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Sierra Leone’s soldiers heal trauma with yoga

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Warrior pose: Sierra Leone's soldiers heal trauma with yoga

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Pregnant Students in Africa Need Your Support, Not Rejection

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“Angela,” 20, walks with her son near her home after returning from school in Migori county, western Kenya. She is a Form 4 student at a girls-only school. Angela became pregnant when her trainee teacher offered to pay some of her primary school fees in return for sex. Her father tried to marry her off to suitors after she gave birth, but Angela’s mother fought against this and supported her return to school. She wants to go to college and study nursing.

© 2018 Smita Sharma for Human Rights Watch

In late 2018, Sierra Leone's First Lady, Fatima Bio, opened a national campaign "Hands Off Our Girls."   Her campaign made big promises to reduce child marriages and teenage pregnancies in the country, in part to tackle the spike in teenage pregnancies following widespread rape during the Ebola crisis. Reflecting on this campaign, President Julius Maada Bio stated: "We have wasted a lot of time in restricting the potentials of women and girls."

In light of this important acknowledgment, his government senselessly adheres to a policy that intentionally wastes the potential of many thousands of girls who are expelled from school each year because they are pregnant - which also effects the number of girls who stay in secondary school in the country.

In Sierra Leone, like in Tanzania and many other African countries, one of the most often cited excuses for not letting pregnant girls stay in school is that they will "corrupt" other girls into pregnancy. But isolating and excluding pregnant girls from school will not stop teen pregnancies because "immorality" is not the cause.

These punitive approaches, which in Tanzania and elsewhere have led to harassment and even arrest of pregnant girls, only serve to stigmatize and disempower girls, and to perpetuate gender discrimination. The fact is that many teenage girls are vulnerable to becoming pregnant because of factors such as poverty, violence, exploitation, and lack of knowledge about sexuality. Government officials might be quick to blame some of the most vulnerable girls, but authorities are incredibly slow when it comes to tackling these key factors through smart policies and programs.

The stories of hundreds of girls whom we have interviewed stand in sharp contrast to the dominant narrative by authorities and others in a position of power, such as teachers, education staff, or politicians who condemn them.

When we've asked girls - pregnant or not - what they think about their peers' pregnancies and drop-outs, most have told us that seeing other pregnant girls drop out of school is enough of a deterrent. Girls can often see that their peers have to deal with heavy stigma as a result of pregnancy. Their families reject or insult them. Most struggle to raise a child when they are children themselves.

In Tanzania, we interviewed Sawadee - she chose this pseudonym - who was in the third grade of secondary school when she got pregnant. Her neighbor - an adult man - followed her for a few years. He used to give her small gifts, which she felt she had to accept. At first, she refused to have sex with him, but her friends advised her to accept the money he was offering, as she would be better off. She got pregnant the first time they had sex, when she was only 16. Her parents kicked her out of their home, and she was expelled from school. For years, she dreamed of becoming a nurse - but getting back into education was nearly impossible: Sawadee and her daughter suffered hardship. She could only find very precarious jobs. "When I failed to get money, me and my baby didn't get a meal," she told us. Girls understand that pregnancy could mean the end of their hard-gained efforts to get a secondary or university education. Like Sawadee, they know pregnancy can destroy their ambitions.

But many girls also tell us about the challenges they face at school, and in their communities, which contribute to their vulnerability. Many girls we have spoken with became pregnant because they were raped, sexually exploited in exchange for food, money or grades or coerced into sex by adultsincluding their own teachers, and at a worryingly high rate, by boys their age.

But many also get pregnant following a sexual relationship they consented to with boys - often students or others they know in their communities. The lack of sexual education - or even how to protect themselves - plays a part in this.

Education ministries have a great tool available to act and respond in an empowering way. Age-appropriate comprehensive sexuality education can help students understand sexuality and reproduction and how to protect themselves from pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections. But importantly, this education can help them recognize that they can use their right of consent to decide when to have sexual relationships, and understand that sexual exploitation and abuse are crimes and that no one should subject them to sexual violence. Yet, many African governments refuse to provide comprehensive sexuality education in schools. Where it is provided it is often substandard. Most provide a half-baked and often unscientific version that focuses on the biology of reproduction or a stigmatized approach to adolescent sexuality that does little to protect students.

African governments have a legal obligation to promote girls' rights to education without discrimination. Sierra Leone should immediately lift the ban and not just allow all girls access to education, but support them fully to return to school. The African Union should call on Sierra Leone, Tanzania and all African governments to safeguard all girls' potential, and stop the exclusion of pregnant girls from schools.


          

iLUCKI Casino Exclusive Free Spins

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_AM30132

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(v.l.) Isha Johansen, FC Johansen Sierra Leone, Mag. Siegi Stemer, Sportlandesrat, Vorarlberg Österreich

Tags: International Forum «together we are stronger» Grand Resort Bad Ragaz 3. und 4. August 2011
          

_AM30136

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Isha Johansen, FC Johansen Sierra Leone

Tags: International Forum «together we are stronger» Grand Resort Bad Ragaz 3. und 4. August 2011
          

World: Knowledge for Children in Africa: 2019 Publications Catalogue

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Source: UN Children's Fund
Country: Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Foreword

Every year, UNICEF and partners generate a wealth of evidence on the situation of children in Africa. Knowledge and evidence are essential to informing the development, implementation, and monitoring of relevant policies and programmes for the realization of children’s rights. To this end, UNICEF Regional Directors in Africa are pleased to present the 2019 edition of the Knowledge for Children in Africa Publications Catalogue.

The 2019 edition of the catalogue features 107 reports and studies on the situation of children, young people, and women in Africa. These publications represent the collective knowledge generated by UNICEF Country and Regional Offices during the year, and capture the work of UNICEF and partners to support the rights and well-being of children across the continent.
The publications cover a wide range of topics. Publications are listed under the following categories:

  • Child Poverty
  • Child Protection
  • Child-Sensitive Social Protection
  • Education and Early Childhood Development
  • Financing for Development: Public Finance for Children
  • HIV and AIDS
  • Humanitarian Action, Resilience and Peacebuilding
  • Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
  • Nutrition
  • Situation Analysis and Socioeconomic Development
  • Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

Many of the publications are, or will be, available online. The entry for each study or report includes a short description, as well as information on the authors and contributors, planned publication date, and contact details for obtaining additional information.
Evidence plays a critical role in shaping successful initiatives in support of children and women.
We sincerely hope that you will find the publications listed in this catalogue to be a helpful resource for evidence-based decision making and programming.

Ted Chaiban Regional Director UNICEF Middle East and North Africa

Mohamed Malick Fall Regional Director UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa

Marie-Pierre Poirier Regional Director UNICEF West and Central Africa


          

Spiegel Geschichte: Special Air Service - Englands geheime Krieger

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07.11.2019 20:15 - 21:00
Einsatz in Sierra Leone
1. Staffel, Folge 1: Während des Bürgerkriegs im westafrikanischen Sierra Leone werden 11 britische Soldaten gefangen genommen und im Dschungel als Geiseln gehalten. Der SAS soll sie befreien. Nach intensiver Planung und Training im nachgebauten Dschungelcamp wird D Squadron 22 aus Hubschraubern abgesetzt und schlägt sich unter widrigen Umständen zu Fuß alleine durch. Mitglieder der Gruppe erzählen von den extremen körperlichen und mentalen Herausforderungen dieser lebensgefährlichen ...
          

The list of Africa nations in ascending order, by population VS new video of Michael Kiwanuka ‘You Ain’t The Problem’

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Djibouti Eswatini Equatorial Guinea Mauritius Guinea- Bissau Gabon Gambia Lesotho Botswana Namibia Mauritania Liberia Central African Republic Republic of The Congo Libya Sierra Leone Eritrea Togo (that’s 18 of 46 — it ends with Nigeria) South Sudan Burundi Benin (10,008,749) … Continue reading
          

Elim CAN 2021 : Michel Dussuyer se méfie de la Sierra Leone

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Le Bénin va jouer son deuxième match de groupe des éliminatoires de la CAN 2021 face à la Sierra Leone après avoir affronté le Nigéria 4 jours plus tôt. Si pour […]

Lire l'article Elim CAN 2021 : Michel Dussuyer se méfie de la Sierra Leone sur Africa Top Sports.


          

Palm oil production by smallholder farmers in North Sierra Leone

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This set of documents sums up the findings of several works related to palm oil production in Bombali District, including a specific study conducted in 2017 aiming at better understanding the histo


          

Tournoi UFOA (U20) : la Guinée dans la poule A avec le Sénégal

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Les équipes qualifiées au tournoi de l’Union des Fédérations Sportives Ouest Africaines (UFOA) des moins de 20 ans connaissent désormais leurs adversaires. La Guinée se retrouve dans la poule A en compagnie du Sénégal entre autres, a appris Guineematin.com à travers un de ses journalistes. Le tirage au sort a eu lieu ce mercredi, 06 novembre 2019, à Conakry. Logée dans la poule A, l’équipe guinéenne des moins des 20 ans va affronter la Mauritanie, qui l’avait éliminée de la course à la dernière CAN de cette catégorie, mais aussi le Sénégal et Sierra Leone. La Gambie, le Mali, le Libéria et la Guinée Bissau composent la poule B. La compétition se déroulera du 24 novembre au 08 décembre 2019, à Conakry. Le stade du 28 septembre et celui de Nongo sont les deux sites retenus pour cette compétition. Pour le stade de l’Unité de Nongo, ça sera une première d’abriter un match de football, plus de 10 ans après le lancement du projet de construction de cette infrastructure. C’est...

Cet article Tournoi UFOA (U20) : la Guinée dans la poule A avec le Sénégal est apparu en premier sur Guinée Matin - Les Nouvelles de la Guinée profonde.


          

World: Education Above All Foundation, World Bank Partner to Ensure Education for Two Million Out of School Children Around the World

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Source: World Bank, Education Above All
Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Haiti, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zambia

WASHINGTON DC, September 20, 2019 - This week, Education Above All Foundation (EAA) and the World Bank announced a ground-breaking partnership to enrol two million out of school children from more than 40 countries by 2025. During a meeting with World Bank President David Malpass, Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, Founder and Chairperson of Education Above All Foundation, stressed the importance of this framework agreement.

The agreement commits up to $250 million in funding for developing countries striving to enable access to quality primary education for all of their still out-of-school children. Unlike traditional philanthropic efforts of organizations like EAA who usually fund local non-profits directly, this innovative funding model aims to take lessons learned in the field to scale, through direct support to participating countries with implementation, evaluation, and reporting - enabling accountability and systemic change at the national level.

Out of school children (OOSC) are among the hardest to reach in each country due to the many and often compounding barriers to education including extreme poverty, distance to school, and conflict. This new agreement calls on governments to utilise funds to prioritise out of school children by ensuring their access to quality primary education through results-based financing. The agreement highlights the importance of multi-stakeholder partnerships in supporting developing nations, in providing education for all, and meeting the UN Sustainable Development Goals, particularly SDG 4 (ensuring inclusive and quality education for all and promoting lifelong learning).

"The World Bank is committed to addressing the global learning crisis. The partnership with Education Above All is critically important in this effort. There are still too many out of school children around the globe. Together we will bring these children into school and help them learn and fulfil their potential. Learning for all is a foundation for building strong human capital for every country," said Jaime Saavedra, Global Director for Education at the World Bank.

"Our partnership with Qatar and Education Above All will play an especially important role in the Middle East and North Africa," said Ferid Belhaj, World Bank Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa. "As access to quality education is critical for the region to unlock the huge potential of its large youth population, whose energy and creativity could become a new source of dynamic and inclusive growth."

Through this new funding structure, EAA and The World Bank will support financing opportunities for resource mobilization, education advocacy, and poverty reduction in developing countries across three continents. Proposed targeted countries include Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Haiti, India, Iran, Iraq, Kenya, Laos, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, and Zambia.

About Education Above All (EAA) Foundation

The Education Above All (EAA) Foundation is a global education foundation established in 2012 by Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser. The Foundation envisions bringing hope and real opportunity to the lives of impoverished and marginalized children, youth and women, especially in the developing world and in difficult circumstances such as conflict situations and natural disasters. It believes that education is the single most effective means of reducing poverty, generating economic growth and creating peaceful and just societies, as well as a fundamental right for all children and an essential condition to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). For more information, visit educationaboveall.orghttp://educationaboveall.org/.

About World Bank Group Work on Education

The World Bank Group is the largest financier of education in the developing world. We work on education programs in more than 80 countries and are committed to helping countries reach Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4, which calls for access to quality education and lifelong learning opportunities for all by 2030. In 2018, we provided about $4.5 billion for education programs, technical assistance, and other projects designed to improve learning and provide everyone with the opportunity to get the education they need to succeed. Our current portfolio of education projects totals $17 billion, highlighting the importance of education for the achievement of our twin goals, ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity.

For more information, please visit: worldbank.org/educationhttp://.worldbank.org/education educationaboveall.orghttp://www.educationaboveall.org


          

World: Forced Migration Review Issue 58: Economies: Rights and access to work

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Source: Forced Migration Review, University of Oxford
Country: Afghanistan, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Ecuador, Eritrea, Germany, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Myanmar, Pakistan, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, World, Zambia

From the editors

When people are forced by conflict or other circumstances to leave their homes, they usually also leave behind their means of economic activity and subsistence. In their new location, they may not be able, or permitted, to work to support themselves. This has wide-ranging implications not only for people’s immediate earning capacity and well-being but also for community relations, economic development and the capacity of future generations to lead fulfilling lives. In our main feature on Economies, authors explore the complex interactions of the constraints and opportunities involved, drawing on case-studies from around the world and highlighting the roles of new actors, new technologies and new – or renewed – approaches.

We are also pleased to include two ‘mini-features’ in this FMR, one on Refugeeled social protection and one on Humans and animals in refugee camps. (See the back cover if you are interested in collaborating with FMR on a mini-feature – or a full feature.)

We would like to thank Karen Jacobsen (Tufts University) and Khalid Koser (Global Community Engagement and Resilience Fund) for their assistance as advisors to the Economies feature theme. We are also grateful to the following donors for their support of this issue: ESRC-AHRC (Economic and Social Research Council and Arts and Humanities Research Council) Global Challenges Research Fund, the Global Program on Forced Displacement of the World Bank Group, Mercy Corps, UNHCR Division of Resilience and Solutions (Livelihoods Unit) and the Wellcome Trust.

See www.fmreview.org/economies to access the magazine, its accompanying ‘digest’ and all individual articles. A podcast of each article is also available. FMR 58 will be available in English, Arabic, Spanish and French. For printed copies, please email us at fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk.

Forthcoming issues (see www.fmreview.org/forthcoming)

• FMR 59: Twentieth anniversary of the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement (October 2018)

• FMR 60: Education (February 2019)

Follow us on Facebook or Twitter or sign up for email alerts at www.fmreview.org/request/alerts.

Marion Couldrey and Jenny Peebles
Editors, Forced Migration Review


          

World: Education in Emergencies - ECHO Factsheet

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Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations
Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Armenia, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen

Key messages

Education is lifesaving. Education is crucial for both the protection and healthy development of girls and boys affected by crises. It can rebuild their lives; restore their sense of normality and safety, and provide them with important life skills. It helps children to be self-sufficient, to be heard, and to have more influence on issues that affect them. It is also one of the best tools to invest in their long-term future, and in the peace, stability and economic growth of their countries.

Education in emergencies actions can help prevent, reduce, mitigate and respond to emergency-related academic, financial, social, institutional, physical and infrastructural barriers to children's education, while ensuring the provision of safe, inclusive and quality education.

In 2017, the EU dedicates 6% of its annual humanitarian aid budget to education in emergencies, one of the most underfunded sectors of humanitarian aid. In 2018, this amount will increase to 8%.

4.7 million girls and boys in 52 countries have benefited from EUfunded education in emergencies actions between 2012 and 2017.


          

Full Masters Scholarships offered by Commonwealth (Deadline: 18 December 2019)

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Full Masters Scholarships offered by Commonwealth (Deadline: 18 December 2019)

Commonwealth Shared Scholarships are for candidates from least developed and lower middle income Commonwealth countries, for full-time Master’s study on selected courses, jointly supported by UK universities.

Funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), Commonwealth Shared Scholarships enable talented and motivated individuals to gain the knowledge and skills required for sustainable development, and are aimed at those who could not otherwise afford to study in the UK.

These scholarships are offered under six themes:

  1. Science and technology for development
  2. Strengthening health systems and capacity
  3. Promoting global prosperity
  4. Strengthening global peace, security and governance
  5. Strengthening resilience and response to crises
  6. Access, inclusion and opportunity

For more information on other scholarships offered by the CSC, visit the CSC Apply page.

Eligibility
Terms and conditions
Selection Process
How to apply
Enquiries

Eligibility

To apply for these scholarships, you must:

  • Be a citizen of or have been granted refugee status by an eligible Commonwealth country, or be a British Protected Person
  • Be permanently resident in an eligible Commonwealth country
  • Be available to start your academic studies in the UK by the start of the UK academic year in September/October 2020
  • By September 2020, hold a first degree of at least upper second class (2:1) standard, or a second class degree and a relevant postgraduate qualification (usually a Master’s degree). The CSC typically does not fund a second UK Master’s degree. If you are applying for a second UK Master’s degree, you will need to provide justification as to why you wish to undertake this study.
  • Not have studied or worked for one (academic) year or more in a high income country
  • Be unable to afford to study in the UK without this scholarship

The CSC aims to identify talented individuals who have the potential to make change. We are committed to a policy of equal opportunity and non-discrimination, and encourage applications from a diverse range of candidates. For further information on the support available to candidates with a disability, see the CSC disability support statement.

The CSC is committed to administering and managing its scholarships and fellowships in a fair and transparent manner. For further information, see the CSC anti-fraud policy and the DFID guidance on reporting fraud.

Eligible Commonwealth countries

Bangladesh
Cameroon
Eswatini
The Gambia
Ghana
India
Kenya
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
Nigeria
Pakistan
Papua New Guinea
Rwanda
Samoa
Sierra Leone
Solomon Islands
Sri Lanka
Tanzania
Tuvalu
Uganda
Vanuatu
Zambia

Terms and conditions

For full terms and conditions – including further details of the scholarship themes, value of the scholarship, and general conditions – see the Commonwealth Shared Scholarships terms and conditions 2020.

Selection process

Each participating UK University will conduct its own recruitment process to select a specified number of candidates to be awarded Commonwealth Shared Scholarships. Universities must put forward their selected candidates to the CSC in March 2020. The CSC will then confirm that these candidates meet the eligibility criteria for this scheme. Universities will inform candidates of their results by July 2020.

Applications will be considered according to the following selection criteria:

  • Academic merit of the candidate
  • Potential impact of the work on the development of the candidate’s home country

For further details, see the Commonwealth Shared Scholarships 2020 selection criteria.

How to apply

You can apply to study one of the taught Master’s courses offered in the Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme. These scholarships do not cover undergraduate courses, PhD study, or any pre-sessional English language teaching, and are usually tenable for one year only. View a full list of eligible courses.

You must also secure admission to your course in addition to applying for a Shared Scholarship. You must check with your chosen university for their specific advice on when to apply, admission requirements, and rules for applying. View a full list of university contact details.

You must make your application using the CSC’s online application system, in addition to any other application that you are required to complete by your chosen university. The CSC will not accept any applications that are not submitted via the online application system.

You can apply for more than one course and/or to more than one university, but you may only accept one offer of a Shared Scholarship.

The CSC particularly welcomes applicants from the following countries:

Eswatini
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
Papua New Guinea
Rwanda
Samoa
Solomon Islands
Tanzania
The Gambia
Tuvalu
Vanuatu

All applications must be submitted by 16.00 (GMT) on 18 December 2019 at the latest.

You are advised to complete and submit your application as soon as possible, as the online application system will be very busy in the days leading up to the application deadline.

Your application must include the following supporting documentation by 16:00 (GMT) on 18 December 2019 in order for your application to be eligible for consideration:

  • Proof of citizenship or refugee status – uploaded to the online application system
  • Full transcripts detailing all your higher education qualifications including to-date transcripts for any qualifications you are currently studying (with certified translations if not in English) – uploaded to the online application system

The CSC’s online application system is now open.

Enquiries

If you have any queries about applying for a Commonwealth Shared Scholarship, you can Contact us. We will not use your email address for any purpose other than responding to your enquiry.

For more information on other scholarships offered by the CSC, visit the CSC Apply page.

 

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

The post Full Masters Scholarships offered by Commonwealth (Deadline: 18 December 2019) appeared first on mucuruzi.com.


          

STUDY IN UK : Full Funded Scholarships from Commonwealth for candidates from least developed and lower middle income, Deadline : 18 December 2019

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STUDY IN UK : Full Funded Scholarships from Commonwealth for candidates from least developed and lower middle income, Deadline : 18 December 2019

Shared Scholarships

Commonwealth Shared Scholarships are for candidates from least developed and lower middle income Commonwealth countries, for full-time Master’s study on selected courses, jointly supported by UK universities.

Funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), Commonwealth Shared Scholarships enable talented and motivated individuals to gain the knowledge and skills required for sustainable development, and are aimed at those who could not otherwise afford to study in the UK.

These scholarships are offered under six themes:

  1. Science and technology for development
  2. Strengthening health systems and capacity
  3. Promoting global prosperity
  4. Strengthening global peace, security and governance
  5. Strengthening resilience and response to crises
  6. Access, inclusion and opportunity

For more information on other scholarships offered by the CSC, visit the CSC Apply page.

Eligibility
Terms and conditions
Selection Process
How to apply
Enquiries

Eligibility

To apply for these scholarships, you must:

  • Be a citizen of or have been granted refugee status by an eligible Commonwealth country, or be a British Protected Person
  • Be permanently resident in an eligible Commonwealth country
  • Be available to start your academic studies in the UK by the start of the UK academic year in September/October 2020
  • By September 2020, hold a first degree of at least upper second class (2:1) standard, or a second class degree and a relevant postgraduate qualification (usually a Master’s degree). The CSC typically does not fund a second UK Master’s degree. If you are applying for a second UK Master’s degree, you will need to provide justification as to why you wish to undertake this study.
  • Not have studied or worked for one (academic) year or more in a high income country
  • Be unable to afford to study in the UK without this scholarship

The CSC aims to identify talented individuals who have the potential to make change. We are committed to a policy of equal opportunity and non-discrimination, and encourage applications from a diverse range of candidates. For further information on the support available to candidates with a disability, see the CSC disability support statement.

The CSC is committed to administering and managing its scholarships and fellowships in a fair and transparent manner. For further information, see the CSC anti-fraud policy and the DFID guidance on reporting fraud.

Eligible Commonwealth countries

Bangladesh
Cameroon
Eswatini
The Gambia
Ghana
India
Kenya
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
Nigeria
Pakistan
Papua New Guinea
Rwanda
Samoa
Sierra Leone
Solomon Islands
Sri Lanka
Tanzania
Tuvalu
Uganda
Vanuatu
Zambia

Terms and conditions

For full terms and conditions – including further details of the scholarship themes, value of the scholarship, and general conditions – see the Commonwealth Shared Scholarships terms and conditions 2020.

 

 

Selection process

Each participating UK University will conduct its own recruitment process to select a specified number of candidates to be awarded Commonwealth Shared Scholarships. Universities must put forward their selected candidates to the CSC in March 2020. The CSC will then confirm that these candidates meet the eligibility criteria for this scheme. Universities will inform candidates of their results by July 2020.

Applications will be considered according to the following selection criteria:

  • Academic merit of the candidate
  • Potential impact of the work on the development of the candidate’s home country

For further details, see the Commonwealth Shared Scholarships 2020 selection criteria.

How to apply

You can apply to study one of the taught Master’s courses offered in the Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme. These scholarships do not cover undergraduate courses, PhD study, or any pre-sessional English language teaching, and are usually tenable for one year only. View a full list of eligible courses.

You must also secure admission to your course in addition to applying for a Shared Scholarship. You must check with your chosen university for their specific advice on when to apply, admission requirements, and rules for applying. View a full list of university contact details.

You must make your application using the CSC’s online application system, in addition to any other application that you are required to complete by your chosen university. The CSC will not accept any applications that are not submitted via the online application system.

You can apply for more than one course and/or to more than one university, but you may only accept one offer of a Shared Scholarship.

The CSC particularly welcomes applicants from the following countries:

Eswatini
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
Papua New Guinea
Rwanda
Samoa
Solomon Islands
Tanzania
The Gambia
Tuvalu
Vanuatu

All applications must be submitted by 16.00 (GMT) on 18 December 2019 at the latest.

You are advised to complete and submit your application as soon as possible, as the online application system will be very busy in the days leading up to the application deadline.

Your application must include the following supporting documentation by 16:00 (GMT) on 18 December 2019 in order for your application to be eligible for consideration:

  • Proof of citizenship or refugee status – uploaded to the online application system
  • Full transcripts detailing all your higher education qualifications including to-date transcripts for any qualifications you are currently studying (with certified translations if not in English) – uploaded to the online application system

The CSC’s online application system is now open.

Enquiries

If you have any queries about applying for a Commonwealth Shared Scholarship, you can Contact us. We will not use your email address for any purpose other than responding to your enquiry.

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

The post STUDY IN UK : Full Funded Scholarships from Commonwealth for candidates from least developed and lower middle income, Deadline : 18 December 2019 appeared first on mucuruzi.com.


          

La missione di Clitoraid in Kenya è stata un grande successo

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LAS VEGAS, 15 maggio - La missione umanitaria di Clitoraid, svoltasi in occasione del Mese della Consapevolezza del Clitoride per due settimane a Nairobi, in Kenya , si è conclusa lo scorso 12 maggio. Il bilancio conclusivo è di 45 pazienti, vittime di MGF, che hanno riottenuto chirurgicamente la funzionalità del proprio clitoride e la propria dignità di donne.

La dott.ssa Bowers, capo chirurgo di Clitoraid, organizzazione no-profit con sede a San Francisco, negli USA, ha formato sul posto 16 medici keniani e ha definito questa missione un faro di speranza per il corno d'Africa, dove risiedono milioni di vittime di MGF.

Maitreya Rael, il leader spirituale che ha inspirato la creazione di Clitoraid, afferma che "la femminilità è il futuro dell'Umanità". Clitoraid contribuisce fortemente a valorizzare le donne, un sentimento condiviso da tutte le nostre pazienti keniane.

"Non appena a Nairobi si è saputo della possibilità di sottoporsi a questo trattamento chirurgico, molte donne hanno affollato fin dall'alba l’esterno e le sale d'attesa degli ospedali di Karen e Mama Lucy che ospitavano la nostra missione, sponsorizzata dalla ONG Kenia Garana (Project Pink Plus)", spiega Nadine Gary, portavoce di Clitoraid.

Alcune donne hanno scritto a Clitoraid anche da Paesi quali la Nigeria e la Sierra Leone, chiedendoci di recarci da loro.

La dott.ssa Lalla Malika Issoufou Mahamadou, moglie del presidente del Niger, ha espresso il desiderio di poter ospitare una missione di Clitoraid.

La missione in Kenya si è occupata di pazienti che vanno dall'età di 8 a 64 anni.

"La chirurgia ricostruttiva del clitoride non è indicata per le bambine, ma questa ragazza di 8 anni è stata portata in ospedale vittima di una mutilazione genitale e di gravi abusi sessuali che necessitavano di un importante intervento di ricostruzione genitale", spiega la Gary. "La dott.ssa Bowers e il dott. Abdullahi hanno immediatamente alleviato la sua sofferenza grazie alla loro esperienza nel campo della chirurgica pelvica".

La Gary afferma che le donne sono stanche di subire le orribili conseguenze di questa tradizione. "Tutte le donne disperate che sono venute a trovarci per sottoporsi all’operazione erano in grande maggioranza d’accordo: questa orribile pratica mutila il loro corpo, il loro matrimonio e la loro intera vita".

La maggior parte delle pazienti che la scorsa settimana si sono sottoposte alla ricostruzione del clitoride hanno confidato che i loro matrimoni sono falliti a causa delle mutilazioni genitali subite.

Questa missione ha rappresentato per le pazienti un'importante opportunità di guarire non solo i loro organi genitali, ma tutta la loro vita.

"Nella stanza di convalescenza riservata per le terapie post-operatorie, le pazienti si sono aperte le une con le altre, parlando del giorno in cui subirono la mutilazione. Molte, si sono confidate per la prima volta nella loro vita. Hanno parlato del dolore, della rabbia, della disperazione, del risentimento, delle frustrazioni sessuali, della fine dei loro matrimoni, delle loro fantasie sessuali. Ridevano e piangevano insieme, all’interno di quello che era un gigantesco gruppo di guarigione", dichiara la Gary.

Alcune pazienti hanno creato un gruppo online per rimanere in contatto durante tutto il periodo di convalescenza e per sostenersi reciprocamente in futuro.

La convalescenza dura circa 3 mesi. Al termine, le pazienti inizieranno una fisioterapia clitoridea sotto la guida professionale del dott. Esho e della guida raeliana Clemence Linard, i sessuologi che hanno assistito clinicamente le pazienti.

          

4 ways low-income economies can boost tax revenue without hurting growth

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La réalisation des objectifs de développement durable nécessite d’augmenter massivement les investissements dans les dix prochaines années.  Pour certains pays en développement, cela équivaudrait chaque année à pas moins de 8,2 % de leur PIB (a). Déjà considérable pour les pays riches, un tel effort constituerait un fardeau écrasant pour les pays pauvres.

La situation de la plupart des pays pauvres est extrêmement tendue : la moitié des pays éligibles aux ressources de l’Association internationale de développement (IDA) de la Banque mondiale présentent un risque élevé de surendettement ou sont déjà surendettés.  Un certain nombre d’entre eux ont réalisé qu’ils n’allaient pas pouvoir continuer longtemps à emprunter auprès de bailleurs étrangers — et que la mobilisation des ressources intérieures, par le biais de l’impôt, serait décisive pour assurer le progrès économique.

Dans plus d’un tiers (a) des pays emprunteurs de l’IDA — et 70 % des États fragiles et en conflit — le recouvrement des impôts contribue actuellement à moins de 15 % à la richesse nationale. C’est à peine suffisant pour permettre aux gouvernements d’assurer les fonctions les plus essentielles de l’État. Et en risquant d’aggraver la pauvreté et de freiner la croissance, un alourdissement des taux de prélèvement serait contreproductif. Il existe des leviers plus judicieux pour augmenter les recettes fiscales de manière viable.

En voici quatre :

     1. Installer la confiance et apporter la preuve de l’efficacité de l’action publique

Pour que l’impôt fonctionne, les citoyens doivent avoir confiance dans leur gouvernement . Ils doivent avoir la preuve que l’argent qu’ils ont durement gagné est investi de manière judicieuse et qu’à terme, ils bénéficieront des projets financés par le contribuable.

Pour cela, les dépenses publiques doivent être transparentes. Cela peut commencer par l’adoption et la publication, par les autorités, d’une stratégie de revenu à moyen terme qui montrera aux citoyens à quoi sert leur argent.

Il faut aussi leur prouver qu’ils en ont vraiment pour leur argent. Là où la défiance est particulièrement forte, les gouvernements peuvent mobiliser de nouvelles ressources en faveur de projets procurant des avantages sensibles pour tous : la construction d’un nouvel hôpital ou d’une nouvelle école peut faire beaucoup pour restaurer la confiance. Dès lors que le gouvernement parvient à démontrer sa capacité à fournir des biens publics de qualité, il peut renoncer à cibler de nouvelles ressources fiscales sur des projets spécifiques. L’amélioration des services publics renforcera la confiance de la population avec, pour corollaires, la réduction de l’évasion fiscale et l’augmentation des recettes de l’État. Ce faisant, le niveau de prestations des agents publics sera maintenu, instituant un cercle vertueux bâti sur la confiance et des résultats concrets.

     2. Privilégier la simplicité

Une fiscalité complexe entretient la culture de l’évasion et est la porte ouverte à la corruption. En Amérique latine par exemple, une entreprise consacrera en moyenne 547 heures par an pour effectuer 22 opérations (a) en vue d’acquitter ses impôts. Rien d’étonnant à ce que l’évasion fiscale ait privé les pays d’Amérique latine et des Caraïbes de 340 milliards de dollars de recettes (a) en 2015.

Selon un rapport du Groupe de la Banque mondiale de 2014, une réduction de 10 % du nombre d’opérations de paiement et du temps nécessaire pour satisfaire aux obligations entraîne un recul de la corruption fiscale de 9,64 % (a). La simplification du code des impôts peut inciter les petites entreprises à rejoindre le secteur formel imposable . Elle peut aussi rendre l’environnement plus prévisible pour les investisseurs internationaux avec, à la clé, davantage d’opérations et de rentrées fiscales.

Bien conscients de l’intérêt de ces évolutions, les gouvernements sont passés à l’action, pour notre plus grande satisfaction. Désormais, 50 pays n’appliquent plus qu’un seul impôt (a) par assiette fiscale. Et au cours des 13 dernières années, 57 ont fusionné ou supprimé certains impôts.

     3. Prendre le virage du numérique

Plus le régime fiscal est simple, plus l’introduction du paiement électronique des impôts est aisée. 

De plus en plus de pays s’engagent dans cette voie, même si les progrès sont inégaux. Avec l’introduction d’un système de déclaration en ligne pour les entreprises en Côte d’Ivoire (a), le nombre d’heures nécessaires pour préparer et envoyer les documents est passé à 205 heures en 2017, contre 270 auparavant. Mais malgré l’adoption d’un système identique au Gabon, le temps passé pour préparer et soumettre sa déclaration en ligne a au contraire augmenté en 2017.

Pour que l’informatisation des processus soit efficace partout, de nombreux pays vont devoir s’attaquer aux obstacles liés aux infrastructures de télécommunication. Mais une fois les structures de base en place, ils peuvent continuer de progresser en associant l’imposition dématérialisée à d’autres approches innovantes : identification numérique, finance en ligne, suivi informatique des factures et du chiffre d’affaires ou encore feuilles d’impôt pré-remplies que les contribuables n’ont plus qu’à vérifier. Le Kenya a ainsi profité du système de transfert d’argent (a) M-Pesa, omniprésent dans le pays, pour autoriser les contribuables à payer leurs impôts via cette plateforme.

     4. Trouver de nouvelles sources de revenus

Parce qu’ils concernent avant tous les ménages les plus aisés, les impôts fonciers, les droits d’accise et la taxe carbone sont autant de sources possibles de recettes fiscales supplémentaires dans les pays à faible revenu. C’est aussi un moyen de prévenir les comportements indésirables, comme le fait de prendre sa voiture dans des zones au bord de l’asphyxie, de fumer ou de consommer des aliments malsains.

Nous soutenons l’initiative mondiale emmenée par l’OCDE pour remettre à plat les modalités d’imposition des grandes entreprises multinationales, souvent déjà converties au numérique, dans le but de permettre aux pays en développement de tirer un meilleur parti de leurs activités. Pour l’instant, 100 à 600 milliards de dollars (a) échappent à l’impôt, partout dans le monde, à la faveur de formes légales de fraude et d’évasion fiscales. La proposition soutenue par l’OCDE marque un tournant dans les règles fiscales internationales et, à condition d’être correctement mise en œuvre, pourrait réorienter davantage de fonds vers les pays en développement, comme l’analyse un document récent de la Banque mondiale intitulé International Tax Reform, Digitalization and Developing Economies.

Les conditions préalables au changement

Les équipes de la Banque mondiale s’emploient à aider les pays à mobiliser les ressources fiscales (a) dont ils ont besoin pour assurer leur développement. Au Sénégal, nous aidons les autorités à lancer une stratégie de revenu à moyen terme, tandis qu’à Maurice et au Cabo Verde, nous soutenons les efforts du gouvernement en vue de publier des rapports sur les dépenses fiscales et supprimer les impôts inefficaces. En Ouganda, nous avons collaboré avec les autorités pour identifier les produits susceptibles de supporter un droit d’accise. Et en Sierra Leone, nous accompagnons le gouvernement dans la modernisation de ses services des douanes et de la fiscalité intérieure : au cours du premier trimestre 2019, les recettes fiscales ont pratiquement doublé en glissement annuel, ressortant à 211 milliards de leones contre 127 milliards un an auparavant.

Ces améliorations ne tombent pas du ciel. Elles dépendent de conditions difficiles à réunir, qu’il s’agisse de la présence d’infrastructures numériques de base ou de la volonté politique. Malgré tout, les raisons d’espérer sont là : en dix ans, des centaines de réformes (a) ont été adoptées partout dans le monde pour optimiser les régimes fiscaux. Nous devons tous redoubler d’efforts pour mobiliser suffisamment de ressources intérieures aux fins de financer les objectifs de développement durable.

Prenez part au débat


          

ECOWAS – Supplementary Protocol A/SP.1/5/81 Amending Article 2 of the Protocol relating to the Definition of the Concept of Originating Products from the Member States of the Economic Community of West African States

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This Supplementary Protocol was adopted on 29 May 1981 in Freetown, Sierra Leone. This is an Amendment of Article 2 of the 1976 Protocol relating to the Definition of the Concept of Originating Products of the Member States of the Economic Community of West African States, which relate to Rules of Origin of Community goods. […]
          

Gemelline siamesi di un mese verranno separate a Padova: l'incredibile operazione

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Le due neonate hanno in comune la cavità addominale e l’intestino, e i medici della Sierra Leone non hanno dato alcuna...
          

1st #VdGMForum | Barcelona, 7-8 February 2014

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The Vasco da Gama Movement whishes to thank all participants, speakers and supporters of the first PanEuropean meeting for Trainees and Junior Family Doctors, the #VdGMForum !

 

 

Download the 2014 #VdGMForum programme and abstract booklet by clicking here (PDF, 5MB)

 

Welcome message

The Vasco da Gama Movement invites you to be part of the first PanEuropean meeting for Trainees and Junior Family Doctors !

We are delighted to welcome you to the first Pan European meeting for trainees and junior Family Doctors, the Vasco da Gama Movement Forum, which will be held in the city of Barcelona on 7th-8th February 2014. After organising 8 succesful European PreConferences and co-organising 2 fantastic World PreConferences ahead of the Wonca Conferences between 2005-2013, and alongside preparations for the 2014 VdGM PreConference in Lisbon in July, the Vasco da Gama Movement is ready to take the next step ! 
 
We are organizing the VdGM Forum, a scientific conference rich in contents, under the title “One Strong Voice for the Family Doctors of the 21st Century”. The programme will be focused on the topics of the Future of Family Medicine, Emergency Medicine and Out-of-Hours Services, Career Development, Research Skills and Emerging Technologies.
 
Prior to the VdGM Forum, a vocational exchange will be organized for selected participants, who will have the opportunity to observe GP/FM practices (offices) in Barcelona and learn more about the national organisation of primary care.
 
We strongly believe that the progress of our movement depends on our colleagues, on whether they share our cause, and on the continuity of our platform; a platform in which members meet regularly and they have the chance to establish and develop good professional relationships, which are essential for launching exciting and aspirational new projects. Alongside trainees and newly qualified (5 years) General Practitioners / Family Doctors, we also welcome senior GP/FD, other specialities but also patients and undergraduate medical students.
 
For this very reason we are working with great enthusiasm so that you can enjoy a unique scientific and cultural programme.
 
We warmly invite you all to join us for an amazing conference; we are looking forward to meeting you in Barcelona!
 
The Host Organising Committee of the First VdGM Forum
 
 

Speakers

Confirmed speakers to the VdGM Forum

 

Enric Aragonès  (Spain) 

Enric Aragonès, MD, PhD,is a family physician and general practitioner at Constantí Primary Care Centre (Catalan Heath Institute). He is working in research projects in mental health in the primary care area (mainly in clinical and healthcare topics of depression) and is the manager of the Research Group in Mental Health and Primary Care in Tarragona (Primary Care Research Institute IDIAP Jordi Gol). He is member of the Working Group in Mental Health of the CAMFiC (Catalan Society of Family Medicine) and coordinator of the semFYC Working Group in Mental Health (Spanish Society of Family Medicine).

 

Manuel Campíñez Navarro

(Spain)

Manuel Campiñez Navarro. Family physician in EBA Vallcarca, Barcelona. Master in Primary Health Care, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). Associate Clinical Professor in the Medicine Department, UAB. Directive Member of the Communication and Health Group in the Spanish Family Physicians Association (SEMFYC). PhD Student in UAB.

Magdalena Canals

(Spain)

Magdalena  Canals Aracil is a family and community doctor. She works in a Health Center in the south of Madrid. She’s member of  the Emergencyand ContinuingCare group of semFYC  and is Family Medicine resident´s tutor in Madrid and Associate Professor of practice in the Complutense University. She has a lot of experience learning basic/advanced live support, she makes with her ESVAP program group (Enseñanza de Soporte Vital en Atención Primaria) many courses all over Spain. She is coordinator of ESVAP program in Madrid.

Sonia Cibrián

(Spain)

Family physician un EBA VAllcarca, Barcelona. Member of the Communication and Health Group in the Spanish Family Physicians Association (semFYC). PhD Student in Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB).

Lorraine Cleaver

(UK)

Lorraine Cleaver is a Scottish wife and mother who has petitioned the Scottish Parliament for improved Thyroid diagnosis and treatment. The petition has benefited from the involvement of the Minister for Public Health and is progressing well. After her thyroid was removed in 2006 for Graves disease, Lorraine's health declined by an alarming degree, despite being under the care of an Endocrinologist. Her GP was desperate to help but the system of deferring to the consultant and guidelines made this almost impossible. She recovered her health by working alongside her GP but outwith the established Endocrinology model. Gathering evidence for the petition reinforced that the treatment model for chronic diseases is failing many thousands of patients who go on to develop worsening health and a reliance on polypharmacy. She is optimistic that putting patients at the center of their treatment will help to change this, improving patient's health and enabling GP's to have more autonomy in the patient's care.

Xavier Cos
(Spain)
 

Mercedes Fernández

(Spain)

Mercedes Pérez Fernández. GP, specialist in Internal Medicine, Equipo CESCA, Madrid (Spain). President of the Ethical Committee of the Spanish Network of Primary Care, and NoGracias.

Odile Fernández

(Spain)

Odile Fernández. GP. Postgradute in preventive medicine and public health. Author of the book: "Mis Recetas Anticáncer: alimentación y vida anticáncer" ( My recipes anticancer: food and life anticancer). Survivor of stage IV ovarian cancer. She is working in the promotion of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of cancer. 

Aurora Rovira Fontanals

(Spain)

Aurora Rovira Fontanals (Barcelona, 1961). MD (UAB, 1985). Family physician since 1989, working in CAP La Pau (Barcelona) since 1992. Tutor of GP trainees since 1995. Member of Gender Violence network and Primary Care of CAMFiC. Member of Red-CAPS (female healthcare professional’s network).

Berta Garcia Arbol

(Spain)

Medical student at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Currently studying at the University of Alcalá in a national exchange program. Member of Farmacriticxs, a national project of International Federation of Medical Students Associations of Spain (IFMSA-Spain). Member of the organization committee of the second Farmacriticxs- NoGracias conference “Salut amb Seny” at Barcelona, 2011. One month clinical clerkship at Teresina, Brazil through an International Clinical Exchange Program of IFMSA. Member of Red-CAPS, a female healthcare professional’s network.

Juan Gervas

(Spain)

Juan GERVAS. GP, PhD. Equipo CESCA, Madrid (Spain). Honorary professor, public health, Autonomous University, Madrid. Visiting professor, international health, National School of Public Health, Madrid.

Raquel Gomez-Bravo
(Spain)
Dr Raquel Gómez Bravo is a Spanish young family doctor from Alhaurín el Grande Málaga, where she was graduated in 2004 (UAM). She made her Specialization in Family and Community Medicine in Madrid 2005-2009, being very in the Spanish Scientific Society of Family and Community Medicine SemFYC. Chief of Residents of Universitary of Hospital La Paz 2009-2010. Emergency Department of the University Hospital La Paz (Madrid, Spain) (June, 2009 to August 2012). Mentor of trainees: June 2010-August 2012. Teacher at Autonomous University of Madrid: “TAD de Medicina y Cirugía de Urgencias” during 3 years (Academic years 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2011-2012), specialize in communication skills and new technologies. Expert in Mental Health in Primary Care (University of Alcalá) 2009. European Expert in Quality Management in Health Care (AENOR) 2011. Nowadays she is the Spanish Representative Member in VdGM Europe Council. Coordinator of Beyond Europe Group in VdGM. VdGM Executive. Liaison with EURIPA and member of EURIPA Executive. Liaison with WWPWFM. Member of Family Violence Special Interest Group and actually working in her PhD about Gender Violence. 

Ángel González

(Spain)

Advertising practitioner with 30 years of experience, half of them in the Healthcare sector. He has been co-President of Publicis Healthcare Spain, heading the Madrid office by managing its change and bringing innovation to lead it to being “the reference of the market on a global scale”. Afterwards, he joined the Madrid office of Global Healthcare as partner and managing director with the responsibility of re-launching it onto the Spanish market. In January 2009, Angel set up Ideagoras, the first fully independent Social Media in Healthcare company established in Spain. He was the founder of #hcsmeuES, leading the tweet-chats during its first year.

Angelina González Viana

(Spain)

Registered Nurse at Barcelona University (1996) worked at cardiac units both in Catalan and English hospitals and for Doctors without Borders in Sierra Leone and Uganda in 2003-2004. MPH in 2005 at Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona. Since 2007 I work at Catalan Public Health Agency. Involved on health promotion programs that connect primary health and municipalities into making easy the healthy options at local level as well as involved in impulsing community health projects in vulnerable areas of Catalonia.

Prof Amanda Howe

(UK)

Prof Amanda Howe was elected as WONCA President-Elect in Prague in June 2013. She will become the first woman to be WONCA President in 2016. She was elected RCGP Honorary Secretary in 2009. Prof Howe practices at the Bowthorpe Medical Centre in Norwich, England and has been Professor of Primary Care at the University of East Anglia since 2001. She has been deeply involved with WONCA since 2000, when she facilitated a workshop for their Working Party on Women and Family Medicine. She is on their Executive, chaired the group from 2007-2009, and hosted an international meeting at UEA in 2009. Prof Howe now serves on the newly created Equity Committee, is a member of WONCA Europe’s Bylaws Committee, and (also as part of her role as RCGP Honorary Secretary), often attends WONCA conferences in Europe and around the world to contribute relevant papers and promote the development of family medicine.
 

Sebastian Huter

(Austria)

Sebastian Huter is a medical student from Austria. He is writing his diploma thesis on "the role of the GPs as point of first contact in the Austrian health care system". As a member of the Austrian Medical Students' Association and the Austrian VdGM-membership organisation "JAMÖ" he participated in and coordinated various projects to advocate for better training in general practice, both during and after medical school.

Per Kallestrup

(Denmark)

See more in this link.

Laminu Kaumi

(Spain)

Laminu Kaumi M.D, ETM, MPH, is a final year Resident Doctor in Family and community medicine at Unidad docente Este Madrid, Spain. Graduated at the Latin American school of medicine, Havana with Honours Title (Gold Title, Titulo de Oro) and 7 Academic Awards. Working experience in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa related to global health, tropical medicine and volunteer activities. Presently undergoing a Masters programme in tropical medicine and international health at Universidad autonoma de Madrid. Active Member of the Cuban and Nigerian Medical association.

Oleg Kravtchenko

(Norway)

Born in 1963 to the family of Russian army officer. Graduated Moscow Medical Academy in 1986. Specialized in ENT-surgery at Central Postgraduate University, Moscow, and Eppendorf University, Hamburg. Practiced at the Central Clinical Hospital in Moscow until 1998 when moved to Norway. Studied at Oslo University and then practiced at the Nordland Central Hospital, ENT-dept. and later Ob.-Gyn. dept. Specialized as GP in 2002 and worked in rural practice in Meloey community, Nordland, until summer 2012 when became co-owner at the Fredensborgklinikken, Nordland. Works as a fulltime GP and is an Overseas Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, London, and Vice-President of EURIPA, WONCA. 

Joanne Lane

(UK)

Joanna Lane BA Hons (Oxon).Joanna’s son Chris committed suicide in 2008 at the age of 31. Since then she has been trying her best to raise awareness of neuroendocrine problems after brain injury, with such diverse consequences as getting the issue raised in an Early Day Motion in Parliament, and incorporated into the plot line of a Holby City episode.  She is very willing to speak on post-traumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to any audience, and welcomes emails from anyone who believes they may be affected by this condition. Her website is www.headinjuryhypo.org.uk. Before retirement she taught English as a Second Language. She is married with two surviving daughters and two small granddaughters, and lives in Surrey.

Frederic Llordachs i Marques

Frederic Llordachs

(Spain)

MD with MBA, specialiced in Healthcare Management and Marketing. Direct experience with healthcare insurance, and heathcare management, and interested in medical tourism, innovation in medical devices and new ICT-based healthcare services. Involved in start-ups, like Doctoralia (http://www.doctoralia.com), the global platform for healthcare search and accessibility, and other early stage projects

Francisco Lupiáñez-Villanueva

(Spain)

Associate Professor at School of Information and Communication Science Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and researcher at Internet Interdisciplinary Institute. His research field is focused on Innovative Technologies and eHealth, among others.
He was a scientific Officer at Information Society Unit - European Commission to work on economic evaluation and modelling of Personal Health Systems.

Helena Legido-Quigley

(UK)

Helena Legido-Quigley, is a Lectuer in Global Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. She has conducted research on European health policy, quality of health care, health systems, chronic conditions, and migrant populations. Her latest research focuses on the impact of the financial crisis and austerity measures on health. Her work has been published in peer reviewed journals such as the Lancet, British Medical Journal and PLOS Medicine. It has also been widely covered in International media including the Economist, the Financial Times and Huffington Post.

Juan A Lopez-Rodriguez

(Spain)

Juan A Lopez-Rodriguez, MD, was born in Frigiliana (Malaga-SPAIN) and graduated from Malaga's University in 2009. He is currently a Primary Care Resident at the Madrid Center Multiprofesional Primary Care Teaching Unit and a member of the Working Group in Mental Health at the semFyC (main National Primary Care Society). He worked as an attending Physician in a Substance Misuse clinic and he owns a Master Degree in Psychopharmacology and Drug Abuse by the Universidad Complutense of Madrid. He is currently also a PhD fellow developing his thesis in the field of Addiction treatment tools for Primary Care with the use of social media and computer assisted programs treatments (conducted by Prof. Gabriel Rubio)

Job Metsemakers

(Netherlands)

 
Prof Job Metsemakers became in 2002 professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine, at Maastricht University. At the international level, he has been active as consultant in health care reform in Eastern European countries, and in development of family medicine in Indonesia. He has been on the executive board of The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice and Family Medicine (EURACT), and currently is on the Advisory Board of the European General Practice Research Network (EGPRN). For the last six years (until June 2013) he was the Honorary Secretary of WONCA Europe. From 2010-2013 he served on the WONCA membership committee. He succeeded Tony Mathie (UK), in June 2013, to become President of WONCA Europe 2013-2016.
 
Frederick Miller (Spain) 

Frederick (Rick) Miller is a physician of Family and Community Medicine trained in the United States. He has spent the last 12 years working in both the US and Spain in medicine and community health. He is a founding member of the network AUPA, which comprises over 75 health centres in Catalunya that are doing community health projects, and was the Scientific Secretary for PACAP (Program for Community Health in Primary Care), of the Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine. Currently, he works in Barcelona for Advance Medical, a company that provides expert medical opinions to patients in remote areas of the world, and at Codman Square, a community health center in Boston, as a family physician.

Sergio Minue

(Spain)

 
Sergio Minué is a specialist in Family and Community Medicine and professor of Health Policy and Ethics Department in the Andalusian School of Public Health. At this moment he is Director of Innovation and Research in this institution. He is leading some research project related to clinical decision making in primary care, about diagnostic error, and he is working in some international projects about the impact of the economic crisis in health systems. Sergio carries out functions as semFYC representative in WONCA/CIMF. Member of the semFYC group in patient safety, he publishes two blogs ( “El gerente de Mediado” and "La cara Ve”).
@sminue
 
 Ernesto Mola (Italy)

Ernesto Mola is a family doctor in Lecce (South of Italy), representative of ASSIMEFAC and President Elect of the network of Italian Associations members of WONCA. He is involved in research and in the vocational training for family doctors as coordinator. He collaborated for the Leonardo Project, designed to involve patients in the management of their chronic conditions.

Agostinho Moreira de Sousa

(Portugal)

Agostinho Sousa is a sixth year medical student at the Abel Salazar Biomedical Sciences Institute (ICBAS) of the University of Porto, Portugal. He is now in his second term as Liaison Officer for Medical Education issues. He also serves as the student representative in the World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) and in the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE). His main responsibility is to work with all the external partners that are related to Medical Education.

Marco Noventa

(Italy)

Marco Noventa got his education at University of Padova where in 2002 he got graduated in Science and Agrarian Technologies and attended PhD courses in Michigan State University “management and improvement of animal genetic resources”.  He is responsible beef cattle nutritionist for one of the biggest Italian farmers association (AZOVE)  with more than 50000 heads. He follows all the phases of meat chain production, from selection and purchasing of animals, nutrition, formulation and production of feedstuffs and supplements, premixes and control of meat quality at slaughter houses.

 

Marie Ennis O'Connor

 

Nikos Papachristou

 

Tanja Pekez-Pavlisko

(Croatia)

Luisa Pettigrew

(UK)

Dr Luisa Pettigrew is a young family doctor in London. Whilst in VdGM (2008-2011) she coordinated the ‘Hippokrates’ international exchange programme, helping secure its first European Union funding grant. In parallel in the UK she helped establish the Royal College of General Practitioners' Junior International Committee to enable the future generation of family doctors in the UK to also further in international activities. In 2013 she was elected as a member at large to WONCA's executive board. Luisa has undertaken a Diploma in International Health (2003) and Master in Health Policy (2011). When possible Luisa has taken time to undertake voluntary work for various NGOs and health organisations in Argentina, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico and Mozambique. In addition she has undertaken work for the World Health Organization and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. 

Alba Riesgo

(Spain)

Alba Riesgo, MD, PhD, is a family physician who works in the emergency department of the University Hospital in Oviedo, a medium city in the North of Spain. She is working in research projects in emergency medicine, specially in cardiac acute care and acute stroke. She has participated in different multicentric studies about cardiac acute care in Spain and she has also published several papers about this topic in Spanish medical journals. She also has a lot of experience learning basic/advanced live support, she makes with her ESVAP program group (Enseñanza de Soporte Vital en Atención Primaria) many courses all over Spain. She is coordinator of the semFYC Working Group in emergency medicine (Spanish Society of Family Medicine).

Marta Sastre

(Spain)

Marta Sastre Paz is a young family and community doctor. She was traineed in Vallecas, a district in the south of Madrid. For the last two years, she’s been working in a Health Promotion Centre in Villaverde, also in the south of Madrid; nowadays, her work is more community work than individual consultations, working in Health Promotion Centre, CMS Villaverde - Madrid Salud - Ayuntamiento de Madrid. She’s member of PACAP (Community Activities in Primary Care Programm of semFYC) since 2008. “I believe in the need of engaging with the community, and try to be part of it, to promote health and reduce health inequalities.”

Martin Sattler

(Luxembourg)

Martin Sattler is a family physician working since 2010 in Luxemburg. He completed the GP training in Luxemburg and started the national VdGM group in Luxemburg in 2009. The medical studies he completed in various european countries as Germany, France, Sweden and Italy where her get in contact with the different health care systems and where started his special interest for primary care in europe and worldwide. Personal interests are beside promotion of primary care, alternative medicine and health politics, travelling, languages, sports, music and nature.

Martin Seifert

(Czech Repubblic)

Martin Seifert is a young GP in training from the Czech Republic, currently working in two general practices in Prague. He studied medicine in Prague and gathered his medical experience and skills mainly in the University Hospital in Prague, in Granada (Spain), Ufa (Russia), Jeruzalem (Israel), and Regensburg (Germany), where he worked more than two years in neurological rehabilitation. He has finished a 3-year course of study of traditional Chinese medicine and shiatsu, which he practices and continues to study. Dr. Seifert has additionally been studying and practicing therapeutic yoga in the Czech Republic, Spain, and Nepal for the last 12 years. He practices manual medicine of the famous „Prague school“ and he is in psychotherapeutic training focused on psychosomatics. He has volunteered in many foreign countries, such as Ghana, giving lessons about teenage pregnancy. He teaches as an external assistant at the Department of Family Medicine of Charles University in Prague.

Jordi Serrano Pons

(Spain)

Jordi is a General Practitioner and the founder of the UniversalDoctor Project, the main objective of which is to improve multilingual communication between health professionals and patients.
He is co-founder of Zero Mothers Die, a Global partnership Project using mobile health to improve maternal health.
He recently started working as a consultant to the WHO and TicSalut Foundation and collaborates very frequently with the Geneva Health Forum as advisor on Innovation and Health cited Forum (Forum of Global Health).
     

 

 

Preconference: #DesignThinking for Primary Care Workshop

Design Thinking is about believing we can make a difference, and having an intentional process in order to get to new, relevant solutions that create positive impact.
 
  • It’s human-centred: it begins from deep empathy and understanding of needs and motivations of people
  • It’s collaborative: several great minds are always stronger when solving a challenge than just one.
  • It’s optimistic: Design Thinking is the fundamental belief that we all can create change.
  • It’s experimental: it gives you permission to fail and to learn from your mistakes, because you come up with new ideas, get feedback on them, then iterate.
 
It has five phases that help navigate the development from identifying a design challenge to finding and building a solution.
 
The Five Phases of the Design Thinking Process
 
The Vasco da Gama Movement is developing a fantastic workshop that will enable you to learn firsthand how Design Thinking can be used to innovate in health and healthcare. During this workshop, teams will work together to explore and create solutions to real healthcare challenges.
 
Design Thinking #1
 
The participants will work on problems identified and will use the Design Thinking methods to gain a deep understanding of the problem and develop innovative ‘human-centred’ solutions (ie. solutions that truly meet the needs of users). Methods will include user-interviews, observation, brainstorming and rapid prototyping, with the aim of creating solutions that combine human desirability and usability with business viability and technological feasibility.
 
The workshop will take place in Barcelona just before the 1st #VdGMForum, on 7th February from 9am to 2.30pm. There is only a limited number of places for this workshop. The participation in the workshop will be free of charge. Medical students, other healthcare professionals, people from other professional background and patients are welcome to apply for a place.
 
The deadline for applications is Tuesday 7th January.
 
Design Thinking #2
 

Preconference: Satellite Meetup with the Health 2.0 Barcelona

Are you a technology enthusiast? Do you believe in the potential of technology that will lead to the Creative Destruction of Medicine? We are delighted to invite you to the Preconference Satellite Meetup with the Health 2.0 Barcelona!

Health2.0Bcn is an interdisciplinary group where professionals of the health sector join technology lovers with the aim to improve healthcare through the use of new technologies. Health2.0 wants to encourage projects related to health, developed by startups or individuals, offering them visibility, while inspiring others

This Preconference Satellite Meetup will be held on Thursday 6th February 2014 at 7pm, just a day before the #VdGMForum. A map to the location is available here. The participation is completely free, but we kindly ask you to register here in order to manage the resources that we need for this meetup.

 

The Programme includes:

 

  1. Presentation of the VdGM
  2. Introduction and overview of the latest trends in health2.0 by health2.0Bcn team
  3. Round table of local GPs who will tell us about the use of 2.0 technologies in their day to day, what's available out there and what's missing. 
 
Primary care represents a big market segment with special needs, that are not necessarily covered yet by the new technologies. Let's try to fill that gap. 
 
The confirmed family doctor panelists are:
  • Dra Mireia Sans 
  • Dra Dolors Ruiz  
  • Dra Adriana Bataller 
  • Dr Miguel Angel Mayer 
  • Dr Monica Moro 
  • Dr Jordi Serrano
 
We hope that this session will be a good occasion for startups to size the opportunities and needs of the primary care, and for primary care doctors to share their experience and best practices in order to spread the benefits of those technologies amongst their GP colleagues.

 

We would like to thank the organizers Aline Noizet, Frederic Llordachs, Jordi Serrano Pons and Sophie Park for their enthusiastic support and for making this meeting happen.

 

 

Exchange Programme

It is our pleasure to offer to all European GP trainees/junior GP visitors the opportunity to discover how GPs in and around Barcelona practice medicine, in the Conference Exchange in Barcelona, just before the first Pan European meeting for trainees and junior Family Doctors, the Vasco da Gama Movement Forum! Between 5-6th February, during the Conference Exchange, we will try to show you our art and science to be a doctor. Therefore, we offer 30 places for European visitors in primary health care urban or rural centres.
 
You will enjoy 2 days of rotation before the Vasco da Gama Movement Forum begins, which will be held in the city of Barcelona on 7th-8th February 2014. You can join us and be part of the social program we have prepared just to show the skills, knowledge, technology, art, languages, and awesome Barcelona which is always waiting for you. 
 
We have limited places (12) for those who want to stay in the home of one of our tutors/GP trainers colaborators. Some of them live in rural areas within 2 hours of Barcelona, others in the city of Barcelona.
 
Also, if you want to stay by your own in the city, we can help you to find cheap accomodation in a nice hostel with good transport communication and location.
 
We are working with great enthusiasm so that you can enjoy an unforgettable experience that will not disappoint you ! Please take a look also at the detailed schedule of the Exchange, by clicking here.
 
If you wish to participate in the exchange, please contact your VdGM National Representative.
 
The selection has finished ! Thank you to everyone who applied !
 

You can download the final social programme for the exchange by clicking here.

 
 
 

Place and Time

The Forum venue is the Collegi Oficial de Metges de Barcelona (www.comb.cat). Here is the venue on Google Maps: Map
The Forum will take place on 7th and 8th February 2014.
 

 

Facebook

Join the Facebook Event to be up to date on news - https://www.facebook.com/events/119640248206586

 

Twitter

Join the conversation! We will be tweeting with the #vdgmForum hashtag: http://www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/vdgmforum/
 

Newsletter

You can download the Forum Newsletter here: Announcement Issue

 

 

Scientific Committee

 

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