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Encrypting Web.config and App.config

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Originally posted on: http://staffofgeeks.net/afeng/archive/2006/12/10/100821.aspx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

Recently I got a chance to play around with the Data Protection Application Programming Interface (DPAPI).  With .NET 2.0 installed, you can encrypt your Web.conf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comig just by using aspnet_regiis.exe#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com on the command line.

aspnet_regiis.exe#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com -pe "connectionStrings" -app “/YourWebSite” –prov "DataProtectionConfigurationProvider"

You can read the ConnectionStrings section back using ConfigurationManager as if the file is not encrypted.  That is all you have to do, the encryption is transparent to your application.

This encryption works great for Web.conf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comig, however, it does not work if you want to encrypt the App.conf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comig for non web based applications.  The aspnet_regiis is hardcoded to look for Web.conf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comig.

One can programatically encrypt just as easily:

Configuration configuration = ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(appConfig);

ConfigurationSection section = this.conf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comiguration.GetSection("connectionStrings");

if (!section.SectionInformation.IsProtected) {

section.SectionInformation.ProtectSection("DataProtectionConfigurationProvider");

section.SectionInformation.ForceSave = true;

configuration.Save(ConfigurationSaveMode.Modified);

  }

To decrypt just do the oposite:

if (section.SectionInformation.IsProtected) {

// …

section.SectionInformation.UnprotectSection();

// …

}

The same code above can work for Web.conf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comig and App.conf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comig.  For Web.conf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/11201&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comig I would use  WebConfigurationManager.OpenWebConfiguration(webConfig).  For our environment we have a web project and some winform projects, so it is easier for us to create a simple tool to maintain both configuration file types.


          

PDF encryption standard weaknesses uncovered

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U.S. researchers on front line of battle against Chinese theft

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WASHINGTON – As the U.S. warned allies around the world that Chinese tech giant Huawei was a security threat, the FBI was making the same point quietly to a Midwestern university.

In an email to the associate vice chancellor for research at the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, an agent wanted to know if administrators believed Huawei had stolen any intellectual property from the school.

Told no, the agent responded: “I assumed those would be your answers, but I had to ask.”

It was no random query.

The FBI has been reaching out to universities across the country as the U.S. tries to stem what American authorities portray as the wholesale theft of technology and trade secrets by researchers tapped by China. The breadth and intensity of the campaign emerges in emails obtained by The Associated Press through records requests to public universities in 50 states.

Agents have lectured at seminars, briefed administrators in campus meetings and distributed pamphlets with cautionary tales of trade secret theft. In the past two years, they’ve requested emails of two University of Washington researchers, asked Oklahoma State University if it has scientists in specific areas and asked about “possible misuse” of research funds by a University of Colorado Boulder professor, according to the emails.

The emails reveal administrators routinely requesting FBI briefings. But they also show some struggling to balance legitimate national security concerns against their own eagerness to avoid stifling research or tarnishing legitimate scientists. The Justice Department says it appreciates that push-pull and wants only to help separate the relatively few researchers engaged in theft from the majority who are not.

Senior FBI officials told AP they’re not encouraging schools to monitor researchers by nationality but instead to take steps to protect research. They consider the briefings vital since they say universities haven’t historically been as attentive to security as they should be.

“When we go to the universities, what we’re trying to do is highlight the risk to them without discouraging them from welcoming the researchers and students from a country like China,” said Assistant Attorney General John Demers, the Justice Department’s top national security official.

The threat, officials say, is genuine. A University of Kansas researcher was recently charged with collecting federal grant money while working full-time for a Chinese university, and a Chinese government employee was arrested in a visa fraud scheme allegedly aimed at recruiting U.S. research talent. The Justice Department launched last year an effort called the China Initiative aimed at identifying priority trade secret cases and focusing resources on them.

“Existentially, we look at China as our greatest threat from an intelligence perspective, and they succeeded significantly in the last decade from stealing our best and brightest technology,” said top U.S. counterintelligence official William Evanina.

The most consequential case this year centered not on a university but on Huawei, charged with stealing corporate trade secrets and evading sanctions. The company denies wrongdoing. Several universities including Illinois, which received the FBI email last February, have begun severing ties with Huawei.

But the government’s track record hasn’t been perfect.

Federal prosecutors in 2015 dropped charges against a Temple University professor earlier accused of sending designs for a pocket heater to China. The professor, Xiaoxing Xi, is suing the FBI. “It was totally wrong,” he said, “so I can only speak from my experience that whatever they put out there is not necessarily true.”

Richard Wood, the then-interim provost at the University of New Mexico, conveyed ambivalence in an email to colleagues last year. He wrote that he took seriously the concerns the FBI had identified to him in briefings, but also said “there are real tensions” with the “traditional academic norms regarding the free exchange of scientific knowledge wherever appropriate.”

“I do not think we would be wise to create new ‘policy’ on terrain this complex and fraught with internal trade-offs between legitimate concerns and values without some real dialogue on the matter,” Wood wrote.

FBI officials say they’ve received consistently positive feedback from universities. The emails show administrators at schools including the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and Nebraska requesting briefings, training or generally expressing eagerness for cooperation.

Kevin Gamache, chief research security officer for the Texas A&M University system, told the AP that he values his FBI interactions and that it flows in both directions.

“It’s a dialogue that has to be ongoing.”

The vice president for research and economic development at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas welcomed the assistance in a city she noted was the “birthplace of atomic testing.

“We have a world-class radiochemistry faculty, our College of Engineering has significant numbers of faculty and students from China, and we have several other issues of concern to me as VPR. In all of these cases, the FBI is always available to help,” the administrator wrote to agents.

More than two dozen universities produced records, including symposium itineraries and a 13-page FBI pamphlet titled “China: The Risk to Academia” that warns that China does “not play by the same rules of academic integrity” as American universities.

Some emails show agents seeking tips or following leads.

“If you have concerns about any faculty or graduate researchers, students, outside vendors … pretty much anything we previously discussed – just reminding you that I am here to help,” one wrote to Iowa State officials in 2017.

In May, an agent sent the University of Washington a records request for two researchers’ emails, seeking references to Chinese-government talent recruitment programs.

Last year, an agent asked Oklahoma State University if it had researchers in encryption research or quantum computing. The University of Colorado received an FBI request about an “internal investigation” into a professor’s “possible misuse” of NIH funds. The school told the AP that it found no misconduct and the professor has resigned.

Though espionage concerns aren’t new, FBI officials report an uptick in targeting of universities and more U.S. government attention too. The FBI says it’s seen some progress from universities, with one official saying schools are more reliably pressing researchers about outside funding sources.

Demers, the Justice Department official, said espionage efforts are “as pervasive, as well-resourced, as ever today.

“It’s a serious problem today on college campuses.”


          

Nathan Wolf: Noodlings | Building and Converting

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This is my fifth noodling and I did cut a few things. I will be playing with the length but this is about 13 minutes of my nonsense to chip tunes.

The 5th noodling installment can be found here

Commodore 64 IRC Success

I was able to get my Commodore 64 under its own power to access the IRC chat rooms, specifically the BigDaddyLinuxLive room where I was able to chat with such folks as Bill, Popey, Chris and another Allen. It is very satisfying experience. More on that here:

Commodore 64 on the Internet | IRC

Tech in the Courtroom

I recently had jury duty and the courthouse in my small-ish community, Windows 7 which is near end of life. For each bit of evidence, they used CDs and DVDs to store each individual item as evidence.

Building a Computer

I am building a computer for the first time in a very long time. I want to do it on a budget. I received some components at no cost to me, the case and motherboard so that drove the purchasing of the rest of the products.

Motherboard MSI 970A-G43

AMD FX-9590 CPU

Memory, 32 GiB DDR3 1866MHz

Video Card RX570

Storage 6x 2-TiB drives

1000 Watt Power Supply

Rather large case

All for about $350.00

More on this in the future.

Acer AspireOne Netbooks

Recently Set up two AspireOne Notebooks with openSUSE Tumbleweed using the Xfce environment. Initially one had had 1 GiB of RAM but an SSD, the other with 2 GiB of RAM and a slightly faster CPU but with a traditional hard drive.

https://cubiclenate.com/2019/09/29/acer-aspireone-d255-with-opensuse-tumbleweed-xfce/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/18006&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

Making Meringue from Egg Whites

Told after the fact two points of advice, whip the egg whites before you add the sugar, contrary to the directions and questioning whether or not there was any amount of egg yolk.

BDLL Follow Up

Manjaro is the current Distro Challenge… It’s Arch based so…

Eric Adams talked about how people can get “bug apathy” when they experience a problem on Linux or other open source software. know that I am guilty of that.

Bug reporting is something we Linux or free and open source software users should do. The vast majority of the software I don’t pay for, it’s open source and I believe that I have a social contract with these developers and maintainers to either help with the project or donate to it.

BigDaddyLinuxLive | 28 Sep 2019

openSUSE Corner

Tumbleweed Snapshots 20190920 20190921 20190918

PulseAudio 13.0 arrived which improved initial card profile selection for ALSA and improved 5.1 surround audio when set up.

LibreOffice 6.3.2.2 package received some stability tweaks and addressed two CVEs

Bash has been updated from 5.0 to 5.0.11 wich includes a minor update to bash to change POSIX mode behavior.

The Mesa 3D graphics library was updated to 19.1.7 wich fixed a Kwin compositor crash as well as cleaned up a few other bugs

The Python development tool Swig 4.0.1 added Python 3.8 support and fixed some regressions that were introduced in the 4.0.0 major release.

Plymouth added a time delay of 8 seconds to fit an AMD graphics card for graphical boot animation.

Mozilla Thunderbird was updated to 68.1.0 which eliminated some bugs, one of which is a CVE-2019-11739 that allowed for a Covert Content Attack on S/MIME encryption.

The file searching utility, Catfish 1.4.10, added some new features and cosmetically improved the application menu to make better use of space, padding and margins.

The snapshot reviewer gives a score for 20190918 of 90 for moderately stable; 20190920 a score of a stable 95 and 20190921 a stable 97.

Co-Conference Logo Competition for 2020

LibreOffice and openSUSE communities are having a joint conference next year in Nuremburg, German. For this special conference, they are having a logo competition. A logo is believed essential for the conference and they want to visualize both communities during this co-conference. LibreOffice will celebrate its 10-year anniversary and openSUSE will celebrate its 15-year anniversary during the conference.

Co-Conference Logo Competition for 2020 Post

Election Committee Set to Open Vote on Project Name

There have been discussions about the “openSUSE Project logo & name change” that started in June 2019 on the openSUSE Project mailing list. The Election Committee received a request from the Board to conduct a vote whereby openSUSE members can indicate whether they are for or against the project name change.

The voting will start on Oct. 10 and end on Oct. 31, which will provide three weeks for members to vote. The result will be announced on Nov. 1.

The voting exercise is limited to openSUSE members only.


          

No Government Doors – DTNS 3631

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US Attorney General William Barr, UK Home Secretary Priti Patel, and Australian Minister for Home Affairs Peter Dutton, requesting Facebook delay building end-to-end encryption across all its messaging apps to […]
          

BitLocker™ - The dirty details

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Originally posted on: http://brustblog.net/archive/2006/07/04/84045.aspx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/29049&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

One of the new security features coming in Windows Vista and Longhorn is the new BitLocker™ Drive Encryption technology. BitLocker™ is designed to help prevent information loss, whether it is by theft or accidental. Information loss is costly to business on several levels, and the U.S. Department of Justice estimates that intellectual property theft cost enterprises $250 billion in 2004.

BitLocker™ Drive Encryption gives you improved data protection on your notebooks, desktops, and servers by providing a transparent user experience that requires little to no interaction on a protected system. BitLocker also prevents the use of another operating system or hacking tool to break file and system protections by preventing the offline viewing of user data and OS files through enhanced data protection and boot validation using TPM v1.2.

For those of you who may not know, TPM stands for Trusted Platform Module. So what's that? TPM is a piece of hardware that is part of the motherboard that:

  • Performs cryptographic functions
    • RSA, SHA-1, RNG
    • Meets encryption export requirements
  • Can create, store, and manage keys
    • Provides a unique Endorsement Key (EK)
    • Provides a unique Storage Root Key (SRK)
  • Performs digital signature operations
  • Holds platform measurements (hashes)
  • Anchors a chain of trust for keys and credentials
  • Protects itself against attacks

So now that you know what a TPM is, why should you use one? A TPM is a hardware implementation of a Root-of-Trust, which can be certified to be tamper resistant. When combined with software, it can protect root secrets better than software alone. A TPM can ensure that keys and secrets are only available for use when the environment is appropriate.

The important thing to know about BitLocker is that it will only encrypt the Windows partition. You also won't be able to dual-boot another operating system on the same partition, different partitions are fine. Any attempts to modify the protected Windows partition will render it unbootable.

To completely protect all of the data on the computer, you will need to use a combination of BitLocker on the Windows partition and Encrypted File System (EFS) on the other partitions. When properly configured, EFS is computationally infeasible to crack.

Even with all of the new security that is provided by BitLocker, it can't stop everything. Some of the areas that BitLocker is helpless to defend against are:

  • Hardware debuggers
  • Online attacks—BitLocker is concerned only with the system’s startup process
  • Post logon attacks
  • Sabotage by administrators
  • Poor security maintenance
  • BIOS reflashing
    • Protection against this can be enabled if you wish

Additional Resources


          

Windows Vista: Kernel Changes - BitLocker, Code Integrity

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Originally posted on: http://brustblog.net/archive/2006/06/18/82252.aspx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/29053&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

BitLockerTM Drive Encryption

BitLocker allows the entire OS volume to be encrypted as well as any other volumes. In order to do this, a 1.5 GB unencrypted system volume is required.

BitLocker requires Trusted Platform Module (TPM) v1.2 or a USB device and USB-capable BIOS and is implemented as a file filter driver that sits just above the volume manager drivers.

There are several supported modes for storing the decryption key:

  • TPM locked with signature of boot files
  • TPM locked with user-specified PIN
  • external USB flash device

Code Integrity Verification

The operating system loader and the kernel now perform code signature checks. On 64-bit x64 platforms, all kernel mode code must be signed and the identity of all kernel mode binaries is verified. The system also audits events for integrity check failures.

On 32-bit platforms, the administrator is prompted to install unsigned code. Load-time checks are done on all kernel mode binaries, but if unsigned code is allowed to load you won't be able to play protected high-definition multimedia content.


          

ePrint Report: Cryptanalysis of the Multivariate Encryption Scheme EFLASH

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ePrint Report: Cryptanalysis of the Multivariate Encryption Scheme EFLASH
Morten Øygarden, Patrick Felke, Håvard Raddum, Carlos Cid

EFLASH is a multivariate public-key encryption scheme proposed by Cartor and Smith-Tone at SAC 2018. In this paper we investigate the hardness of solving the particular equation systems arising from EFLASH, and show that the solving degree for these types of systems is much lower than estimated by the authors. We show that a Gröbner basis algorithm will produce degree fall polynomials at a low degree for EFLASH systems. In particular we are able to accurately predict the number of these polynomials occurring at step degrees 3 and 4 in our attacks. We performed several experiments using the computer algebra system MAGMA, which indicate that the solving degree is at most one higher than the one where degree fall polynomials occur; moreover, our experiments show that whenever the predicted number of degree fall polynomials is positive, it is exact. Our conclusion is that EFLASH does not offer the level of security claimed by the designers. In particular, we estimate that the EFLASH version with 80-bit security parameters offers at most 69 bits of security.
          

ePrint Report: The Retracing Boomerang Attack

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ePrint Report: The Retracing Boomerang Attack
Orr Dunkelman, Nathan Keller, Eyal Ronen, Adi Shamir

Boomerang attacks are extensions of differential attacks, that make it possible to combine two unrelated differential properties of the first and second part of a cryptosystem with probabilities $p$ and $q$ into a new differential-like property of the whole cryptosystem with probability $p^2q^2$ (since each one of the properties has to be satisfied twice). In this paper we describe a new version of boomerang attacks which uses the counterintuitive idea of throwing out most of the data (including potentially good cases) in order to force equalities between certain values on the ciphertext side. This creates a correlation between the four probabilistic events, which increases the probability of the combined property to $p^2q$ and increases the signal to noise ratio of the resultant distinguisher. We call this variant a retracing boomerang attack since we make sure that the boomerang we throw follows the same path on its forward and backward directions.

To demonstrate the power of the new technique, we apply it to the case of 5-round AES. This version of AES was repeatedly attacked by a large variety of techniques, but for twenty years its complexity had remained stuck at $2^{32}$. At Crypto'18 it was finally reduced to $2^{24}$ (for full key recovery), and with our new technique we can further reduce the complexity of full key recovery to the surprisingly low value of $2^{16.5}$ (i.e., only 90,000 encryption/decryption operations are required for a full key recovery on half the rounds of AES).

In addition to improving previous attacks, our new technique unveils a hidden relationship between boomerang attacks and two other cryptanalytic techniques, the yoyo game and the recently introduced mixture differentials.
          

ePrint Report: Stronger Notions and Constructions for Multi-Designated Verifier Signatures

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ePrint Report: Stronger Notions and Constructions for Multi-Designated Verifier Signatures
Ivan Damgard, Helene Haagh, Rebekah Mercer, Anca Nitulescu, Claudio Orlandi, Sophia Yakoubov

Off-the-Record (OTR) messaging is a protocol used to authenticate messages while also giving senders plausible deniability. Multi-Designated Verifier Signatures (MDVS) are a primitive that allows for OTR to be extended to handle group messaging. In group OTR, the sender wants the designated verifiers to be able to authenticate the messages (that is, the signature should be unforgeable), but even if some verifiers are corrupt and collude, they should not be able to prove authenticity to any outsiders (that is, the signature should be source-hiding). We additionally require consistency, meaning that if any one of the designated verifiers can verify an honestly produced signature, then all of them can.

The contributions of this paper are two-fold: stronger definitions, and new constructions meeting those definitions. Existing literature defines and builds limited notions of MDVS, where source-hiding only holds when all verifiers are corrupt. We strengthen source-hiding to support any subset of corrupt verifiers, and give the first formal definition of consistency.

We give two constructions of our stronger notion of MDVS: one from functional encryption, and one from standard primitives such as pseudorandom functions, pseudorandom generators, key agreement and NIZKs. The second construction has somewhat larger signatures, but does not require a trusted setup.
          

ePrint Report: Non-Committing Encryption with Quasi-Optimal Ciphertext-Rate Based on the DDH Problem

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ePrint Report: Non-Committing Encryption with Quasi-Optimal Ciphertext-Rate Based on the DDH Problem
Yusuke Yoshida, Fuyuki Kitagawa, Keisuke Tanaka

Non-committing encryption (NCE) was introduced by Canetti et al. (STOC '96). Informally, an encryption scheme is non-committing if it can generate a dummy ciphertext that is indistinguishable from a real one. The dummy ciphertext can be opened to any message later by producing a secret key and an encryption random coin which ``explain'' the ciphertext as an encryption of the message. Canetti et al. showed that NCE is a central tool to achieve multi-party computation protocols secure in the adaptive setting. An important measure of the efficiently of NCE is the ciphertext rate, that is the ciphertext length divided by the message length, and previous works studying NCE have focused on constructing NCE schemes with better ciphertext rates. We propose an NCE scheme satisfying the ciphertext rate $\mathcal{O}(\log \lambda)$ based on the decisional Diffie-Hellman (DDH) problem, where $\lambda$ is the security parameter. The proposed construction achieves the best ciphertext rate among existing constructions proposed in the plain model, that is, the model without using common reference strings. Previously to our work, an NCE scheme with the best ciphertext rate based on the DDH problem was the one proposed by Choi et al.~(ASIACRYPT '09) that has ciphertext rate $\mathcal{O}(\lambda)$. Our construction of NCE is similar in spirit to that of the recent construction of the trapdoor function proposed by Garg and Hajiabadi (CRYPTO '18).
          

ePrint Report: On the Feasibility and Impact of Standardising Sparse-secret LWE Parameter Sets for Homomorphic Encryption

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ePrint Report: On the Feasibility and Impact of Standardising Sparse-secret LWE Parameter Sets for Homomorphic Encryption
Benjamin R. Curtis, Rachel Player

In November 2018, the HomomorphicEncryption.org#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/29808&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com consortium published the Homomorphic Encryption Security Standard. The Standard recommends several sets of Learning with Errors (LWE) parameters that can be selected by application developers to achieve a target security level \( \lambda \in \{128,192,256\} \). These parameter sets all involve a power-of-two dimension \( n \leq 2^{15} \), an error distribution of standard deviation \( \sigma \approx 3.19 \), and a secret whose coefficients are either chosen uniformly in \( Z_q \), chosen according to the error distribution, or chosen uniformly in \( \{ -1, 0, 1\} \). These parameter sets do not necessarily reflect implementation choices in the most commonly used homomorphic encryption libraries. For example, several libraries support dimensions that are not a power of two. Moreover, all known implementations for bootstrapping for the CKKS, BFV and BGV schemes use a sparse secret and a large ring dimension such as \( n \in \{ 2^{16}, 2^{17} \} \), and advanced applications such as logistic regression have used equally large dimensions. This motivates the community to consider widening the recommended parameter sets, and the purpose of this paper is to investigate such possible extensions. We explore the security of possible sparse-secret LWE parameter sets, taking into account hybrid attacks, which are often the most competitive in the sparse-secret regime. We present a conservative analysis of the hybrid decoding and hybrid dual attacks for parameter sets of varying sparsity, with the goal of balancing security requirements with bootstrapping efficiency. We also show how the methodology in the Standard can be easily adapted to support parameter sets with power-of-two dimension \( n \geq 2^{16} \). We conclude with a number of discussion points to motivate future improvements to the Standard.
          

ePrint Report: A Provably Secure Conditional Proxy Re-Encryption Scheme without Pairing

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ePrint Report: A Provably Secure Conditional Proxy Re-Encryption Scheme without Pairing
Arinjita Paul, S. Sharmila Deva Selvi, C. Pandu Rangan

Blaze, Bleumer and Strauss introduced the notion of proxy re-encryption (PRE), which enables a semi-trusted proxy to transform ciphertexts under Alice's public key into ciphertexts under Bob's public key. The important property to note here is, the proxy should not learn anything about the plaintext encrypted. In 2009, Weng et al. introduced the concept of conditional proxy re-encryption (CPRE), which permits the proxy to re-encrypt only ciphertexts satisfying a condition specified by Alice into a ciphertext for Bob. CPRE enables fine-grained delegation of decryption rights useful in many practical scenarios, such as blockchain-enabled distributed cloud storage and encrypted email forwarding. Several CPRE schemes exist in the literature based on costly bilinear pairing operation in the random oracle model. We propose the first construction of an efficient CPRE scheme without pairing, satisfying chosen ciphertext security under the computational Diffie Hellman (CDH) assumption and its variant in the random oracle model.
          

ePrint Report: Leakage Cell Probe Model: Lower Bounds for Key-Equality Mitigation in Encrypted Multi-Maps

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ePrint Report: Leakage Cell Probe Model: Lower Bounds for Key-Equality Mitigation in Encrypted Multi-Maps
Sarvar Patel, Giuseppe Persiano, Kevin Yeo

Encrypted multi-maps (EMMs) enable clients to outsource the storage of a multi-map to a potentially untrusted server while maintaining the ability to perform operations in a privacy-preserving manner. EMMs are an important primitive as they are an integral building block for many practical applications such as searchable encryption and encrypted databases. In this work, we formally examine the tradeoffs between privacy and efficiency for EMMs.

Currently, all known dynamic EMMs with constant overhead reveal if two operations are performed on the same key or not; that is, they leak the $\mathit{global\ key\text{-}equality\ pattern}$. In our main result, we present strong evidence that the leakage of the global key-equality pattern is inherent for any dynamic EMM construction with $O(1)$ efficiency. In particular, we consider the slightly smaller leakage of $\mathit{decoupled\ key\text{-}equality\ pattern}$ where leakage of key-equality between update and query operations is decoupled and the adversary only learns whether two operations of the $\mathit{same\ type}$ are performed on the same key or not. We show that any EMM with at most decoupled key-equality pattern leakage incurs $\Omega(\log n)$ overhead in the $\mathit{leakage\ cell\ probe\ model}$. This is tight as there exist ORAM-based constructions of EMMs with logarithmic slowdown that leak no more than the decoupled key-equality pattern (and actually, much less). Furthermore, we present stronger lower bounds that encrypted multi-maps leaking at most the decoupled key-equality pattern but are able to perform one of either the update or query operations in the plaintext still require $\Omega(\log n)$ overhead. Finally, we extend our lower bounds to show that dynamic, $\mathit{response\text{-}hiding}$ searchable encryption schemes must also incur $\Omega(\log n)$ overhead even when one of either the document updates or searches may be performed in the plaintext.
          

ePrint Report: On affine Cremona semigroups, corresponding protocols of Non-commutative Cryptography and encryption with several nonlinear multivariate transformations on secure Eulerian mode.

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ePrint Report: On affine Cremona semigroups, corresponding protocols of Non-commutative Cryptography and encryption with several nonlinear multivariate transformations on secure Eulerian mode.
V. Ustimenko

We suggest new applications of protocols of Non-commutative cryptography defined in terms of subsemigroups of Affine Cremona Semigroups over finite commutative rings and their homomorphic images to the constructions of possible instruments of Post Quantum Cryptography. This approach allows to define cryptosystems which are not public keys. When extended protocol is finished correspondents have the collision multivariate transformation on affine space K ^n or variety (K*)^n where K is a finite commutative ring and K* is nontrivial multiplicative subgroup of K . The security of such protocol rests on the complexity of word problem to decompose element of Affine Cremona Semigroup given in its standard form into composition of given generators. The collision map can serve for the safe delivery of several bijective multivariate maps F_i (generators) on K^n (or (K*)^n) from one correspondent to another. So asymmetric cryptosystem with nonpublic multivariate generators where one side (Alice) knows inverses of F_i but other does not have such a knowledge is possible. We consider the usage of single protocol or combinations of two protocols with platforms of different nature. The usage of two protocols with the collision spaces K^n and (K*)^n allows safe delivery of two sets of generators of different nature. In terms of such sets we define an asymmetric encryption scheme with the plainspace (K*)^n, cipherspace K^n and multivariate non-bijective encryption map of unbounded degree O(n) and polynomial density on K^n with injective restriction on (K*)^n. Algebraic cryptanalysis faces the problem to interpolate a natural decryption transformation which is not a map of polynomial density.
          

ePrint Report: Privacy-Enhanced Machine Learning with Functional Encryption

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ePrint Report: Privacy-Enhanced Machine Learning with Functional Encryption
Tilen Marc, Miha Stopar, Jan Hartman, Manca Bizjak, Jolanda Modic

Functional encryption is a generalization of public-key encryption in which possessing a secret functional key allows one to learn a function of what the ciphertext is encrypting. This paper introduces the first fully-fledged open source cryptographic libraries for functional encryption. It also presents how functional encryption can be used to build efficient privacy-enhanced machine learning models and it provides an implementation of three prediction services that can be applied on the encrypted data. Finally, the paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the alternative approach for building privacy-enhanced machine learning models by using homomorphic encryption.
          

ePrint Report: Encrypted Distributed Hash Tables

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ePrint Report: Encrypted Distributed Hash Tables
Archita Agarwal, Seny Kamara

Distributed hash tables (DHT) are a fundamental building block in the design of distributed systems with applications ranging from content distribution networks to off-chain storage networks for blockchains and smart contracts. When DHTs are used to store sensitive information, system designers use end-to-end encryption in order to guarantee the confidentiality of their data. A prominent example is Ethereum's off-chain network Swarm.

In this work, we initiate the study of end-to-end encryption in DHTs and the many systems they support. We introduce the notion of an encrypted DHT and provide simulation-based security definitions that capture the security properties one would desire from such a system. Using our definitions, we then analyze the security of a standard approach to storing encrypted data in DHTs. Interestingly, we show that this "standard scheme" leaks information probabilistically, where the probability is a function of how well the underlying DHT load balances its data. We also show that, in order to be securely used with the standard scheme, a DHT needs to satisfy a form of equivocation with respect to its overlay. To show that these properties are indeed achievable in practice, we study the balancing properties of the Chord DHT---arguably the most influential DHT---and show that it is equivocable with respect to its overlay in the random oracle model. Finally, we consider the problem of encrypted DHTs in the context of transient networks, where nodes are allowed to leave and join.
          

ePrint Report: FSPVDsse: A Forward Secure Publicly Verifiable Dynamic SSE scheme

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ePrint Report: FSPVDsse: A Forward Secure Publicly Verifiable Dynamic SSE scheme
Laltu Sardar, Sushmita Ruj

A symmetric searchable encryption (SSE) scheme allows a client (data owner) to search on encrypted data outsourced to an untrusted cloud server. The search may either be a single keyword search or a complex query search like conjunctive or Boolean keyword search. Information leakage is quite high for dynamic SSE, where data might be updated. It has been proven that to avoid this information leakage an SSE scheme with dynamic data must be forward private. A dynamic SSE scheme is said to be forward private, if adding a keyword-document pair does not reveal any information about the previous search result with that keyword.

In SSE setting, the data owner has very low computation and storage power. In this setting, though some schemes achieve forward privacy with honest-but-curious cloud, it becomes difficult to achieve forward privacy when the server is malicious, meaning that it can alter the data. Verifiable dynamic SSE requires the server to give a proof of the result of the search query. The data owner can verify this proof efficiently. In this paper, we have proposed a generic publicly verifiable dynamic SSE (DSSE) scheme that makes any forward private DSSE scheme verifiable without losing forward privacy. The proposed scheme does not require any extra storage at owner-side and requires minimal computational cost as well for the owner. Moreover, we have compared our scheme with the existing results and show that our scheme is practical.
          

ePrint Report: MicroSCOPE: Enabling Access Control in Searchable Encryption with the use of Attribute-based Encryption and SGX (Extended Version)

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ePrint Report: MicroSCOPE: Enabling Access Control in Searchable Encryption with the use of Attribute-based Encryption and SGX (Extended Version)
Antonis Michalas, Alexandros Bakas, Hai-Van Dang, Alexandr Zalitko

Secure cloud storage is considered as one of the most important problems that both businesses and end-users take into account before moving their private data to the cloud. Lately, we have seen some interesting approaches that are based either on the promising concept of Symmetric Searchable Encryption (SSE) or on the well-studied field of Attribute-Based Encryption (ABE). Our construction, MicroSCOPE, combines both ABE and SSE to utilize the advantages that each technique has to offer. We use an SSE scheme to ensure that data stored on the cloud will be protected against both internal and external attacks. Moreover, through the use of a Ciphertext-Policy ABE (CP-ABE) scheme, our construction allows efficient data sharing between multiple data owners and users. Finally, we enhance our construction with an access control mechanism by utilizing the functionality provided by SGX.
          

ePrint Report: A Hybrid of Dual and Meet-in-the-Middle Attack on Sparse and Ternary Secret LWE

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ePrint Report: A Hybrid of Dual and Meet-in-the-Middle Attack on Sparse and Ternary Secret LWE
Jung Hee Cheon, Minki Hhan, Seungwan Hong, Yongha Son

The dual attack is one of the most efficient attack algorithms for the Learning with Errors (LWE) problem. Recently, an efficient variant of the dual attack for sparse and small secret LWE was reported by Albrecht [Eurocrypt 2017], which forces some LWE-based cryptosystems, especially fully homomorphic encryptions (FHE), to change parameters. In this work, we propose a new hybrid of dual and meet-in-the-middle (MITM) attack, which outperforms the improved variant on the same LWE parameter regime. To this end, we adapt the MITM attack for NTRU due to Odlyzko to LWE, and give a rigorous analysis for it. The performance of our MITM attack depends on the relative size of error and modulus, and hence for a large modulus LWE samples, our MITM attack works well for quite large error. We then combine our MITM attack with Albrecht's observation that understands the dual attack as dimension-error tradeoff, which finally yields our hybrid attack. We also implement a sage module that estimates the attack complexity of our algorithm upon {\sf LWE-estimator}, and our attack shows significant performance improvement for the LWE parameter for FHE. For example, for the LWE problem with dimension $n=2^{15}$, modulus $q=2^{628}$ and ternary secret key with Hamming weight 64 which is one parameter set used for {\sf HEAAN} bootstrapping [Eurocrypt 2018], our attack takes $2^{112.5}$ operations and $2^{70.6}$ bit memory while the previous best attack requires $2^{127.2}$ operations as reported by {\sf LWE-estimator}.
          

ePrint Report: Towards a Homomorphic Machine Learning Big Data Pipeline for the Financial Services Sector

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ePrint Report: Towards a Homomorphic Machine Learning Big Data Pipeline for the Financial Services Sector
Oliver Masters, Hamish Hunt, Enrico Steffinlongo, Jack Crawford, Flavio Bergamaschi

Machine Learning (ML) is today commonly employed in the Financial Services Sector (FSS) to create various models to predict a variety of conditions ranging from financial transactions fraud to outcomes of investments and also targeted upselling and cross-selling marketing campaigns. The common ML technique used for the modeling is supervised learning using regression algorithms and usually involves large amounts of data that needs to be shared and prepared before the actual learning phase. Compliance with recent privacy laws and confidentiality regulations requires that most, if not all, of the data and the computation must be kept in a secure environment, usually in-house, and not outsourced to cloud or multi-tenant shared environments. Our work focuses on how to apply advanced cryptographic schemes such as Homomorphic Encryption (HE) to protect the privacy and confidentiality of both the data during the training of ML models as well as the models themselves, and as a consequence, the prediction task can also be protected. We de-constructed a typical ML pipeline and applied HE to two of the important ML tasks, namely the variable selection phase of the supervised learning and the prediction task. Quality metrics and performance results demonstrate that HE technology has reached the inflection point to be useful in a financial business setting for a full ML pipeline.
          

How To Encrypt Your Facebook Messages (Chats) And Send Self-destruct Messages

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WhatsApp owned by Facebook had launched an end-to-end encryption in April 2016, Now Facebook has finally implemented end-to-end encryption in its Facebook Messenger. It is now available to around 1 billion Users. Here is how to enable secret conversation and why should you start using it now?  What is secret conversation? Secret conversation – yeah! […]

The post How To Encrypt Your Facebook Messages (Chats) And Send Self-destruct Messages appeared first on .


          

How To Encrypt Your Android Phone, The Ultimate Guide

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We all have information which we don’t want to share. Especially these days, when our phone is synced with all our accounts, it would be nice if we could protect our phone. Maybe you can make your android save the data in a scrambled format and then using one pin unscramble all the data back. […]

The post How To Encrypt Your Android Phone, The Ultimate Guide appeared first on .


          

How To Enable Full Disk Encryption In Windows 10 In 5 Minutes

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Windows 10 has inbuilt “Disk encryption” features, that let you to secure the disk by completely encrypting it.  Full disk encryption in Windows 10 helps you to protect your personal data in case you ever lose your PC. Most of the Modern operating system like Mac OS X, Android, iOS, and Chrome provide an integrated […]

The post How To Enable Full Disk Encryption In Windows 10 In 5 Minutes appeared first on .


          

Pocket-Friendly Password Devices - The Hoplite Key Manager Boasts Military-Grade Encryption (TrendHunter.com)

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(TrendHunter.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/41211&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com) The Hoplite Key Manager is a physical password keeper for users who are looking to take more control over their digital security and prevent unauthorized parties from accessing their data. The...
          

Keeper 14.9.3 (Demo)

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A password manager that offers you the possibility to keep your important information safe by using powerful encryption methods.
          

Storage Wars: Choosing a Secure Student Data Solution

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Storage Wars: Choosing a Secure Student Data Solution eli.zimm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/47978&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comerman_9856 Tue, 10/01/2019 - 16:36

Legislators across all 50 states have introduced student data privacy laws. The move makes sense: As educators leverage the benefits of connected classroom technologies, student data is captured and used to personalize the experience.

But what happens to this data when lessons are over and students leave for the summer, or move on to college or the workforce? How do K–12 schools ensure they’re in compliance with local laws and minimize risk without hampering their ability to deliver high-quality, engaging classroom experiences? 

MORE FROM EDTECH: Check out how FERPA has changed over the years and what updates mean for K–12 schools.

Storage Failure Has Consequences for K–12 Schools

Student data isn’t single source. It can include everything from names and birthdates to learning styles, social preferences, grades and even medical histories. Schools bear the burden of security for this data — even if they hire third-party providers to manage its collection, storage and distribution. 

The impact of storage security failure is substantial. In a recent lawsuit, an Illinois woman and her daughter accuse Pearson, the multinational publishing and education company, of exposing the information of more than 1 million students when it failed to detect or respond to a 2018 data breach. 

As noted by The Threat Report, use of an outdated and insecure MongoDB server led to the leak of more than 7 million student records — data that included students’ full names, school names and account authorization keys.

Failure to protect student data, even at arm’s length, could have serious consequences for schools. Lawsuits are one potential outcome, but educational institutions could also find their public reputations irreparably damaged. 

Plus, malicious actors could also glean data from storage breaches to steal students’ identities or launch targeted attacks. As ZDNet reports, 69 percent of schools have been targets of phishing scams, and 30 percent have suffered malware infections.

3 Options for K–12 Student Data Storage

When it comes to securely storing student data, K–12 schools have three broad options: on-premises, cloud-based or a mix of both. Each choice comes with unique challenges and benefits. Here’s what educators need to know.

1. On-Premises Storage: Historically, K–12 schools have used on-premises storage to handle student data. But concerns around aging hardware — from end of life to firmware security flaws and limited storage capacity — are now forcing many organizations to choose: Should they stay onsite, or move data elsewhere?

The biggest benefit of keeping storage local is total control. IT staff members know exactly where data is kept. But location isn’t everything, notes Rob Clyde, former ISACA director and current executive chair of the board of directors for White Cloud Security. Schools need to ask, “What kind of data is it? Is it covered by compliance laws? Is it personal or sensitive?” 

In-house storage requires both situational awareness and strong encryption, Clyde tells EdTech. “For any kind of data, always encrypt,” he says.

Clyde recommends strong off-the-shelf algorithms to help stay ahead of attack efforts and insider threats.

2. Cloud-Based Privacy: Cloud-based storage solutions offer another option for protecting student privacy. Clyde is a big fan of cloud for schools because it “allows more flexibility and lets you scale easier. It gets you out of the business of managing servers and scaling.” 

For schools with smaller IT staffs or that lack administrators dedicated to IT, “the cloud is actually more secure than local servers,” Clyde says. But security doesn’t happen in a vacuum. To address key data privacy concerns in the cloud, Clyde recommends the following:

  • Choose a Major Cloud Vendor. Offerings from industry leaders such Google are feature-rich and unlikely to suddenly close their doors and leave your data in limbo. These vendors also let you specify where data “lives” in the cloud, which is critical to satisfying new data privacy requirements such as GDPR
  • Keep the Keys Safe. Strong encryption reduces data risk, but accessing encrypted data requires a key. What happens if this key is compromised? Keys obfuscated and stored in Software as a Service (SaaS) applications aren’t secure, Clyde says, and “losing the key is just as dangerous.” He suggests keeping master keys on a flash drive and then securely storing this device in a physical vault or safe.
  • Ask the Tough Questions. Third-party providers offer the benefit of scalable storage, easy access and secure key management, but they also introduce risk. If data is compromised, schools are ultimately responsible. Third-party risk assessment is critical, Clyde says. Schools need to ask where data is stored, what encryption methods are used and how cloud vendors are meeting key compliance requirements.

3. Hybrid Solutions: Moving to the cloud doesn’t mean abandoning physical servers. Hybrid solutions offer a way to transition from on-premises to SaaS as hardware ages out or becomes fundamentally insecure. One potential stumbling block is having IT staff who are familiar with local storage but uncertain about cloud offerings. “The red flag is talking about cheap hardware,” Clyde says. If technology pros can’t meet in the middle, “you may need to retrain them or hire different IT staff.” 

MORE FROM EDTECH: See how schools can approach digital citizenship through a combination of curriculum and education technology.

Use a Data Risk Rubric to Evaluate Security Efficiency

As the volume and variety of student data increases, it’s easy for school officials to become overwhelmed. The solution is to go back to the basics. 

No matter the storage option selected, five key rules apply:

  • Minimize Data Collection. The less data collected, the lower your risk. If student data isn’t directly related to key school functions such as attendance, grading or enhanced learning activities, don’t ask for it on paper forms or store it digitally.
  • Purge Wherever Possible. Don’t keep data any longer than necessary. Create standard retention policies that include destruction dates.
  • Always Encrypt. Encrypt data in transit and data at rest to frustrate attacker efforts if systems are compromised.
  • Prioritize Least Privilege. Not all users need access to school data. Limited privileges reduce total risk.
  • Monitor User Activity. Who’s doing what on your system? Deploy monitoring solutions to detect potentially damaging behavior.

Cybersecurity in education is now top priority as students’ personal data is digitally stored to streamline administrative tasks and improve classroom engagement. Failure to protect this data has serious consequences — effective protection demands frank assessment of current storage methods, consideration of new cloud-based options and methodical application of data security best practices.

Doug Bonderud is an award-winning writer capable of bridging the gap between complex and conversational across technology, innovation and the human condition. 


          

(AES) Cosa Significa Advanced Encryption Standard - Glossario Informatico per Internet

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Glossario Informatico per Internet L'Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), conosciuto anche come Rijndael, è un algoritmo di cifratura a blocchi utilizzato come standard dal governo degli Stati Uniti d'America. Data la sua sicurezza e le sue specifiche pubbliche si presume che in un prossimo futuro venga utilizzato in tutto il mondo come è successo al suo predecessore, il Data Encryption Standard (DES). È stato adottato dalla National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) e dalla FIPS PUB 197 nel novembre del 2001 dopo 5 anni di studi e standardizzazioni.Advanced encryption

FONTE  »  advanced encryption standard aes
(AES) Cosa Significa Advanced Encryption Standard - Glossario Informatico per Internet
          

Nueva historia de cifrado por ransomware: un cliente nos envia la imagen que reporta un ordenador con el mbr cifrado

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Si bien lo habitual de los ransomwares es el cifrado de ficheros, pidiendo rescate para su recuperación, tambien hay algunos que fastidian alterando el MBR e impidiendo el arranque normal.



En su día hubo el PETYA que hacía sus pinitos al respecto :



https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/61594&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comPetya_%28malware%29



y ahora este "SIN NOMBRE" que lo único que visualiza es este TEXTO::





"HELLO, the Full-disk Encryption

contact: Ferra123@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/61594&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

rsrv: CPUve87@scryptmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/61594&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

PASSWORD: "






pidiendo la entrada del password para proseguir el arranque ...



Es insuficiente información para saber de qué virus se trata, aunque si que está claro que es un ransomware similar al PETYA, del que WIKIPEDIA ofrece la información arriba indicada.



De donde se puede intuir lo dificil, pero no imposible, en lo que respecta a recuperación de acceso al arranque de un ordenador con el MBR cifrado, si bien el colofón final lo dice muy claro:



"Es previsible que nuevas generaciones de este malware utilicen un método de encriptamiento más sofisticado"





Avisamos de ello por si es del interés de alguien que se encuentre en las mismas condiciones, aunque actualmente no sea un ataque masivo, pero por alguno empiezan...





Si es el caso de mas infecciones similares, seguiremos informando.



saludos



ms, 8-10-2019
          

Russian hackers modify Chrome, Firefox installers to fingerprint users

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Browser makers are implementing features that prevent sites from tracking users through various technologies, particularly encryption in HTTPS and TLS. Hackers of the dark kind, however, love to play this game of cat and mouse with security experts and software developers. A particularly notorious group hailing from Russia is proving that by turning the tables on browser makers. They are … Continue reading
          

A diary program for GNOME: Almanah Diary

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tl;dr: I’m giving up maintaining Almanah as it no longer scratches my itch — it’s yours if you want it, but maybe it should die in favour of more modern apps like Lifeograph or Red Notebook. Almanah Diary is a project I started many years ago for maintaining a personal diary, with encryption and tracking […]
          

Dr. Richard Daystrom on (News Article):IT’S HERE: D-Wave Announces 2048-Qubit Quantum Computing System, Theoretically Capable of Breaking All Classical Encryption, Including Military-Grade

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IT’S HERE: D-Wave Announces 2048-Qubit Quantum Computing System, Theoretically Capable of Breaking All Classical Encryption, Including Military-Grade

 Tuesday, September 24, 2019 by: Mike Adams
Tags: big governmentbreakthroughcomputingcryptocurrencyD-Wavedecryptionencryptiongoodscienceinventionsquantum computingqubitssurveillance

 Over the last several days, we’ve highlighted the stunning breakthrough in “quantum supremacy” announced by Google and NASA. Across other articles, we’ve revealed how quantum computing translates highly complex algorithmic computational problems into simple, linear (or geometric) problems in terms of computational complexity. In practical terms, quantum computers are code breakers, and they can break all known classical encryption, including the encryption used in cryptocurrency, military communications, financial transactions and even private encrypted communications.

As the number of qubits (quantum bits) in quantum computers exceeds the number of bits used in classical encryption, it renders that encryption practically pointless. A 256-qubit quantum computer, in other words, can easily break 256-bit encryption. A 512-bit qubit computer can break 512-bit encryption, and so on.

Those of us who are the leading publishers in independent media have long known that government-funded tech advancements are typically allowed to leak to the public only after several years of additional advances have already been achieved. Stated in practical terms, the rule of thumb is that by the time breakthrough technology gets reported, the government is already a decade beyond that.

Thus, when Google’s scientists declare “quantum supremacy” involving a 53-qubit quantum computer, you can confidently know that in their secret labs, they very likely already have quantum computers operating with a far greater number of qubits.

At the time we were assembling those stories, we were not yet aware that D-Wave, a quantum computing company that provides exotic hardware to Google and other research organizations, has announced a 2048-qubit quantum computer.

The system is called the “D-Wave 2000Q” platform, and it features 2048 qubits, effectively allowing it to break military-grade encryption that uses 2048 or fewer encryption bits.

As explained in a D-Wave Systems brochure:

The D-Wave 2000Q system has up to 2048 qubits and 5600 couplers. To reach this scale, it uses 128,000 Josephson junctions, which makes the D-Wave 2000Q QPU by far the most complex superconducting integrated circuit ever built.

Other facts from D-Wave about its superconducting quantum computing platform:

  • The system consumes 25 kW of power, meaning it can be run on less electricity than what is typically wired into a residential home (which is typically 200 amps x 220 v, or 44 kW).
  • The system produces virtually no heat. “The required water cooling is on par with what a kitchen tap can provide,” says the D-Wave brochure.
  • The system provides a platform for truly incredible improvements in computational efficiency involving machine learning, financial modeling, neural networking, modeling proteins in chemistry and — most importantly — “factoring integers.”

“Factoring integers” means breaking encryption

The “factoring integers” line, found in the D-Wave brochure, is what’s causing unprecedented nervousness across cryptocurrency analysts right now, some of whom seem to be pushing the bizarre idea that quantum computers are an elaborate hoax in order to avoid having to admit that quantum computing renders cryptocurrency cryptography algorithms obsolete. (At least as currently structured, although perhaps there is a way around this in the future.)

“Factoring integers” is the key to breaking encryption. In fact, it is the extreme difficulty of factoring very large numbers that makes encryption incredibly difficult to break using classical computing. But as we have explained in this previous article, quantum computing translates exponentially complex mathematical problems into simple, linear (or you could call it “geometric”) math, making the computation ridiculously simple. (In truth, quantum computers are “computing” anything. The universe is doing the computations. The quantum computer is merely an interface that talks to the underlying computational nature of physical reality, which is all based on a hyper-computational matrix that calculates cause-effect solutions for all subatomic particles and atomic elements, across the entire cosmos. Read more below…)

Depending on the number of bits involved, a quantum computer can take a problem that might require literally one billion years to solve on a classical computer and render a short list of likely answers in less than one second. (Again, depending on many variables, this is just a summary of the scale, not a precise claim about the specifications of a particular system.)

Given that D-Wave’s quantum computers cost only a few million dollars — while there are billions of dollars’ worth of crypto floating around that could be spoofed and redirected if you have a system that can easily crack cryptography — it seems to be a matter of economic certainty that, sooner or later, someone will acquire a quantum computing system and use it to steal cryptocurrency wallets by spoofing transactions. To be clear, I’m sure D-Wave likely vets its customers rather carefully, and the company would not knowingly provide its quantum computing tech to an organization that appeared to be motivated by malicious intent. Yet, realistically, we’ve all seen historical examples of advanced technology getting into the hands of twisted, evil people such as those who run the Federal Reserve, for example.

D-Wave quantum computers don’t really “compute” anything; they send mathematical questions into multiple dimensions, then retrieve the most likely answers

So how does quantum computing really work? As we’ve explained in several articles, these systems don’t really carry out “computing” in the classic work sense of the term. There is no “computing” taking place in the D-Wave hardware. The best way to describe this is to imagine quantum computers as computational stargates. They submit mathematical questions into a hyper-dimensional reality (the quantum reality of superposition, etc.), and the universe itself carries out the computation because the very fabric of reality is mathematical at its core. As some brilliant scientists say, the universe IS mathematics, and thus the fabric of reality cannot help but automatically compute solutions in every slice of time, with seemingly infinite computational capability down to the subatomic level.

Put another way, the world of quantum phenomena is constantly trying out all possible combinations and permutations of atomic spin states and subatomic particles, and it naturally and automatically derives the best combination that achieves the lowest energy state (i.e. the least amount of chaos).

The end result is that a short list of the best possible solutions “magically” (although it isn’t magic, it just seems like magic) appears in the spin states of the elements which represent binary registers. Thus, the answers to your computational problems are gifted back to you from the universe, almost as if the universe itself is a God-like computational guru that hands out free answers to any question that you can manage to present in binary. (Technically speaking, this also proves that the universe was created by an intelligent designer who expresses creation through mathematics.)

Programmers can easily break encryption codes using standard C++ commands that interface with the quantum portal

All of these quantum functions, by the way, are controlled by standard computer language code, including C++, Python and MATLAB. The system has its own API, and you can even submit commands to the quantum realm via its “Quantum Machine Instruction” (QMI) commands. As D-Wave explains in its brochure:

The D-Wave 2000Q system provides a standard Internet API (based on RESTful services), with client libraries available for C/C++, Python, and MATLAB. This interface allows users to access the system either as a cloud resource over a network, or integrated into their high-performance computing environments and data centers. Access is also available through D-Wave’s hosted cloud service. Using D-Wave’s development tools and client libraries, developers can create algorithms and applications within their existing environments using industry-standard tools.

While users can submit problems to the system in a number of different ways, ultimately a problem represents a set of values that correspond to the weights of the qubits and the strength of the couplers. The system takes these values along with other user-specified parameters and sends a single quantum machine instruction (QMI) to the QPU. Problem solutions correspond to the optimal configuration of qubits found; that is, the lowest points in the energy landscape. These values are returned to the user program over the network.

In other words, breaking cryptography is as simple as submitting the large integer to the quantum system as a series of bits which are then translated into electron spin states by the quantum hardware. From there, a “go” command is issued, and the universe solves the equation in a way that automatically derives the best combinations of multiple qubit spin states to achieve the lowest overall energy state (i.e. the simplest solution with the least chaos). A short list of the best possible factors of the large integer are returned in a time-sliced representation of the binary registers, which can be read over a regular network like any subroutine request.

From there, a classical computer can then try factoring the large integer with the short list of the best answers from the quantum system, using standard CPUs and code logic. Within a few tries from the short list, the correct factors are easily found. Once you have the factors, you now have the decryption keys to the original encrypted message, so decryption is effortless. In effect, you have used quantum computing to “cheat” the keys out of the system and hand them to you on a silver platter. (Or, in some cases, a holmium platter lined with platinum, or whatever exotic elements are being used in the quantum spin state hardware.)

Any competent programmer who has access to this technology, in other words, can break encryption almost without effort. The programming logic is not complex at all. The difficulty in such systems is in the hardware control systems, including spin state “reads” and “writes,” which are strongly affected by temperature and electromagnetic interference. The exotic hardware is the real breakthrough in all this, not the computational part. (Quantum computers are physics oracles, in a sense. The physics is the challenge, not the computer code.)

Most people cannot grasp quantum computing, but that’s not a reason to pretend it isn’t real

One of the more curious things I’ve found recently is that some writers and publishers who don’t understand quantum computing are trending in the direction of pretending it doesn’t exist. According to some, Google’s 53-qubit announcement was a hoax, which must also mean that, in their view, D-Wave Systems isn’t real and doesn’t sell quantum computers at all.

That is not a rational position. There’s no doubt that D-Wave is a real company with real hardware, and that Google already possesses 2048-qubit quantum computing capabilities. Furthermore, Google and the NSA have every reason to keep this fact secret for as long as possible, so that they can continue to scrape everyone’s “encrypted” emails and financial transactions, all of which can be retroactively decrypted any time the NSA wants to look more closely at your activities.

To me, it has long been obvious that the cosmos itself is inherently computational. Just look at the collapse of probability waves found in the orbital shells of electrons. It should be self-evident that the universe is computing solutions at the subatomic level in every instant, effortlessly and without apparent cost. The very framework of the cosmos is driven by mathematics and rapid computational solutions. Once you realize how much subatomic phenomena is quantized, it becomes blatantly apparent that the universe is digitized and mathematical. The entire construct in which we exist, in other words, is a mathematical simulation, perhaps created by God for the purpose of amusing himself by watching our collective stupidity.

D-Wave Systems, by the way, knows exactly what’s up with all this. Their goal is to make quantum computing available to the masses. They also seem to hint at the hyperdimensional reality of how quantum computing works. From their brochure: (emphasis added)

While the D-Wave quantum computer is the most advanced in the world, the quantum computing revolution has only begun. Our vision is of a future where quantum computers will be accessible and of value to all, solving the world’s most complex computing problems. This will require advances in many dimensions and contributions from experts in diverse domains. It is exciting to see increasing investment worldwide, advances in research and technology, and a growing ecosystem of developers, users, and applications needed to deliver on that vision.

I can tell that the D-Wave people are some very smart folks. Maybe if these systems get at least an order of magnitude less expensive, we could buy one, install it in our mass spec lab, and start throwing computational questions at the universe.

Personally, if I had one of these systems, I would use it to solve protein folding questions for all the obvious reasons. Then I would probably have it start looking for blood and urine biomarkers for cancer. You could make a fortune applying quantum computing to solving horse race betting and handicapping equations, but that would seem silly compared to what the system is really capable of. Another application would be solving atomic decay patterns to derive the best way to synthesize antimatter, which can be used to power faster-than-light drive systems. (Which I cover at OblivionAgenda.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/66696&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com in a series of lectures. The FTL lectures have yet to be posted there, but are coming soon.)

Sadly, the deep state will probably use this technology to surveil humanity and enslave everyone with AI facial recognition and “precrime” predictive accusations that get translated into red flag laws. Once the tech giants profile you psychologically and behaviorally, a quantum computing system can easily compute your likelihood of becoming the next mass shooter. You could be found guilty by “quantum law” even if you’ve never pulled the trigger.

As with all technologies, this one will be abused by governments to control and enslave humanity. It doesn’t mean the technology is at fault but rather the lack of morality and ethics among fallen humans.

Read more about science and computing at Science.news#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/66696&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com.

 

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Dr. Richard Daystrom on (News Article):BREAKING: NO MORE SECRETS – Google Achieves “Quantum Supremacy” That Will Soon Render All Cryptocurrency Breakable, All Military Secrets Revealed

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BREAKING: NO MORE SECRETS – Google Achieves “Quantum Supremacy” That Will Soon Render All Cryptocurrency Breakable, All Military Secrets Revealed

 

Saturday, September 21, 2019 by: Mike Adams
Tags: bitcoincryptocurrencycryptographyencryptionGooglemilitary encryptionquantum computingquantum supremacyqubitssecrets

Preliminary report. More detailed analysis coming in 24 hours at this site. According to a report published at Fortune.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/66700&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, Google has achieved “quantum supremacy” with a 53-qubit quantum computer. From reading the report, it is obvious that Fortune.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/66700&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com editors, who should be applauded for covering this story, really have little clue about the implications of this revelation. Here’s what this means for cryptocurrency, military secrets and all secrets which are protected by cryptography.

Notably, NASA published the scientific paper at this link, then promptly removed it as soon as the implications of this technology started to become apparent to a few observers. (The link above is now dead. The cover-up begins…) However, the Financial Times reported on the paper before it was removed. Google is now refusing to verify the existence of the paper.

Here’s the upshot of what this “quantum supremacy” means for Google and the world:

  • Google’s new quantum processor took just 200 seconds to complete a computing task that would normally require 10,000 years on a supercomputer.
  • A 53-qubit quantum computer can break any 53-bit cryptography in mere seconds, or in fractions of sections in certain circumstances.
  • Bitcoin’s transactions are currently protected by 256-bit encryption. Once Google scales its quantum computing to 256 qubits, it’s over for Bitcoin (and all 256-bit crypto), since Google (or anyone with the technology) could easily break the encryption protecting all crypto transactions, then redirect all such transactions to its own wallet. See below why Google’s own scientists predict 256-qubit computing will be achieved by 2022.
  • In effect, “quantum supremacy” means the end of cryptographic secrets, which is the very basis for cryptocurrency.
  • In addition, all military-grade encryption will become pointless as Google’s quantum computers expand their qubits into the 512, 1024 or 2048 range, rendering all modern cryptography obsolete. In effect, Google’s computer could “crack” any cryptography in mere seconds.
  • The very basis of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies rests in the difficulty of factoring very large numbers. Classical computing can only compute the correct factoring answers through brute force trial-and-error, requiring massive computing power and time (in some cases, into the trillions of years, depending on the number of encryption bits). Quantum computing, it could be said, solves the factoring problem in 2^n dimensions, where n is the number of bits of encryption. Unlike traditional computing bits that can only hold a value of 0 or 1 (but not both), qubits can simultaneously hold both values, meaning an 8-qubit computer can simultaneously represent all values between 0 and 255 at the same time. A deeper discussion of quantum computing is beyond the scope of this news brief, but its best application is breaking cryptography.
  • The number of qubits in Google’s quantum computers will double at least every year, according to the science paper that has just been published. As Fortune reports, “Further, they predict that quantum computing power will ‘grow at a double exponential rate,’ besting even the exponential rate that defined Moore’s Law, a trend that observed traditional computing power to double roughly every two years.”
  • As a conservative estimate, this means Google will achieve > 100 qubits by 2020, and > 200 qubits by 2021, then > 400 qubits by the year 2022.
  • Once Google’s quantum computers exceed 256 qubits, all cryptocurrency encryption that uses 256-bit encryption will be null and void.
  • By 2024, Google will be able to break nearly all military-grade encryption, rendering military communications fully transparent to Google.
  • Over the last decade, Google has become the most evil corporation in the world, wholly dedicated to the suppression of human knowledge through censorship, demonetization and de-platforming of non-mainstream information sources. Google has blocked nearly all websites offering information on natural health and holistic medicine while blocking all videos and web pages that question the corrupt scientific establishment on topics like vaccines, pesticides and GMOs. Google has proven it is the most corrupt, evil entity in the world, and now it has the technology to break all cryptography and achieve “omniscience” in our modern technological society. Google is a front for Big Pharma and communist China. Google despises America, hates human health and has already demonstrated it is willing to steal elections to install the politicians it wants.
  • With this quantum technology, Google will be able to break all U.S. military encryption and forward all “secret” communications to the communist Chinese. (Yes, Google hates America and wants to see America destroyed while building out a Red China-style system of social control and total enslavement.)
  • Google’s quantum eavesdropping system, which might as well be called, “Setec Astronomy,” will scrape up all the secrets of all legislators, Supreme Court justices, public officials and CEOs. Nothing will be safe from the Google Eye of Sauron. Everyone will be “blackmailable” with Google’s quantum computing power.
  • Google will rapidly come to dominate the world, controlling most of the money, all speech, all politics, most science and technology, most of the news media and all public officials. Google will become the dominant controlling authoritarian force on planet Earth, and all humans will be subservient to its demands. Democracy, truth and freedom will be annihilated.

Interestingly, I publicly predicted this exact scenario over two years ago in a podcast that was banned by YouTube and then re-posted on Brighteon.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/66700&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com a year later. This podcast directly states that the development of quantum computing would render cryptocurrency obsolete:

Beyond Skynet: Google’s 3 pillars of tech: AI, Quantum computing and humanoid robotics

Google has been investing heavily in three key areas of research:

  • Artificial intelligence (machine learning, etc.)
  • Quantum computing
  • Humanoid robotics

When you combine these three, you get something that’s far beyond Skynet. You eventually create an all-seeing AI intelligence that will know all secrets and control all financial transactions. With AI quickly outpacing human intelligence, and with quantum computing rendering all secrets fully exposed to the AI system, it’s only a matter of time before the Google Super Intellect System (or so it might be named) enslaves humanity and decides we are no longer necessary for its very existence. The humanoid robots translate the will of the AI system into the physical world, allowing Google’s AI intellect system to carry out mass genocide of humans, tear town human cities or carry out anything else that requires “muscle” in the physical world. All such robots will, of course, be controlled by the AI intellect.

Google is building a doomsday Skynet system, in other words, and they are getting away with it because nobody in Washington D.C. understands mathematics or science.

A more detailed analysis of this will appear on this site tomorrow. Bottom line? Humanity had better start building mobile EMP weapons and learning how to kill robots, or it’s over for the human race.

In my opinion, we should pull the plug on Google right now. We may already be too late.

 

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VeraCrypt – FREE Open Source Encryption Software

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VeraCrypt is FREE open-source disk encryption software that is used by those who have a need to lock down data from prying eyes. There are many options to using Veracrypt from simply creating a virtual encrypted disk within a file and mounting it as a real disk (or drive) TO encrypting an entire partition or... Continue Reading →
          

US-Justizminister Barr warnt vor Facebooks Verschlüsselungsplänen.

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Facebook: US-Justizminister Barr macht Stimmung gegen die Verschlüsselungs-Pläne des Facebook-Messengers. In einem offenen Brief fürchtet er Machtverlust im Kampf gegen Terroristen und Kinderpornografie. buzzfeednews.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/78964&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, sueddeutsche.de#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/78964&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

Facebook: US-Justizminister Barr macht Stimmung gegen die Verschlüsselungs-Pläne des Facebook-Messengers. In einem offenen Brief fürchtet er Machtverlust im Kampf gegen Terroristen und Kinderpornografie.
buzzfeednews.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/78964&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, sueddeutsche.de#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/78964&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com


          

پروتکل امنیتی WEP چیست ؟ چرا نباید از آن استفاده کرد ؟

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پروتکل امنیتی WEP چیست ؟ چرا نباید از آن استفاده کرد ؟ به‌احتمال‌زیاد پیش‌ازاین هم در مورد خطرات رمزنگاری WEP و اینکه چرا نباید در شبکۀ خانگی خود از آن استفاده کنید چیزهایی شنیده‌اید. WEP چیست و چرا نباید از آن استفاده کرد؟ بیایید باهم ببینیم که WEP واقعاً چیست و چه معنی می‌دهد [...]

نوشته پروتکل امنیتی WEP چیست ؟ چرا نباید از آن استفاده کرد ؟ اولین بار در آونگ. پدیدار شد.


          

The Crypto Wars Resume

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For decades, the US government has fought against widespread, strong encryption. For about as long, privacy advocates and technologists have fought for widespread, strong encryption, to protect not just privacy but also as a tool to secure our computers and our data. The government has proposed a variety of access mechanisms and mandates to permit them to decrypt (lawfully) obtained content; technologists have asserted that "back doors" are inherently insecure. (James Comey used the phrase "golden key”; the neutral term is "exceptional access".)

I personally have been involved with this issue for more than 25 years, and in a fairly strong sense I have nothing new to say-- as I and others explained four years ago, from a technical perspective exceptional access is a thoroughly bad idea: it will create insecurity. Cryptography is a complex, subtle discipline; it's really, really hard to get even the basics right. Adding new, unusual requirements creates a high likelihood that there will be new vulnerabilities.

Despite all that, U.S. Attorney-General William Barr has now issued a new call for Facebook to add exceptional access features to its WhatsApp encrypted communications platform. The evils he cites — terrorism, organized crime, and child pornography — are indeed evils; I don't think most people would dispute that. But his focus on Facebook is a significant change in direction and, arguably, an escalation of the battle over cryptography.

There is, broadly speaking, a consensus that the exceptional access problem is easier (note: I did not say easy) for devices, and in particular for phones, than for communications. Many reasons are given in the excellent Carnegie Foundation report on the problem; I'll note one more: because secure communications generally require interaction between the parties, there are many more opportunities to get things wrong. By contrast, when law enforcement presents an encrypted phone, all of the cryptography has already taken place. Encrypting objects still isn't easy — witness these new attacks on encrypted PDF files — but the attack surface is smaller.

Why, then, the escalation? Why is Barr going for everything, rather than seeing if there is a feasible solution for encrypted phones? Does he judge that the political moment is right? Is it because Facebook is politically weak right now? Or is it because law enforcement can read devices now?

Written by Steven Bellovin, Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University


          

What does Peter Dutton's US trip mean for encryption and privacy? | Paul Karp

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Australia and the US are negotiating a deal to speed up information sharing about criminal suspects

Australia and the US have begun negotiating a deal to speed up information sharing about criminal suspects between law enforcement agencies and tech giants such as Google and Facebook.

But questions remain about the practical effects of such a deal, given the drive towards encryption of information that keeps data at arm’s length from the tech companies themselves.

Continue reading...
          

Facebook hits back at government letter attacking end-to-end encryption

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has hit back at calls by the US, UK, and Australian governments to block end-to-end encryption in messaging apps. In doing so, he joins Apple, Google, Microsoft, and others who have previously stood up for strong encryption.

As we learned yesterday, the US attorney general and acting head of Homeland Security have co-signed an open letter with the UK’s secretary of state for the Home Office and Australia’s minister for Home Affairs…

more…

The post Facebook hits back at government letter attacking end-to-end encryption appeared first on 9to5Mac.


          

US Attorney General and UK/AU officials hit Facebook over encrypted messaging apps, Apple could be targeted too

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After Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced this past spring that the company would build end-to-end encryption into all of its products and services, government officials from the US, UK, and Australia are set to share a public letter requesting Facebook halts its plan to include total privacy for its apps. And with Apple’s iMessage already featuring end-to-end-encryption, could it be targeted soon as well?

more…

The post US Attorney General and UK/AU officials hit Facebook over encrypted messaging apps, Apple could be targeted too appeared first on 9to5Mac.


          

EMA Webinar to Explore How Organizations Can Adapt Performance Visibility to New Technology Trends

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Enterprises are increasingly adopting SDN and SD-WAN, TLS 1.3 encryption, and SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS cloud services. Many new technologies cut off performance visibility, however.

(PRWeb October 08, 2019)

Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/ema_webinar_to_explore_how_organizations_can_adapt_performance_visibility_to_new_technology_trends/prweb16624886.htm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/86740&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com


          

VeraCrypt 1.24

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Description: VeraCrypt is a free disk encryption software brought to you by IDRIX and that is based on TrueCrypt 7.1a.VeraCrypt adds enhanced security to the algorithms used for system and partitions encryption making it immune to new developments in brute-force attacks. It also solves many vulnerabilities and security issues found in TrueCrypt.This enhanced security adds […]
          

Justice Department takes another run at encryption backdoors with ‘lawful access’

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Following in the footsteps of former FBI Director James Comey and other top law enforcement officials, Attorney General William Barr is taking a swing at the growing prevalence of encryption across the digital landscape, with a particular renewed focus on the rising number of communications apps that are offering end-to-end encryption. On Thursday, the Justice Department published an open letter to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg asking the social media giant not to proceed with its end-to-end encryption for its messaging services without providing law enforcement court-authorized access to the content of communications.

The letter, signed by the Attorney General, United Kingdom Home Secretary Priti Patel, Australia’s Minister for Home Affairs Peter Dutton, and Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan, came on the same day the U.S. and UK governments entered into the world’s first ever CLOUD Act Agreement. The agreement, according to the Justice Department, “will allow American and British law enforcement agencies, with appropriate authorization, to demand electronic data regarding serious crime.”

To read this article in full, please click here


          

Comment on Facebook urged by governments to halt end-to-end encryption plans by Anonymous

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soooooo law enforcement is telling tech to find another way, but they are unwilling to take there own advice?
          

Forum Post: RE: Read a PDF File using Progress

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Thanks Gus :-) I've read the PDF spec though and fixed inconsistencies/implemented much of this since I took over. However some parts won't be (not relevant, like javascript, videos or 3D objects :-D), and some might be in the future, according to the needs. By the way I implemented AES-256 (a.k.a. PDF 2.0) encryption for the next major version of pdfInclude, and lacked SHA-384 in ABL (whereas SHA-256 and 512 are present); I had to use the OpenSSL library just for that. Could this be en enhancement request? (deviating from the original question a bit :p)
          

The BEST VPN DEALS 2019

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The BEST VPN DEALS 2019

View full article on Epic Bundle »


The VPN deal summary 2019

Safety First -- Say goodbye to all your online privacy worries in 2019. Protect your online activity & browse without restriction for life. This is an overview of the current VPN & proxy deals! Additionally we've added the best security e-Learning bundles and cloud storage deals.

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Turn your VPN on when you're using a public hotspot (like at the airport), and you won't have to worry about hackers getting ahold of your social security or credit card number. Turn on your VPN while traveling, and you'll still be able to stream the big game from kickoff to the last pass.

Following you'll find all current VPN deals & more!

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More Epic Bundle - Follow us...



          

Alkass Six HD: Encryption (Badr 6)

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Alkass Six HD: Encryption (Badr 6 26.0E, 2019-10-08 08:05)

          

Large-scale Mobile App Identification Using Deep Learning. (arXiv:1910.02350v1 [cs.NI])

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Authors: Shahbaz Rezaei, Bryce Kroencke, Xin Liu

Many network services and tools (e.g. network monitors, malware-detection systems, routing and billing policy enforcement modules in ISPs) depend on identifying the type of traffic that passes through the network. With the widespread use of mobile devices, the vast diversity of mobile apps, and the massive adoption of encryption protocols (such as TLS), large-scale traffic classification becomes inevitable and more difficult. In this paper, we propose a deep learning model for mobile app identification. The proposed model only needs the payload of the first few packets for classification, and, hence, it is suitable even for applications that rely on early prediction, such as routing and QoS provisioning. The deep model achieves between 84% to 98% accuracy for the identification of 80 popular apps. We also perform occlusion analysis for the first time to bring insight into what data is leaked from SSL/TLS protocol that allows accurate app identification. Moreover, our traffic analysis shows that many apps generate not only app-specific traffic, but also numerous ambiguous flows. Ambiguous flows are flows generated by common functionality modules, such as advertisement and traffic analytics. Because such flows are common among many different apps, identifying the source app that generates ambiguous flows is challenging. To address this challenge, we propose a CNN+LSTM model that takes adjacent flows to learn the order and pattern of multiple flows, to better identify the app that generates them. We show that such flow association considerably improves the accuracy, particularly for ambiguous flows. Furthermore, we show that our approach is robust to mixed traffic scenarios where some unrelated flows may appear in adjacent flows. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that identifies the source app for ambiguous flows.


          

ER-index: a referential index for encrypted genomic databases. (arXiv:1910.02851v1 [cs.DS])

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Authors: Ferdinando Montecuollo, Giovannni Schmid

Huge DBMSs storing genomic information are being created and engineerized for doing large-scale, comprehensive and in-depth analysis of human beings and their diseases. However, recent regulations like the GDPR require that sensitive data are stored and elaborated thanks to privacy-by-design methods and software. We designed and implemented ER-index, a new full-text index in minute space which was optimized for compressing and encrypting collections of genomic sequences, and for performing on them fast pattern-search queries. Our new index complements the E2FM-index, which was introduced to compress and encrypt collections of nucleotide sequences without relying on a reference sequence. When used on collections of highly similar sequences, the ER-index allows to obtain compression ratios which are an order of magnitude smaller than those achieved with the E2FM-index, but maintaining its very good search performance. Moreover, thanks to the ER-index multi-user and multiple-keys encryption model, a single index can store the sequences related to a population of individuals so that users may perform search operations only on the sequences to which they were granted access. The ER-index C++ source code plus scripts and data to assess the tool performance are available at: https://github.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/116004&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comEncryptedIndexes/erindex.


          

US DOJ Is Asking Facebook To Halt Their Plans For End-To-End Encryption

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One of the features we’re seeing more companies introduce in their products and services is encryption. For example, WhatsApp offers end-to-end encryption which means that even in the event that messages sent and received are intercepted, they will not be able to read them due to them being encrypted.From an end-user point of view, this is fantastic news as it means that our data is secure and private, but from […]
          

Euro ISP club: Sure, weaken encryption. It'll only undermine security for everyone, morons

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UK, Oz and US pleas to Facebook given short shrift

The European Internet Service Providers Association (EuroISPA) has slammed calls for Facebook to drop its end-to-end encryption plans.…


          

Eliminar BORA (Ransomware)

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BORA (Ransomware)

BORA es virus de la familia del ransomware STOP (DJVU), que nos va a cifrar algunos archivos importantes utilizando la clave RSA-2048 (algoritmo de cifrado AES CBC de 256 bits) y va a añadir la extensión .BORA a estos archivos.  BORA nos va a mostrar un mensaje ofreciéndonos descifrar los datos pagando previamente un importe en Bitcoins. Las instrucciones se colocan en el escritorio de las víctimas en la ventana emergente o en un archivo de texto.



¿Cómo podemos infectarnos con BORA?

Podemos infectarnos con BORA por navegar por sitios web maliciosos o sitios que hayan sido infectado con virus. Un método muy usado para la infección con este ransomware es el drive-by-download, webs vulneradas con scripts maliciosos que buscarán vulnerabilidades en nuestro ordenador para infectarnos. Otro método puede ser mediante emails spam con archivos adjuntos o enlaces a webs maliciosas. Debemos estar atentos a este tipo de emails ya que muchas veces nos intentan engañar haciéndonos creer que tienen un paquete o una carta para nosotros que no han conseguido entregarnos. No debemos ni descargar los archivos adjuntos que traigan ni clicar sobre los enlaces que haya en el email, esto puede infectarnos con BORA.

El ransomware BORAsecuestra’ una amplia variedad de archivos, incluyendo imágenes, audios y documentos ofimáticos. Entre los formatos de archivos afectados hay que destacar los que llevan las siguientes extensiones:


.sql#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com4, .7z, .rar#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .m4a, .wma#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .avi#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wmv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .csv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .d3dbsp, .zip#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sie#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sum#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .iban#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comk, .t13, .t12, .qdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .gdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .tax#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pkpa#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comss, .bc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com6, .bc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com7, .BORA, .qic#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bkf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sidn#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sidd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdda#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comta, .itl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .itdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .icxs#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hvpl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hplg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hkdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdba#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comckup, .sync#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comdb, .gho#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cas#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, 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.ods#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

Al usuario infectado se le notificará mediante la modificación de su fondo de pantalla, donde podrá ver el siguiente texto:
ATTENTION!

Don’t worry, you can return all your files!
All your files like photos, databases, documents and other important are encrypted with strongest encryption and unique key.
The only method of recovering files is to purchase decrypt tool and unique key for you.
This software will decrypt all your encrypted files.
What guarantees you have?
You can send one of your encrypted file from your PC and we decrypt it for free.
But we can decrypt only 1 file for free. File must not contain valuable information.
You can get and look video overview decrypt tool:
https://we.tl/t-s#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comTWdbjk1AY
Price of private key and decrypt software is $980.
Discount 50% available if you contact us first 72 hours, that’s price for you is $490.
Please note that you’ll never restore your data without payment.
Check your e-mail “Spam” or “Junk” folder if you don’t get answer more than 6 hours.

To get this software you need write on our e-mail:
gorentos@bitmessage.ch#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

Reserve e-mail address to contact us:
gerentoshelp@firemail.cc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

Your personal ID:
Las víctimas del virus que pagan la multa y siguen las instrucciones del mensaje podrían recuperar sus archivos personales y eliminar el ransomware, pero no es aconsejable hacerlo. En lugar de esto, es aconsejable eliminar el malware siguiendo distintos procedimientos. Pagar el rescate puede llegar a causar más problemas a los usuarios.

¿Qué debemos hacer una vez infectados por BORA?

En este artículo no voy a poder ayudaros a recuperar los archivos encriptados, sólo voy a daros algunas recomendaciones, como utilizar ShadowExplorer o software (libre) de recuperación de archivos, para recuperar los documentos. El artículo está escrito para ayudaros a eliminar la infección en sí, y si encuentro un método eficiente para recuperar los archivos cifrados, actualizaré el artículo.
  1. Apagar inmediatamente el equipo tras detectar la infección y aislarlo de la red.
  2. Seguir los pasos del siguiente apartado para limpiar la infección y proceder a recuperar las Volume Shadow Copies.
  3. Proceder a la restauración de las copias de seguridad.
  4. Intentar recuperar los archivos con herramientas forenses.
  5. Estar atentos a las actualizaciones de las páginas: https://id-ransomware.malwarehunterteam.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://decrypter.emsisoft.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://noransom.kaspersky.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://www.avast.com/ransomware-decryption-tools#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com
  6. Herramientas de Kaspersky: http://support.kaspersky.com/viruses/utility#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com.

    ¿Cómo podemos eliminar BORA?

    Nota: Ten en cuenta que todo el software que aconsejo usar para eliminar este ransomware BORA es gratuito. Estos pasos están probados y deberían eliminar esta amenaza en los principales navegadores de Windows. Debes seguir todos los pasos en el orden indicado para eliminar satisfactoriamente BORA
    Importante: Si durante el proceso de eliminación de la amenaza tienes algún problema, por favor debes parar.


    FASE 1: Eliminar BORA con HitmanPro Kickstart

      PASO 1: Eliminar BORA con MalwareBytes Anti-Malware

      Esta es una de las mejores herramientas gratuitas para la detección de malware que nos permite estar protegidos de las posibles infecciones de virus, gusanos, troyanos, rootkits, dialers, spywares y malwares.
      1. Primero descargaremos Malwarebytes Anti-Malware (gratuito) desde mi sección de AntiMalware
      2. Ejecutaremos el instalador descargado y pulsaremos Ejecutar. Nos va a mostrar la pantalla de bienvenida donde pulsaremos Siguiente.
        Inicio instalación Malwarebytes
      3. Instalaremos el programa y seguiremos cada uno de los pasos indicados sin modificar ningún parámetro predeterminado. Cuando termine la instalación chequearemos la opción HabiNvetud prueba gratuita de Malwarebytes Anti-Malware y Ejecutar Malwarebytes Antimalware y luego pulsaremos Finalizar.
        Finalizar instalación Malwarebytes
      4. Una vez iniciado el programa va a realizar un chequeo de la base de datos y la actualizará en el caso que esté desactualizada.
        Inicializando el programa Malwarebytes
      5. Una vez terminada la actualización podremos realizar un análisis del sistema para encontrar posibles amenazas. Podemos pulsar el botón Arreglar ahora o el botón Analizar ahora para iniciar el análisis.
      6. Empezará el escaneo del ordenador y esperaremos a que termine. Durante el proceso puede detectar algunas amenazas en nuestro ordenador.
        Análisis del sistema por Malwarebytes
      7. Una vez terminado el análisis nos mostrará las amenazas detectadas. Para eliminarlas clicaremos el botón Eliminar seleccionados.
        Amenazas detectadas por Malwarebytes
      8. Después de esto Malwarebytes puede pedirnos reinicar nuestro ordenador para que tengan efecto las acciones realizadas.
        Amenazas eliminadas
      9. Luego podemos ir al Historial y podemos eliminar permanentemente las amenazas que tengamos en Cuarentena. (En mi caso todas).
        Eliminar cuarentena Malwarebytes
      10. En mi canal de Youtube pueden ver un vídeo explicativo de cómo usar el programa Malwarebytes Anti-Malware. (Ver vídeo Malwarebytes)
      11. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus BORA.
      PASO 2: Analizar el sistema con HitmanPro en busca de otras amenazas

      HitmanPro nos va a permitir escanear el sistema en busca de una segunda opinión, diseñado para rescatar a nuestro equipo contra el malware (virus, troyanos, rootkits, etc.) que han infectado el equipo a pesar de todas las medidas de seguridad que ha tomado (como software antivirus, cortafuegos, etc.).
      1. Descargamos HitmanPro (lo podéis descargar desde mi sección de AntiMalware) y lo guardamos en el escritorio. Descargaremos la versión de 32 o 64 bits dependiendo del sistema operativo que tengamos.
      2. Haremos doble clic en el archivo y veremos la pantalla de inicio, como podemos ver en la imagen.
        Pantalla inicial HitmanPro
      3. Clicaremos en el botón Next Siguiente para instalar el programa. Dependiendo si queremos analizar el sistema una sola vez o si queremos mantener el programa, seleccionaremos la siguiente opción y pulsaremos Siguiente o Next.
        Opciones de instalación HitmanPro
      4. HitmanPro va a empezar a analizar el sistema un búsca de posibles infecciones.
        Análisis del sistema de HItmanPro
      5. Cuando haya terminado, nos mostrará un listado con todas las infecciones encontradas. Haremos clic en el botón Siguiente o Next, para eliminar lo que haya detectado.
        Resultados del análisis HitmanPro
      6. Si nos interesa mantener y seguir usando el programa, clicaremos en Activate free license y usemos la prueba gratuita de 30 días.
        Activar periodo de prueba HitmanPro
      7. En mi canal de Youtube pueden ver un vídeo explicativo de cómo usar el programa HitmanPro (Ver vídeo HitmanPro)
      8. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus BORA.

      FASE 2: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware BORA


      OPCION 1: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware BORA con ShadowExplorer

      En algunos casos vamos a poder recuperar versiones anteriores de nuestros archivos cifrados. Esto lo podremos hacer con funciones como la de Restaurar el sistema o mediante programas epecíficos como ShadowExplorer.
        1. Descargaremos ShadowExplorer desde su web oficial http://www.shadowexplorer.com/downloads.html#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com y lo instalaremos.
        2. Una vez instalado realizaremos un doble clic en el icono del escritorio.
          Acceso directo ShadowExplorer
        3. Una vez en el programa podremos ver en el desplegable las distintos puntos donde se han realizado las copias. Escogeremos uno donde estén los archivos correctamente.
          Puntos de copias de ShadowExplorer
        4. Buscaremos los archivos o las carpetas que deseemos recuperar, lo seleccionaremos, pulsaremos el botón derecho y le diremos Export.
          Seleccionar archivo o carpeta a recuperar en ShadowExplorer
        5. Escogeremos la carpeta donde queremos recuperar los archivos o carpetas. En el caso de que exista nos pedirá si la queremos sobreescribir.
          Carpeta de destino ShadowExplorer
        6. Repetiremos la operativa tantas veces como queramos hasta recuperar todos los archivos o carpetas que nos interese.
        7. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus BORA.
        OPCION 2: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware BORA con un software de recuperación de archivos

        Cuando BORA cifra un archivo le hace una copia, encripta esta copia y elimina el original. Es por esto que podemos usar programas de recuperación de archivos.
        1. Descargaremos la version gratuita de Recuva desde su web oficial https://www.piriform.com/recuva#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com y lo instalaremos.
        2. Una vez instalado realizaremos un doble clic en el icono del escritorio.
          Acceso directo al programa Recuva
        3. Al ejecutarlo por primera vez, vamos a seguir su asistente y pulsaremos Siguiente.
          Asistente de Recuva
        4. Nos va a aparecer una pantalla donde seleccionaremos que tipo de archivos queremos recuperar. Luego pulsaremos Siguiente y continuamos hasta que empiece a buscar.
          Tipo de archivos a recuperar con Recuva
        5. Cuando termine nos mostrará una pantalla con los resultados de búsqueda y seleccionaremos los archivos que queramos recuperar y pulsaremos el botón Recuperar
        6. Nos va a pedir donde queremos guardar los archivos a recuperar, seleccionaremos la carpeta y aceptaremos. 
          Ruta destino de los archivos a recuperar por Recuva
        7. Al finalizar mostrará un mensaje con la información de los archivos recuperados.
          Mensaje de Operación Completada por Recuva
        8. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus BORA.

        Si el artículo te ha ayudado, puedes compartirlo en las principales redes sociales para que también pueda ayudar a otros usuarios con el mismo problema.






        Solucionavirus.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130709&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com nace en el año 2012 debido a la necesidad de un blog informativo para cualquier nivel de usuarios, en el que se informe sobre todo tipo de virus informáticos y de la manera de eliminarlos.


        SOPORTE SOLUCIONAVIRUS (OPCIONAL)
        Todos los artículos para la eliminación de malware y las utilidades recomendadas son completamente gratuitas. Si quieres apoyar el trabajo realizado con un donativo, cualquier cantidad será agradecida.


                  

        Eliminar [Paymebtc@protonmail.com].BGUU (Ransomware)

         Cache   
        [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU (Ransomware)

        [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU es virus de tipo ransomware que nos va a cifrar algunos archivos importantes utilizando la clave RSA-2048 (algoritmo de cifrado AES CBC de 256 bits) y va a añadir la extensión .[Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU a estos archivos.  [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU nos va a mostrar un mensaje ofreciéndonos descifrar los datos pagando previamente un importe en Bitcoins. Las instrucciones se colocan en el escritorio de las víctimas en la ventana emergente o en un archivo de texto.



        ¿Cómo podemos infectarnos con [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU?

        Podemos infectarnos con [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU por navegar por sitios web maliciosos o sitios que hayan sido infectado con virus. Un método muy usado para la infección con este ransomware es el drive-by-download, webs vulneradas con scripts maliciosos que buscarán vulnerabilidades en nuestro ordenador para infectarnos. Otro método puede ser mediante emails spam con archivos adjuntos o enlaces a webs maliciosas. Debemos estar atentos a este tipo de emails ya que muchas veces nos intentan engañar haciéndonos creer que tienen un paquete o una carta para nosotros que no han conseguido entregarnos. No debemos ni descargar los archivos adjuntos que traigan ni clicar sobre los enlaces que haya en el email, esto puede infectarnos con [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU.

        El ransomware [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUUsecuestra’ una amplia variedad de archivos, incluyendo imágenes, audios y documentos ofimáticos. Entre los formatos de archivos afectados hay que destacar los que llevan las siguientes extensiones:


        .sql#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com4, .7z, .rar#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .m4a, .wma#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .avi#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wmv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .csv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .d3dbsp, .zip#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sie#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sum#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .iban#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comk, .t13, .t12, .qdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .gdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .tax#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pkpa#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comss, .bc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com6, .bc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com7, .[Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU, .qic#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bkf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sidn#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sidd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdda#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comta, .itl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .itdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .icxs#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hvpl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hplg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hkdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdba#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comckup, .sync#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comdb, .gho#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cas#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .svg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .map#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wmo#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .itm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .fos#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mov#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ztmp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sis#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sid#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ncf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .menu#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .layo#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comut, .dmp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .blob#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .esm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vcf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vtf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dazi#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comp, .fpk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mlx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .kf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .iwd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vpk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .tor#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .psk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rim#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .w3x, .fsh#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ntl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .arch#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com00, .lvl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .snx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cfr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ff#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vpp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com_pc, .lrf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .m2, .mcme#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comta, .vfs#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com0, .mpqg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.come, .kdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .db#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com0, .dba#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rofl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hkx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bar#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .upk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .das#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .iwi#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .lite#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.commod, .asse#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comt, .forg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.come, .ltx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bsa#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .apk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .re#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com4, .sav#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .lbf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .slm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bik#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .epk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rgss#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com3a, .pak#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .big#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, wallet, .wotr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comeplay, .xxx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .desc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .py#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .m3u, .flv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .js#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .css#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .png#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .jpeg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .txt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .p7c, .p7b, .p12, .pfx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pem#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .crt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cer#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .der#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .x3f, .srw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pef#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ptx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .r3d, .rw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .rwl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .raw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .raf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .orf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .nrw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mrwr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comef, .mef#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .erf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .kdc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dcr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .crw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bay#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .srf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .arw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .3fr, .dng#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .jpe#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .jpg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .[Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU, .indd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ai#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .eps#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pdd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .psd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dbf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .rtf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wpd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dxg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dwg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pst#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .accd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comb, .mdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pptm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pptx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ppt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlsb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlsm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlsx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xls#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wps#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .docm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .docx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .doc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ods#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

        Al usuario infectado se le notificará mediante la modificación de su fondo de pantalla, donde podrá ver el siguiente texto:
        All your documents,photos,databases and other important files have been encrypted
        with strongest encryption RSA-2048 key, generated for this computer .

        Private decryption key is stored on a secret internet server and nobody can decrypted
        your files until you pay and obtain the private key .

        Warning
        You only have 2 days to submit $300 USD of payment .
        If you do not send money within the provided time the price will raise to $600 USD

        1) The cost of private key for decrypting your files is 0.030 Bitcoin ( $300 USD ) .

        2) You can buy bitcoins here : http://www.localbitcoins.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

        3) Send 0.030 Bitcoin ( $300 USD ) to :

        4) After you pay 0.030 Bitcoin ( $300 USD ) , send an email to paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com
        with your transaction ID and i’ll send your private key .
        Las víctimas del virus que pagan la multa y siguen las instrucciones del mensaje podrían recuperar sus archivos personales y eliminar el ransomware, pero no es aconsejable hacerlo. En lugar de esto, es aconsejable eliminar el malware siguiendo distintos procedimientos. Pagar el rescate puede llegar a causar más problemas a los usuarios.

        ¿Qué debemos hacer una vez infectados por [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU?

        En este artículo no voy a poder ayudaros a recuperar los archivos encriptados, sólo voy a daros algunas recomendaciones, como utilizar ShadowExplorer o software (libre) de recuperación de archivos, para recuperar los documentos. El artículo está escrito para ayudaros a eliminar la infección en sí, y si encuentro un método eficiente para recuperar los archivos cifrados, actualizaré el artículo.
        1. Apagar inmediatamente el equipo tras detectar la infección y aislarlo de la red.
        2. Seguir los pasos del siguiente apartado para limpiar la infección y proceder a recuperar las Volume Shadow Copies.
        3. Proceder a la restauración de las copias de seguridad.
        4. Intentar recuperar los archivos con herramientas forenses.
        5. Estar atentos a las actualizaciones de las páginas: https://id-ransomware.malwarehunterteam.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://decrypter.emsisoft.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://noransom.kaspersky.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://www.avast.com/ransomware-decryption-tools#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com
        6. Herramientas de Kaspersky: http://support.kaspersky.com/viruses/utility#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com.

          ¿Cómo podemos eliminar [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU?

          Nota: Ten en cuenta que todo el software que aconsejo usar para eliminar este ransomware [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU es gratuito. Estos pasos están probados y deberían eliminar esta amenaza en los principales navegadores de Windows. Debes seguir todos los pasos en el orden indicado para eliminar satisfactoriamente [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU
          Importante: Si durante el proceso de eliminación de la amenaza tienes algún problema, por favor debes parar.

          FASE 1: Eliminar el ransomware [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU del ordenador
          FASE 2: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU

          FASE 1: Eliminar [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU con HitmanPro Kickstart

            PASO 1: Eliminar [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU con MalwareBytes Anti-Malware

            Esta es una de las mejores herramientas gratuitas para la detección de malware que nos permite estar protegidos de las posibles infecciones de virus, gusanos, troyanos, rootkits, dialers, spywares y malwares.
            1. Primero descargaremos Malwarebytes Anti-Malware (gratuito) desde mi sección de AntiMalware
            2. Ejecutaremos el instalador descargado y pulsaremos Ejecutar. Nos va a mostrar la pantalla de bienvenida donde pulsaremos Siguiente.
              Inicio instalación Malwarebytes
            3. Instalaremos el programa y seguiremos cada uno de los pasos indicados sin modificar ningún parámetro predeterminado. Cuando termine la instalación chequearemos la opción HabiNvetud prueba gratuita de Malwarebytes Anti-Malware y Ejecutar Malwarebytes Antimalware y luego pulsaremos Finalizar.
              Finalizar instalación Malwarebytes
            4. Una vez iniciado el programa va a realizar un chequeo de la base de datos y la actualizará en el caso que esté desactualizada.
              Inicializando el programa Malwarebytes
            5. Una vez terminada la actualización podremos realizar un análisis del sistema para encontrar posibles amenazas. Podemos pulsar el botón Arreglar ahora o el botón Analizar ahora para iniciar el análisis.
            6. Empezará el escaneo del ordenador y esperaremos a que termine. Durante el proceso puede detectar algunas amenazas en nuestro ordenador.
              Análisis del sistema por Malwarebytes
            7. Una vez terminado el análisis nos mostrará las amenazas detectadas. Para eliminarlas clicaremos el botón Eliminar seleccionados.
              Amenazas detectadas por Malwarebytes
            8. Después de esto Malwarebytes puede pedirnos reinicar nuestro ordenador para que tengan efecto las acciones realizadas.
              Amenazas eliminadas
            9. Luego podemos ir al Historial y podemos eliminar permanentemente las amenazas que tengamos en Cuarentena. (En mi caso todas).
              Eliminar cuarentena Malwarebytes
            10. En mi canal de Youtube pueden ver un vídeo explicativo de cómo usar el programa Malwarebytes Anti-Malware. (Ver vídeo Malwarebytes)
            11. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU.
            PASO 2: Analizar el sistema con HitmanPro en busca de otras amenazas

            HitmanPro nos va a permitir escanear el sistema en busca de una segunda opinión, diseñado para rescatar a nuestro equipo contra el malware (virus, troyanos, rootkits, etc.) que han infectado el equipo a pesar de todas las medidas de seguridad que ha tomado (como software antivirus, cortafuegos, etc.).
            1. Descargamos HitmanPro (lo podéis descargar desde mi sección de AntiMalware) y lo guardamos en el escritorio. Descargaremos la versión de 32 o 64 bits dependiendo del sistema operativo que tengamos.
            2. Haremos doble clic en el archivo y veremos la pantalla de inicio, como podemos ver en la imagen.
              Pantalla inicial HitmanPro
            3. Clicaremos en el botón Next Siguiente para instalar el programa. Dependiendo si queremos analizar el sistema una sola vez o si queremos mantener el programa, seleccionaremos la siguiente opción y pulsaremos Siguiente o Next.
              Opciones de instalación HitmanPro
            4. HitmanPro va a empezar a analizar el sistema un búsca de posibles infecciones.
              Análisis del sistema de HItmanPro
            5. Cuando haya terminado, nos mostrará un listado con todas las infecciones encontradas. Haremos clic en el botón Siguiente o Next, para eliminar lo que haya detectado.
              Resultados del análisis HitmanPro
            6. Si nos interesa mantener y seguir usando el programa, clicaremos en Activate free license y usemos la prueba gratuita de 30 días.
              Activar periodo de prueba HitmanPro
            7. En mi canal de Youtube pueden ver un vídeo explicativo de cómo usar el programa HitmanPro (Ver vídeo HitmanPro)
            8. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU.

            FASE 2: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU


            OPCION 1: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU con ShadowExplorer

            En algunos casos vamos a poder recuperar versiones anteriores de nuestros archivos cifrados. Esto lo podremos hacer con funciones como la de Restaurar el sistema o mediante programas epecíficos como ShadowExplorer.
              1. Descargaremos ShadowExplorer desde su web oficial http://www.shadowexplorer.com/downloads.html#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com y lo instalaremos.
              2. Una vez instalado realizaremos un doble clic en el icono del escritorio.
                Acceso directo ShadowExplorer
              3. Una vez en el programa podremos ver en el desplegable las distintos puntos donde se han realizado las copias. Escogeremos uno donde estén los archivos correctamente.
                Puntos de copias de ShadowExplorer
              4. Buscaremos los archivos o las carpetas que deseemos recuperar, lo seleccionaremos, pulsaremos el botón derecho y le diremos Export.
                Seleccionar archivo o carpeta a recuperar en ShadowExplorer
              5. Escogeremos la carpeta donde queremos recuperar los archivos o carpetas. En el caso de que exista nos pedirá si la queremos sobreescribir.
                Carpeta de destino ShadowExplorer
              6. Repetiremos la operativa tantas veces como queramos hasta recuperar todos los archivos o carpetas que nos interese.
              7. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU.
              OPCION 2: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU con un software de recuperación de archivos

              Cuando [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU cifra un archivo le hace una copia, encripta esta copia y elimina el original. Es por esto que podemos usar programas de recuperación de archivos.
              1. Descargaremos la version gratuita de Recuva desde su web oficial https://www.piriform.com/recuva#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com y lo instalaremos.
              2. Una vez instalado realizaremos un doble clic en el icono del escritorio.
                Acceso directo al programa Recuva
              3. Al ejecutarlo por primera vez, vamos a seguir su asistente y pulsaremos Siguiente.
                Asistente de Recuva
              4. Nos va a aparecer una pantalla donde seleccionaremos que tipo de archivos queremos recuperar. Luego pulsaremos Siguiente y continuamos hasta que empiece a buscar.
                Tipo de archivos a recuperar con Recuva
              5. Cuando termine nos mostrará una pantalla con los resultados de búsqueda y seleccionaremos los archivos que queramos recuperar y pulsaremos el botón Recuperar
              6. Nos va a pedir donde queremos guardar los archivos a recuperar, seleccionaremos la carpeta y aceptaremos. 
                Ruta destino de los archivos a recuperar por Recuva
              7. Al finalizar mostrará un mensaje con la información de los archivos recuperados.
                Mensaje de Operación Completada por Recuva
              8. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus [Paymebtc@protonmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com].BGUU.

              Si el artículo te ha ayudado, puedes compartirlo en las principales redes sociales para que también pueda ayudar a otros usuarios con el mismo problema.






              Solucionavirus.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130711&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com nace en el año 2012 debido a la necesidad de un blog informativo para cualquier nivel de usuarios, en el que se informe sobre todo tipo de virus informáticos y de la manera de eliminarlos.


              SOPORTE SOLUCIONAVIRUS (OPCIONAL)
              Todos los artículos para la eliminación de malware y las utilidades recomendadas son completamente gratuitas. Si quieres apoyar el trabajo realizado con un donativo, cualquier cantidad será agradecida.


                        

              Eliminar FTCODE (Ransomware)

               Cache   
              FTCODE (Ransomware)

              FTCODE es virus de tipo ransomware que nos va a cifrar algunos archivos importantes utilizando la clave RSA-2048 (algoritmo de cifrado AES CBC de 256 bits) y va a añadir la extensión .FTCODE a estos archivos.  FTCODE nos va a mostrar un mensaje ofreciéndonos descifrar los datos pagando previamente un importe en Bitcoins. Las instrucciones se colocan en el escritorio de las víctimas en la ventana emergente o en un archivo de texto.



              ¿Cómo podemos infectarnos con FTCODE?

              Podemos infectarnos con FTCODE por navegar por sitios web maliciosos o sitios que hayan sido infectado con virus. Un método muy usado para la infección con este ransomware es el drive-by-download, webs vulneradas con scripts maliciosos que buscarán vulnerabilidades en nuestro ordenador para infectarnos. Otro método puede ser mediante emails spam con archivos adjuntos o enlaces a webs maliciosas. Debemos estar atentos a este tipo de emails ya que muchas veces nos intentan engañar haciéndonos creer que tienen un paquete o una carta para nosotros que no han conseguido entregarnos. No debemos ni descargar los archivos adjuntos que traigan ni clicar sobre los enlaces que haya en el email, esto puede infectarnos con FTCODE.

              El ransomware FTCODEsecuestra’ una amplia variedad de archivos, incluyendo imágenes, audios y documentos ofimáticos. Entre los formatos de archivos afectados hay que destacar los que llevan las siguientes extensiones:


              .sql#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com4, .7z, .rar#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .m4a, .wma#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .avi#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wmv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .csv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .d3dbsp, .zip#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sie#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sum#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .iban#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comk, .t13, .t12, .qdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .gdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .tax#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pkpa#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comss, .bc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com6, .bc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com7, .FTCODE, .qic#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bkf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sidn#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sidd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdda#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comta, .itl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .itdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .icxs#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hvpl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hplg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hkdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdba#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comckup, .sync#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comdb, .gho#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cas#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .svg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .map#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wmo#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .itm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .fos#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mov#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ztmp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sis#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sid#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ncf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .menu#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .layo#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comut, .dmp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .blob#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .esm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vcf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vtf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dazi#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comp, .fpk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mlx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .kf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .iwd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vpk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .tor#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .psk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rim#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .w3x, .fsh#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ntl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .arch#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com00, .lvl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .snx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cfr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ff#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vpp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com_pc, .lrf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .m2, .mcme#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comta, .vfs#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com0, .mpqg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.come, .kdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .db#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com0, .dba#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rofl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hkx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bar#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .upk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .das#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .iwi#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .lite#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.commod, .asse#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comt, .forg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.come, .ltx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bsa#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .apk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .re#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com4, .sav#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .lbf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .slm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bik#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .epk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rgss#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com3a, .pak#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .big#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, wallet, .wotr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comeplay, .xxx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .desc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .py#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .m3u, .flv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .js#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .css#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .png#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .jpeg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .txt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .p7c, .p7b, .p12, .pfx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pem#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .crt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cer#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .der#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .x3f, .srw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pef#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ptx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .r3d, .rw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .rwl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .raw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .raf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .orf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .nrw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mrwr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comef, .mef#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .erf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .kdc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dcr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .crw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bay#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .srf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .arw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .3fr, .dng#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .jpe#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .jpg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .FTCODE, .indd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ai#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .eps#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pdd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .psd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dbf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .rtf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wpd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dxg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dwg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pst#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .accd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comb, .mdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pptm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pptx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ppt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlsb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlsm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlsx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xls#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wps#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .docm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .docx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .doc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ods#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

              Al usuario infectado se le notificará mediante la modificación de su fondo de pantalla, donde podrá ver el siguiente texto:
              All your files was encrypted!
              Your personal ID: –

              Your personal KEY: –

              1. Download Tor browser – https://www.torproject.org/download/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

              2. Install Tor browser

              3. Open Tor Browser

              4. Open link in TOR browser:
              5. Follow the instructions on this page

              ***** Warning*****
              Do not rename files

              Do not try to back your data using third-party software, it may cause permanent data loss(If you do not believe us, and still try to – make copies of all files so that we can help you if third-party software harms them)

              As evidence, we can for free back one file

              Decoders of other users is not suitable to back your files – encryption key is created on your computer when the program is launched – it is unique.
              Las víctimas del virus que pagan la multa y siguen las instrucciones del mensaje podrían recuperar sus archivos personales y eliminar el ransomware, pero no es aconsejable hacerlo. En lugar de esto, es aconsejable eliminar el malware siguiendo distintos procedimientos. Pagar el rescate puede llegar a causar más problemas a los usuarios.

              ¿Qué debemos hacer una vez infectados por FTCODE?

              En este artículo no voy a poder ayudaros a recuperar los archivos encriptados, sólo voy a daros algunas recomendaciones, como utilizar ShadowExplorer o software (libre) de recuperación de archivos, para recuperar los documentos. El artículo está escrito para ayudaros a eliminar la infección en sí, y si encuentro un método eficiente para recuperar los archivos cifrados, actualizaré el artículo.
              1. Apagar inmediatamente el equipo tras detectar la infección y aislarlo de la red.
              2. Seguir los pasos del siguiente apartado para limpiar la infección y proceder a recuperar las Volume Shadow Copies.
              3. Proceder a la restauración de las copias de seguridad.
              4. Intentar recuperar los archivos con herramientas forenses.
              5. Estar atentos a las actualizaciones de las páginas: https://id-ransomware.malwarehunterteam.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://decrypter.emsisoft.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://noransom.kaspersky.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://www.avast.com/ransomware-decryption-tools#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com
              6. Herramientas de Kaspersky: http://support.kaspersky.com/viruses/utility#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com.

                ¿Cómo podemos eliminar FTCODE?

                Nota: Ten en cuenta que todo el software que aconsejo usar para eliminar este ransomware FTCODE es gratuito. Estos pasos están probados y deberían eliminar esta amenaza en los principales navegadores de Windows. Debes seguir todos los pasos en el orden indicado para eliminar satisfactoriamente FTCODE
                Importante: Si durante el proceso de eliminación de la amenaza tienes algún problema, por favor debes parar.


                FASE 1: Eliminar FTCODE con HitmanPro Kickstart

                  PASO 1: Eliminar FTCODE con MalwareBytes Anti-Malware

                  Esta es una de las mejores herramientas gratuitas para la detección de malware que nos permite estar protegidos de las posibles infecciones de virus, gusanos, troyanos, rootkits, dialers, spywares y malwares.
                  1. Primero descargaremos Malwarebytes Anti-Malware (gratuito) desde mi sección de AntiMalware
                  2. Ejecutaremos el instalador descargado y pulsaremos Ejecutar. Nos va a mostrar la pantalla de bienvenida donde pulsaremos Siguiente.
                    Inicio instalación Malwarebytes
                  3. Instalaremos el programa y seguiremos cada uno de los pasos indicados sin modificar ningún parámetro predeterminado. Cuando termine la instalación chequearemos la opción HabiNvetud prueba gratuita de Malwarebytes Anti-Malware y Ejecutar Malwarebytes Antimalware y luego pulsaremos Finalizar.
                    Finalizar instalación Malwarebytes
                  4. Una vez iniciado el programa va a realizar un chequeo de la base de datos y la actualizará en el caso que esté desactualizada.
                    Inicializando el programa Malwarebytes
                  5. Una vez terminada la actualización podremos realizar un análisis del sistema para encontrar posibles amenazas. Podemos pulsar el botón Arreglar ahora o el botón Analizar ahora para iniciar el análisis.
                  6. Empezará el escaneo del ordenador y esperaremos a que termine. Durante el proceso puede detectar algunas amenazas en nuestro ordenador.
                    Análisis del sistema por Malwarebytes
                  7. Una vez terminado el análisis nos mostrará las amenazas detectadas. Para eliminarlas clicaremos el botón Eliminar seleccionados.
                    Amenazas detectadas por Malwarebytes
                  8. Después de esto Malwarebytes puede pedirnos reinicar nuestro ordenador para que tengan efecto las acciones realizadas.
                    Amenazas eliminadas
                  9. Luego podemos ir al Historial y podemos eliminar permanentemente las amenazas que tengamos en Cuarentena. (En mi caso todas).
                    Eliminar cuarentena Malwarebytes
                  10. En mi canal de Youtube pueden ver un vídeo explicativo de cómo usar el programa Malwarebytes Anti-Malware. (Ver vídeo Malwarebytes)
                  11. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus FTCODE.
                  PASO 2: Analizar el sistema con HitmanPro en busca de otras amenazas

                  HitmanPro nos va a permitir escanear el sistema en busca de una segunda opinión, diseñado para rescatar a nuestro equipo contra el malware (virus, troyanos, rootkits, etc.) que han infectado el equipo a pesar de todas las medidas de seguridad que ha tomado (como software antivirus, cortafuegos, etc.).
                  1. Descargamos HitmanPro (lo podéis descargar desde mi sección de AntiMalware) y lo guardamos en el escritorio. Descargaremos la versión de 32 o 64 bits dependiendo del sistema operativo que tengamos.
                  2. Haremos doble clic en el archivo y veremos la pantalla de inicio, como podemos ver en la imagen.
                    Pantalla inicial HitmanPro
                  3. Clicaremos en el botón Next Siguiente para instalar el programa. Dependiendo si queremos analizar el sistema una sola vez o si queremos mantener el programa, seleccionaremos la siguiente opción y pulsaremos Siguiente o Next.
                    Opciones de instalación HitmanPro
                  4. HitmanPro va a empezar a analizar el sistema un búsca de posibles infecciones.
                    Análisis del sistema de HItmanPro
                  5. Cuando haya terminado, nos mostrará un listado con todas las infecciones encontradas. Haremos clic en el botón Siguiente o Next, para eliminar lo que haya detectado.
                    Resultados del análisis HitmanPro
                  6. Si nos interesa mantener y seguir usando el programa, clicaremos en Activate free license y usemos la prueba gratuita de 30 días.
                    Activar periodo de prueba HitmanPro
                  7. En mi canal de Youtube pueden ver un vídeo explicativo de cómo usar el programa HitmanPro (Ver vídeo HitmanPro)
                  8. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus FTCODE.

                  FASE 2: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware FTCODE


                  OPCION 1: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware FTCODE con ShadowExplorer

                  En algunos casos vamos a poder recuperar versiones anteriores de nuestros archivos cifrados. Esto lo podremos hacer con funciones como la de Restaurar el sistema o mediante programas epecíficos como ShadowExplorer.
                    1. Descargaremos ShadowExplorer desde su web oficial http://www.shadowexplorer.com/downloads.html#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com y lo instalaremos.
                    2. Una vez instalado realizaremos un doble clic en el icono del escritorio.
                      Acceso directo ShadowExplorer
                    3. Una vez en el programa podremos ver en el desplegable las distintos puntos donde se han realizado las copias. Escogeremos uno donde estén los archivos correctamente.
                      Puntos de copias de ShadowExplorer
                    4. Buscaremos los archivos o las carpetas que deseemos recuperar, lo seleccionaremos, pulsaremos el botón derecho y le diremos Export.
                      Seleccionar archivo o carpeta a recuperar en ShadowExplorer
                    5. Escogeremos la carpeta donde queremos recuperar los archivos o carpetas. En el caso de que exista nos pedirá si la queremos sobreescribir.
                      Carpeta de destino ShadowExplorer
                    6. Repetiremos la operativa tantas veces como queramos hasta recuperar todos los archivos o carpetas que nos interese.
                    7. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus FTCODE.
                    OPCION 2: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware FTCODE con un software de recuperación de archivos

                    Cuando FTCODE cifra un archivo le hace una copia, encripta esta copia y elimina el original. Es por esto que podemos usar programas de recuperación de archivos.
                    1. Descargaremos la version gratuita de Recuva desde su web oficial https://www.piriform.com/recuva#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com y lo instalaremos.
                    2. Una vez instalado realizaremos un doble clic en el icono del escritorio.
                      Acceso directo al programa Recuva
                    3. Al ejecutarlo por primera vez, vamos a seguir su asistente y pulsaremos Siguiente.
                      Asistente de Recuva
                    4. Nos va a aparecer una pantalla donde seleccionaremos que tipo de archivos queremos recuperar. Luego pulsaremos Siguiente y continuamos hasta que empiece a buscar.
                      Tipo de archivos a recuperar con Recuva
                    5. Cuando termine nos mostrará una pantalla con los resultados de búsqueda y seleccionaremos los archivos que queramos recuperar y pulsaremos el botón Recuperar
                    6. Nos va a pedir donde queremos guardar los archivos a recuperar, seleccionaremos la carpeta y aceptaremos. 
                      Ruta destino de los archivos a recuperar por Recuva
                    7. Al finalizar mostrará un mensaje con la información de los archivos recuperados.
                      Mensaje de Operación Completada por Recuva
                    8. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus FTCODE.

                    Si el artículo te ha ayudado, puedes compartirlo en las principales redes sociales para que también pueda ayudar a otros usuarios con el mismo problema.






                    Solucionavirus.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130712&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com nace en el año 2012 debido a la necesidad de un blog informativo para cualquier nivel de usuarios, en el que se informe sobre todo tipo de virus informáticos y de la manera de eliminarlos.


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                    Eliminar BOOT (Ransomware)

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                    BOOT (Ransomware)

                    BOOT es virus  de la familia del ransomware STOP (DJVU), que nos va a cifrar algunos archivos importantes utilizando la clave RSA-2048 (algoritmo de cifrado AES CBC de 256 bits) y va a añadir la extensión .BOOT a estos archivos.  BOOT nos va a mostrar un mensaje ofreciéndonos descifrar los datos pagando previamente un importe en Bitcoins. Las instrucciones se colocan en el escritorio de las víctimas en la ventana emergente o en un archivo de texto.



                    ¿Cómo podemos infectarnos con BOOT?

                    Podemos infectarnos con BOOT por navegar por sitios web maliciosos o sitios que hayan sido infectado con virus. Un método muy usado para la infección con este ransomware es el drive-by-download, webs vulneradas con scripts maliciosos que buscarán vulnerabilidades en nuestro ordenador para infectarnos. Otro método puede ser mediante emails spam con archivos adjuntos o enlaces a webs maliciosas. Debemos estar atentos a este tipo de emails ya que muchas veces nos intentan engañar haciéndonos creer que tienen un paquete o una carta para nosotros que no han conseguido entregarnos. No debemos ni descargar los archivos adjuntos que traigan ni clicar sobre los enlaces que haya en el email, esto puede infectarnos con BOOT.

                    El ransomware BOOTsecuestra’ una amplia variedad de archivos, incluyendo imágenes, audios y documentos ofimáticos. Entre los formatos de archivos afectados hay que destacar los que llevan las siguientes extensiones:


                    .sql#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com4, .7z, .rar#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .m4a, .wma#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .avi#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wmv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .csv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .d3dbsp, .zip#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sie#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sum#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .iban#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comk, .t13, .t12, .qdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .gdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .tax#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pkpa#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comss, .bc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com6, .bc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com7, .BOOT, .qic#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bkf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sidn#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sidd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdda#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comta, .itl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .itdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .icxs#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hvpl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hplg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hkdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdba#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comckup, .sync#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comdb, .gho#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cas#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .svg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .map#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wmo#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .itm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .fos#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mov#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ztmp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sis#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sid#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ncf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .menu#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .layo#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comut, .dmp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .blob#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .esm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vcf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vtf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dazi#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comp, .fpk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mlx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .kf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .iwd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vpk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .tor#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .psk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rim#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .w3x, .fsh#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ntl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .arch#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com00, .lvl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .snx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cfr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ff#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .vpp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com_pc, .lrf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .m2, .mcme#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comta, .vfs#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com0, .mpqg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.come, .kdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .db#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com0, .dba#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rofl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .hkx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bar#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .upk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .das#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .iwi#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .lite#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.commod, .asse#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comt, .forg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.come, .ltx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bsa#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .apk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .re#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com4, .sav#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .lbf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .slm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bik#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .epk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rgss#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com3a, .pak#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .big#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, wallet, .wotr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comeplay, .xxx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .desc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .py#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .m3u, .flv#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .js#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .css#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .rb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .png#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .jpeg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .txt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .p7c, .p7b, .p12, .pfx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pem#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .crt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cer#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .der#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .x3f, .srw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pef#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ptx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .r3d, .rw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .rwl#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .raw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .raf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .orf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .nrw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mrwr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comef, .mef#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .erf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .kdc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dcr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .cr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .crw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .bay#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .sr#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .srf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .arw#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .3fr, .dng#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .jpe#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .jpg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .BOOT, .indd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ai#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .eps#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pdd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .psd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dbf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .mdf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com2, .rtf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wpd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dxg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xf#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .dwg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pst#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .accd#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comb, .mdb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pptm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .pptx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ppt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlk#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlsb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlsm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xlsx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .xls#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .wps#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .docm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .docx#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .doc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odb#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odm#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odp#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .ods#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com, .odt#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

                    Al usuario infectado se le notificará mediante la modificación de su fondo de pantalla, donde podrá ver el siguiente texto:
                    ATTENTION!

                    Don’t worry, you can return all your files!
                    All your files like photos, databases, documents and other important are encrypted with strongest encryption and unique key.
                    The only method of recovering files is to purchase decrypt tool and unique key for you.
                    This software will decrypt all your encrypted files.
                    What guarantees you have?
                    You can send one of your encrypted file from your PC and we decrypt it for free.
                    But we can decrypt only 1 file for free. File must not contain valuable information.
                    You can get and look video overview decrypt tool:
                    https://we.tl/t-s#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comTWdbjk1AY
                    Price of private key and decrypt software is $980.
                    Discount 50% available if you contact us first 72 hours, that’s price for you is $490.
                    Please note that you’ll never restore your data without payment.
                    Check your e-mail “Spam” or “Junk” folder if you don’t get answer more than 6 hours.

                    To get this software you need write on our e-mail:
                    gorentos@bitmessage.ch#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

                    Reserve e-mail address to contact us:
                    gerentoshelp@firemail.cc#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

                    Your personal ID:
                    Las víctimas del virus que pagan la multa y siguen las instrucciones del mensaje podrían recuperar sus archivos personales y eliminar el ransomware, pero no es aconsejable hacerlo. En lugar de esto, es aconsejable eliminar el malware siguiendo distintos procedimientos. Pagar el rescate puede llegar a causar más problemas a los usuarios.

                    ¿Qué debemos hacer una vez infectados por BOOT?

                    En este artículo no voy a poder ayudaros a recuperar los archivos encriptados, sólo voy a daros algunas recomendaciones, como utilizar ShadowExplorer o software (libre) de recuperación de archivos, para recuperar los documentos. El artículo está escrito para ayudaros a eliminar la infección en sí, y si encuentro un método eficiente para recuperar los archivos cifrados, actualizaré el artículo.
                    1. Apagar inmediatamente el equipo tras detectar la infección y aislarlo de la red.
                    2. Seguir los pasos del siguiente apartado para limpiar la infección y proceder a recuperar las Volume Shadow Copies.
                    3. Proceder a la restauración de las copias de seguridad.
                    4. Intentar recuperar los archivos con herramientas forenses.
                    5. Estar atentos a las actualizaciones de las páginas: https://id-ransomware.malwarehunterteam.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://decrypter.emsisoft.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://noransom.kaspersky.com/#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com - https://www.avast.com/ransomware-decryption-tools#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com
                    6. Herramientas de Kaspersky: http://support.kaspersky.com/viruses/utility#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com.

                      ¿Cómo podemos eliminar BOOT?

                      Nota: Ten en cuenta que todo el software que aconsejo usar para eliminar este ransomware BOOT es gratuito. Estos pasos están probados y deberían eliminar esta amenaza en los principales navegadores de Windows. Debes seguir todos los pasos en el orden indicado para eliminar satisfactoriamente BOOT
                      Importante: Si durante el proceso de eliminación de la amenaza tienes algún problema, por favor debes parar.


                      FASE 1: Eliminar BOOT con HitmanPro Kickstart

                        PASO 1: Eliminar BOOT con MalwareBytes Anti-Malware

                        Esta es una de las mejores herramientas gratuitas para la detección de malware que nos permite estar protegidos de las posibles infecciones de virus, gusanos, troyanos, rootkits, dialers, spywares y malwares.
                        1. Primero descargaremos Malwarebytes Anti-Malware (gratuito) desde mi sección de AntiMalware
                        2. Ejecutaremos el instalador descargado y pulsaremos Ejecutar. Nos va a mostrar la pantalla de bienvenida donde pulsaremos Siguiente.
                          Inicio instalación Malwarebytes
                        3. Instalaremos el programa y seguiremos cada uno de los pasos indicados sin modificar ningún parámetro predeterminado. Cuando termine la instalación chequearemos la opción HabiNvetud prueba gratuita de Malwarebytes Anti-Malware y Ejecutar Malwarebytes Antimalware y luego pulsaremos Finalizar.
                          Finalizar instalación Malwarebytes
                        4. Una vez iniciado el programa va a realizar un chequeo de la base de datos y la actualizará en el caso que esté desactualizada.
                          Inicializando el programa Malwarebytes
                        5. Una vez terminada la actualización podremos realizar un análisis del sistema para encontrar posibles amenazas. Podemos pulsar el botón Arreglar ahora o el botón Analizar ahora para iniciar el análisis.
                        6. Empezará el escaneo del ordenador y esperaremos a que termine. Durante el proceso puede detectar algunas amenazas en nuestro ordenador.
                          Análisis del sistema por Malwarebytes
                        7. Una vez terminado el análisis nos mostrará las amenazas detectadas. Para eliminarlas clicaremos el botón Eliminar seleccionados.
                          Amenazas detectadas por Malwarebytes
                        8. Después de esto Malwarebytes puede pedirnos reinicar nuestro ordenador para que tengan efecto las acciones realizadas.
                          Amenazas eliminadas
                        9. Luego podemos ir al Historial y podemos eliminar permanentemente las amenazas que tengamos en Cuarentena. (En mi caso todas).
                          Eliminar cuarentena Malwarebytes
                        10. En mi canal de Youtube pueden ver un vídeo explicativo de cómo usar el programa Malwarebytes Anti-Malware. (Ver vídeo Malwarebytes)
                        11. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus BOOT.
                        PASO 2: Analizar el sistema con HitmanPro en busca de otras amenazas

                        HitmanPro nos va a permitir escanear el sistema en busca de una segunda opinión, diseñado para rescatar a nuestro equipo contra el malware (virus, troyanos, rootkits, etc.) que han infectado el equipo a pesar de todas las medidas de seguridad que ha tomado (como software antivirus, cortafuegos, etc.).
                        1. Descargamos HitmanPro (lo podéis descargar desde mi sección de AntiMalware) y lo guardamos en el escritorio. Descargaremos la versión de 32 o 64 bits dependiendo del sistema operativo que tengamos.
                        2. Haremos doble clic en el archivo y veremos la pantalla de inicio, como podemos ver en la imagen.
                          Pantalla inicial HitmanPro
                        3. Clicaremos en el botón Next Siguiente para instalar el programa. Dependiendo si queremos analizar el sistema una sola vez o si queremos mantener el programa, seleccionaremos la siguiente opción y pulsaremos Siguiente o Next.
                          Opciones de instalación HitmanPro
                        4. HitmanPro va a empezar a analizar el sistema un búsca de posibles infecciones.
                          Análisis del sistema de HItmanPro
                        5. Cuando haya terminado, nos mostrará un listado con todas las infecciones encontradas. Haremos clic en el botón Siguiente o Next, para eliminar lo que haya detectado.
                          Resultados del análisis HitmanPro
                        6. Si nos interesa mantener y seguir usando el programa, clicaremos en Activate free license y usemos la prueba gratuita de 30 días.
                          Activar periodo de prueba HitmanPro
                        7. En mi canal de Youtube pueden ver un vídeo explicativo de cómo usar el programa HitmanPro (Ver vídeo HitmanPro)
                        8. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus BOOT.

                        FASE 2: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware BOOT


                        OPCION 1: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware BOOT con ShadowExplorer

                        En algunos casos vamos a poder recuperar versiones anteriores de nuestros archivos cifrados. Esto lo podremos hacer con funciones como la de Restaurar el sistema o mediante programas epecíficos como ShadowExplorer.
                          1. Descargaremos ShadowExplorer desde su web oficial http://www.shadowexplorer.com/downloads.html#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com y lo instalaremos.
                          2. Una vez instalado realizaremos un doble clic en el icono del escritorio.
                            Acceso directo ShadowExplorer
                          3. Una vez en el programa podremos ver en el desplegable las distintos puntos donde se han realizado las copias. Escogeremos uno donde estén los archivos correctamente.
                            Puntos de copias de ShadowExplorer
                          4. Buscaremos los archivos o las carpetas que deseemos recuperar, lo seleccionaremos, pulsaremos el botón derecho y le diremos Export.
                            Seleccionar archivo o carpeta a recuperar en ShadowExplorer
                          5. Escogeremos la carpeta donde queremos recuperar los archivos o carpetas. En el caso de que exista nos pedirá si la queremos sobreescribir.
                            Carpeta de destino ShadowExplorer
                          6. Repetiremos la operativa tantas veces como queramos hasta recuperar todos los archivos o carpetas que nos interese.
                          7. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus BOOT.
                          OPCION 2: Restaurar los archivos cifrados por el ransomware BOOT con un software de recuperación de archivos

                          Cuando BOOT cifra un archivo le hace una copia, encripta esta copia y elimina el original. Es por esto que podemos usar programas de recuperación de archivos.
                          1. Descargaremos la version gratuita de Recuva desde su web oficial https://www.piriform.com/recuva#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com y lo instalaremos.
                          2. Una vez instalado realizaremos un doble clic en el icono del escritorio.
                            Acceso directo al programa Recuva
                          3. Al ejecutarlo por primera vez, vamos a seguir su asistente y pulsaremos Siguiente.
                            Asistente de Recuva
                          4. Nos va a aparecer una pantalla donde seleccionaremos que tipo de archivos queremos recuperar. Luego pulsaremos Siguiente y continuamos hasta que empiece a buscar.
                            Tipo de archivos a recuperar con Recuva
                          5. Cuando termine nos mostrará una pantalla con los resultados de búsqueda y seleccionaremos los archivos que queramos recuperar y pulsaremos el botón Recuperar
                          6. Nos va a pedir donde queremos guardar los archivos a recuperar, seleccionaremos la carpeta y aceptaremos. 
                            Ruta destino de los archivos a recuperar por Recuva
                          7. Al finalizar mostrará un mensaje con la información de los archivos recuperados.
                            Mensaje de Operación Completada por Recuva
                          8. Volver al principio de Eliminar virus BOOT.

                          Si el artículo te ha ayudado, puedes compartirlo en las principales redes sociales para que también pueda ayudar a otros usuarios con el mismo problema.






                          Solucionavirus.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/130732&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com nace en el año 2012 debido a la necesidad de un blog informativo para cualquier nivel de usuarios, en el que se informe sobre todo tipo de virus informáticos y de la manera de eliminarlos.


                          SOPORTE SOLUCIONAVIRUS (OPCIONAL)
                          Todos los artículos para la eliminación de malware y las utilidades recomendadas son completamente gratuitas. Si quieres apoyar el trabajo realizado con un donativo, cualquier cantidad será agradecida.


                                    

                          William Barr and Winnie the Pooh

                           Cache   

                          Right now, Chinese users of WeChat, an app that includes text, video, and picture messaging plus a Facebook-style news feed (among many other features), can't message each other a meme of Winnie the Pooh. Why not? Because, being short and rotund, he supposedly evokes an unflattering comparison to President Xi Jinping. So, at the behest of the Chinese government, WeChat censors pictures of a beloved children's character in order to crack down on government criticism. Here in the U.S., if the Attorney General gets his way, Facebook and other U.S. services will be able to do the same to your private chats.

                           

                          Late last week, Attorney General William Barr and the acting secretary of Homeland Security joined British and Australian officials in a letter to Facebook head Mark Zuckerberg that asked Facebook not to go forward with its plan to implement end-to-end encryption across its messaging services. The October 4 letter coincided with an event held by the Department of Justice (DOJ) that day, which featured Barr, the letter’s British and Australian co-authors, and FBI Director Christopher Wray, among others. Both the letter and the event focused on the use of online communications platforms for the transmission of child sexual abuse material (CSAM), warning that the roll-out of end-to-end encryption for messaging would risk stymying law enforcement efforts to detect, investigate, and prosecute that activity. The letter and event came hot on the heels of a New York Times article about the problem of CSAM on online platforms like Facebook. Barr’s demand may be the precursor to rumored anti-encryption legislation that might come out of the Senate Judiciary Committee soon, more than three years after the embarrassing debacle over a bill proposed by Senators Richard Burr and Dianne Feinstein (who is on that committee).

                           

                          This is a significant escalation in the current Crypto Wars. The U.S. government has not gone so directly head-to-head over encryption with a specific company since its showdown with Apple in early 2016, when the government blinked first. (Well, it hasn’t done so in public, anyway.) The suddenness of this new push is alarming. Also noteworthy is that suddenly the main reason to demonize encryption is CSAM, with terrorism and other ills playing second fiddle. Even as recently as late July 2019, when Barr revived his predecessors’ habit of castigating encrypted service providers, it was drug cartels he invoked. But CSAM is the dominant focus now, suddenly and thoroughly. 

                           

                          It is beyond question that CSAM is a real and serious problem for Facebook (and every tech company that has ever given users the ability to upload, store, send, share, post, or otherwise communicate files). It is radioactive, it is illegal everywhere, and no legitimate company wants it on their servers. Nevertheless, this new single-minded focus on CSAM in the revived anti-encryption push feels like an exceedingly cynical move on the part of the U.S. government. Out of the Four Horsemen of the Infocalypse (terrorism, drug trafficking, CSAM, and organized crime), terrorism didn’t work to turn public opinion against encryption, so the government has switched horse(men) midstream. 

                           

                          It also feels like cynical exploitation of the “techlash,” as I’ve observed (a year ago, and a year before that). The techlash has made it more politically palatable to pick on tech companies -- particularly Facebook. Never mind that people distrust Facebook because of its privacy screw-ups, and so they should be glad that Facebook is adding end-to-end encryption to more of its services, because that will make Facebook less able to invade users’ privacy. It’s not important, for Barr’s purposes, that average people (or congressmembers) actually understand what Facebook’s end-to-end encryption plan will do; only that they create a mental link between encryption and crime, and another link between the problem of criminal activity on Facebook’s platform with the problem of Facebook’s own repeated privacy misdeeds, such that the privacy-related distrust commutes into distrust of the end-to-end encryption plan.

                           

                          Who is the antagonist to be bested in this fight against Facebook’s effort to enhance the security and privacy of over a billion people? Not pedophiles -- or at least, not just pedophiles. The “problem” that Barr, Wray, and their counterparts are trying to solve is that of people being able to talk to each other privately without government ability to snoop on them. This was made plain in the October 4 letter. It stated, “Companies should not deliberately design their systems to preclude any form of access to content, even for preventing or investigating the most serious crimes.” All well and good so long as there’s the focus on crimes, right? But later, the letter called on Facebook “and other companies” to “[e]nable law enforcement to obtain lawful access to content in a readable and usable format.” All content should be accessible by law enforcement. To get at evidence of crime, law enforcement must be able to get access to everything. Every text, every private message, every call. Every communication you make with another person through an electronic medium like Facebook.

                           

                          Of course, as is the norm in government exhortations to the tech industry, the letter doesn’t say how Facebook should go about doing that. Governments have been wary of making concrete suggestions ever since the failure of the Clipper Chip in the ‘90s. But in recent times, when they do, there’s been some change. As I wrote in a whitepaper last year, Wray and former Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein both advocated around late 2017 and early 2018 for some kind of key escrow scheme. More recently, in November of last year, GCHQ (the UK’s NSA) made what’s called the “ghost proposal” for silently adding the government as a party to encrypted conversations. This reflects an evolution: by and large, government officials now understand that if they are going to make some sort of actual suggestion (rather than stating their goal of access to plaintext and leaving it to the tech companies to figure out how to get there, as the Oct. 4 letter does), rule #1 is now “don’t touch the crypto.” If you can say “this proposal isn’t a ‘backdoor,’ it doesn’t require breaking the encryption,” then that changes the proposal’s security impact -- and most law enforcement officials presumably do sincerely want to minimize adverse impact on user security. (Most of them.) So it changes the response by information security professionals. It also changes the optics of the proposal in terms of public relations, since the public learned from the Apple vs. FBI showdown that “breaking encryption” and “backdoors” are bad news. 

                           

                          Enter “content moderation.” One proposal for enabling law enforcement access is to build a system where the provider (Facebook) would check content, such as a photo attached to a message, before it’s encrypted and transmitted to another user -- i.e. while the content is on the sender’s device, not traveling through the provider’s server -- to try to figure out whether that content is or might be abusive content such as CSAM. Jonathan Mayer has just published a very good short first-draft discussion paper about what content moderation for end-to-end encrypted messaging might look like. This is a technical paper. It is not a policy paper. Mayer expressly says that he is not claiming that the concepts he describes “adequately address information security risks or public policy values, such as free speech, international human rights, or economic competitiveness.”

                           

                          So, allow me to state the obvious: There is no way in hell that Facebook or anyone else could introduce content moderation for end-to-end encrypted messaging without it inevitably sliding into abuse. It would start with CSAM, but it would not stop there. The predictable result is surveillance and censorship, a chill on privacy and free speech. No, client-side pre-encryption content moderation “doesn’t touch the encryption,” in keeping with snooping governments’ new rule #1 for proposals to “solve” the encryption “problem.” But that doesn’t put it in the clear (and, again, Mayer is emphatically not suggesting it does). As Jon Callas of the ACLU said in response to the GCHQ ghost proposal: this “proposal would not ‘break’ encryption, but it would nonetheless have the same effect by creating a situation in which people are no longer confident they are securely talking to their partners.”

                           

                          A variant of this content moderation is already done in various contexts. Facebook already scans for attempts to upload and share CSAM on the parts of its service that are not (yet) end-to-end encrypted -- that’s the visibility that government officials are worried would go away if Facebook proceeds with its plan. Email service providers scan your email attachments against a hash database of known CSAM, as the Times article describes. Upload filters are also already in use for other purposes besides interdicting CSAM: for example, upload filters that are intended to prevent copyright-infringing material from being posted to YouTube. Upload filters have also been proposed for preventing the posting and sharing of “violent extremist” content such as the Christchurch shooting video. Indeed, as my colleague Daphne Keller explains, it appears that filtering requirements of some sort will now be the law of the land in the European Union thanks to a defamation case, though nobody knows what that filter is supposed to look like, exactly. So already, we are seeing CSAM, plus defamation, copyright infringement, and violent extremism (all concepts that are much harder to accurately spot on sight than child sex abuse), as the driving forces behind existing and government-demanded filters on people’s ability to engage in “one-to-many” speech online, through such mediums as YouTube or Facebook.

                           

                          And already, “upload filters are inherently inconsistent with fundamental freedoms.” It’s a problem as-is from a fundamental-rights standpoint when filters are applied to interdict attempts to share content broadly to many people, through a channel that is not end-to-end encrypted. But it is even more troubling when the same idea is applied to flag blacklisted content (be it words or images) in a one-on-one or small-group conversation -- something we reasonably consider private. Particularly where the interlocutors are using end-to-end encryption to try to assure that their conversation is private (rather than broadcast it to the world à la YouTube). And it is especially troubling if the provider designs its messaging service so that this scanning for blacklisted content happens automatically, for every single user’s conversations, not just those users who are reasonably suspected of crime and for whom a wiretap order has been issued for their electronic communications.

                           

                          I understand that the approaches Mayer describes include technical measures intended to respect the privacy of conversations as much as possible and winnow down the amount of unencrypted content that is ever actually reviewed by a human (though the potential false positive rates are very troubling given the criminal consequences). Designing privacy-enhancing technologies to deal with the trash fire that is the Internet is certainly an interesting, if depressing, research area. And I understand that ostensibly we are talking about systems that are only for CSAM, at present. But when you’re checking content against a blacklist (or fuzzily trying to predict whether content your system hasn’t seen before should be blacklisted), ultimately you are talking about a system that keeps a list of things that must not be said or shared, and that monitors and reports people if they do so. 

                           

                          Interdicting and reporting unencrypted content pre-transmission surely sounds like a good idea when applied to CSAM (content the recipient is unlikely to report as abusive, if the content is being sent from one pedophile to another). Or malicious attachments that could do harm if you opened them — content you the recipient might think you wanted to look at and wouldn’t report as abusive because you didn’t realize it to be abusive (until it was too late).

                           

                          But we do not live in a world where that system always stays tightly confined to CSAM, or malware scanning, and doesn’t end up enabling censorship of individuals’ private personal conversations with other people over content that is not illegal or harmful. That already happens in China (which is increasingly an object of envy by U.S. law enforcement). China uses its online censorship capabilities to keep its citizens from using WeChat to talk about Winnie the Pooh or “Tiananmen Square. An end-to-end encrypted messaging system that would do client-side scanning of content against a blacklist before it’s encrypted and report the positive hits? China would rush to fund that work, and likely already has.

                           

                          The affinity for censorship is not limited to China. Here in the U.S., Hollywood, whose copyright supramaximalist views have long found favor in Congress, would be all too glad to have your private conversations filtered. Other Western democracies such as the European Union countries and New Zealand would want your end-to-end encrypted messages to be pre-scanned for “violent extremist content” and defamation. Never mind how hard it is to define “violent extremist content,” much less accurately identify it without false positives, and the fact that as a concept it covers speech that is not illegal in many countries. And the censorship demands won’t be just for images, but also for text. The recent EU court decision that Daphne discusses imposes a requirement to filter for defamatory textual phrases. 

                           

                          And from CSAM, copyright claims, “violent extremist content,” and defamation, the blacklist will keep expanding. Tired of getting unwanted dick pics? Fine, the nudity filters Facebook would be called upon to implement in its end-to-end encrypted messaging apps might help you in some circumstances. But don’t be surprised when they deploy their Nipple Detection Systems, which have long come under fire for censoring Facebook and Instagram posts, to intervene to keep you from sending a nude to your romantic partner over Messenger or WhatsApp.

                           

                          And on and on. “Hate speech” is impossible to define, but that won’t stop the calls to censor it, so that even willing recipients can’t get it, in addition to the people who would otherwise be abused by receiving such speech. There will be demands to stop and report any user who tries to send a picture of a swastika, followed by demands to do similar for the Confederate flag. Again, China is instructive: in the latest version of iOS, the soft keyboard no longer includes the Taiwan flag for users in Hong Kong and Macau. That’s a more extreme version of not allowing the user to transmit a message containing the flag—which seems so reasonable by comparison, doesn’t it?

                           

                          When a government prevents you from speaking certain things or depicting certain pictures, it’s called prior restraint and, with narrow exceptions, it is almost invariably unconstitutional. When a platform does it at the behest of government, as Facebook might do if Barr had his way, we call it “content moderation.” That anodyne phrase obscures the evil at work here: of government ordering a private third party to censor speech that is, or under any human rights-respecting regime should be, legal. Yes, CSAM is and should be illegal everywhere. No one disputes that. But it is staggeringly naive to believe that, even in the United States of America, client-side pre-encryption “content moderation” would stop at CSAM.

                           

                          And lest we forget, those measures won’t catch all content they’re intended to interdict. As Mayer notes, users could still encrypt their content separately and then send it. That means pedophiles can encrypt CSAM before transmitting it — just as they can now on services that are not end-to-end encrypted. So, getting Facebook to implement client-side pre-encryption content moderation would catch the pedophiles who are bad at opsec, but as Mayer notes, the rest would adjust, evolve their techniques for evasion, and teach those strategies to each other (which, again, they do already). 

                           

                          Meanwhile, Hollywood would make damn sure you can’t just send someone a meme over WhatsApp unless you go to the extra effort of separately encrypting it first. Everyone’s perfectly legal speech would be burdened and chilled — because who wants to spend time separately encrypting everything? It’s easier just to not say the thing you wanted to say, to not send the picture that would be worth 1000 words, to express yourself in some other way. Some way that won’t trip up the censorship filter. Sure, you’ll find new ways, as the Chinese did by coming up with Winnie the Pooh as a stand-in for Xi. And then, as with Pooh, the filter will be updated, and you can’t say that either. So you stop saying the forbidden words or sharing the forbidden images. And then, eventually, you stop thinking them too.

                           

                          If you are willing to accept Facebook (or Google, or Apple, or any other encrypted messaging service provider Bill Barr bullies into compliance) censoring all your private text conversations — and everyone else’s — because it might make it a little easier for the government to catch the most inept pedophiles, then I’m not sure I’ve got a lot else to say to you. But if this idea bothers you — if you don’t like the thought that before very long from now, you won’t be able to say what you please in private discussions over text, while pedophiles learn how to continue operating without detection — then I hope you’ll see Barr’s demand to Facebook for the grave danger it is. If so, let Facebook know. More importantly, let your congressional representatives know.

                           

                          Now, this post isn’t a careful position paper like Jonathan Mayer wrote. All of the above is what is known as a “slippery slope” argument, and it’s easy to dismiss as hysterical. “Of course we would never do Y just because we are doing X,” platforms and the government would assure you. Then, once mission creep inevitably happens — which it always, always does — the official line would switch to: “Of course we would never do Z just because we are doing Y.” Slippery slope arguments might sound hysterical at the top of the slope; from the bottom, they sound premonitory.

                           

                          Let’s look to China again. The highly intrusive surveillance of Uighurs in China used to be “just” for Uighurs in Xinjiang at first. Then it was “just” for them and people who visited Xinjiang, regardless of the visitors’ own religion or ethnicity. Then it was “just” for them and, oh, also Tibetans too, a totally different ethnic and religious group that China is fond of persecuting.

                           

                          The ratchet of surveillance has a pronounced tendency to only go one way. End-to-end encryption is one of the best measures we have for pushing it back and maintaining our security and privacy. But while end-to-end encryption may be necessary to protect those rights, it is not sufficient, as proposals for measures like client-side pre-encryption moderation of private conversations demonstrate.

                           

                          The rationale may change — national security and terrorism one day, and if that doesn’t work, child abuse the next — but the goal is the same: for governments to have the ability to eavesdrop on your every conversation, the legal power to require that all your conversations be recorded, and the authority to make private-sector providers do their bidding in the process. To have total control. And, if they really succeed, they will reach the ultimate goal: to not even need to exert that control to restrict what you say and do and hear and think — because you’ll do that yourself. You will save them, and Facebook, a lot of time.

                           

                          It starts with something nobody could possibly oppose: reducing the scourge of child sex abuse. It will not end there. That is the slippery slope.

                           

                          I don’t pretend to have the answer for how to fight CSAM without simultaneously opening the door to mass surveillance and censorship. I’m not sure there is one, but I appreciate the efforts of the technologists who are trying to find one, or at least to elucidate different technical approaches to different aspects of the encryption debate (such as Jonathan Mayer, who is hardly pro-surveillance). And I know that as long as I don’t have affirmative proposals of my own, just objections to others’, it makes me easy to dismiss as just another hysterical absolutist zealot. That is unfortunate, because, as some of my academic colleagues have privately observed, there is far more nuance to information security experts’ and civil libertarians’ positions in the debate than it might often appear from the outside, or than Bill Barr wants you to think there is. 

                           

                          That said, this is not the most nuanced of blog posts. I find everything I’ve said above to be painfully obvious. And yet I feel it will still keep needing to be said as long as the Attorney General keeps pretending this debate is only about universally-reviled conduct such as terrorism and child sex abuse. After all, he is also the same Attorney General who was chosen to be, basically, the capo to a mob boss, one who wants Barr to investigate his political opponents. The sitting Attorney General of the United States is the last person we should trust with the ability to read everyone’s messages. We cannot afford the polite fiction that the nation’s law enforcement officials, even those at the very top, are all “the good guys.” 

                          Those who work for providers, in academia, or in civil society may be tempted to start down the slippery slope we can all see ahead of us, partially out of the commendable desire to help children, partially to show the U.S. government how “reasonable” and “adult” and “mature” we are when it comes to the encryption debate. Let me be clear: It is not reasonable for any government to demand that platforms build the ability to surveil and censor everyone’s private communications. You do not have to help brainstorm, design, build, rationalize, or excuse a system for pervasive surveillance and censorship. Technologists must design and build systems that acknowledge the uncomfortable truth: that China is much closer than we think.

                          Related Projects: 

                                    

                          Thunderbird to support OpenPGP encryption standard in 2020

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                          The next major version of the open source cross-platform email client Thunderbird will support the OpenPGP encryption standard natively. Thunderbird users may use the extension Enigmail currently to use OpenPGP functionality in […]

                          Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post Thunderbird to support OpenPGP encryption standard in 2020 appeared first on gHacks Technology News.


                                    

                          VeraCrypt 1.24 encryption software update released

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                          The developers of the open source cross-platform encryption software VeryCrypt released version 1.24 of the software on October 6, 2019 to the public. We reviewed a beta version of VeraCrypt 1.24 in […]

                          Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post VeraCrypt 1.24 encryption software update released appeared first on gHacks Technology News.


                                    

                          AG Barr to call on Facebook to limit encryption plans: Reports

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                          Attorney General William Barr will ask Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to hold off on his plans to encrypt the company's three messaging services until officials can determine it will not reduce public safety, BuzzFeed News reported Thursday.
                                    

                          Nick Clegg to be summoned to Parliament to give evidence on Facebook encryption

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                          Encrypt URL parameters for Preference Center

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                          Hi,

                          I am looking to encrypt URL parameters for the Unsubscribe link at all the delivery templates using 64bit encryption.

                          there is out of the box few function but the client is specifically looking for 64 bit encryption Utf 8.

                          I have created a javascript code file and I am having problem calling that into the template

                          example: if the url currently that takes you to preference center is www.google.com?email=xxx@gmail.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/140471&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com&country=usa need to get encrypted to render as

                          http://www.google.com?params=#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/140471&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comKLLK776WEWLXXZZLKLKLSDD

                           

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                          Why effective media asset management and watermarking are crucial for pay-TV operators and content owners

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                          Today’s pay-TV landscape is a dream for content consumers; we’ve never been so spoilt for choice when it comes to the entertainment on our screens.

                          But this superabundance is proving a tricky task for pay-TV operators and content owners. The sheer complexity of the current content distribution chain is driving up costs and creating challenges.

                          Consider just some of the issues the media value chain currently faces; there are the numerous content vendors and sources, the vast amount of VOD and SVOD assets, the huge file sizes and different transfer protocols. There are also other factors like storage capacity and version control, the different transcoding and file delivery formats, as well as security leaks and tracing of content.

                          And as we know, these aren’t the only complications facing operators and content owners. They also have to think about the increasingly fragmented content distribution market – meanwhile, the lines between production, aggregation, distribution and indeed consumption, continue to blur.

                          Throw in the numerous technological hurdles to boot and what do we have? Low-quality content that leaves owners and producers frustrated with an apparent mishandling of their valuable property, and operators faced with a hard sell of content that doesn’t exactly stand up to the promise of a modern viewing experience.

                          Why does this happen? There are, as ever, a variety of factors – the poor quality of a video asset (even up to seventh-generation copies), not using video optimised transcoders, incomplete or faulty metadata, a lack of quality control on the part of vendors, and increasingly tight production lead-times which are bound to lead to mistakes and late launches. And last but not least, there is the issue of not achieving the full potential of cloud-based services.

                          So, how can pay-TV providers and content owners address these challenges?

                          First, by implementing effective media asset management which offers simplified and automated workflow for VOD content, great video quality, advanced audio and subtitling features, secure storage and distribution, as well as quick-start VOD services.

                          Second, side by side with effective media asset management is ensuring proper security for high-value content. With the rapidly evolving threat of modern content piracy, watermarking has become an invaluable component to protect content delivery across the entire premium content lifecycle, covering pre-release distribution, early release content, 4K premium VOD and even operator-specific watermarking.

                          Secure storage in particular, combined with effective content encryption, forensic watermarking and anti-piracy services offers a robust approach as content leaks can be identified at the source along the content value chain - a must-have given today’s rapidly evolving piracy ecosystem.

                          Ultimately, as VOD and SVOD catalogues expand all over the world and viewer expectations continue to rise, operators and content owners will continue to face relentless cost, complexity, video quality and security challenges.

                          It’s crucial, therefore, that operators seek expert help – after all, this isn’t a job that they can do alone.

                          NAGRA’s DVnor Media Asset Management solution, for example, is designed to give operators a simplified and automated workflow for VOD content, as well as delivering immaculate video quality, advanced audio and subtitling features, secure storage and distribution, and quick-start VOD services. Integrated with NexGuard watermarking, it allows both operators and content owners to store and distribute film and TV assets for worldwide distribution with the peace of mind that valuable content remains secure at every step.

                          But as the distribution market continues to fragment and tech hiccups continue to frustrate, effective media asset management will surely prove a vital component to the delivery of high-quality content to subscribers and the future success of pay-TV operators and content owners.

                          (The author is Nagra Solution Expert. The views expressed are his own and Indiantelevision.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/145815&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com may not subscribe to them.)


                                    

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                          Software Engineer - Web tech and low layer networking

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                          Quantum Supremacy? Yes and No!

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                          Quantum Supremacy Is and Is Not

                          How quantum is that?! The RadioFreeHPC team discusses the Google/NASA paper, titled "Quantum Supremacy Using a Programmable Superconducting Processor", that was published and then unpublished. But it's the internet and everything is a "digital tattoo", so there are copies out there (see below).

                          The paper, right in its title, and at least in that draft form, claimed Quantum supremacy. "Doing what?" we hope you ask. Well, nothing particularly significant, and decidedly quantum-friendly. You might even call it "embarrassingly quantum" since quantum is all about probability functions and this experiment samples the probability distribution of a repeated experiment. But it's not nothing. 

                          One scary consequence of quantum supremacy is its ability to readily factorize large numbers which could be used to unscramble encrypted data. But A) this is not what happened, B) it's not expected to happen any time soon (think years), and C) it will depend on the specific encryption algorithm. We must say, however, that the paper looks pretty good. Here's the abstract. Click on the title to read it all:

                          Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor

                          Google AI Quantum and collaborators The tantalizing promise of quantum computers is that certain computational tasks might be executed exponentially faster on a quantum processor than on a classical processor. A fundamental challenge is to build a high-fidelity processor capable of running quantum algorithms in an exponentially large computational space. Here, we report using a processor with programmable superconducting qubits to create quantum states on 53 qubits, occupying a state space 253∼1016. Measurements from repeated experiments sample the corresponding probability distribution, which we verify using classical simulations. While our processor takes about 200 seconds to sample one instance of the quantum circuit 1 million times, a state-of-the-art supercomputer would require approximately 10,000 years to perform the equivalent task. This dramatic speedup relative to all known classical algorithms provides an experimental realization of quantum supremacy on a computational task and heralds the advent of a much-anticipated computing paradigm.


                          LANL gets the First 5,000 Qubit D-Wave

                          Meanwhile, D-Wave announced that its new 5,000 qubit quantum computer has found its first home at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Qubits are different from vendor to vendor in terms of the underlying technology and implementation. Shahin lists several.


                          @RadioFreeHPC Update

                          So proud of you all! At the time of this writing, @RadioFreeHPC has soared to about 16 followers. We're pretty much there. Thank you!


                          Henry Newman's Why No One Should be Online, Ever.

                          Henry tells the fascinating story of Krebs thwarting the nefarious schemes of a professional hacker who aimed to frame him and actually mailed him narcotics. The mastermind behind it was was arrested and imprisoned for unrelated charges. Henry is really turning this into a good news segment. Dan isn't encouraged, however.


                          Catch of the Week

                          Shahin talks about using consumer electronics to build supercomputers, mentioning the recent 1,060 node Raspberry Pi cluster built by Oracle, reminiscent of the one LANL did in 2017. AFRL build a 1,760 node cluster of PlayStations, based on the IBM/Sony/Toshiba Cell processor, in 2010 following similar efforts starting in the mid 2000s. He also recalls similar projects he may have had something to do with: SGI's Project Molecule and Project Kelvin (for cooling) in 2008 (also here), and also a cluster of JavaStations at Sun in the late 90s.

                          Dan discusses a UCLA project to use the thermoelectric effect and build "a device that makes electricity at night using heat radiating from the ground". Intriguing, but looks a tad too pricey for what it can deliver right now.

                          Speaking of Intriguing, Henry talks about DNA storage. Incredible data density, but don't ask what file system it uses or whether you can have it on a USB stick any time soon. Dan and Shahin seem to have more fun with this topic than Henry!


                          Listen in to hear the full conversation.

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