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Avengers Damage Control Virtual Reality Experience Is Coming to Disneyland’s The Void!

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A new Avengers-themed virtual reality experience is coming to The Void at Downtown Disney in Disneyland Resort!
          

VR App Development and Five Ways the VR Development Industry is Influencing the App Development Industry

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VR App Development emerged as the front runner in the race with its unique capabilities of converting our humble smart devices across all platforms into Virtual Reality Devices. The industry has continued to develop over the last year or so and will continue to witness massive growth. It has improved continuously to streamline communication between companies and clients, and companies and its customers. This definitely explains the pivotal role VR App Development Companies play in the day to day world.


          

Avengers, Ghostbusters & Nicodemus at The Void (trailer)

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The Void has a new virtual reality attraction in rotation at its Santa Monica and Anaheim locations: Avengers: Damage Control,

The post Avengers, Ghostbusters & Nicodemus at The Void (trailer) appeared first on Hollywood Gothique.


          

Trailer: Jack the Ripper Virtual Reality Escape Room

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Check out the video teaser for the Jack the Ripper Virtual Reality Escape Room, currently operating in the South Bay

The post Trailer: Jack the Ripper Virtual Reality Escape Room appeared first on Hollywood Gothique.


          

New Restaurant Mixes Virtual Reality, Escape Room and Food — At The Mall

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BOCA RATON, FL (BocaNewsNow.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/35153&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com) (Source: Rex Baron Restaurant) —ED NOTE: We don’t normally run restaurant press releases verbatim, but this is so unique that it deserves attention: Ready to excite, astound and surprise, Rex Gryphon restaurant group brings its newest REX (Restaurant, Entertainment, Xperience) destination to South Florida; its Rex Baron Survivors Kitchen/VRex Lounge will open Wednesday, October […]
          

Balancing Act: Cybersecurity in the Connected Classroom

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Balancing Act: Cybersecurity in the Connected Classroom eli.zimm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/47972&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comerman_9856 Fri, 10/04/2019 - 13:13

With K–12 schools leveraging connected technologies to help improve student outcomes and boost classroom collaboration, effective cybersecurity is not optional. It’s essential to meet student expectations and to satisfy state regulations.

This requires a balancing act: How do educators leverage connected technology without putting student data and other critical information at risk?

With National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) in full swing, it’s the perfect time for schools to identify key risks and develop effective security solutions.

BECOME AN INSIDER: Sign up access to exclusive EdTech videos, whitepapers and articles.

The State of STEM Classrooms

Science, technology, engineering and math initiatives are helping students nationwide prepare for STEM-track careers, but they’re also gaining traction as fundamental aspects of the K–12 curriculum.

This creates a potential cybersecurity gap: Greater adoption of connected tools provides enhanced student opportunity but requires increased oversight of how data is stored, managed and utilized.

Consider the work of Aurora Public Schools, which serves more than 60 area schools and was recently recognized as a leader in education by nonprofit group Colorado Succeeds. According to Kevin Riebau, Director of Learning Resources for APS, the school district is leveraging several connected classroom initiatives to empower student outcomes and launch IT deployments, including:

  • Google Classroom Tools: For Riebau, cloud-based solutions “help manage the day-to-day sharing of resources” among students and staff, creating “feedback loops” that let students develop their own digital footprints. 

    The challenge? Ensuring cloud services provide a secure environment for data storage and comply with current legislation.
     

  • AR and VR Experiences: APS is now deploying both augmented reality and virtual reality experiences for K–12 students, including “expeditions” for elementary and middle school students and VR-based postsecondary tours for high school students. As noted by Riebau, “It’s not always practical to conduct college tours physically,” and VR lets schools bridge the gap. K–12 schools are also diversifying their device footprints, using everything from school-issued laptops to interactive touch panels. Here, accessibility matters. Who has access to this technology? For what purpose? How is use tracked, cataloged and stored for potential cybersecurity audits?
     
  • The APS Digital Badge Program: The APS Digital Badge Program uses microcredentials to describe student success across five key areas: collaboration, critical thinking, information literacy, invention and self-direction. Riebau describes the program “as a way to recognize student assets and open doors of opportunity.” Once in high school, students can choose to move their badges from internal networks to public-facing social sites such as LinkedIn. But making this shift from private to public networking introduces risk. Both students and teachers need training on how to effectively handle credentials in-house and ensure the move to public networks doesn’t compromise local data storage.

Doug Bonderud is an award-winning writer capable of bridging the gap between complex and conversational across technology, innovation and the human condition. 


          

Innovative Teaching Approaches: Virtual Reality

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Study International As universities play a crucial role in moulding tomorrow’s talents, the application of technology can help universities stay ahead of the curve by not only supporting educators’ teaching and promoting creative enquiry, but also enhancing learning through exposure to advanced technology, making learning more satisfying and engaging than cases of passive classroom learning. Advances […]
          

Augmented and Virtual Reality (AR VR) Market in Aviation

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Added: Oct 07, 2019
By: AerospaceDefense
Views: 2
MarketsandMarkets projects the global Augmented and Virtual Reality Market in Aviation to grow from USD 78 million in 2019 to USD 1,372 million by 2025, at a CAGR of 61.2% from 2019 to 2025.

          

VR Reduces Leg Muscle Pain During High Intensity Cycling

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High intensity cycling is less painful when combined with virtual reality, according to a new study by University of Georgia researchers.


          

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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In the virtual world, cashiers are taught to show greater empathy, mechanics learn to repair planes, and retail workers experience how to deal with armed robbery.
          

Top 10 Trends in Digital Commerce

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Much has changed since the first products were sold online in the 1990s. Early instances of e-commerce focused on the transaction, with little emphasis on improving fulfillment, customer service or loyalty.

Then, organizations began to hone commerce operations in response to customer desires, offering features like inventory visibility, product reviews and package tracking.

Now, organizations focus on more strategic initiatives that will give them competitive advantage in the future, such as providing a unified experience throughout the customer’s journey and establishing a trusted relationship with the customer.

Read more: How Retailers Can Compete With E-Commerce Giants

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Next phase of digital commerce trends

Sandy Shen, Senior Director Analyst at Gartner, says digital commerce is getting more intelligent and personal.

Customer analytics is a key enabling technology leading to superior customer experience, supporting personalized and unified experience. It involves the use of multiple tools to get various perspectives of customer data so organizations get more value from the same dataset.

By 2023, the majority of organizations using AI for digital commerce will achieve at least a 25% improvement in customer satisfaction, revenue or cost reduction

Trust and privacy is becoming more important due to the increasing focus on customer data and analytics, and more jurisdictions are issuing privacy laws. Organizations need to keep the balance between getting more than enough customer data and enough data to deliver a good customer experience without crossing the privacy line. Customer trust is the prerequisite of a successful business in any capacity.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the technology that will have a profound impact on commerce, according to Gartner. By 2023, the majority of organizations using AI for digital commerce will achieve at least a 25% improvement in customer satisfaction, revenue or cost reduction.

These 10 hot trends will impact the future of digital commerce

  1. Visual commerce. Visual commerce enables users to interact with a brand’s products in a visual, immersive manner. Visual commerce technology spans 360-degree video, 2D and 3D configuration, visual search, augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR).
  2. Personalization. Personalization is the process that creates a relevant, individualized interaction to optimize the experience of the user. There are many opportunities to personalize throughout the customer journey, such as landing/product page, search, product recommendation, banners and offers. Personalization can achieve objectives like purchase, engagement, loyalty and customer satisfaction.
  3. Trust and privacy. Building a trusted customer relationship starts with protecting customer privacy. Customers want to have transparency and control of their data. Nearly 160 countries and jurisdictions have or are developing privacy regulations, and organizations face mounting pressures to comply. Think about how to build trusted customer relations beyond being compliant.
  4. Unified commerce. Customers use an increasing number of channels throughout the buying and owning stages. Unified commerce not only offers consistency across channels but also a continuous experience throughout the customer journey. Ideally it is also personalized for the customer context.
  5. Subscription commerce. Everything from socks to video games can be now sold on a recurring and automatically renewing basis. Organizations can benefit from subscription commerce with repeatable and predictable revenue; customers like the convenience, cost savings and personalized curation. By 2023, 75% of organizations selling direct to consumers will offer subscription services, but only 20% will succeed in increasing customer retention.
  6. Thing commerce. Billions of connected devices will gain the ability to act as customers. Connected machines such as home appliances and industrial equipment can make purchases on behalf of human customers. The primary benefit of thing commerce is to reduce customer effort and friction in purchases. This trend is in the early stage, as many organizations are still focused on expanding commerce through traditional channels like websites and mobile apps.  
  7. Enterprise marketplace. This is a business model where organizations shift from selling only products they own or source to selling third-party products that are owned, managed and serviced by someone else. Early adopters such as airports, shopping malls, real estate developers and manufacturers tend to have large numbers of customers and partners. 
  8. Customer analytics. Customer analytics includes a range of analytics tools that extract insight from customer data to improve customer experience and achieve business goals. Given the large amounts of data processed by digital commerce platforms and the transient window of opportunity to convert shoppers, customer analytics plays a critical role in digital commerce. By 2021, more than 40% of all data and analytics projects will relate to an aspect of customer experience.
  9. Application programming interface (API)-based commerce. Businesses are building modular platforms instead of relying on a single monolithic commerce solution to improve their flexibility and agility in supporting new customer experiences, business models and ecosystem partners. API-based commerce enables organizations to decouple the front end from the back end and quickly integrate new capabilities or systems.
  10. Artificial intelligence. AI applies advanced analysis and logic-based techniques, including machine learning, to interpret events, support and automate decisions, and to take actions. Examples of AI in digital commerce range from product recommendation, content personalization, fraud detection, price optimization and virtual assistants to image search and categorization and customer segmentation.

Shen recommends focusing on no more than three items in this list at a time. “Check out the competition to see which technologies are must-have or give you competitive advantages, and move those to the top of the list. Prioritize the remaining options based on business value, time and cost to deliver,” she says.

This article has been updated from the original, published on October 12, 2019, to reflect new events, conditions or research.

The post Top 10 Trends in Digital Commerce appeared first on Smarter With Gartner.


          

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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In the virtual world, cashiers are taught to show greater empathy, mechanics learn to repair planes, and retail workers experience how to deal with armed robbery.
          

Software Engineer Internship for Virtual Reality - HP - Fort Collins, CO

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HP brings together a portfolio that spans printing, personal computing, software and services to serve more than 1 billion customers in over 170 countries.
From HP - Thu, 03 Oct 2019 10:12:48 GMT - View all Fort Collins, CO jobs
          

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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In the virtual world, cashiers are taught to show greater empathy, mechanics learn to repair planes and retail workers experience how to deal with armed robbery.
          

How classroom tech brings accessibility with dignity

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For Lisa Berghoff, Director of Instructional Technology at Highland Park High School in Highland Park, Illinois, one of her big assistive technology “aha” moments came while working with a student with autism. The student, often disruptive in class because she wanted immediate answers to questions, needed a teaching aide at her side—an accommodation that set her apart from her peers. “There’s nothing less cool than having an adult next to you in a high school class,” Berghoff says. 

Berghoff decided to open up a Google Doc on the student’s Chromebook, with the teaching aide accessing the same Doc on her own Chromebook from across the room and responding to the student’s questions in real time. “That document, with all the questions and answers captured by the student, actually became a resource for other students—it was a huge win for everyone,” Berghoff says. “That’s something we couldn't have done years ago.” 

In Berghoff’s 25 years in education, she’s seen the many changes that technology has brought to every student—but particularly those with learning challenges. In honor of Disability Awareness Month, we asked Berghoff about the impact of assistive technology and accessibility up close. Just getting started with G Suite and Chromebooks, and want to learn more about accessibility? Head to edu.google.com/accessibility#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/107436&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com to learn more. 

How’d you get started in special education?

I did my undergrad degree in psychology with grand plans to be a psychologist, but when I applied to some Ph.D programs they told me to get some experience in the real world. My first job was working at a crisis shelter for teenage girls. Because of my work with the girls who struggled so much to learn, I took some courses in special education—and realized that was where I wanted to be.

How’d you make the switch from special education to instructional technology?

I’d spent the last several years working with high school students with an array of significant disabilities. I would try anything if I thought it could help my kids learn, so the technology office started throwing all the tech my way—everything from Chromebooks to iPads to Promethean boards—because they knew I’d give it all an honest try. 

I saw that when used with integrity, technology could really be a game changer in helping kids learn. I distinctly recall a reading lesson where I recorded myself reading and shared a YouTube link, so students could pause and replay the video at their own pace.

Timing was on my side, and when the instructional technology director position opened up at Highland Park, the thought of having a wider influence appealed to me. At the time, I was fascinated by all kinds of kids with learning challenges—not just the students with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). No matter what challenges kids have, many often need some kind of special support and could benefit from the right technology. 

Lisa Berghoff in the classroom

So you’re seeing the value of the “accessibility for all” movement up close.

I do a lot of training in universal design, which is about making everything more accessible. When you design things for people at the edges, everyone benefits—like how ramps help people in wheelchairs, but if you’re pushing a baby stroller, you’ll benefit too. 

What’s changed in special education and EdTech over your time in the field?

It’s the attitude of the kids, and that’s because of the better tools we have. In the past we had to give struggling students big, bulky laptops with accessibility tools—and they hated them, because the laptops made the students look different than everyone else. Now laptops like Chromebooks are so ubiquitous; everyone has one. I love that students with disabilities can access the tools they need in a way that gives them dignity, and that doesn’t separate them from the rest of the class. Having a device in each student's hand has completely changed teaching and learning.

What’s the next new thing in assistive technology?

I think there’s a lot coming with augmented reality and virtual reality, especially for students with physical disabilities who don’t have access to the wider world. There’s also the possibility to use technology for global connections. We see kids who have a rare disease or disorder, and feel like they’re the only ones out there. If they can connect to other students just like them out in the world, it makes a big difference for them psychologically. 

I have a student who doesn’t speak, and hasn’t physically been to school for a long time. Even simply using Gmail helps her make friends at school—and her friends feel like they are her ally. Her lack of speech is no longer a barrier.


          

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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Virtual reality — long touted as the next big thing in tech — hasn't taken off as a consumer product, but employers are embracing it as a more efficient and effective tool for on-the-job training. This year, Walmart is training more than 1 million employees using virtual reality. And moving companies, airlines, food processing and financial firms are all using VR in different ways. In the virtual world, cashiers are taught to show greater empathy, mechanics learn to repair planes and retail workers experience how to deal with armed robbery. The sensory immersion is key to its effectiveness. Because things look and sound as if they were real, the brain processes virtual reality as though it were a real experience, says Stanford communication professor Jeremy Bailenson, who also founded the school's Virtual Human Interaction Lab. "People learn by doing ... getting feedback on mistakes, and then repeating and iterating," he says. Not every workplace situation is conducive to virtual
          

Cognitive! - Entering a New Era of Business Models Between Converging Technologies and Data

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by Matthias Reinwarth

Digitalization or more precisely the "digital transformation" has led us to the "digital enterprise". It strives to deliver on its promise to leverage previously unused data and the information it contains for the benefit of the enterprise and its business. And although these two terms can certainly be described as buzzwords, they have found their way into our way of thinking and into all kinds of publications, so that they will probably continue to exist in the future. 

Thought leaders, analysts, software and service providers and finally practically everyone in between have been proclaiming the "cognitive enterprise" for several months now. This concept - and the mindset associated with it - promises to use the information of the already digital company to achieve productivity, profitability and high innovation for the company.  And they aim at creating and evolving next-generation business models between converging technologies and data.​  

So what is special about this cognitive enterprise“? Defining it usually starts with the idea of applying cognitive concepts and technologies to data in practically all relevant areas of a corporation. Data includes: Open data, public data, subscribed data, enterprise-proprietary data, pre-processed data, structured and unstructured data or simply Big Data). And the technologies involved include the likes of Artificial Intelligence (AI), more specifically Machine Learning (ML), Blockchain, Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), the Internet of Things (IoT), ubiquitous communication with 5G, and individualized 3D printing​.  

As of now, mainly concepts from AI and machine learning are grouped together as "cognitive", although a uniform understanding of the underlying concepts is often still lacking. They have already proven to do the “heavy lifting” either on behalf of humans, or autonomously. They increasingly understand, they reason, and they interact, e.g. by engaging in meaningful conversations and thus delivering genuine value without human intervention. 

Automation, analytics and decision-making, customer support and communication are key target areas, because many tasks in today’s organizations are in fact repetitive, time-consuming, dull and inefficient. Focus (ideally) lies on relieving and empowering the workforce, when the task can be executed by e.g. bots or through Robotic Process Automation. Every organization is supposed to agree that their staff is better than bots and can perform tasks much more meaningful. So, these measures are intended to benefit both the employee and the company. 

But this is only the starting point. A cognitive enterprise will be interactive in many ways, not only by interacting with its customers, but also with other systems, processes, devices, cloud services and peer organizations. As one result it will be adaptive, as it is designed to be learning from data, even in an unattended manner. The key goal is to foster agility and continuous innovation through cognitive technologies by embracing and institutionalizing a culture that perpetually changes the way an organization works and creates value.  

Beyond the fact that journalists, marketing departments and even analysts tend to outdo each other in the creation and propagation of hype terms, where exactly is the difference between a cognitive and a digital enterprise?  Do we need yet another term, notably for the use of machine learning as an apparently digital technology?  

I don't think so. We are witnessing the evolution, advancement, and ultimately the application of exactly these very digital technologies that lay the foundation of a comprehensive digital transformation. However, the added value of the label "cognitive" is negligible.   

But regardless of how you, me or the buzzword industry really decide to call it in the end, much more relevant are the implications and challenges of this consistent implementation of digital transformation. In my opinion two aspects must not be underestimated: 

First, this transformation is either approached in its entirety, or it is better not to do it at all, there is nothing in between. If you start doing this, it's not enough to quickly look for a few candidates for a bit of Robot Process Automation. There will be no successful, "slightly cognitive” companies. This will be a waste of the actual potential of a comprehensive redesign of corporate processes and is worth little more than a placebo. Rather, it is necessary to model internal knowledge, to gain and to interconnect data.  Jobs and tasks will change, become obsolete and will be replaced by new and more demanding ones (otherwise they could be executed by a bot again). 

Second: The importance of managing constant organizational change and restructuring is often overlooked. After all, the transformation to a Digital/Cognitive Enterprise is by far not entirely about AI, Robotic Process Automation or technology. Rather, focus has to be put on the individual as well, i.e. each member of the entire workforce (both internal and external). Established processes have to be managed, adjusted or even reengineered and this also applies to processes affecting partners, suppliers and thus any kind of cooperation or interaction.  

One of the most important departments in this future will be the human resources department and specifically talent management. Getting people on board and retaining them sustainably will be a key challenge. In particular, this means providing them with ongoing training and enabling them to perform qualitatively demanding tasks in a highly volatile environment. And it is precisely such an extremely responsible task that will certainly not be automated even in the long term...


          

Vanquishing the Windigo: Standing Up to Marc Tucker and Digital Capitalism – Wrench in the Gears

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Vanquishing the Windigo: Standing Up to Marc Tucker and Digital Capitalism – Wrench in the Gears

Vanquishing the Windigo: Standing Up to Marc Tucker and Digital Capitalism

I’ve embarked on some intense Internet peregrinations lately, and work has been super busy. But it keeps me grounded in the real, physical world for which I am eternally grateful. It is captivating, full of generous people and natural wonders. It’s worth fighting to protect, which is why I continue to wander and try to share the information I stumble over along the way.
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I’m excited to finally have a free weekend to write. I feel a growing sense of urgency as I connect with more and more folks across the country. Alaska, California, Utah, Illinois, North Dakota, Oklahoma…the pressure is intensifying, everywhere. If these thoughts seem somewhat scattered, bear with me. This is more an exercise in unburdening than some of my other posts.
Our current education system, admittedly far from perfect, is in the process of being dismantled. Its replacement? Digitally mediated, “lifelong learning,” workforce-aligned pathways. They’re being pitched in Colorado and Washington State as the “Swiss Model.” Other states are seeing the emergence of Markle Foundation-funded Skillful initiatives. Then there’s the normalization of gamified behavioral compliance tied to digital economic incentives paralleling this transformation.
Frighteningly, it appears education settings from P-20 are being set up to train future generations to accept and participate in the construction of STEM-centric worlds steeped in cyber-security. No hard hats required, just an up to date eyeglass prescription. Everyone expected to do their part to build and secure these new “worlds.” No one spared, not even preschoolers.
We must understand the nature of worlds built in code.
They will exist as augmented reality, mixed reality, and virtual reality.
They will be digitized, data-rich, and surveilled.
They will come with embedded nudges imposed by algorithms.
They will become automated, eventually beyond human control.


          

Increasing the Quality of 360{\deg} Video Streaming by Transitioning between Viewport Quality Adaptation Mechanisms. (arXiv:1910.02397v1 [cs.NI])

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Authors: Christian Koch, Arne-Tobias Rak, Michael Zink, Ralf Steinmetz, Amr Rizk

Virtual reality has been gaining popularity in recent years caused by the proliferation of affordable consumer-grade devices such as Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, and Samsung VR. Amongst the various VR applications, 360{\deg} video streaming is currently one of the most popular ones. It allows user to change their field-of-view (FoV) based on head movement, which enables them to freely select an area anywhere from the sphere the video is (virtually) projected to. While 360{\deg} video streaming offers new exciting ways of consuming content for viewers, it poses a series of challenges to the systems that are responsible for the distribution of such content from the origin to the viewer. One challenge is the significantly increased bandwidth requirement for streaming such content in real time. Recent research has shown that only streaming the content that is in the user's FoV in high quality can lead to strong bandwidth savings. This can be achieved by analyzing the viewers head orientation and movement based on sensor information. Alternatively, historic information from users that watched the content in the past can be taken into account to prefetch 360{\deg} video data in high quality assuming the viewer will direct the FoV to these areas. In this paper, we present a 360{\deg} video streaming system that transitions between sensor- and content-based predictive mechanisms. We evaluate the effects of this transition-based approach on the Quality of Experience (QoE) of such a VR streaming system and show that the perceived quality can be increased between 50\% and 80\% compared to systems that only apply either one of the two approaches.


          

Behind The Scenes With SOKRISPYMEDIA: Getting Meticulous With VR

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The popular YouTube channel’s founders, Sam Wickert and Eric Leigh, know that when it comes to creating experiences in virtual reality, success equals extreme attention to detail. Sam Wickert is obsessive when it comes to his craft. The 23-year-old co-founder of SOKRISPYMEDIA will not put anything online unless he feels it’s near perfect. That, he […]

The post Behind The Scenes With SOKRISPYMEDIA: Getting Meticulous With VR appeared first on VRScout.


          

AniCast Lab Releases English-subtitled Video Introducing Tool For Creating VR Anime

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Entertainment company Avex and virtual reality development company XVI Inc. announced last year that they are creating a tool titled AniCast Lab., which...
          

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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In the virtual world, cashiers are taught to show greater empathy, mechanics learn to repair planes and retail workers experience how to deal with armed robbery.
          

Create text for subtitles from the existing video which is 2min16sec long

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This is a promo video for virtual reality arcade which needs subtitles. Video will be provided upon request. Text for the subtitles to be provide within 48 hours from ageering to do the job. (Budget: £10 - £20 GBP, Jobs: English (UK))
          

Social Virtual Reality: Health, Healthcare, and Health IT! – #HITsm Chat Topic

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We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/11 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Chuck Webster (@wareFLO) on the topic “Social Virtual Reality: Health, Healthcare, and Health IT!”. 10 years ago I wrote a blog post (#HIMSS10 Best Ever: Due in Large […]
          

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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Virtual reality — long touted as the next big thing in tech — hasn't taken off as a consumer product, but employers are embracing it as a more efficient and effective tool for on-the-job training. This year, Walmart is training more than 1 million employees using virtual reality. And moving companies, airlines, food processing and financial firms are all using VR in different ways. In the virtual world, cashiers are taught to show greater empathy, mechanics learn to repair planes and retail workers experience how to deal with armed robbery. The sensory immersion is key to its effectiveness. Because things look and sound as if they were real, the brain processes virtual reality as though it were a real experience, says Stanford communication professor Jeremy Bailenson, who also founded the school's Virtual Human Interaction Lab. "People learn by doing ... getting feedback on mistakes, and then repeating and iterating," he says. Not every workplace situation is conducive to virtual
          

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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In the virtual world, cashiers are taught to show greater empathy, mechanics learn to repair planes and retail workers experience how to deal with armed robbery.
          

Microsoft Patent Details Vibrating VR Floor Mat For Interactive Living Room Gaming

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Microsoft Patent Details Vibrating VR Floor Mat For Interactive Living Room Gaming The problem for gamers who try and play VR games in their living room is that the immersion factor means furniture in the home becomes a hazard. Microsoft has a new patent application that has surfaced that shows what it is thinking about to help define the VR playing area to make play safer. The patent application is titled "virtual reality



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