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Robert Zenhausern posted a discussion

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Robert Zenhausern posted a discussion

Education 21. Education for the 21st Century

 Your Name and Title: Robert Zenhausern, CEO School or Organization Name: The Enabling Support Foundation Co-Presenter Name(s): Area of the World from Which You Will Present:  United States and sub-Sahara Africa. Language in Which You Will Present: English Target Audience(s): Teachers of Early Childhood Development Short Session Description (one line): Education 21 is a paradigm shift in Education from the 19th Century into the 21st Century which expects to achieve SDG 4 within 5 years. Full Session Description (as long as you would like): Education 21.  Education for the 21st Century Our goal is not to fix education, but to rebuild it from the start.  A Paradigm Shift. We do not want to bring technology into the classroom.  We want the classroom to join the 21st Century.  Our program, Education 21, emerges from three simple and logical changes.  Each is a unique solution, and an unexpected challenge to well entrenched dogma.The Three Changes.Standardized Testing versus Authentic AssessmentIn place of “teach, memorize, test”, we use Project Based Learning and Authentic Assessment.In Project Based Learning the student does not memorize material but must know where to find specific information.  How well can the student integrate this information and complete a task.  Authentic Assessment evaluates the project as Inadequate, Adequate, or Superior. Replace arithmetic with estimation. In the 19th Century arithmetic was indeed the “gateway” to the sciences and higher mathematics.  Since the advent of calculators, that is no longer the case.  Arithmetic is a linear rote process with a single answer.  Estimation is unbounded and more conceptual.  It is a practical skill in cases where close is good enough.  We want to explore the limits of estimation, and its use as the fundamental calculator.  For those cases where the exact answer is required the spreadsheet becomes a STEM platform it.Subitizing is typically seen as an early childhood skill that is supplanted by counting.  But we plan to explore subitizing as a lifelong skill.  Examples:A painter looks at a room and decides how many cans of paint he will need.  A homeowner wants to build a stone wall and has to decide how many truckloads of stone are needed.  Do architects subitize? All this happens without “teaching”.  Can we enhance the subitizing skill?  Reading.A baby understands the meaning of the spoken word even before speech, but it takes 5 years for the child to understand the meaning of the same word in written form.  That is an absurdity that is accepted without question.Reading is a skill that suffers from a self-inflicted wound.  The purpose of reading is to develop a connection between text and meaning.  From the start we have decided that, because English is a semi-phonetic language, reading should be taught by phonics.That is an epic blunder for two reasons.  The first is that it postpones reading by 5 years, while the child learns phonetic decoding.And second, tragically,  it is effective for only 80% of readers.  The rest are called dyslexic with the heartache and expense that entails.How different speech!  Children learn to speak and understand the spoken word as part of maturation.  Why not reading?  Show the printed word at the same time as the spoken word, and the child will understand both.  Early Reading is a form of speed reading – reading for comprehension, not speech.The Peace Flame networkThe Enabling Support Foundation is a US based 501c(3) nonprofit that provides online support to grassroots African organizations involved with human development and enrichment.  ESF exists only in the Cloud and encourages online and on ground activity by productive organizations.  ESF has created Peace Flame, a network of those organization based on an Office 365 infrastructure.  ESF has strong connections within both LinkedIn and WhatsApp.The Birth of Early ReadingESF was founded in 1994 as an organization that provided technology and Internet access to persons with disabilities, and later education.  Our Mission was to bring Education into the 21st Century, as first outlined in 1990, evolving with the changes in technology.Reading was the first step.  In May 2017 educators from Kenya and Uganda met at Miridians Nursery School near Kampala.  One outcome of the conference was proof of concept study at 9 sites in both countries.  We found and nursery school children learned to read three sentence paragraphs in the 4 months of the study.  As a result, we have reached our first milestone.  Children are starting primary school already reading and writing.  We are now developing the primary grade curricula to take advantage of the instructional time saved by Early Reading.Early Reading has virtually eliminated dyslexia and spelling is much less of an issue.Early Reading has recently added sites in Ghana, Cameroon, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, and Pakistan.We also have a cultural program and we are collecting children’s art for exhibition.  You can see a preview now, but the site is still under construction.  Websites / URLs Associated with Your Session:www.enabling.org/edall#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/5762&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comwww.bigpenkenya.org#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/5762&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comwww.africanchildrensart.org#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/5762&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.comSee More

          

Cameroon Telecoms, Mobile and Broadband Market Size, Growth, Analysis, Drivers and Challenges 2019-2023

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Cameroon increases internet bandwidth with SAIL cable The ICT sector in Cameroon is making steady progress enabling the country to make better use of the digital economy. Currently, about 95% of all electronic transactions are carried through the m-money services operated by MTN Cameroon and Orange Cameroon. The government has also been supportive, having launched … Continue reading Cameroon Telecoms, Mobile and Broadband Market Size, Growth, Analysis, Drivers and Challenges 2019-2023
          

Angelus, 29 September 2019

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POPE FRANCIS

ANGELUS

Saint Peter's Square
Sunday, 29 September 2019

[Multimedia]


 

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

I wish to greet all of you who have participated in this moment of prayer with which we reaffirmed the Church’s attention towards the various categories of vulnerable people on the move. In union with the faithful of all the Dioceses in the world, we have celebrated World Day of Migrants and Refugees in order to reaffirm the need that no one be excluded from society, be they citizens who have been longtime residents or newcomers.

In order to underscore this commitment, I will shortly inaugurate a sculpture which has as its theme these words from the Letter to the Hebrews: “Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for thereby some have entertained angels unawares” (13:2). This sculpture in bronze and clay depicts a group of migrants from various cultures and different historical periods. I wished to have this sculpture placed here in Saint Peter’s Square so that it may be a reminder to everyone of the evangelical challenge of welcoming.

Tomorrow, Monday, 30 September, a meeting for national dialogue will begin in Cameroon in order to seek a resolution to the difficult crisis afflicting the country. As I feel close to the suffering and hopes of the beloved people of Cameroon people, I invite everyone to pray that this dialogue may be fruitful and may lead to just and lasting solutions of peace to benefit all. May Mary, Queen of Peace intercede for us.


          

DR Congo (W) - Cameroon (W)

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Football. Women. Olympic Games / Qualification.
          

Tunisia - Cameroon

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Football. Friendly Match
          

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Politically incorrect anthropology

I have been reading about Napoleon Chagnon for many years now.  I wrote about his findings as early as 2003. So I was pleased to see a recent comprehensive summary of his work in Quillette

As I learned myself by working in two academic departments that covered anthropology, anthropologists are the most Lefist discipline in the social sciences -- and that is saying something.  Chagnon, however, was simply interested in reality and was one of the most committed anthropologists ever.  He spent years living among the people he described -- under conditions that few modern men could endure. So he knew what he was talking about.  Below is a brief excerpt from the Quillette article.  As you can see, his findings went right against the old Leftist claim that man was naturally good and kind but had been corrupted by modern civilization:



In 1966, Chagnon began working with the geneticist James Neel. Neel had had managed to convince the Atomic Energy Commission to fund a genetic study of an isolated population and was able to pay Chagnon a salary to assist his research there. Neel’s team took blood samples from the Yanomamö, and began administering the Edmonston B vaccine when they discovered that the Yanomamö had no antibodies to the measles. In some ways, the Yanomamö sounded like something out of any anthropology textbook—they were patrilineal and polygamous (polygyny); like other cultures around the world, they carved a position for the levirate—a man who married his dead brother’s wife; they had ceremonial roles and practised ritual confinement with taboos on food and sex. But sometimes this exotic veneer would be punctured by their shared humanity, particularly their mischievous sense of humour.

But for all their jocularity, Chagnon found that up to 30 percent of all Yanomamö males died a violent death. Warfare and violence were common, and duelling was a ritual practice, in which two men would take turns flogging each other over the head with a club, until one of the combatants succumbed. Chagnon was adamant that the primary causes of violence among the Yanomamö were revenge killings and women. The latter may not seem surprising to anyone aware of the ubiquity of ruthless male sexual competition in the animal kingdom, but anthropologists generally believed that human violence found its genesis in more immediate matters, such as disputes over resources. When Chagnon asked the Yanomamö shaman Dedeheiwa t0 explain the cause of violence, he replied, “Don’t ask such stupid questions! Women! Women! Women! Women! Women!” Such fights erupted over sexual jealousy, sexual impropriety, rape, and attempts at seduction, kidnap and failure to deliver a promised girl.

Internecine raids and attacks often involved attempts by a man or group to abduct another’s women. “The victim is grabbed by her abductors by one arm, and her protectors grab the other arm. Then both groups pull in opposite directions,” Chagnon learned. In one instance, a woman’s arms were reportedly pulled out of their sockets: “The victim invariably screams in agony, and the struggle can last several long minutes until one group takes control of her.” Although one in five Yanomamö women Chagnon interviewed had been kidnapped from another village, some of these women were grateful to find that their new husbands were less cruel than their former ones. The treatment of Yanomamö women could be particularly gruesome, and Chagnon had to wrestle with the ethical dilemmas that confront anthropologists under such circumstances—should he intervene or remain an observer? Men frequently beat their wives, mainly out of sexual jealousy, shot arrows into them, or even held burning sticks between their legs to discourage the possibility of infidelity. On one occasion, a man bludgeoned his wife in the head with firewood and in front of an impassive audience. “Her head bounced off the ground with each ruthless blow, as if he were pounding a soccer ball with a baseball bat. The head-man and I intervened at that point—he was killing her.” Chagnon stitched her head back up. The woman recovered but she subsequently dropped her infant into a fire as she slept, and was later killed by a venomous snake. Life in the Amazon could be nasty, brutish, and short.

Chagnon would make more than 20 fieldwork visits to the Amazon, and in 1968 he published Yanomamö: The Fierce People, which became an instant international bestseller. The book immediately ignited controversy within the field of anthropology. Although it commanded immense respect and became the most commonly taught book in introductory anthropology courses, the very subtitle of the book annoyed those anthropologists, who preferred to give their monographs titles like The Gentle Tasaday, The Gentle People, The Harmless People, The Peaceful People, Never in Anger, and The Semai: A Nonviolent People of Malaya.

The stubborn tendency within the discipline was to paint an unrealistic façade over such cultures—although 61 percent of Waorani men met a violent death, an anthropologist nevertheless described this Amazonian people as a “tribe where harmony rules,” on account of an “ethos that emphasized peacefulness.”  Anthropologists who considered such a society harmonious were unlikely to be impressed by Chagnon’s description of the Yanomamö as “The Fierce People,” where “only” 30 percent of males died by violence. The same anthropologist who had ascribed a prevailing ethos of peace to the Waoroni later accused Chagnon, in the gobbledygook of anthropological jargon, of the “projection of traditional preconceptions of the Western construction of Otherness.”

SOURCE






Britain looks to Australia on immigration as it seeks to 'end the free movement of people'

Britain's government says it is moving ahead with plans to adopt an Australian-style points-based immigration system.

Addressing supporters at the Conservative party conference in Manchester, British Home Secretary Priti Patel said the government is working hard to make it happen. "I have a particular responsibility when it comes to taking back control: It is to end the free movement of people once and for all," she said to rounds of applause.

"Instead we will introduce an Australian-style points-based immigration system."

Immigration officials in Australia assess skilled worker visa applications awarding points for proficiency in English, work experience and age. The screening system was first rolled out in 1979 and has in the years since been adjusted to better consider the preferences of employers.

Last month, Ms Patel wrote to the Migration Advisory Committee asking it to review if Australia’s points-based migration system could work in Britain. The committee has been asked to report back by January.

Ms Patel said she believes leaving the EU will provide Britain with a "once in a lifetime opportunity" to change the country's immigration system for the better.

"One that works in the best interest of Britain. One that attracts and welcomes the brightest and the best. One that supports the brilliant scientists, the finest academics and the leading people in their fields. And one that is under the control of the British government."

Canada and New Zealand have also adopted a points-style system for skilled migration.

SOURCE 






Adults 'fail by giving in to trans teenagers'

Adults fail in their duty to children if they just give in to the "instant gratification" demands of transgender teenagers who protest they cannot wait until 18 for irreversible sex-reassignment surgery, clinical psychologist Paul Stevenson says.

Mr Stevenson, well known for helping trauma victims after the Bali and Jakarta terror bombings of the 2000s, said psychologists should not "disenfranchise" parents of trans teens, nor "drive a wedge" between child and family. He was commenting on a submission by the Australian Psychological Society that doctors should be able to go ahead with under-16 trans surgery, with both parents opposed and no mandatory counselling for the adolescent, as long as the clinicians were "competent" in assessing the teen's capacity to make the decision.

The APS claims 24,000 members but Mr Stevenson said his breakaway body, the Australian Association of Psychologists Inc, had picked up 2000 new members in the past year, taking the total to 8000, partly because of discontent with the APS.

The AAPi appears to be the first health or medical pro-fessional body in Australia to go public with scepticism about the "child-led" affirmation approach to trans, which critics say discourages thorough investigation of a young patient's history and too readily puts them on a path to risky medical treatment, including puberty-blocker drugs, cross-sex hormones and surgery, such as mastectomy for trans boys.

Gender clinicians claim children are experts in their identity and going along with their transition is best for mental health. Mr Stevenson said the sudden decision of a teen to come out as trans brought grief and stress not just to parents but to the extended family, and for everyone's long-term interests the crucial relationship between teen and parent had to be supported.

 "Psycholo-gists are not in the business of splitting up families," he said. He said the teenage years brought rapid and confusing development, and conflict with parents. Some neuroscience studies suggested the decision-making brain might not fully mature until a person reached their 30s, making it unwise to allow teens under 18 to consent to irreversible medical treatment.

"We've got to help parents get their children through this period of time when the (teenager's) frontal lobe is 'out for renovations'," he said. "Parents are the best-placed people to get their kids through this, we shouldn't be driving wedges between them."

Some parents have reported a pattern of teenagers, typically girls, suddenly declaring trans status with scripted lines from social media about the immediate need for hormones to stop them committing suicide.

Mr Stevenson said suicidal ideas — like any other mental health issues —should be treated directly. Flinders University's Damien Riggs, co-author of the APS submission, claims it is "scientifically, incorrect" to suggest social media or peer pressure might influence a trans teenager's stated identity. He has argued that Medicare should fund a trans mastectomy just as it does for a healthy woman with a genetic risk of breast cancer.

Online forums suggest trans mastectomy costs about $10,000. Dr Riggs, who won a $694,514 federal grant to study "family diversity", is cited as an authority in the 2018 treatment standards for children and adolescents issued by the gender clinic at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne (which does no trans surgery).

Yesterday, the APS said the courts already allowed trans surgery for patients under 18. Where parents opposed it, "minors should have the right to access the opinion and guidance of suitably qualified medical professionals, including psychologists".

From "The Australian" of 4 Oct., 2019






What ‘The Times’ Got Wrong About Slavery in America

The New York Times recently drew a lot of attention for its “1619 Project” initiative, which has been criticized for misrepresenting the role of the slave trade as the central core to the development of the United States. The Times “aims to reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are.

The project name purportedly refers to the date the first African slaves were brought to the English colonies that later became the United States. Like much else in the Times’ version of the role of slavery in American history, even the project name is rooted in distortion. Although the institution of slavery is a stain on national history, the true story is much more complex than the Times represents, and the United States plays a role both as a country that exploited the slave trade as well as a leader in the movement to end the African slave trade, and was not the primary instigator or beneficiary of the brutal trade.

1619 was not, in fact, the date of the first African slaves in the English colonies — those Africans were brought in under indenturement contracts, not bought as slaves. They were contracted to a fixed period of labor (typically five years) to pay for the cost charged by the Dutch slavers, at which point they were freed with a payment of a start-up endowment.

Indenturement Contracts, Not Slaves

This was not unusual or limited to Africans – approximately half of the 500,000 European immigrants to the thirteen colonies prior to 1775 paid for their passage with indenturement contracts. Anthony Johnson, a black Angolan, was typical – he entered Virginia as an indentured servant in 1621, became a free man after the term of his contract, acquired land, and became among the first actual slaveholders in the colonies.

The first actual African slave in the colonies was John Punch, an indentured servant sentenced to slavery in 1640 in Virginia by the General Court of the Governor’s Council for having violated his indenturement contract by fleeing to Maryland. In 1641, the Massachusetts Assembly passed the first statutory law allowing slavery of those who were prisoners of war, sold themselves into slavery, or were sentenced to slavery by the courts, but banning it under other circumstances.

Early slavery, like indenturement contracts, was not specifically targeted at those of African descent. The Massachusetts law was primarily intended to allow slavery of captured Indians in the aftermath of King Phillip’s War. The 1705 Virginia Slave Codes, for example, declared as slaves those purchased from abroad who were not Christian. A Christian African entering the colony, for example, would not be a slave — but a captured American Indian who was not a Christian would be.

Black vs. Black

Ironically, a freed black man initiated the court case that moved slavery to a race-based institution. The Angolan immigrant Anthony Johnson was the plaintiff is a key civil case, where the Northampton Court in 1654 declared after the expiration of the indenturement contract of his African servant John Casor that Johnson owned Casor “for life,” nullifying the protections of the contract for the servant and essentially establishing the civil precedent for the enslavement of all African indentured servants by declaring that a contract for such servants extended for life, rather than the fixed term in the contract.

It was not until 1662 that the children of such slaves became legally slaves rather than free men, in a law passed in Virginia. The African slave trade itself was minor until King Charles II established the Royal African Company with a monopoly on the slave trade to the colonies. As late as 1735, the Colony of Georgia passed a law outlawing slavery, which was repealed due to a labor shortage in 1750. The boom in the import of slaves actually began around 1725, with half of all imported slaves arriving between then and the onset of the American Revolution in 1775.

Relatively speaking, the United States was a minor player in the African Slave Trade — only about 5% of the Africans imported to the New World came to the United States. Of the 10.7 million Africans who survived the ocean voyage, a mere 388,000 were shipped directly to North America. The largest recipients of imported African slaves were Brazil, Cuba. Jamaica, and the other Caribbean colonies. The lifespan of those brought into what is now the United States vastly exceeded those of the other 95%, and the United States was the only purchaser of African slaves where population grew naturally in slavery – the death rate among the rest was higher than the birth rate.

While the institution, even in the United States was a brutal violation of basic human rights, it tended on average to be far more humane than in the rest of the New World.

The World Slave Trade

The Trans-Saharan and Indian Ocean African slave trade, which began by Arabs as early as the 8th Century AD, dwarfed the Trans-Atlantic slave trade and continued up to the 20th Century. Between the start of the Atlantic Slave Trade and 1900, it is estimated that the eastern-bound Arab slave traders sold over 17 million Africans into slavery in the Middle East and India, compared to about 12 million to the new world – and the Eastern-bound slave trade had been ongoing for at least 600 years at the START of that period.

The Western-bound Atlantic slave trade, contrary to the misrepresentation in “Roots,” did not involve the capture of free Africans by Europeans or Arabs, but by the trading of slaves (already a basis for the economy of the local animist or Muslim kingdoms) captured in local wars to Western merchants in exchange for Western goods. The first such slaves brought to the Western Hemisphere were brought by the Spanish to their colonies in Cuba and Hispaniola in 1501, almost a century and a half before the first slave in the English colonies that became the United States.

The last African state to outlaw slavery, Mauritania, did not do so until 2007, and if the institution is illegal on the continent de jure, it still is widespread de facto in Mauritania, Chad, Mali, Niger, and Sudan, as well as parts of Ghana, Benin, Togo Gabon, Angola, South Africa, Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, Cameroon, Libya, and Nigeria.

The contradictions slavery posed on the rebel colonies during the Revolution sparked a backlash against slavery and the slave trade. Colonel John Laurens, son of a large South Carolina slaveholder, noted the contradictions in 1776, stating that “I think we Americans at least in the Southern Colonies, cannot contend with a good Grace, for Liberty, until we shall have enfranchised our Slaves. How can we whose Jealousy has been alarm’d more at the Name of Oppression sometimes than at the Reality, reconcile to our spirited Assertions of the Rights of Mankind, the galling abject Slavery of our negroes. . . . If as some pretend, but I am persuaded more thro’ interest, than from Conviction, the Culture of the Ground with us cannot be carried on without African Slaves, Let us fly it as a hateful Country, and say ubi Libertas ibi Patria.”

The US Constitution Banned the Slave Trade in 1808

More shared that sentiment and the first law in the European world to outlaw the slave trade was, in fact, the US Constitution, which in 1787 banned the slave trade as of 1808. In Massachusetts, a 1783 court decision ended slavery, and all of the Northern States had passed emancipations laws by 1803. The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 outlawed slavery in territories north of the Ohio River. Other countries followed suit. Denmark-Norway banned the slave trade in 1803, but not slavery until 1848. Britain passed a law abolishing the slave trade in 1807, and enforced it with the Royal Navy, and abolished slavery itself in 1833.

In 1807, Congress passed legislation making the import of slaves to the United States a federal crime, and in 1820, Congress passed the Law on Slave Trade, which went beyond the British law in declaring slavers as pirates, punishable by death instead of mere fines – and the US Navy joined the Royal Navy in active interdiction of slave ships.

Economically, the institution of slavery, rather than develop the economy of the new nation, stunted its development. Although bonded labor, whether slave or indentured servant, clearly played an important role in developing a labor force in the early colonial days, its role in the advancement of the economy in the newly established country is questionable. Gavin Wright, in his classic book The Political Economy of the Cotton South, shows in fact that slavery hindered the development of the economy in those states where it remained legal. The artisans, tradesmen, and unskilled labor pool necessary for developing a thriving, diverse economy was discouraged by competition from bonded labor, and the slave-owning class showed little interest in such an economy.

How Slavery Stalled the Economy of the New Country

Increasingly, the economy came to be dominated by cotton monoculture, boosted by the invention of the cotton gin, and the value of the capital invested in slaves. In order to maintain the value of this capital investment, demand for slave labor needed to be maintained, which led to the slaveholding states demanding the opening of new lands for slave cultivation. Wright shows that, contrary to the assertions of many modern critics who try to claim that slavery was responsible for the development of the US economy and to the mistaken belief of secessionists prior to the Civil War, cotton was not King, but rather the greatest return from slaveholding was the capital increase from the reproduction of slaves.

Without new lands to be worked by the expanding slave population, the price of slaves would fall, and the wealth of the ruling classes in the Southern states would have plummeted. Thus, issues like the Wilmot Proviso or Kansas-Nebraska Act, which threatened to close off the expansion of lands to be worked by slaves, posed an existential threat to the wealth of the slaveholders. Meanwhile, unencumbered by the institution of slavery, those states that abolished the institution and emancipated existing slaves embraced other forms of generating wealth, including a manufacturing economy that rapidly outpaced that of the slave states. The Civil War was, in large part, won because the economy of free labor produced at rates that the economy of slave labor could not imagine. In fact, it was not until the abolishment of the Jim Crow laws preserving vestiges of the slave system that the economy of the New South truly began to take off.

While undoubtedly the issue of slavery and conflicts over its contradiction with the ideals of the new Republic shaped the political debates of the new country through the Civil War, it is going too far to assert that the slave trade and slavery were the central core of the development of the United States. Rather, it is more true to state that the ideals of the Anglo-Scottish Enlightenment and political beliefs shaped by the English Civil War and Glorious Revolution created an environment that exposed the immorality of slavery and established the political grounds for ending the slave trade, and eventually the institution of slavery in areas of Western European influence.

It was not a simple process, and required painful conflict to negotiate the conflicts and contradictions between the liberal ideal and the self-interest of those who owned human chattel, but ultimately rather than allow slavery to drive the growth of the nation, the new United States became a leader, along with their cousins in the Anglosphere, in the efforts to end the brutal and illiberal practice of slavery.

The New York Times does a disservice to its readers with the 1619 Project by presenting a simplistic and misleading story of the complex role that the institution of slavery played in the history of the United States, and it largely ignores the role that the underlying values of the Anglo-Scottish Enlightenment that undergird the new nation played in ending slavery and the slave trade.

SOURCE 

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Political correctness is most pervasive in universities and colleges but I rarely report the  incidents concerned here as I have a separate blog for educational matters.

American "liberals" often deny being Leftists and say that they are very different from the Communist rulers of  other countries.  The only real difference, however, is how much power they have.  In America, their power is limited by democracy.  To see what they WOULD be like with more power, look at where they ARE already  very powerful: in America's educational system -- particularly in the universities and colleges.  They show there the same respect for free-speech and political diversity that Stalin did:  None.  So look to the colleges to see  what the whole country would be like if "liberals" had their way.  It would be a dictatorship.

For more postings from me, see TONGUE-TIED, GREENIE WATCH,   EDUCATION WATCH INTERNATIONAL, AUSTRALIAN POLITICS and  DISSECTING LEFTISM.   My Home Pages are here or   here or   here.  Email me (John Ray) here.  Email me (John Ray) here

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Ange Linaud & Danialou Sagbohan (Côte d'Ivoire/1980)

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Danialou Sagbohan on percussions (Benin)
Dizzy Mandjeku on guitar (Cameroon)
Ange Linaud singing (Côte d'Ivoire)




          

Black immigrant rights organizations condemn the death of Cameroonian in ICE custody

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Cameroonian immigrant Nebane Abienwi died Tuesday after undergoing treatment for a brain hemorrhage at Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center.


          

I Love Guardiola As A Coach, But Not As A Person – Samuel Eto’o

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Samuel Eto’o has no doubts about Pep Guardiola’s ability as a coach but his praise of the Catalan didn’t extend beyond his professional capacity. Pep and Eto’o worked together at Barcelona before he was moved on to Inter, but the Cameroonian explained that he understood Guardiola better than anyone else he worked under. “I love […]

The post I Love Guardiola As A Coach, But Not As A Person – Samuel Eto’o appeared first on 360Nobs.com#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/116422&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com.


          

There's a movie coming out about the Toronto Raptors

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The Toronto Raptors' NBA championship win may be in the rear view mirror, but soon we'll have a film about the victory to remind us of the historic season.

The film, titled 2019 NBA Champions: Toronto Raptors, is being produced by NBA Entertainment and includes exclusive behind-the-scenes interviews and footage that takes fans through the triumphant 2018-2019 season. 

The trailer for the film was just released, and it appears to accurately capture the spirit and joy the season brought to Toronto and the rest of Canada.

The film brings to light the different and unique stories of all the people who made the championship win possible. 

It tells the story of how Team President Masai Ujiri acquired one of the most complete two-way players in the game, Kawhi Leonard, on the heels of a disappointing loss in the 2018 NBA Playoffs. 

It tells the story of Kyle Lowry, the longest-tenured member of the team, whose seventh season in Toronto was about redemption. 

It tells Pascal Siakam's story, including his journey from Cameroon and the fact that the season was a chance to establish himself as a rising star after fulfilling his father’s dreams.

The film also tells the stories of Marc Gasol and Serge Ibaka.

While Gasol was added to the team in a trade deadline deal, the campaign provided a perfect opportunity for Ibaka to play for a ring.

The movie will take fans through the Toronto Raptors’ championship run, all the way from the first day of training camp up until the exhilarating six games of the 2019 NBA Finals against the returning champions, the Golden State Warriors.

Viewers will also get to witness the craziness of the jam-packed crowds that took over Jurassic Park in Maple Leaf Square and in towns across Canada.

Interviews in the film include Kawhi Leonard, Kyle Lowry, Nick Nurse and Marc Gasol.

The film will be available to the public on Blu-ray Combo, DVD and online on October 22, 2019. 


          

As Man Dies in ICE Custody, California Moves to Ban For-Profit Prisons, Including Immigrant Jails

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A Cameroonian immigrant died this week in the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in California. The man, identified as 37-year-old Nebane Abienwi, died on Tuesday after suffering a brain hemorrhage. This comes as California lawmakers passed a bill last month that would ban private prisons statewide, a major blow to the for-profit prison industry in the U.S. that is deeply entangled in immigration detention. The legislation also orders the closure of four ICE prisons that can jail up to 4,500 immigrants. The bill is currently awaiting the signature of Governor Gavin Newsom, who said in his January inaugural address that California should "end the outrage of private prisons once and for all." Incarceration at for-profit prisons in California peaked at about 7,000 prisoners in 2016, but state officials have been shifting prisoners to publicly run prisons in recent years. Hamid Yazdan Panah, an immigration attorney with the California Collaborative for Immigrant Justice, joins us for a conversation about the bill and immigrant detention in California.
          

Headlines for October 3, 2019

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House Democrats Prepare White House Subpoena in Impeachment Probe, Trump Rages Against Impeachment Probe with Profanity and Insults, Bernie Sanders Has Surgery to Clear Blocked Artery, Deaths and Injuries Mount as Iraqi Police and Soldiers Fire on Protesters, EU Officials Wary as British PM Boris Johnson Unveils Brexit Plan , Hong Kong Teen Shot During Protests Charged with Assaulting Officer, Record-Breaking Hurricane Lorenzo Lashes Azores, Heads for Ireland, London Climate Protesters Spray British Treasury with Fake Blood, Cameroonian Asylum Seeker Dies in For-Profit Immigration Jail, Plácido Domingo Quits L.A. Opera Amid Sexual Misconduct Claims, R. Kelly Denied Bail in Federal Sex Crimes Case, Dallas Ex-Cop Sentenced to 10 Years for Murdering Neighbor, 10 Arrested in Anti-Drone Protest at Nevada's Creech Air Force Base
          

Cameroon: Military's Reconciliation Efforts Welcomed, Shunned by Anglophones

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[VOA] Boassa, Cameroon -Cameroon's military has begun efforts to implement President Paul Biya's peace resolutions from last week's national dialogue on the country's anglophone separatist crisis, but skepticism lingers as the military is dogged with accusations of rights abuses.
          

Liberia/Cameroon: Amputee Afcon - Liberia Close in On Semi-Finals, Defeat Cameroon 2-0

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[Observer] Liberia's amputee national football team are close to entering the semifinals stage of the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations for Amputee Football after a 2-0 win against debutantes Cameroon on Monday, October 7, at the Nac Benguela Stadium in Angola.


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