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'Survival Math': BW's Conversation with Coates Interviewer Mitchell S. Jackson

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Author and educator Mitchell S. Jackson, who will interview Ta-Nehisi Coates at The Morrison Center on Oct. 7, humanizes the plight of disenfranchised people to show how inequality works in America. If there is a lesson to be learned from the Black Lives Matter movement, it's that the dangers, responsibilities and rules of living in America aren't the same for everyone. Long before BLM, however, people like Mitchell S. Jackson fought to illuminate that principle for others. The title of Jackson's latest book, Survival Math, released earlier this year, suggests that even in the wealthiest nation on earth, there are still many whose lives are games played for the highest stakes: life and death. "Survival math are the on-the-spot decisions one has to make when they’re faced with a really serious threat. That’s on the surface," Jackson said. "People who are disenfranchised are always having to make survival-math choices, which are the broader choices that help them avoid poverty and the criminal justice system." Jackson, who will be in Boise on Monday, Oct. 7, to interview author Ta-Nehisi Coates on the Morrison Center stage for The Cabin's Readings & Conversations series, draws the portraits of real people whose lives have been functions of "survival math" as someone who has lived that life himself. When he was a sophomore in college, he was incarcerated on drug charges; but unlike many people who have been wrung through the justice system, Jackson's career as a writer has been on the up-and-up, and he has taught creative writing at several prestigious institutions of higher learning across the country. He said it was a no-brainer when his agent called him up to gauge his interest in interviewing Coates in Boise. Though Jackson said he's interested in Coates' journalism and nonfiction work—work that has made him a national-caliber thinker on history and race relations—it's Coates' latest book, The Water Dancer, released in late September, that interests him the most. "I think [Coates] gets so many questions that go over the same subjects. I’m going to try to connect this to his other work, but I’m interested in how he put [The Water Dancer] together, what kind of revisions he made. People don’t talk to him a lot about craft, they ask about the issue of black lives in America," Jackson said. The intersection of style and substance are of keen interest to Coates and Jackson both. In The Water Dancer, there are scenes that, though fictional and stylized, mirror and reflect on mechanisms of oppression. In Survival Math, Jackson deploys similar strategies to shade what's ultimately a work…
          

2019 Week 6 Mountain West Football Recap

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Jeremy and Matt are back to recap a Week 6 set of games that featured four conference and two non-conference games. Both non-league games with Navy topping Air Force and then Utah State getting blown out by LSU down in Baton Rogue. The league games saw Boise State, despite some issues, take care of UNLV, San Diego State's defense suffocate Colorado State and San Jose State get its third win of the year of New Mexico. The duo discuss Utah State playing good defense and how the Aggies struggle in that regard and what coaches have the chance of not returning next year.
          

Charlotte aux Poires, Coulis de Framboise (Pear Charlotte with Raspberry Coulis)

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Unlike last week's simple and delicious recipe (Oeufs à la Neige (Snow Eggs with Caramel and Crème Anglaise), this one has five components, which equals a pile of dishes! The ladyfingers are simple, and this time I followed the directions and sprinkled the confectioner's sugar on the piped fingers instead of stirring it into the batter like last time. For the fingers, you just whip the egg whites, fold in the yolks and then fold in the flour. Pipe, sprinkle with icing sugar and bake at 350°F until golden. Why do the French like their pears so much? I've never been overly fond of this fruit and find it mealy. They do improve with poaching, however. Halve the pears and poach in water (to cover), sugar and vanilla. When they're soft, let them cool, then purée half the pears and dice the other half. My favorite part of this dessert is the...

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El invierno para H&M Home es clásico y atemporal

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El invierno para H&M Home es clásico y atemporal

H&M Home sigue definiendo su estilo en cada campaña. Un estilo que se inclina, la mayoría de las ocasiones, por las opciones más clásicas y que confirma a H&M Home como una de las mejores marcas para hacerse con textiles y accesorios de calidad a buen precio.

En este editorial recrean el ambiente de un hotel con camas vestidas en satén, lana y algodón orgánico. Un hotel que respira un inconfundible aires francés con suelos de espiga y espacios cargados de boiseries o molduras en suelos, techos y carpinterías. Los baños con mármoles de suelo a techo, son también el escenario en el que presentan las toallas y albornoces.

Los complementos diseñados para esta esta colección tienden a la vanguardia más opulenta. Parece que H&M Home no quiere que el dinero sea un impedimento para conseguir un ambiente sofisticado en casa. Nos lo demuestra cada temporada y en cada editorial. Hemos seleccionado los mejores accesorios para que consigas este look en casa, este invierno.

EN EL DORMITORIO

Muchos de los estampados de sus cojines y fundas tienen motivos ecuestres lo que los sitúa en un segmento más cercano al lujo.

Y para conseguir de confortable cama de hotel, es imprescindible que la cama sea alta y que esté esté vestida con un faldón o falda de cama. 

Dormitorio 1
Dormitorio 3
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  • H&M Home.  Funda de almohada en satén 12,99 € 
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  • H&M Home. Funda nórdica de algodón 59,99 € 

EN EL SALÓN

En el salón continúan los motivos ecuestres -cuadro del caballlo incluido- y los accesorios de mármol, ratán o porcelana.

Salon
Divan
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Hmgoepprod 15
Hmgoepprod 12
Hmgoepprod 14
Hmgoepprod 16
Hmgoepprod 17
Hmgoepprod 21

EN EL BAÑO

Toallas y accesorios también gana en sofisticación con la apuesta por los  colores oscuras como negros, calderas... y la mezcla con el terciopelo.

Bano Elegante
Toallas
Hmgoepprod 18
Hmgoepprod 20

Imágenes H&M Home

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Zara Home y la elegancia de lo simple en su último editorial

En H&M Home siguen de rebajas y muchos de sus artículos tienen hasta un 70% de descuento

H&M Home apuesta por los clásicos y los tejidos de calidad en su última colección

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La noticia El invierno para H&M Home es clásico y atemporal fue publicada originalmente en Decoesfera por Patricia Gubieda .


          

MGoPodcast 11.6: On the Other Hand

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MGoPodcast 11.6: On the Other Hand Seth October 7th, 2019 at 7:11 AM

THE SPONSORS

We can do this because people support us. You should support them! The show is presented by UGP & The Bo Store, and if it wasn’t for Rishi and Ryan we’d be all be very sad ex-Vox employees with “real” jobs.

Our other sponsors are also key to all of this: HomeSure Lending, Peak Wealth Management, Ann Arbor Elder Law, the Residence Inn Ann Arbor Downtown, the University of Michigan Alumni Association, Michigan Law Grad, Human Element, The Phil Klein Insurance Group, FuegoBox, Perrin Brewing, and The Athletic

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[After THE JUMP: on the one…]

1. The Offense

starts at 1:00

Did that look like the #14 team in the country? Michigan is +4 in turnovers too. Patterson had an O'Korn performance. Terrible INT on a high-low read anybody should be able to make. First throw of the day is nearly intercepted too. Terrible sack he takes—Joel Klatt: "coverage sack"—literally every receiver is open. We're ready for McCaffrey at this point given Patterson's regression. One keeper and everyone says hurrah, and no more from the arc zone game until the 4 minute drill. What were you doing this offseason? Running game is getting nothing now because it's so simplified. Pass pro wasn't bad; Patterson made it look worse.

2. The Defense

starts at 23:54

Dominant performance. Stanley under siege: Michigan was sending their OLBs against Wirfs and Alaric Jackson while Kwity was winning inside. Key drive at the end Alaric Jackson has to tackle Michigan's edge guys. Blitz package was great: Iowa goes five-wide, Michigan consistently got McGrone through. Surprised Stanley didn't fumble when he was Statue of Liberty'ing the ball. Hello Mr. Dwumfour. Four-DE package was killer. Ace: they suckered Iowa into a passing down in the redzone. Stanley's "pre-snap read" to Lavert Hill was thrown too well. Revenge fade to Oliver Martin—Ambry lucky it was uncatchable. Clearly there was supposed to be a safety over the top when Hill got beat. Shout out Khaleke for his run defense.

3. Special Teams/Game Theory

starts at 42:56

If you take a TO to ice the kicker, the HC has to take a Gatorade bath. Running short of the sticks: who thought that was a good idea and why are we doing it? Maybe don't kick pop-ups to one of the kick returners in the conference? Didn't put two guys back on 4th and 20, let the Aussie angle it. Mirror Ferentz showed once, but had a shot in Michigan's territory when Michigan declined the delay of game penalty. Michigan finally got some fluck. Homecoming: we didn't get the traditional band show with Temptation/Hawaiian War Chant.

4. Around the Big Ten wsg Jamie Mac

starts at 1:02:20

Heisman stat padding afternoon for Jon Taylor. Purdue's out literally half their team vs Penn State; Louisville's going to have a better season than Purdue this year. The Journey: Rutgers. Blackshear and Sitkowski both redshirting to preserve eligibility for somewhere other than Rutgers. Tanner Morgan follows up 21/22 with not that. Pat Fitzgerald triple-ices kicker instead of getting another drive.

MUSIC:
  • “The Slow Descent Into Alcoholism”—The New Pornographers
  • “It Hurts Until It Doesn't”—Mothers
  • “Randy Described Eternity”—Built to Spill
  • “Across 110th Street”
THE USUAL LINKS:

I just want to DK Metcalf the offense. That's where we are.

Profile picture for user TheCube

TheCube

October 7th, 2019 at 7:26 AM ^

Thank god. All the people who keep saying the WRs can’t get separation can shut it for one more week. These guys are wide open every play. A college level qb should be able to throw it as they break their route for a catch. Glad Brian noticed Klatt caping for Sheas putrid play.
 

Secondly, fuck Wisconsin, these sneaky B side Wolverines always take dirty shots at our players and concuss a QB at the worst time. Wouldn’t be that mad if one of our guys take their important player’s knees out next time whenever that is. 

Dr. Funkenstein

October 7th, 2019 at 7:37 AM ^

Everyone’s ready for McCaffrey at this point if he’s able to play this week.... Everyone except Harbaugh though, hopefully he’s just blowing coach smoke to cover for his guy until McCaffrey’s healthy and ready to go... 

JFW

October 7th, 2019 at 8:10 AM ^

I'm very sad at Patterson's regression. He looked better last year in the old offense. 

That said, I think it's time to see what McCaffrey can do. I have to believe that they're being (rightly, IMHO) conservative in his concussion. 

BlueHills

October 7th, 2019 at 12:13 PM ^

I’m just curious as to what McCaffrey’s shown this year that makes folks think we’re better off with him as the starter, and that Patterson isn’t as good a QB? Here are some 2019 stats to think about:

McCaffrey: 45.5% completions. QBR 89.

Patterson: 58.3% completions, QBR 131.8.

Source: https://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/players/shea-patterson-1.html#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/37642&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

The stats speak for themselves. To be honest, Patterson didn’t have a great game on Saturday, but he’s still a more ready quarterback with significantly better stats.

kevin holt

October 7th, 2019 at 1:02 PM ^

The issue with looking at QBR alone is that it only accounts for passing attempts and whether or not they were successful. Several of Shea's issues wouldn't be reflected in his passer rating. E.g.: when Shea throws a short completion when he has someone else wide open downfield, that's a positive event to his QBR; when he takes a bad sack or scrambles when he doesn't need to, his QBR is unaffected because those are considered running plays; most importantly, his inexplicable inability to keep/run the ball has a huge effect on the function of the offense, as does his ability to get the ball out on time or to open guys (plus the hampering of the offense if we have to dumb it down and go half-field reads), and those things don't show up in the QBR.

Shea is a decently accurate thrower; he's just not seeing the field for some reason.

BlueHills

October 7th, 2019 at 3:45 PM ^

I wonder if it’s that he’s not seeing the field, or there are other factors we haven’t taken into consideration. Given his recent injury, and the fact that his backup is concussed, I don’t think his reluctance to run the ball is inexplicable. It’s possible that he was told to take it easy with runs unless absolutely necessary.

In any case, I hate to second-guess the coaching staff here. The guy is an accurate passer; he’s a proven winner (isn’t his record 14 Ws and 4 losses as a starter?), yet he’s getting a ton of criticism as a result of a game he led the team to a win in.

I’d say yes, there’s room for improvement everywhere, in fact, the entire offense needs to pick up their game, but McCaffrey isn’t currently available to play, and Milton has potential, but also has thrown more picks than TDs, if memory serves.

After the D’s performance against Iowa, I think Michigan’s at least competitive in every game left, except that Ohio State looks to be in another league altogether in terms of offensive firepower. And not just their QB. The entire offense looks like a machine. They’re very impressive. 

One thing Michigan doesn’t have yet is a game-dominating running back. Whether that’s on the O-line, or the play calling, or the backs, I have no idea. I just think folks are being pretty hard on a college kid who’s actually done pretty darn well.

ChungusAmongUs

October 7th, 2019 at 4:39 PM ^

The argument is that Shea is the reason that the offense has room for improvement. The offense goes through him every play and he has significantly underperformed. 

To say that he “led the team to a win” is awfully generous, considering all he did was not turn the ball over too many times

Profile picture for user crg

crg

October 7th, 2019 at 8:06 AM ^

I was also impressed with Stanley's physicality this game - the Rothlesburger comparisons were not far off in that respect.  That - and our blitzing defenders might need to work on bringing guys down a bit faster and not just clinging on to them.

bronxblue

October 7th, 2019 at 8:22 AM ^

Michigan going 8-4/9-3 this year shouldn't be some random shocker to everyone.  Listen, I thought they'd maybe win 11 games if everything broke their way, but 9/10 wins with the bowl game felt not unreasonable.  I know people expected Michigan's offense to look awesome because they changed their OC but it hasn't and probably won't.  At that point, getting mad you were wrong about pre-season expectations isn't a team problem, it's a you problem.

And I'm tired of the "we suck and anything good is actually bad and anyone who tells you to be happy is a slappy" bullshit.  Yes, Iowa isn't a top-10 team.  But you want to know who was the #13 team in the country last week?  Oregon.  UCF was #18.  Boise #16.  Washington #15.  Like, look around and after that top 9-10 it's a whole lotta question marks.  Iowa isn't demonstrably different than any of those teams, and just because Michigan looks a hell of a lot closer to the Hawkeyes than OSU doesn't change that reality.  Maybe Michigan improves a bit this year; already the defense looks like it's made strides.

I really like this site, and I get that not everyone has to agree with my perception of the team.  But it's just so damn relentlessly negative around here right now, and it's infuriating because I already see the same ennui coming out with the basketball team when they inevitably struggle.  It's not that you can't be critical but just, I don't know, it's just tiring.

JFW

October 7th, 2019 at 8:54 AM ^

Amen. I wish I could upvote this times 25.

I had a lot more fun as a student watching Michigan football; and we had 2 8-4 seasons. 

A big reason it was more fun was the lack of concentrated pervasive negativity. 

I remember losing to Minnesota one year and thinking “man, they always seem to get us every few years. Oh well, we can still win the B1G.”

You know what? The offense looked bad. Shea has regressed. But the defense looked amazing and I just want to have fun with a win; and enjoy college football like I used to back in the day. I’ve really cut back on my sports media intake because so much of it is negative. If we can’t find some enjoyment in a win over a ranked team, at homecoming, with a tremendous defensive performance, then it’s sad. 

Criticism is fine. But the rampant blowtorch of cynicism and anger gets to be too much. 

I also wonder about the bias I see sometimes, If a team has a superlative offensive performance and wins a close one because their defense had a shit day, people aren’t nearly as bugged it seems. 

Booted Blue in PA

October 7th, 2019 at 9:18 AM ^

Yup....   Most of the time i get the impression that the majority of the contributors here are 12 to 15 years old.  If they had their way, we'd be on our third head coach since the beginning of the season and would have gone through at least two coordinators on each side of the scrimmage line.

Our #2 QB is out with a concussion but they're calling for him to start, that makes sense.  Don Brown is the worst DC ever, total 'one trick pony'... yet his defense just held the #14 team in the country to 3 points and after 8 sacks, 1 total yard rushing..... Oh yeah, they passed for less than 200 yards and no TD, but they did get a couple crossing route completions (one of which should have been called back for offensive PI but wasn't, that was his fault too).

Seriously, you bring in a new OC (which everyone clamored for for three years) and the offense is struggling while he installs a new system, imagine that.  The offensive line was supposed to be the strength of this offense, they don't look it in run blocking or pass protection for that matter. 

Reading the comments on this blog you'd think we were 0-5 not 4-1.  That one loss was to the #8 team in the country.   

By the way, Washington just fired Gruden..... how long until the Harbaugh to the NFL rumors start up again?   I know, I know..... some will hope that he goes, then again they'd say the same thing about his replacement, after he loses his first game.

Onward, Go Blue!

 

          

Boise Man Drives Into Cemetery and Breaks Headstones

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'Tis the season for a visit to the cemetery, but this is not the way to do it. Continue reading…
          

WIN Tickets to Breaking Bad's New Movie El Camino with MIX 106

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Boise's own Aaron Paul is holding a private screening of his new Breaking Bad movie El Camino at the Egyptian Theater on October 8th. Here's the only way you can get tickets! Continue reading…
          

Entretien avec Baudouin Vercken, Co-fondateur d’EcoTree

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Pour cette interview hors-série spécial Bois & Immobilier, Chroniques Urbaines™ a rencontré Baudouin Vercken, Co-fondateur d’EcoTree. Cette jeune entreprise bretonne est spécialisée dans la gestion durable des forêts privées. Baudouin Vercken nous partage sa vision de la filière bois et l’importance du reboisement. Il explique aussi le financement singulier du renouvellement de la forêt française
          

ID Submits 'One-Strike' Medicaid Work Requirement for Feds' Approval

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ID Submits 'One-Strike' Medicaid Work Requirement for Feds' Approval BOISE, Idaho — The public comment period is open on Idaho's application to the federal government to add work reporting requirements to its expanded Medicaid program. State lawmakers passed a bill this year requiring that recipients age 19-59 work at least 20 hours a week to maintain Medicaid eligibility. But the waiver must first be approved by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. ...(Read More)
          

ID Mayors Make Strides on Children's Health with Walking Challenge

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ID Mayors Make Strides on Children's Health with Walking Challenge BOISE, Idaho – Mayors across Idaho are challenging each other to walk this month to encourage physical activity among young people. The sixth annual Mayor's Walking Challenge from the Blue Cross for Idaho Foundation for Health has signed up 77 mayors in all but five Idaho counties. A mayor who averages at least 10,000 steps a day in October will earn $1,000 for their community to spend on school or community projects, or promote physical activity or healthy foods. ...(Read More)
          

Boise closes day shelter, shifts funds to another shelter

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BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The city of Boise has closed a day-shelter for homeless families and plans on moving some of the funding to Interfaith Sanctuary Shelter, which will begin offering day-shelter services seven days a week later this month. Interfaith Sanctuary Jodi Peterson-Stigers told the Idaho Statesman that shelter officials hope to reduce the […]
          

Türk Sanatçılar Leonardo da Vinci'nin İzinde

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Rönesans döneminin dahisi Leonardo da Vinci ölümünün 500’üncü yıl dönümünde tüm dünyada anılıyor. Türkiye'den de 20 kadar sanatçı, bilim adamı, müzisyen ve yazar, Da Vinci’nin hayata gözlerini yumduğu Fransa'nın Amboise kentine gitti. VOA Türkçe'den Arzu Çakır geziyi sanatçılarla birlikte takip etti
          

The Search Party for 'El Camino' Tickets Commences in Downtown Boise

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'Breaking Bad'-star and Idaho native Aaron Paul is set to host a screening of the Netflix movie and spin-off at the Egyptian Theatre Tuesday, Oct. 8. David Mansfield, along with his search party compatriot Calley Ames, sported yellow jumpsuits similar to those worn by meth cooks in hit show Breaking Bad as they rifled through the corners of downtown searching for tickets to the new Breaking Bad movie El Camino. BB-star and Idaho native Aaron Paul is set to host a screening of the Netflix movie and spin-off at the Egyptian Theatre Tuesday, Oct. 8. He announced on his Twitter that tickets cannot be bought, only found hidden downtown or won through local radio stations. Mansfield said Paul pulled a similar stunt for some of the final episodes of the series. When he went down to the Egyptian to try to purchase a ticket off of someone, he ended up meeting Paul, who let him into the screening. …
          

'Survival Math': BW's Conversation with Coates Interviewer Mitchell S. Jackson

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Author and educator Mitchell S. Jackson, who will interview Ta-Nehisi Coates at The Morrison Center on Oct. 7, humanizes the plight of disenfranchised people to show how inequality works in America. If there is a lesson to be learned from the Black Lives Matter movement, it's that the dangers, responsibilities and rules of living in America aren't the same for everyone. Long before BLM, however, people like Mitchell S. Jackson fought to illuminate that principle for others. The title of Jackson's latest book, Survival Math, released earlier this year, suggests that even in the wealthiest nation on earth, there are still many whose lives are games played for the highest stakes: life and death. "Survival math are the on-the-spot decisions one has to make when they’re faced with a really serious threat. That’s on the surface," Jackson said. "People who are disenfranchised are always having to make survival-math choices, which are the broader choices that help them avoid poverty and the criminal justice system." Jackson, who will be in Boise on Monday, Oct. 7, to interview author Ta-Nehisi Coates on the Morrison Center stage for The Cabin's Readings & Conversations series, draws the portraits of real people whose lives have been functions of "survival math" as someone who has lived that life himself. When he was a sophomore in college, he was incarcerated on drug charges; but unlike many people who have been wrung through the justice system, Jackson's career as a writer has been on the up-and-up, and he has taught creative writing at several prestigious institutions of higher learning across the country. He said it was a no-brainer when his agent called him up to gauge his interest in interviewing Coates in Boise. Though Jackson said he's interested in Coates' journalism and nonfiction work—work that has made him a national-caliber thinker on history and race relations—it's Coates' latest book, The Water Dancer, released in late September, that interests him the most. "I think [Coates] gets so many questions that go over the same subjects. I’m going to try to connect this to his other work, but I’m interested in how he put [The Water Dancer] together, what kind of revisions he made. People don’t talk to him a lot about craft, they ask about the issue of black lives in America," Jackson said. The intersection of style and substance are of keen interest to Coates and Jackson both. In The Water Dancer, there are scenes that, though fictional and stylized, mirror and reflect on mechanisms of oppression. In Survival Math, Jackson deploys similar strategies to shade what's ultimately a work…
          

Ailleurs : Château de Marsannay, dégustation au domaine sur la route des Grands Crus du vignoble de Bourgogne

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Aux portes de Dijon, Marsannay-la-Côte est le premier village sur la route des grands crus du vignoble de Bourgogne et le Château de Marsannay, un heureux prélude. Ce dernier a été créé en 1990 par la famille Boisseau, fondatrice des Maisons Kircher et Patriarche, alors propriétaire depuis 1973 du Château de Meursault, domaine historique datant du XIème siècle en Côte de Beaune. Associé à un domaine de trente-quatre hectares sur le vignoble de la Côte de Nuits, répartis de Marsannay-la-Côte à Vosne-Romanée, du Bourgogne de Montre-Cul à Dijon au Nord aux vignes du Clos-Vougeot au Sud, la richesse de son patrimoine viticole a fait sa réputation. Sur les vingt-huit hectares en appellation Marsannay, treize lieux-dits qui comptent parmi les meilleurs Climats de l’appellation ont fait l’objet d’une récente demande de classement premier cru.




 



Au cœur du vignoble réuni par les Boisseau au début des années 1990, une vaste bâtisse est construite à grand frais, en moins de deux ans, afin de vinifier et élever les vins sur place. Aux deux niveaux de caves voutées, à la cuverie moderne sont ajoutées une boutique de vente ainsi qu’une salle de réception de 400m2, rareté en Bourgogne. Le Château de Marsannay accueille toute l’année amateurs éclairés et grands connaisseurs afin de leur faire découvrir au domaine une production composée en majorité de vins rouges mais également de deux blancs et d’un vin rosé. 

En 2012, convaincu de l’excellence des terroirs bourguignons, Olivier Halley, descendant d’une grande famille française du monde des affaires, fondatrice de Promodès qui a fusionné avec Carrefour en 2012, se porte acquéreur du Château de Marsannay et de la société d’exploitation du Château de Meursault. Si le clan Halley est d’origine normande, il est présent dans le négoce du vin depuis le XIXème siècle et partage les valeurs familiales des Boisseau. Avec cet investissement, le savoir-faire économique rencontre la volonté d’une philosophie pérenne.










La direction du Château de Meursault et du Château de Marsannay est alors confiée à Stéphane Follin-Arbelot qui a acquis une vaste expérience chez Bouchard Père et Fils. Sylvain Pabion, ingénieur agronome, devient chef d’exploitation du domaine de Marsannay. Les importants investissements à la vigne et au chai, pressoir vertical, nouvelles cuves à bois, entre autres, vont permettre de faire progresser les vins en respectant les spécifiés des parcelles.  Les Climats les plus intéressants sont isolés afin de réaliser des nectars au fruit précis, aux fins tanins. 

Le domaine viticole du Château de Marsannay s’étend sur 34 hectares du vignoble de la Côte de Nuits, dont 26 hectares du domaine en appellation Marsannay (AOC), 8 hectares sur les communes de Dijon, Fixin, Gevrey-Chambertin, Vosne-Romanée et Vougeot (Clos-Vougeot). Le domaine exploite également en fermage les 4 hectares de vignes des Hospices de Dijon, dans le vignoble de la côte de Beaune, sur les communes d’Aloxe-Corton, Savigny-lès-Beaune, Beaune, Pommard et Puligny-Montrachet.

Aujourd’hui exploités en culture raisonnée, les quarante hectares de vignes passent progressivement au bio. Le Château de Marsannay mise sur la maîtrise des rendements et la qualité des raisins. Les vendanges exclusivement manuelles, les grappes réunies en petites caisses, les trois types de tri des raisins procèdent d’une volonté d’excellence. Au cours du processus, la rafle n’est pas retirée. Cette manipulation délicate qui peut apporter un soyeux particulier au vin marque aussi le risque d’une astringence inopportune. Dans une quête de délicatesse, de juteux, la vinification et l’entonnage sont réalisés par gravité, poids du jus.











Au Château de Marsannay, chaque Climat est vinifié séparément. Lors de la visite privée, une installation présente les différents profils de terroirs afin de mieux les comprendre et d’appréhender les subtilités des Climats de Bourgogne classés au patrimoine mondial de l’Unesco depuis le 4 juillet 2015. « En Bourgogne, un Climat est un terroir viticole associant parcelle, cépage et savoir-faire. Chaque Climat de Bourgogne est une parcelle de vigne, soigneusement délimitée et nommée depuis des siècles, qui possède son histoire et bénéficie de conditions géologiques et climatiques particulières. Chaque vin issu d’un Climat a son goût et sa place dans la hiérarchie des crus (Appellation Régionale, Village, Premier Cru, Grand Cru). Les Climats sont plus de 1000 à se succéder sur un mince ruban courant de Dijon à Santenay, au sud de Beaune ; certains répondant à des noms illustres comme Chambertin, Romanée-Conti, Clos de Vougeot, Montrachet, Corton, Musigny... ». Olivier Halley, l’un des grands mécènes fondateurs de l’Association des Climats de Bourgogne, se passionne pour ces vignes remarquables.

Au Château de Marsannay, les Climats de l’appellation, Les Boivins, Les Favières, Les Longeroies, Le Clos du Roy, Les Champs Perdrix, font honneur à ce patrimoine. Trois climats en premier crus de Chevrey-Chambertin et Vosne-Romanée et quatre grands crus Chambertin, Ruchottes-Chambertin, Echezeaux et Clos-Vougeot complètent ce panel prestigieux. La vinification étant parcellaire, les assemblages portent donc sur les parcelles et non les cépages.

L’élevage se poursuit au château qui possède deux niveaux de caves voutées, profondes de neuf mètres. Leur architecture s’inspire de celle des caves patrimoniales cisterciennes du Château de Meursault. Il y règne une température constante de 15°C. Dallés de pierre de Meuilley, les sols sont régulièrement arrosés dans le but de maintenir le niveau d’humidité. Ces caves développent une capacité de 500 pièces de vin et de 400 000 bouteilles. Les fûts bourguignons en chêne français dans lesquels sont élevés les vins proviennent de différents tonneliers et ont subi divers brûlages. Chaque année sont employés seulement 25% de fûts neufs afin d’éviter que le vin ne soit trop boisé. Leur taille est adaptée à la production. Il existe quelques petites barriques en châtaignier. Inspiré par le Barolo italien, des foudres ovoïdes se sont glissés parmi les tonneaux ronds, expérimentation sur la forme qui prolonge une recherche de pureté, de finesse, d’élégance. 












A la dégustation, cinq vins du château sont présentés. Le Marsannay 2018 rosé est un vin atypique qui associe la fraîcheur des fruits rouges, framboises, cassis. Il doit au pinot noir raisin à la chair blanche mais à la peau rouge sa couleur rose pâle. Seulement 3 500 bouteilles sont produites par an et la demande se fait bien supérieur à l’offre. Le Marsannay Les Champs Perdrix 2017, blanc ample et minéral est vinifié pendant huit mois. Il s'exprime élégamment sur la fraîcheur des arômes de fruits jaunes, de fleurs blanches, convoque la rondeur de la brioche, des notes grillées. En bouche, il est ample et souple dans la fraîcheur fruitée des fruits à noyaux et des agrumes. Ce vin rencontre un tel succès que pour le faire découvrir à de nouveaux clients malgré la forte demande des habitués, le château a choisi de libérer de ses collections privés les années 2014 et 2015. 

En 2016, trois jours de grêle et de tempête ont ravagé 1/4 des ceps qui ont dû être arrachés. Cette perte terrible classe ce millésime en rareté curieuse. Le Marsannay rouge 2016, assemblage de climats sur le terroir de Marsannay en pinot noir, déploie une belle couleur grenat bleutée. Nez généreux de fruits frais, expressivité de notes fumées, la bouche est souple, équilibrée marquée par des accents épicés. Le Marsannay Les Echezots 2016, procède d’un seul climat. La robe sombre jette des reflets rubis. Ce vin très fin développe au nez des parfums de fruits rouges soutenus par des notes boisées. En bouche, la richesse aromatique est marquée par la fraîcheur des baies, le croquant de la griotte. Le Gevrey Chambertin 2016, un vin rouge épicé élevé durant 16 mois en fût de chêne français, prend le parti de la finesse à contrepied du Chambertin classique très robuste et tanique. Le nez déploie des notes de cerises confites, la chaleur des épices, de cannelle en particulier. La bouche ciselée révèle une puissance élégante.  

220 000 bouteilles en cinq formats sont produites chaque année au Château de Marsannay. 30% partent à l’export notamment en Amérique. 50% sont destinées aux restaurants, cafés, hôtels, belles maisons telles que Loiseau, Bocuse, Ducasse, la Tour d’Argent. 10% sont réservées à une clientèle privée. 5% entrent dans les collections du Château de Marsannay. 5% sont dédiées aux tours et partenaires. Les primeurs sont lancés au mois de mai mais la réservation ouverte ne se fait que sur listing. 

Château de Marsannay
2 rue des Vignes - 21160 Marsannay-la-Côte
Tél : 03 80 51 71 11

Les Climats du vignoble de Bourgogne

L’abus d’alcool est dangereux pour la santé, à consommer avec modération




          

🚨What's Their Issue?🚨 Debora Juarez vs. Ann Davison Sattler

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What do Juarez and Sattler most disagree on? by Lester Black
Sattler (left) and Juarez (right).
Sattler (left) and Juarez (right). Sattler campaign and Lester Black

Welcome to a new election column from The Stranger that looks at the biggest policy issue dividing each pair of candidates fighting for a seat on the Seattle City Council this fall. In District 1, we decided it was funding homeless service policies. In District 2, it was the candidates' approach to police accountability. In District 3, it was progressive taxation. In District 4, it was zoning laws. Today...

District 5: Council Member Debora Juarez versus challenger Ann Davison Sattler. Juarez, a veteran attorney specializing in Native American law, is running for her second term on the council. Sattler, also an attorney, is running for office for the first time. Jaurez earned 45.1 percent of the August primary vote while Sattler won 26.7 percent of the primary vote. If you're wondering where District 5 is:

Council-District-Map__1_.jpg#utm_source=googlier.com/page/2019_10_08/147525&utm_campaign=link&utm_term=googlier&utm_content=googlier.com

What’s the biggest issue that divides Juarez and Sattler?

Juarez and Sattler say: Absolutely nothing. Neither candidate responded to our repeated requests to participate in this story.

What we say: the criminalization of homelessness.

Sattler has focused much of her campaign on solving the city’s homelessness crisis and a central tenet of her platform is forcing homeless people off the streets. She’s called on the city and the Seattle Police Department to aggressively go after people sleeping outside and force them into shelters, writing on her website that “the only way to ensure the crisis will improve is by enforcing no-street-camping regulations.”

Many service providers and homeless people themselves say removing encampments does not reduce the visible homeless population and only further destabilizes at-risk populations. They also point out that there are legal problems with enforcing anti-camping laws.

A recent federal court case led to a ruling that it’s “cruel and unusual” punishment for cities to ban camping if they don’t also provide enough shelter space for the people being removed. But Sattler has a somewhat crazy plan to solve this: she wants to create “refugee style” tent shelters to house thousands of people together inside three abandoned warehouses across the city. A shelter expert said the financial numbers behind her plan did not make sense, on top of it being problematic to house thousands of people together in makeshift shelters.

Juarez has called for the removal of specific encampments in her North Seattle district, saying in one Facebook post that city departments need to “enforce the laws of the city of Seattle,” but she has also said she opposes aggressively sweeping the homeless. Juarez told the Stranger Election Control Board (SECB) that she does not support Mayor Jenny Durkan’s increase in the frequency and aggressiveness of homeless sweeps (Durkan’s administration removed 75 percent more encampments in the first four months of 2019 compared to the previous year, according to the Seattle Times). Juarez also told the SECB that cops should instead focus on actual crimes.

“If people are selling drugs,” Juarez told the SECB, “if they are assaulting people, if there are raping people, if they are running a sex ring which we had on Lake City Way, they should be arrested. I don’t care if you are in a tent or a house. But I don’t think that just because a bunch of neighbors are pissed off that someone put up two tents because they have nowhere to go, that you should send out three officers to remove them.”

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Myeloma's sound of silencing.

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