile functions ratio and do not require re-sampling techniques. The performance of the simultaneous confidence bands is demonstrated in simulations. Analysis of expenditure data from Uganda in years 1999, 2002 and 2005 illustrates the relevance of our approach.


          

The Global Franchise Market Concludes in Dubai Today

 Cache   
Nov 06, 2019
Picture: 

Dubai - United Arab Emirates, 6 November 2019 --( ASIA TODAY )-- The 4th edition of The Global Franchise Market – TGFM concluded today on a high-note attracting more than 1600 investors and franchisees coming from different parts of the world while also featuring the participation of 80 leading brands, representing a variety of business industries and sectors. The event succeeded in showcasing new franchise concepts and emerging key trends that are rapidly transforming the franchise landscape across many fields and sectors.

Throughout the 2 days, the exhibition floor witnessed a number of successful meetings and lucrative business partnerships and agreements. Golden Fork Seafood Restaurants, a 33-year old Dubai based seafood restaurants chain, signed a master franchise agreement with Uganda based Rawda Holdings Limited. The agreement was signed in the presence of Mohammed Shanavas, Managing Director, Golden Fork Seafood Restaurants LLC and Tarig Mohamed, Chairman of Rawda Holding Ltd, Uganda. Through this agreement, Golden Fork Seafood Restaurants will develop 25 outlets across 5 countries in Central Africa, where the first fine dining outlet is expected to open at Kampala city in Uganda by January, 2020. Golden Fork currently has 20 operating outlets and plans to expand to 20 countries by 2022 targeting 100 outlets.

Besides that, Ruky perfumes, the Dubai based perfume brand, signed a regional franchise development agreement, which involves a 30-outlet expansion across Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Kuwait. The agreement was signed in the presence of Dr. Shanith Mangalat, MD, Ruky Perfumes LLC and Mohammed Salem of Al Salem Group, Al Ain. Ruky Perfumes currently has 20 operating outlets and it aims to expand to 300 outlets across Arab Gulf region by 2025.

On another note, Rolf G. Kirst, Board Member, Franchise Pool International, commented on their participation saying, “On behalf of Franchise Pool International, it gives me great pleasure to attend TGFM, which has truly evolved into a major franchise event in the region. TGFM is a unique platform to meet with the ever-growing list of potential investors and leading franchise brands from the UAE, Middle East and the globe who prefer face-to-face interactions. Over the years, Dubai has grown immensely to become a lucrative competitive market in the franchise landscape and it retained its status as the top destination for franchising in the region. Moreover, Dubai is the best location for us franchise exhibitors, as it is home to those visitors who have the capital to start a real business and the imagination to succeed and expand their business.”

On her part, Romany Ward, Marketing Executive, Coffee Planet, Dubai said, “With a strong and established trading base across our foodservice, retail and C-store platforms in Dubai, it is indeed a great opportunity for us to be a part of a regionally focused franchise event such as TGFM here in Dubai, the homeland of our business and roastery. At TGFM, we met many serious F&B investors looking to partner with us, and we hope to continue growing the success story of our brand in the UAE and wider GCC countries.”

She added, “Dubai is the place where franchisors can make their dreams come alive and it offers both an inspirational and aspirational place to set up a shop. In today’s franchise market, only the very best operational brands setting up the highest retailing standards can survive the demands of the knowledgeable and culturally diverse breadth of customers in this region. We are constantly increasing our efforts to succeed and continue to drive more to share our coffee experience and expertise.”

Commenting on their participation, Umair Tariq, CFO, Kido Schools, said, “This is the first time we participate in TGFM, and it was indeed a great opportunity for us to meet and connect with many potential partners and investors who could help us in expanding the Kido Brand to the lucrative markets in the UAE and other parts of the GCC region. Since its inception in 2014, with its first school in Hong Kong, Kido School has today opened more than 24 schools spanning many cities such as Dubai, London and 4 cities in India. By 2020, we plan to open our first branch in Houston, Texas and another 10 schools across many countries worldwide.”

He added, “The UAE has historically led the wave of growth in the region’s education sector and still represents an attractive market opportunity. Dubai and Abu Dhabi are among the largest and the most popular markets for educational investors. While the franchise industry is rapidly evolving in many countries of the GCC and MENA regions, the UAE remains a preferred destination for franchisors and franchisees, given its easy accessibility, stability of its legal and regulatory systems and its openness to foreign investment.”

The Global Franchise Market (TGFM) is held under the patronage of Dubai Economy and is organized annually by INDEX Conferences and Exhibitions – a member of INDEX Holding. The event witnesses the support of Ministry of Economy – National Program for Small and Medium Enterprises and Projects and the strategic partnership of Franchise Souq and Francorp Middle East as Platinum Sponsor.

- The End -

Category: 
Business Services
Event
Exhibition
FeaturedNews: 
Show in Featured News
TopPicture: 

          

Everyone thinks Uganda must win Cecafa Women's Championship - Bulega

 Cache   
They reached the final in last year's competition and the coach believes fans will be expecting nothing less than the title this time
          

Duniani Leo November 5, 2019 - Novemba 05, 2019

 Cache   
Wabunge wa Kivu kaskazini, Beni, Lubero na Butembo wameiomba serikali ya Congo kutowashirikisha wanajeshi wa Rwanda, Uganda na Burundi. Na Mauritius itapiga kura katika uchaguzi ambao unabashiriwa waziri mkuu Pravind Jugnauth kupata ushindi mkubwa,


Next Page: 10000

© Googlier LLC, 2019